By on February 25, 2015

2015 Nissan Xterra

Looking at buying a new Nissan Xterra? Better pull the trigger soon, as the SUV will leave the U.S. market after the 2015 model year.

Edmunds reports the Xterra is leaving these shores for regulatory reasons, with Nissan finding no business case in bringing the SUV up to code for an audience that also adores the Jeep Wrangler. Updating the Xterra to meet regulatory and environmental requirements was deemed too costly for such a low volume product. CAFE regulations also don’t favor the Xterra’s small, body-on-frame SUV layout, making the updates a tougher sell.

The automaker moved 16,505 Xterras in 2014, a 7 percent decline compared to 2013’s 17,766 units sold. The SUV also faces stiff competition from crossovers like the Buick Encore, Toyota RAV4, and Nissan’s own Rogue, nearly 200,000 of which left the lot last year.

For those few who will buy one of the last Xterras, features for 2015 include NissanConnect, a USB connection for the iPod, and a new color named SolarFlare Yellow.

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199 Comments on “Nissan Xterra Leaving US Market After 2015 Model Year...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    That’s too bad, I always liked the BOF Xterra. One of the last true small SUVs.

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      So did you buy one? If not, you are the reason they discontinue it.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        No, because no sunroof, otherwise I would have

        • 0 avatar
          Stumpaster

          So what did you end up getting in its stead?

        • 0 avatar
          snakebit

          I hate to be contrere, but ‘no sunroof’? Now, I know who’s forcing manufacturers to install a $1000 hole in the roof that I could easily do without. For maybe another $1000-2000, you could feed your fresh air habit with a used Miata.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I don’t care, I think they’re great. I hate A/C so my sunroof is open every day weather permitting. Not only for the fresh air, but for the extra light I need for doing a lot of my job from the front seat of my car, win/win

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            You can even get a sunroof in pickup trucks and minivans these days. What a time to be alive.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Yeah, but what really tickles me is four real full-size doors! Four f’n doors! My 1962 IHC had four doors but none of my other trucks since did. Then again, the 1962 IHC was an old Air Force flightline truck.

            And I don’t count the DoubleCab, ExtCab, or SuperCab rear doors as real full-size doors. They’re too cramped for fullsized people (6ft and up) like me.

        • 0 avatar
          HerrKaLeun

          Manufacturers will never satisfy the inyernet enthusiast who really wants that brown wagon with MT and diesel and used…..

        • 0 avatar
          Counterpoint

          That’s funny, I would actually pay extra for a vehicle without a sunroof. They reduce front-seat headroom, are prone to leaks, make the interior heat up more when parked in the sun, and add extra weight in the worst possible location. I wish more manufacturers offered a “sunroof delete” option.

          • 0 avatar
            matador

            I have a sunroof in my Audi. I have no headroom issue, no leaks, and there’s a panel that I can pull over it in the summer to avoid heating the car up. The weight doesn’t bother me- the car doesn’t feel negatively impacted by it at all.

            95% of the time, I have the flap covering the sunroof. The other 5% makes it worthwhile, though.

          • 0 avatar
            ect

            I’ve had several vehicles with sunroofs (6 that I can think of). Like Matador, never felt any loss of headroom, never had a leak.

            Like Lie2me, I like the extra light in the car, and I find it helps cool the car faster in hot weather by acting as a chimney to evacuate hot air.

            At this point, I can’t imagine having a car without a sunroof (unless it was a convertible, of course).

          • 0 avatar
            krhodes1

            I just want the sunroof AND enough headroom. Is it really too much to ask?

            I did get the sunroof delete option on my M235i, no way I could wear a helmet in it with the roof. And since the availability of that delete option was the main reason I got the M235i instead of a 228i, I pretty much spent $3K to not get a sunroof. Expensive lack of hole, that.

            But back to Lie2Me’s original point – there are lots of cars that I really like that I would never in a million years buy. Ford Flex is probably top of that list. Love it, love the way it looks, love the way it drives, but I have absolutely zero need for something like that.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          A bit weird that people are picking on you for NOT buying an Xterra.

          If they want you in one so bad, maybe they should just buy you one?

        • 0 avatar
          Dave M.

          That was my reason it got cut off in the 2013 new car sweepstakes. That and it seemed I could only find poverty spec versions out there.

          To slap a sunroof, decent sound system, and power, heated seats for a $2000 upgrade wouldn’t have killed them.

          It would have been the perfect sized replacement for my Trooper….

          Meanwhile, been doing sunroofs for 30+ years. Such a common option brings smiles and fun many days of the year. Can’t imagine why someone wouldn’t want one, but that’s why there is choice I suppose…

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            +1 We talk so much about boring appliance cars here, it’s amazing how just adding a sunroof can improve the fun quotient on even the dullest automobile

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          I don’t know if it’s a weird Canadian market thing, but I’ve seen a number of Xterras with what appears to be a factory pop-up sunroof.

          It provided a great view of the underside of that cargo box/roof rack setup.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I doubt it, see the way the roof slants up? That’s to allow for the rear stadium seating, but not for a sunroof

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            http://www.autotrader.ca/a/Nissan/Xterra/Oakville/Ontario/5_22328263_ON20090311093054836/?showcpo=ShowCPO&orup=6_15_8

            Like I said, a pop-up sunroof. Manual. Doesn’t slide back. Have sat in several so equipped. They’re out there. It doesn’t do much.

        • 0 avatar
          mkirk

          Weird…I thought you could get a roof on the Frontier Crew Cab. Must be the roof rack or something on the Xterra.

        • 0 avatar
          Ryoku75

          At Lie2:

          Thanks, I couldn’t tell you how many cars I wish were still in production, but wouldn’t necessarily buy. Requiring a sunroofs just as valid as a transmission preference.

          Where were these guys when the Crown Vic was discontinued? I don’t remember anyone getting bitter over others NOT buying those things new.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @Lie2me,
          Hmmm…….

          What about aftermarket, or I’d guess you’d come up with another story.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I don’t need to come up with any story, the Grand Cherokee won out over the Xterra the sunroof being one of the issues. An after-market pop-up sunroof might be ok for you, but not me

        • 0 avatar
          ezeolla

          We looked at the Xterra but ended up with a Liberty because we could get a sunroof

      • 0 avatar
        azmtbkr81

        No, the reason it was discontinued is because it hasn’t seen an update for over 10 years. I don’t know many 10 year old vehicles that are great sellers. The interior is dated, it gets poor fuel mileage (worse than the Wrangler), and it has ongoing serious durability/reliability problems. I know because I owned one. If Nissan had chosen to remedy some of these issues it could have had a serious Wrangler competitor. It is a poor strategic move during a time when even KIA considering jumping into the off-road SUV market.

        • 0 avatar
          HerrKaLeun

          the other way around, it never got an upgrade because the sales were slow. Even back then with some more sales, an upgrade wouldn’t have jumped sales from under 20k to 50K. In today’s world you need to sell many, unless you can charge Rolls Royce prices.

          of course, some internet chatter people would for sure have bought one if it just had that one feature….

