By on July 10, 2014

01 - 1972 International Harvester Scout II Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinHere in Colorado, Scouts are all over the place, which means that Denver-area wrecking yards get a steady stream of worn-out or abandoned examples. So far in this series, we’ve seen this ’70, this ’71, this ’73, and this ’74, and I’ve skipped over a bunch of totally-stripped Scouts that weren’t worth photographing. Today’s find has donated a lot of parts to the local Scout ecosystem, but still intact enough to be of interest.
07 - 1972 International Harvester Scout II Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe IHC V8 was a heavy, farm-equipment-grade brute. There’s probably some easy way to tell a 304 from a 345 at a glance, but I don’t know what it is.
08 - 1972 International Harvester Scout II Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe smog sticker says it’s a 345, but owners of these trucks have always been notorious engine-swappers. Hey, why is there a California catalyst sticker on a ’72? This junkyard goes by VIN records when determining model year, so I suspect that some VIN-swapping magic was performed by a previous owner and we’re really looking at a late-70s Scout.
06 - 1972 International Harvester Scout II Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIHC made a Rallye version of the Scout II, but this looks like a homegrown decal job.
09 - 1972 International Harvester Scout II Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIt’s not incredibly rusty, but there’s no reason to restore a truck like this when you can buy nicer runners for reasonable prices in Colorado.


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35 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1972 International Harvester Scout II...”


  • avatar

    I can’t take it. Hearts are breaking all over the Midwest to see largely rust-free examples of cars we never even see anymore junked. It’s fucking unbearable.

    • 0 avatar

      I had the same response Josh. Makes me sad about how decrepit things become around here, especially favorites like the Scout.

      Hey Murilee, ever think of a selling a map of the Junkyard Stars?

    • 0 avatar
      challenger2012

      IH might not have been able to make a long lasting vehicles, but their refrigerators must have been real good. My grandparents had only one refrigerator their entire lives and it was an IH.

    • 0 avatar
      Neb

      I had never seen a IH Scout in the wild until I lived in Western Canada. I’m going to guess there’s a ‘island of dryness’ in North America that allows certain cars that long ago returned to iron oxide in say Ontario to continue to exist.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I thought the decals looked pretty good for an amateur job.

  • avatar
    I've got a Jaaaaag

    IIRC that design of Rallye Stripe was exclusive to the 1980 model, of course that means it should have the square headlights. Also I don’t think that color was available in 1972. It makes me wonder if someone put a rust free California body on a 1972 chassis.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    Legend has it these trucks started rusting while they were still on the assembly line. I’ve never seen an IH Scout without major rust issues. Pretty incredible find.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      That legend might have started in the later years of production, when IH was trying to get costs down. Eliminating or reducing rustproofing might have been one of the “savings”. The 1960s models didn’t seem to rust as bad as the late 1970s models did.

  • avatar
    doug-g

    You usually lose me now at “here in Colorado”.

    My folks knew a couple who owned an IH dealership. The factory was a “drive-away” and was known as “Tow Bar City”. Merle and Ethel would fly out and drive two IH vehicles back, each towing one. They disconnected the speedometers, but drove them carefully and felt they were doing the new owners a favor by “breaking them in” properly.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      No it was not a drive away factory though dealers could do it if they desired to. Most left on rail cars, though some went by truck. If the purchaser was savy they could tell if it was a drive away, truck, or rail shipment. For example my Travelall says to ship to the Portland OR rail yard while both of my Scouts and my 1510 show they went to the Auburn WA rail yard. It is listed on the LST or line set ticket an original copy of which is supposed to be included in the sale and by the 70’s a mini copy was attached to the vehicle. On early Scout II it would have been where the emissions labels are on this one, later Scout II had them on the inside of the glove box door. Both of those were stickers. The 70’s full size trucks had a mini paper copy taped to the back of the glove box. If it was a drive-away it will say ship to TSPC (truck sales processing center). That is not to be confused with ship through TSPC which means it went there to get something that wasn’t normally installed on the production line like a winch or the soft tops used on the SSII.

      However to save that money many dealers particularly those closer to the factory would do a drive away and the Wisconsin Historical Society has a number of pictures of some pretty crazy set ups all lashed together leaving the TSPC. I’ve seen pictures of a Scout strapped to the frame rails of a 1 ton chassis and cab with that strapped to the frame rails of a 2-3 ton truck and then a Travelall on a tow bar behind that mess.

      I have heard from some of the IH guys I know who’s family owned a dealership that they would order a truck with the factory hitch even though the person who ordered it didn’t ask for it just so they could do a drive-away and use a tow bar to bring back another vehicle. Then when the person showed up to pickup the truck say well I guess you got a free hitch and take that cost off of the invoice.

      • 0 avatar
        doug-g

        Great reply, I really enjoyed it. Sorry for my error in referring to the factory as being a drive away factory; that was *my* take on what I had been told. Merle and Ethel had a dealership that was more “garage” than “dealership”. From the time Scouts came out, until they sold the “dealership” in about 1973, Merle and Ethel sold 50 Scouts. That number was a source of pride. My father would stare at them. But, they lived in a very small town so that was a pretty good amount I guess. They also sold all the trucks to the surrounding towns and counties and busses to the schools. Combined with the garage work, they had a good life.

      • 0 avatar
        snakebit

        Speaking of IH and Travelalls, the September 2014 issue of Hemmings Classic Car magazine has a six page article devoted to the Travelall, from day one until the end of production, a nice collection of black and white early model photos, and color photos of the mid-50’s and newer models. It’s just came out in the last week, so it may still be available at newsstands. I’m not a