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            … and a sunroof :D

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            Or because the platform this rides on (Frontier is due for replacement in 2016ish) is not long for this world so why upgrade it to keep it on sale for another year. Here is hoping we get the Frontier with the little Cummins motor and that truck spawns a new Xterra…complete with 6 peed manual and diesel.

          • 0 avatar
            azmtbkr81

            It might have, especially considering that nearly all remaining off-road oriented SUVs have been discontinued. We’re down to the Wrangler and 4runner. That’s it. Jeep sells something like 150k+ Wranglers per year, Nissan could have had a piece of that pie but decided not to and Jeep is laughing all the way to the bank.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @mkirk,
            I guess you hit the nail on the head. The US is due to receive the new D23 Frontier.

            Here’s a D23 SUV. I don’t know if the US will have this one. Like a lot of nice SUV/pickups of late the US isn’t getting these vehicles.

            They might not placate those dumbass CAFE regulations.

            I think it comes with a sunroof;)

            http://www.rushlane.com/nissan-navara-suv-12126591.html

    • 0 avatar

      FWIW, I’m sad to see the xTerra go, because I like BOF SUV’s and it’s sad to have one fewer on the market.

      I didn’t buy one. But I did buy a 2012 Pathfinder (the last year of the BOF model).

      Also, the whole “we haven’t made any major improvements to this vehicle in a decade or so, so we are just going to discontinue it, because clearly sales are so low because nobody wants this category of vehicle and not because we haven’t updated it since the Clinton era”. Which is the same thing Ford did for the Ranger. And yes, I traded in my 2006 Ranger (xlt 4×4 extended cab, in bright yellow) for the Pathfinder.

      • 0 avatar
        dtremit

        Ford didn’t think the Ranger was unpopular — it thought a replacement would be unprofitable. They kept making the old one as long as it would meet regulations, and they redesigned it for other markets.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    They never updated this in all those years, save for bumper and tail light treatments. Very much their own fault. The earlier ones rusted pretty badly and ate catalytic converters, so I’m sure that didn’t help either.

    Aside from all the dated-ness (I remember these being quite cool when they came out half way through high school, and I’m 28.5 now), who is the target customer? Guys in white sunglasses bought these (now they’re in Velosters or WRX vehicles) and college girls got them when their dad was not gonna spring for the Wrangler. That’s about it.

    Good riddance.

    • 0 avatar
      TEXN3

      Interesting, never seen this and I’m only 4 years older than you. It’s obviously quite a bit different market where you live than out West. People out here buy them to use as family haulers on the daily commute during the week and out on the desert or in the mountains on the weekends. We’ve been considering one to replace our old Escape, with the Pro-4X package and tow package for a decent hardside camper. But my wife would rather have the extra utility of a Pilot, while she doesn’t seem to care for capability like I do. Plus, you can’t find those departure angles anywhere! I’d rather sell her Accord, get one of these and keep the Escape as a little work commuter that it is. Unpainted bumpers FTW!

      I’ve had many as rentals and ask for them specifically, they’re perfect for the backroads and trails of NV, MT, OR, ID, and UT.

      People usually bought these because they couldn’t spring for a 4Runner.

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        Or they need/had a real Cherokee and this is the closest SUV still in the market.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Yep, there are none of those instances of deserts/trails/etc here. I mean you can go through the woods and stuff on a track. Or drive through a creek bed.

        But there aren’t many people who do that, and there are limited places TO do it. You’ll get a citation for trespassing pretty quickly.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        “People usually bought these because they couldn’t spring for a 4Runner”

        That sums it up perfectly. I just test drove one a few days ago when I got my bi-annual itch to sell my old ’96 and consolidate back to one new SUV (instead of old SUV and commuter sedan).

        A new 4Runner would be $35k for a 4wd SR5. Let’s get this straight, it is superior to the Xterra in just about every subjective/objective way, except for lacking the Xterra’s rough-and ready bumpers that are more amenable to being stepped on (for loading a canoe). The 2012 SE I test drove just felt cheap in every way. Interior was nasty, shifter felt cheap moving through the PRND motions. That leaf spring rear end does the truck no favors, expansion joints in a corner totally upset the rear, it felt like the whole thing hopped sideways. Even my 96 4Runner handles bumps better than that (coil springs all around). a 5th gen 4runner has the road holding of a Mercedes in comparison to the Nissan.

        Xterra feels ‘perky’ due to throttle calibration, but the transmission felt like it kind of slipped from gear to gear. Could be a matter or perception but it made me uneasy. To be fair xterra is substantially lighter than a new 4runner by atleast 400lb so that makes a difference as well.

        4Runner is roomier in all interior dimensions, particularly second row legroom, and has 6 inches more cargo room lengthwise. The roll down rear window is another key feature missing on the Nissan (and every other SUV ever made unfortunately)

        Overall, I came away appreciating why a 4Runner costs atleast $10k more. Oh well, I’ll keep driving and maintaining my ’96. A new SR5 with a premium package (to get moonroof and leatherette) is in the $37k range, and it would be missing the rear locking diff that I now have. A Trail Premium ($38k+) which has all of the things I need can only be had with a coal black interior, also unacceptable.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          EYE ROLL!

          You must bring this up at least once per month (far more than bi-annually), something you drove just recently as a replacement for your 4Runner, the one you just got fixed up and totally redid. Sometimes it’s a sedan, sometimes (like here) it’s an SUV.

          Then at the end you state how either yours or the current 4Runner is superior, and list reasons you’ll keep it.

          This meme is almost as common as DW’s Cadillac rant!

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            The man loves his 4Runner, nothing wrong with that. Too bad they’re so damn ugly

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Sorry, but that truly is the situation. Most recently (last month), gf and I decided to finally relocate downtown to shorten her commute come summer, which got me back on the ‘consolidate to one vehicle’ track. Her and I really did go to the Toyota dealer this past weekend and test drove an SR5. I really did test drive a used 2012 Xterra SE Monday after work.

            I didn’t mean to be as harsh on the Xterra. I think it boils down to this: The Xterra will match the 4Runner offroad, at a much lower (30% or more) price point. That’s huge. But on the road, it is a much less comfortable vehicle that holds less people/stuff. I was genuinely hoping that I would like the Xterra more, $20k for a used one (especially a stick shift) would be awesome, no car payments necessary.

            But for me, my needs specifically, I realized that the single vehicle on the market that matches my needs is simply another 4Runner. Which costs WAY more that I’m willing to spend at this point in my life. Hence my conclusion.

            No need to get all worked up.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Nope nothing wrong with it, but throwing other cars up against it with biased evaluation all the time is not necessary.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I figure you’re right on that note, I guess it is just too tempting to talk about oneself in an anonymous public setting. But I thought it would be a useful reference point as a perspective of a person who is precisely targeted by the Xterra marketing folks (young, outdoorsy/active, has dogs), and why I did not buy one (lack of updates over the years to make interior and driving refinement class competitive).

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I’s cool. I’m not worked up – and I usually appreciate your contributions on transmissions and differentials and such!

          • 0 avatar

            Exactly – how bad are gauges on Xterra?

            BTW I always wanted to buy Xterra but ended up with Fusion don’t know why. SAAB was also on my short list. As well as Oldsmobile Aurora and Pontiac GTO. Add to this also Maybach – no way I could afford one but always wanted it. Needless to say Hummer also was in my list and I could see myself driving Fisker as a personal electric sport car. I would like to have larger garage. I am afraid to say that but when I was shopping for the new car last I seriously considered Mazda6.

          • 0 avatar
            mkirk

            I can get an xterra for near 20 grand. Not even close on the 4 runner. The 4 runner felt more solid but it also felt like a dog when I drove em’ back to back.

          • 0 avatar

            Give him a break. At least the door didn’t make a tinny sound (the guy who carried that cross posted it 5 times in 1 comment thread).

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            gtemnykh knows what’s up. The N180 4-Runner and R50 Pathfinder (which I owned in 5-speed Chilkoot form) of the late nineties are the high water mark for SUVs, IMO. Compact, handsome, comfortable, durable, off-road capable vehicles with quality interiors, actual steering and pedal feel, cable operated throttles, manual transmissions, and manual transfer cases.

            As someone who is somewhat sad to see one of the two true off-roaders on the market disappear, I was all set to dismiss him as I began reading his post. But his comments were reasonable, and then I remembered my buddy’s opinion on the current (N50) Xterra after he test drove it. A couple years ago he was looking for a replacement for his lifted 2010 Tundra that he regularly took on serious mountain back roads to get to his hiking locations but was just too big and impractical for city use. To him, the N50 Xterra felt too cheap and unrefined. He bought a 2004 Xterra with 120K miles instead. It’s not as refined as my Pathfinder was, but every bit as tactile and communicative.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            Agreed on the older pathfinders (pre-Alpha BOF).

            The first gen (sold as the Terrano overseas), are fantastically rugged little beasts. Unfortunately the rust monster took most of them off the roads in the northern US.

            The next two unibody generations are very nice handling, almost sporty driving vehicles, much moreso than a 4Runner, all while retaining a whole lot of off road capability (Although I’d give the edge in durability to the 4runner). Sluggish with the VG motors, but sticking in the Maxima’s VQ35 totally transformed them.

            I’d add Mitsubishi’s fullsize Monteros and Isuzu Troopers to the list of excellent turn of the century SUVs. Larger and more cumbersome than the aforementioned midsizers, but also roomier and able to carry more weight.

            Check out this beauty:

            linkhttp://www.cars.com/vehicledetail/detail/628977046/overview/

            Overpriced, yes. But wow what a rare and awesome vehicle. Just look at the quality and detail/design of the interior. You’d have to step up to a $80k landcruiser to get that these days.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Ha, $7k for a very old Montero with cloth, manual, and no (huge) sunroof?!? Even with those miles, $4500 max!

            Those aren’t that hard to find, and largely they were loaded up. Agree that it’s nearly impossible to find a gen1 Pathfinder. They started rusting in many areas, all at once.

            I put the Trooper below the Pathfinder models AND the Montero, because of the endless transmission issues they have.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            Nice. It looks like it just needs some real tires and it’s ready to go!

            Mitsubishi wasn’t sold in Canada back then, so I’m not sure I’ve ever even seen a Montero like that. There are a few RHD Delicas around here.

          • 0 avatar
            rpn453

            “Ha, $7k for a very old Montero with cloth, manual, and no (huge) sunroof?!? Even with those miles, $4500 max!”

            $8k, actually! It is a dealer ad, so they probably don’t expect to get anywhere near that much. But they might if they get the right buyer, so why not try. Otherwise, someone will be happy to have negotiated such a fantastic deal, at two or three grand off the listed price.

            A single-owner ’96 Pathfinder or 4-Runner in mint condition with that sort of mileage could probably fetch that amount (in $CDN) around here.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Interesting. I have a 2014 4Runner as a rental in Houston this week, and find it pretty dire. It’s like a bus you can’t see out of, and horribly cramped inside. Bouncy castle ride too. Super grabby but mushy brakes. Does look rugged though. It’s obviously much bigger than an Xterra, friend of mine had two of those and liked them – I thought it drove like an old pickup (not in a good way).

          Hertz in Houston seems bound and determined to give me the largest vehicle they can manage. My last three rentals here have been a Tahoe, a Sedona, and now the 4Runner. Or I could have had a Corolla. Just shoot me now.

          And all you kids in your 30s are making me feel old – where’s HDC and some of the other old farts to make me feel younger. :-)

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Kids today, *sigh* they’re a lot younger then they were back in my day ;-)

          • 0 avatar
            wstarvingteacher

            Ok Krhodes1. Anything to make you feel better. I’m 71 and live on 5 acres of clay and water just north of Houston. I bought my 95 4runner with almost 200k on the clock and am just as enthusiastic as gt above. The guy who sold it to me had to give a “no offense” comment when he told me that an old guy in a samll town further north had owned it.

            Body nearly faultless. Everything works and I mean everything. Realized it had a sunroom after I had decided to buy it and am happy it does because it doesn’t leak. I wish it was a year later because it would have the land cruiser chassis and a 3.4 instead of the 3.0. Cold weather means it’s tough to get into first till the transmission warms up.

            Could have just as easily been an exterra but this is what popped up and I’m glad. We put the insane miles that living in the country requires on the wife’s Nissan Cube. It will be replaced before the 4Runner. 4wd was the big seller for me and this could likely be the last truck I buy. Hope that all makes you feel younger KR1 and hope you enjoyed Houston. I visited Portland two years ago in May and enjoyed it there.

            Sorry. After reading the comments below I realize I should have said I am 71.73972603. If I am off a few digits I am also too old to care.

    • 0 avatar
      VW16v

      Not sure the Xterra followers can even be associated with people buying WRX’s. WRX’s is the go to car for network engineers and programmers. Xterra has always been that Jeep crowd that never wanted to buy an American off road vehicle. But truthfully I’m amazed Nissan is still sell it today.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        Great SUV, sad to see it go. Nissan kind of let it die on the vine, it should have been updated to stay competitive.

        These are very popular with the mountain bike and dog segment. They get cross shopped against the likes of the Tacoma.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Hehe dog segment. If I ever have a dog, I’ll probably have a dog car as well.

          …It’ll just be a Town Car or something.

          BUT WAIT that would be an excuse to get an XC70. So never mind. Even if the dog selected is a Boston Terrier.

      • 0 avatar
        duncanator

        Damn, you described me perfectly. I am a programmer (in my 40’s though), want a WRX, but have always wanted a Jeep or XTerra. I’ve wished they updated the interior on the XTerra and could never commit to buying a Jeep.

        • 0 avatar

          Why “commit” to a Jeep though? You aren’t marrying it and it holds the value quite well. Even has a “drift” button (well, used to have in the 3.8L sub-generation). BTW, as far as programmers go, their tastes vary quite a bit. Majority of those I know gravitate to Bimmers. Coincidentially, another one of those programmers moved from an Xterra to Audi R8. Still has it.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “I’m 28.5 now”

      28.5? Are you also a cyborg from the future Corey? (I’ve never heard someone refer to their age in decimal).

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      I’m 31 and had a post-facelift first gen XTerra in high school because my dad wanted to get rid of our old car when I was going to college and it would revert back to his car after I left.

      It was slow, the V6 sucked down gas, and he didn’t spring for 4wd so it was wouldn’t do the off-road thing. All that said, it was a great car to cruise around in FL, throw my surfboards in, etc. and girls and guys both thought it was cool. Plus it was a manual. I liked it and thought it was pretty cool.

      I’m sad to see it go, I’d consider picking up a used Pro-4x one if I wanted something to go off-road in that was relatively inexpensive

    • 0 avatar
      I bought the law

      > college girls got them when their dad was not gonna spring for the Wrangler

      Can confirm. Have 30-year-old sister with 10-year-old XTerra.

      Considering questionable maintenance practices, it’s held up reasonably well. In comparison to her previous YJ, at least. And it doesn’t have enough features to really notice or care when one of them stops working or falls off or wears through.

      Of course, it’s showing its age these days, so she’ll need her 30-year-old-lady car replacement. I guess I should expect to see her in an IS250, G25, or cheap X3 soon. Or, if she’s hard on cash, maybe even that single professional woman staple–the W203 C230 coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      Car Ramrod

      You damn whippersnappers. I’m 32.252055, and it’s not all peaches and cream.

      I am old enough to remember the first time the Xterra was available in yellow though…

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @CoryDL,
      Did Frontiers also have a catalytic converter issue? From what I can remember the Xterra has a very similar engine drivetrain combo as the Frontier.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        @Big Al

        I have not heard this, but when I was doing some shopping at the time, I only looked for the Xterra. I would assume the Frontier had the same issues, but they really didn’t sell many of those around here.

  • avatar
    John R

    Damn. That’s too bad. My buddy’s wife owns one of these, She loves it to pieces.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I sent this article to the five XTerra owners I know. Maybe they’ll buy a new one.

      This is such a popular vehicle with young GI’s. It is sad to see it go.

  • avatar
    caltemus

    As far as I can tell this became the oldest car still sold when the XC90 ceased to exist. After this I think it’ll be one of the small Jeeps (compass/patriot)

  • avatar
    319583076

    By specification, this is the successor to the XJ Cherokee. However, it’s about 1,000 lbs heavier than the XJ and quite a bit uglier.

    I don’t think anyone will weep over this development.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      This isn’t at all like an XJ, this is more like an original Explorer or an S-10 Blazer/Jimmy

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Hey yesterday I saw two rare things when I was stuck in traffic!

        A Jimmy Diamond Edition, in navy blue (rare color for that trim), and a very pristine early 80s Accord 2-door hatch (rare entirely for SW salty Ohio – no rust)!

        Just like this: http://imganuncios.mitula.net/1982_honda_accord_lx_2_door_7780122423104774348.jpg

        Also interesting:
        http://www.autoguru-katalog.at/wp-content/gallery/1985_honda_accord_aerodeck_us_0813/1987_accord_aerodeck_2.jpg

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          Did they ever sell that Aeroback? Never saw one

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Nope, JDM and Euro markets only (figures). I just came across it while searching for the Accord hatch. It was the first time I had seen a two door Accord that old. Of course I’ve seen (or used to see) plenty of the mid 80s pop-up headlamps one.

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        I’ve always considered it a modern(ish) XJ as well. Relatively simple, robust 4WD, utilitarian interior. My problem was that it was always styled more like an X-Games prop than a vehicle an adult might want to drive.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Lie2me,
        I did look at Explorers in the 90s and ended up buying a 4×4 XJ Cherokee Sports. The Explorer was significantly larger than the XJ.

        The Xterra is most in size to the Jeep.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          The Xterra is BOF like the original Explorer the Jeep was unibody

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Lie2me,
            Actually the XJ ran a chassis with a unibody integrated with the chassis.

            If you have any knowledge of the construction industry you would of heard of a “top hat” section. This shape has the cross profile of an atypical flower pot (flowerpot sliced lengthwise through the centre).

            This profile is used and is called a “Hat Frame” in the automotive industry.

            Pictures in the link below give you an idea of the XJ’s chassis rails.

            http://www.ruffstuffspecialties.com/catalog/XJRAIL.html

            Here’s some information to enlighten you and expand your little knowledge you have regarding motor vehicles.

            1984–1996[edit]

            1986–1990 Jeep Wagoneer (XJ)

            1994–1997 Jeep Cherokee (XJ) Sport (Australia)

            1993–1996 Jeep Cherokee XJ (Japan)

            1993-1996 Jeep Cherokee Country XJ (USA)
            The XJ Cherokee introduced for the 1984 model year was the first Jeep with a ladder-boxed chassis integrated into a single monocoque unit rather than the traditional separate body-on-frame construction. The design was rigid and sturdy, “yet wonderfully lightweight, [the] Uniframe permitted outstanding performance even with AMC’s new 2.5-liter/150-cubic-inch four-cylinder engine.”[

            Hat
            Hat frames resemble a “U” and may be either right-side-up or inverted with the open area facing down. Not commonly used due to weakness and a propensity to rust, however they can be found on 1936-1954 Chevrolet cars and some Studebakers.

            High performance custom frame, using boxed rails and tube sections.
            Abandoned for a while, the hat frame gained popularity again when companies started welding it to the bottom of unibody cars, in effect creating a boxed frame.

            Dumb? If it makes you feel better.

            I can teach you lots, if you would only pay attention instead of attempting to be the “cute” one on this site.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’m well aware of how Jeeps are built having personally had four of them.

            As you said…

            “The XJ Cherokee introduced for the 1984 model year was the first Jeep with a ladder-boxed chassis integrated into a single monocoque unit rather than the traditional separate body-on-frame construction. The design was rigid and sturdy, “yet wonderfully lightweight”

            = unibody, thanks for agreeing

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Lie2me,
            The link provides a unitary constructed vehicle.

            Look at the structure and see where and how the structure has strength. There are no rails like the XJ has.

            http://www.audiworld.com/news/04/b7a4/body/body3.jpg

            Now look at the image of the XJ, see the difference on where the loads are displaced?

            http://images.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/06/uniframe.gif

            What supports the Quadra link suspension and live axle? A unibody? Doh!

            Now look again at the Audi which is a true unibody.

            Here’s a cut and paste from a previous TTAC article.

            “Concerned that traditional unibody architecture would not be up to the rigors of being a trail rated Jeep, AMC’s engineers and Dick Teague’s designers came up with what they called a Uniframe assembly. Essentially that involved integrating and welding a traditional ladder frame into the unibody structure. Some have described the Cherokee as being overengineered, which may help explain the Jeep SUV’s legendary durability.”

            Keep on reading, young man “I’ll edumacate and learnered you stuff”.

            I feel really great mentoring you and aiding in your development as a more knowledgeable “motor vehicle enthusiast.

            Unibody………Uniframe (according to AMC) or Hat frame.

    • 0 avatar
      Cirruslydakota

      The biggest problem is the Wrangler Unlimited. Its really the Cherokee but with a removable roof and a lower tow rating. Not to mention FCA sells every single one they make at msrp.

  • avatar
    nickoo

    That’s too bad. This is a real SUV with real capabilities. I looked at getting one more than once before I inherited a Tahoe. The xterra would have been a better choice for me, maybe when I sell the tahoe I’ll pick one up. Too bad there isn’t a 10,000 sales or less cafe exemption, Nissan could sell 10,000 a year every year.

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      Another request for manufactuer to sell vehicle, but not actually buying one.

      • 0 avatar
        Cirruslydakota

        The Xterra was #2 on my list when looking for a capable off-road vehicle. It wasn’t chosen because it had the same problem all the other choices had (FJ, Explorer, Jimmy/Blazer, Trailblazer, 4Runner, and Pathfinder).

        No solid front axle.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I’m curious, what sort of off roading did you have in mind?

          Off roading can mean running tight, technical trails at off road parks (rock crawling, etc)

          For others offroading is more of a means to get out to isolated and picturesque spots in the great outdoors, with occasional serious obstacles but mostly just rutted, rough roads that will shake the life out of a sedan based CUV.

          If you’re in the former camp, then yes solid axles front and rear are wonderful. if you are in the latter camp, a sturdy independent front end may serve you very well indeed. Better ride and control on washboard roads, and sometimes (as I recently found out from a fellow B&Ber with a JK) a solid front axle does not necessarily mean unbreakable durability. And vice versa, certain IFS trucks have a reputation for insane longevity (Mitsubishi, Isuzu, Toyota torsion bar front ends on their 90s trucks).

          Additionally, for the latter category of people that want to venture out into the outdoors, the vehicle’s utility and ability to carry heavy/bulky things comes more into play. I personally crossed the JKU off my list when I saw how tight the interior was due to the roll bars, as well as the inability to mount cargo to the roof without an extra, external frame.

          For those that have to ‘have it all’ here in the US (lots of load carrying ability, solid axles front and rear), the options are very limited: used LC80 land cruiser or a G-wagen, or a Power Wagon with a cap on the bed (or an off-road rated camper).

          A rather curious wild-card is the 3rd generation Mitsubishi Montero (full size). As roomy as a Land Cruiser 100, at a third of the price on the used market, and with a unique approach to an offroad-capable suspension. The independent rear suspension on a Montero actually has more travel (droop) than the solid rear axle it replaced on the highly regarded 2nd gen. Monteros are wash-board/high speed whoop conquering beasts, after all that is a Dakar winning suspension!

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “Another request for manufactuer to sell vehicle, but not actually buying one.”

        You know they could have updated it a bit if they wanted more Sales. I was looking forward to an all new one to go with the new Frontier. It would have been on my short list for next vehicle

      • 0 avatar
        nickoo

        What part of inherited a Tahoe did you not understand? Frankly, I’m surprised you managed to make it onto the internet all by yourself.

        • 0 avatar
          VW16v

          You where probably better off with the Tahoe. Coworker spent over $4500 on her 86,000 mile. Xterra. It was a real pos. Next step was a new transmission, and ac condenser. And she is not the only person that I’ve heard complain about the longevity of the xterra. Just because it looks tough with all the plastic bits, does not make a strong vehicle.

  • avatar
    Cirruslydakota

    Well, there goes the only Nissan left I was still interested in ever owning. When I bought my WJ Grand Cherokee this was the runner up. Just last week I recommended the Xterra to a friend when he was inquiring about tough as nails off-road choices.

    The FJ and now the Xterra, just goes to show the Wrangler Unlimited is and will continue to be king.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      The interior of the Xterra is entirely unacceptable for any date past 2005.

      • 0 avatar
        Cirruslydakota

        I wont argue with you there. I sat in one at a recent car show and was just as disappointed as the first time I sat in one when the second generation came out. Worse yet is my 99 Grand Cherokee has a better interior with soft touch plastics and is 16 years old.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        I’m sorry but that award goes to the Land Cruiser. For the price you pay, the dashboard is absolutely cheap. Knock $20K off the price.

    • 0 avatar
      HerrKaLeun

      Who prevents you from buying pne now?

      Or are you holding out for the brown MT diesel version, used?

      • 0 avatar
        cgjeep

        I did buy a brown WJ used. They didn’t make a manual one.

      • 0 avatar
        Cirruslydakota

        My WJ has served me well with 270,000 miles on the clock. The Xterra as it is now isn’t any better at doing what my 16 year old GC currently does. For Christmas it took my wife and I round trip from Baltimore to Denver without a single problem in 4500 miles of driving over two weeks. Even drove through a massive snowstorm to Gunnison and stopped at St. Elmo and owl creek pass along the way. Good thing gas was cheap as it burned plenty, but still managed 18-20 on the highway. Its just sad to see another choice to away.

  • avatar
    bomberpete

    I am shocked these are still on sale

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This was such a cool SUV…in 1999.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Above I said I thought they came out in mid high school, which would be 02. I had NO IDEA they had been around since 99. This is certainly the ONLY car from the 90s still on sale today in the US.

      • 0 avatar
        Cirruslydakota

        I remember the year these came out because my AP art teacher bought one in yellow. Being fresh out of college we all thought her Xterra was just as hot as she was. Funny enough the other art teacher bought the then just released Audi TT in silver. The parking lot at my school in the late 90’s had some pretty cool metal parked in it.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        My boss at the time bought a 99 in 98.. Pretty bad ass except for the turbo v 6 under the hood, drank Gas at an alarming rate even for back then.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          Would have been 02′ and a supercharger not a turbo. But you ar correct they drank premium fuel with abandon,

          • 0 avatar
            cpthaddock

            The first gen Xterra needed the supercharger. My wife owned an Xterra when we started dating and the novelty value quickly wore off for me.

            While it proved rugged across desert backroads and trails, it was never comfortable, ever.

            A trip from Phoenix to Palm Springs left me wanting to kill myself. In BOF style, the seats were all too low to the floor (OK if you’re 4’11” like my wife) and the lack of leg room for my 6′ frame was torture over distances greater than a couple of miles.

            The regular V6 guzzled fuel like a V8 with a trunk full of concrete but to this day my wife is convinced her Xterra was only a 4 cylinder.

            To cap it all, the interior finishes weren’t holding up very well (much like some recent low milegae Audi’s I’ve driven)

            Maybe she felt guilty for having made me drive her Xterra while she ferried a new X5 V6 for BMW? The day after we got to Palm Springs she traded it for one of the first-on-the-lot Honda Pilot’s which, in terms of power and ride quality easilly outclassed those early, underpowered X5 V6’s.

            The Xterra, along with it’s sun-roof-blocked-by-a-plastic-basket, stayed in California.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        I remember the year because the ad campaign used Lenny Kravitz’s “Fly Away” in it, and the song had just been popular. The ad campaign when it debuted was outstanding, I was definitely at the heart of the demographic they were going after.

  • avatar
    RangerDangerStranger

    Wonder what this means for the Frontier. Doesn’t it share a platform with the xterra?

    • 0 avatar
      cpthaddock

      That was the last gen BOF Frontier. The same platrform is related to the Titan so it makes sense that as they move to update the Titan they prune the slow selling branches from the complexity tree.

  • avatar
    slance66

    As with Lie2Me and others, if they had updated it, I’d buy it, or an updated 4Runner. It’s a great size, better than anything else in the Nissan lineup, now that the Pathfinder is a bloated, wallowing whale and the Murano is something nobody with a Y chromosome wants to come near.

    Jeep is laughing all the way to the bank. There is a market for a masculine SUV, that isn’t gigantic (no 3rd row), can do light off road duty, but which has an engine and transmission that doesn’t feel like something from a 1982 pickup and has a modern interior. It’s not the Wrangler they need to target, it’s the Grand Cherokee. They have no answer to it. Nor does any other manufacturer except Land Rover.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      +1, Absolutely! I was following a Pathfinder yesterday wondering “OMG what happened to you? You turned into a fat station wagon”

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Having a parent with an 08 Pathfinder, I can tell you they’re no prize or joy to drive, and don’t do anything particularly well when you’re on a paved road.

        It’s loud, uncomfortable, very ponderous, poorly assembled inside, and has very little room in the third row. There are hard plastics everywhere, and it gulps fuel through the 4.0 like a Tahoe. You could have the 5.7 as well, which I’m sure helped matters in that department.

        I think upon the 05 restyling they went entirely the wrong direction with it. I’d rather have an 03 QX4 (it died a year before the Pathfinder did) any day of the week than a 12 Pathfinder.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          Yeah, I’ve never understood that generation of Pathfinder either. Hardly any larger, more capable, or more luxurious than the Xterra and the two a bit hard to tell apart outside and in. Seems the same problem Nissan has with the Maxima/Altima.

      • 0 avatar
        Cirruslydakota

        +2 Its sad to see what’s happened to the Pathfinder. Might as well rename it to Mallfinder.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I absolutely agree Slance, that’s the precise sweet spot I’m looking at. As much as I may deny it and try to explain things with logic, but I love the looks and proportions of a ‘proper’ SUV. To my eye, the current Land Cruiser is the epitome of the ‘right’ look (never mind the astronomical price). Long hood, upright windshield, upright rear hatch, upright side windows, large ground clearance.

      Even the pre-2012 Explorers still had decent ‘legit’ SUV looks, especially with the classic two-tone paint. The current CUV Explorer just has a heavy, melting-to-the-ground look.

      The current Grand Cherokee is sitting on a precipice. It’s lost a lot of ground clearance and gained low hanging plastic, as well as gone to IRS. But a 2 speed transfer case is still widely available, and the basic lines are still unapologetically SUV. I wonder what the next generation will bring.

  • avatar
    TW5

    The Xterra is old and it doesn’t move much volume. Nissan should reduce the price to make the vehicle more attractive, especially to the Rocky Mountain market.

    But if they reduce the price and people start buying new Xterras, Nissan will never meet CAFE regulations. Thanks, Obama.

    These footprint regulations have got to go. No car shall make less than 23mpg combined on the EPA test cycle. The fleet must achieve 40mpg EPA by 2025. Job done. Stop horsing around with the wheelbase and track.

    Nobody wins when vehicles like the Xterra, Wrangler and 4Runner are put out to pasture. We didn’t win when pickup trucks replaced full-size sedans, either. Same dumb regulators, different day.

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      The wheelbase/track and light trucks/passenger car regulations are likely the result of lobbying from the automakers, not because of the government’s insistence.

      Makes it easier to sell large high margin vehicles like fullsize pickups while still meeting CAFE requirements (because they are based on the number produced, not just looking at all the model’s MPG numbers).

      If everything was under the same standard then Nissan couldn’t price dump the Xterra and sell as many of them as they want- because that would drag the average below your 40 mpg. Easier to sacrifice the Xterra and work on selling as many Pathfinders (which Nissan get a higher profit from then trying to update the Xterra, while being under similar to easier standards) and Versas/Sentras/Altimas.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        Footprint regulations are not necessary to protect trucks or other vehicles. The hypothetical regulations I posited permit trucks and other SUVs without complicated footprint calculations.

        The NHTSA added the footprint regs because CAFE led to smaller, lighter, more dangerous passenger vehicles the first time around. Paranoia led the NHTSA to seek more control over vehicular dimension to maximize the effectiveness of their crash testing and avoid a spike in road fatalities. They could simply have prohibited light-duty vehicle below or above a certain footprint, but then they wouldn’t get to control everything in between. It’s just the typical run-of-the-mill federal boondoggle.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “The NHTSA added the footprint regs because CAFE led to smaller, lighter, more dangerous passenger vehicles the first time around. Paranoia led the NHTSA to seek more control over vehicular dimension to maximize the effectiveness of their crash testing and avoid a spike in road fatalities.”

          This is true. I wrote a paper on this a while back. Coming into the latest round of CAFE increases, the automotive marketplace was in a similar place to what it looked like during after the introduction of CAFE standards in the late 70s. Roadways clogged with 2 ton+ behemoths that were about to face down the new fleet of downsized compliance cars. The problem wasn’t so much with the safety of the lighter cars themselves, but when those tin can K cars collided with ’78 New Yorkers.

          This time around the problem had the potential to be worse with the prospect of 2.5+ ton SUVs with greater bumper height facing down compact compliance cars.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The footprint requirement forces automakers to develop technological innovations in all size classes in order to comply. Building a PT Cruiser and classifying it as a truck in order to sell more full-size pickups no longer works. It’s closing a loophole.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          @TW5,
          Light trucks in the US also include SUVs, etc.

          The US has classified it’s vehicles differently according to what government department is protecting them from imports.

          CAFE requirement for pickups/SUVs/CUVs/Vans are not the same as for cars.

          The FE requirement for “trucks” is relaxed in comparison.

          If CAFE was a fairer system they would use weight irrespective of the vehicles intended use.

          No way can a CUV be a truck, but yet they are considered so.

          Then the chicken tax only affects pickups and vans, not SUVs and CUVs.

          It all a pile of red tape that is costing the Amercian consumer billions of dollars every year.

          We have a great system at the moment in Australia. If the manufacturer builds a vehicle and it meets emissions you can buy it. That’s how we have supercharged 6.2 Commodores around or supercharged Ford Falcons.

          CAFE sucks and it sucks money out of your pocket.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    The practical sort of people who buy this kind of vehicle are too practical to buy new cars. It isn’t butch enough to appeal to the image-conscious crowd, hardcore enough to appeal to the off-road crowd, luxurious enough to appeal to the I’m-better-than-you crowd, or fuel/space efficient enough to appeal to the need-a-minivan-but-won’t-buy-one crowd.

  • avatar
    Zackman

    I, for one, have heard few good words about the Xterra – ride quality and all that, so I can’t really comment with any authority.

    Having said that, some aspects of the design I find interesting, but as a whole, it’s an ungainly-looking SUV.

    Certainly doesn’t have quite the macho appeal of a Jeep Wrangler or a Hummer, I guess!

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      If I were in the market for a new suv, between say the xterra and 4 runner and wrangler I’d go xterra every time, the wrangler and 4 runner are too expensive. The xterra is priced right for what it is

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    My buddy bought one because he thought it was a CUV. It turns out it’s really an SUV. That full frame reduces the interior space vs. a CUV and the gas mileage is abysmal vs. a CUV. Shame he didn’t do his research.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      He kind of sounds like an idiot, in all honesty. If he actually looked at the vehicle, and CERTAINLY if he test drove it, he would know it was not a CUV.

      Or even if he asked the salesman, “Is this a CUV?” He may have heard, “No ma’am, but this Rogue is.”

  • avatar
    Hummer

    This segment has been completely abandoned, GMs entire fullsize lineup is effectively priced as luxury vehicles even under Chevrolet, the 4Runner needs a powertrain update and is also overpriced. Then there’s the wrangler, sales keep increasing YoY. So basically the buyers choices are car based, or Wrangler. Buyers exist, enough of them, but when the product is 16 years old the consumers will only buy so many.
    We’ve been having quite a bit of snow in NC and last I checked we have an estimated 8-12 inches possibly coming. I haven’t seen that much since I was in high school iirc. The snow really solidifies my love of my trucks, I have full time 4 wheel drive that continues to surprise me by not spinning tires when I expect them to.
    If I hit a curb, who cares the 17 inch rims are almost 10 inches from the ground, if I hit a snow bank, who cares I have steel bumpers directly attached to the frame that cost ~$180 to replace in the highly unlikely scenario it gets bent to where I can’t bend it back.

    I want to see another 3/4 ton SUV, just make sure it has a GVWR over 8600 lbs to get moved into the HD class and out of the main part of CAFE, even with heavy use of steel, if they can keep weight below 7k, it wouldn’t be hard to help the fuel economy in the HD class to begin with.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      The z-71 suburban is coming back with real off road capabilities

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        If it’s anything like the latest Z71 pickups, just how ‘real’ those capabilities are is in question. Revalved shocks and a G80 ‘slip then lock’ rear diff don’t mean much when you’re rolling on low profile chrome rims and dragging the front bumper along the ground.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I want a Hennessey Velocirapotor SUV.

      http://www.hennesseyperformance.com/velociraptor-suv.html

    • 0 avatar
      azmtbkr81

      How is the wheeling in NC? I’m going to be in Charlotte all summer for work and with the low gas prices am considering driving my Bronco from Arizona instead of flying.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Uwharrie is always great, it’s not too far from Charlotte, the outer banks has a couple of spots that can only be reached with 4×4 or a couple miles of walking, great for relaxing. Corova, NC is usually my favorite place, kids love the wild horses too. Best bet is to find a forum and some good people who know the area. I usually go into the woods behind my house, between my land, a neighbors, a farmers paths, power and water cutaways and a lot of streams and rocks inbetween I have a couple miles of good paths without ever really having to go very far. There’s another place I’ve been too that I can’t remember the name of not too far from Raleigh, I simply remember it as mosquito island, couldn’t even open a window without them eating you alive.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      @Hummer,
      Outside of the US there is a wide range of mid size SUVs on the market, not CUVs.

      The larger SUV buyers are buying for size, not capability, like 75% of full size pickup owners who buy a crew cab for it’s size.

      The many mid size SUVs on the global market would sell in the US. The numbers they would sell I don’t know. But if the vehicles are more modern than the Xterra I would think they would more than the Xterra is moving.

      You have the Toyota Prado, Mitsubishi Pajero, older Patrol (large SUV), 70 Series Landcruiser wagons, Mitsubishi Challenger, Holden Colorado 7, the upcoming Ford Everest, etc. Many of these vehicles unfortunately don’t make it to the US. They would be a nice addition to you current range of vehicles.

      But, the actual use of these as 4x4s with hi-lo might not be as large as off roading in Australia is.

      Many US CUVs/SUVs are only 2 wheel drive. This is a relatively recent in our market to have 2wd vehicles of this nature.

      This indicates that many “station wagon” and “people mover” (minivan) types are migrating to the types of 2wd vehicles.

      Like most owners of these types of vehicles they only wanted to additional space and not the off road prowess.

      Toyota Kluger (US Highlander), Kia Sorento, new Pathfinder, MX-7/9, etc are not really for off road. They might go down a dirt road okay, but they aren’t sturdy enough to travel many Outback tracks. I’d suspect the same in the US and Canada.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    I worked at a nissan store in 00′ and 01′ when these came out. From what I can tell , not much has changed since then save Bluetooth optioning. The motor is the same, six speed Mt is the same. Can’t speak for the slush box, if that has been updated.

    The issue with their rig today, is the same as it was then when I spoke with the nissan slaes rep a decade an a half ago. It is designed and appeals to the folks who, wait for it, have no money. In CO I see plenty of them, driven by the same folks who were targeted a decade or more ago. As mentioned above, the hard core rock climber, mountain biker, skier/boarder who lives in the mountains. The good news is they can now afford one of the various 100k optioned rigs that are now available for 1/3 the asking price and still offer the same amenities, which is to say, none.

    The drivetrain is durable, guzzles gas though, so why buy a new one?

    I have a frontier, which is the same unit but a pick up body. The Interiors are the same up front drivetrains etc. With a good set of tires they are great off road, but who really dos this on a regular basis with their new car?

    As for the don’t want to buy domestic because they are not reliable, I have to ask, if the Wrangler has such poor reliability what are the reasons they continue to sell every single one they make with a good margin? You would think the memo would have gotten out they are junk. They are not my cup of tea, but those hat I know who have them and broke them readily admit that perhaps they were in over there head in a 4×4 road and fore got about 4low.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      “I have to ask, if the Wrangler has such poor reliability what are the reasons they continue to sell every single one they make with a good margin?”

      No competition. Where else you going to go to get an open-air 4X4 for less then $30K

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      2nd gen (05+) trucks are massively different than the D21 based 1st gen. 2nd gen Xterra rides on the same “Alpha” frame as the much larger Titan. Motor and transmission are both different as well. VQ40 making a hell of a lot more power/torque than the gutless wonder VG33. Automatic is a 5spd vs 4spd. But since ’05 you are right, little has changed beyond minor bumper/grille revisions and a new center stack for 2009.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The only surprising thing here is that the Xterra stuck around for so long.

    I recall from a while back the restraint systems calibration had a little sensitivity issue where under certain off road maneuvers, the curtain air bags would deploy. Fourwheeler mag found out the hard way in one of their shootouts.

    http://www.fourwheeler.com/vehicle-reviews/129-1301-the-ultimate-factory-4×4-shootout/

    Needless to say, the Xterra placed last.

  • avatar
    r129

    The most amazing thing to me, aside from the fact that they still sell these, is that there is a 2WD version available.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      An old carryover trick for those in the sunbelt, I think.

      An in-law bought a 2wd Grand Cherokee in the mid-90s. Lived in Vegas. All of the 90s SUV image with neutered capabilities. This is a person who said they’d never own another manual because they didn’t like holding the clutch in for the whole traffic light. Knowing this person as I do now, none of this is surprising.

      I also have a good friend who bought a used 2wd pathfinder, for the rugged outdoorsy lifestyle they were trying to live and because it was cheap. That thing got stuck EVERYWHERE and could barely get moving on level ground in snow. Worthless, they didn’t keep it long.

      • 0 avatar
        r129

        I’m sure that there was a larger market for a 2WD Xterra about 15 years ago, when everyone just had to have an SUV for image reasons, but I can’t imagine that there would be many takers now, with the widespread acceptance of the CUV. That being said, I know they still sell a lot of 2WD Tahoes and Yukons down south, but that’s an entirely different type of buyer, usually someone who has something to tow.

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        I live in Las Vegas, and there are tons of 2WD SUVs and CUVs here. Yes, a lot of them are nothing but glorified station wagons, but (unless you’re into serious rock crawling) a 2WD SUV/CUV can do a lot of “off-roading” around here, because it’s more about the suspension than the drivetrain.

        All sorts of BLM roads, fire roads, and other dirt paths don’t *usually* call for 4WD, but they do call for a beefy suspension.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    A badly outdated relic in an atrophying segment, I strongly suspected it would be cancelled rather than updated. I’m not sure updating it would have done much for its sales.

    I live out West and have considered buying a capable 4×4 like this for several years to serve as a camping rig and everyday family car. 2-yo used ones have been a steal. But with kids and work, the opportunity to use it just isn’t all that frequent and in the meantime you deal with jiggly ride quality, no joy at all from behind the wheel, unreasonable fuel economy, and a cheap, cheap, cheap interior. I like the Xterra, but not enough to buy one new.

    Just have to get a 4-door Tacoma with a bed shell if I ever go that route.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Bye Felicia.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    CoreyDL, whatever lamenting agenda you have against the Xterra is frankly moot. Have another coffee and tell us even more.

  • avatar
    johnharris

    A 5-speed 2000 Xterra was the first new car I ever bought, age 27. For an SUV of that era it handled pretty well and did yeoman duty hauling boats and gear. As my first new car I was astonished at its poor reliability. I had opted for manual everything—locks and windows, etc.—reasoning that such measures would guarantee more long-term reliability than the aging hoopties I’d been living with. Disaster! One by one, both door locks and the hatch lock failed and had to be replaced. Then the ignition lock failed. A dead fuel pump stranded me on the NJ Turnpike in the middle of a time-critical business trip. Stereo died. I nursed it to 175,000 miles, but haven’t considered a Nissan since. Maybe they’re better now.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Mine was not much better, had an 02. The transmission had to be replaced for second gear grind, there was a leak at the RMS, the headliner was delaminating from the ceiling, and the switch that controlled the brake lights broke, and the head unit died. This all happened in under 100k miles too. My mom has an 05 altima that’s not holding up much better over time either.

      I used to be a big Nissan fan, but I really find them suspect now.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Everyone I knew who had one of these loved it. However I’ve generally observed when seeing the Xterra in Consumer Reports etc. that it was one of the lowest scoring Nissans.

    Here in the American West they continue to be popular. Sometimes I think every Xterra sold in the last several years was sold west of the Mississippi River. :-P

  • avatar
    LUNDQIK

    I own one of these, bought new.

    Its been a great reliable all rounder (commuter, camper, tow vehicle, small family hauler, home-depot runner, capable on trails, etc.) I will miss it and hope when my X does need replacement something similar will be available at the same value (price point) the X had.

    It was no super star and Nissan did let it rot on the vine. But there were updates (the interior did get improved for 2012), 2009 addressed the early issues with radiators and curtain airbags. Above all it was a great value for what you paid and what you got.

    Folks like to point to the low sales numbers, which true, aren’t the full picture. The Xterra was based off the same platform as the Titan, Last Gen Pathfinder, and Frontier. The R&D costs for an “Xterra” is really the delta to adding a hatch to the Frontier.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      I thought maybe the Xterra was going to see a small jump in sales when the Pathfinder went CUV from SUV. Obviously in the “mommy-mobile” market CUV is the way for the Pathfinder to go but I thought there would be a few hardcore folks who would want to trade their old Pathfinders for a new Xterra.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I wonder if it is because a seven-year old Pathfinder is so alike a brand new Xterra (even the dashboard is practically identical) that even hardcore folks wouldn’t want to make new car payments on a vehicle barely indistinguishable from their current one. Even a habitual repeat Camry buyer gets a new dashboard and sheet metal every 5 or so years.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    I remember the slogan when this came out: Everything you need, nothing you want.

    Wait. No. Everything you want, nothing you need.

    Erm. Hmmm.

  • avatar
    skyline59

    My 2000 Xterra (4WD), bought new in Fall ’99, was my DD, weekend off-roader and tow vehicle until last month. The only thing, other than tires and brakes, that I ever had to replace was the stock head until, which died about 10 years ago. Sure the ride wasn’t fantastic and the MPG was only high teens, but it was a reliable workhorse for over 200,000 miles. At that time in my life, it was the perfect do-everything truck and I’ll miss it. It gave it’s life to a head on collision with a 1 year old Escape – no injuries to the 3 Xterra passengers, both Escape passengers had to be cut out and transported to the ED.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Well, this is the proof you need that the US will get a new Frontier.

    I remember reading an article on this in Popular Science years ago. The main aim of the Xterra was to use as many Frontier/Pathfinder (D40) components as possible to come up with a “new” SUV.

    I don’t see the current Pathfinder anywhere’s near what the old Pathfinder was. Nissan has lost it’s way with SUVs. CUVs are good and I suppose that’ where the cash is at the moment.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    I always like the Xterra in terms of styling. I almost bought one on two separate occasions. Ended up getting a Pathfinder the second time because my wife needed a third row for the several kids she planned on having. We only had two kids by the time we got rid of it. So missed my chance I suppose.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Never really had much interest in the Xterra, sad to see it go though, its one of the few compact SUVs that still looks rugged, nice and square too.

  • avatar
    azmtbkr81

    I had a love/hate relationship with my 2007 Xterra. It was perfect for exploring the mountains of Colorado. It did very well off-road and in deep snow and was a blast to drive with the manual transmission. Unfortunately ,it spent a lot of time in the shop. In the 3 years I owned it it chewed through 3 timing chain guides, two sets of shocks, and miscellaneous other smaller parts. I got rid of it just as the warranty expired out of fear of repair costs. The ’96 Bronco I replaced it with has been much more reliable and gets roughly the same mileage. Sometimes I miss my Xterra and I am sad to see it discontinued; letting it slowly die on the vine was a missed opportunity for Nissan.

  • avatar
    Flat6

    ***Simple point***
    15 years ago this vehicle was the reason Nissan had traffic in the showroom after losing $ for the previous 5+ years. With the combination of Renault’s cash reserves, Gohn’s business mind and the right product at the right time (small SUV craze), Nissan was salvaged in the USA. Luckily Nissan bet the farm to develop the Xterra during their internal financial crisis. The Maxima at the time was on the ropes against the CamCords, the ‘new’ Z was already a few years old and consumers wanted more convertibles (MX-5, Z3, Boxster, S2000 options). The Frontier was punch drunk by the Tacoma and the Pathfinder was moving up market. Glad the Xterra, Ghosn, and Renault’s $ arrived when it did, else the Nissan of today and the cult following GT-R would likely not be.


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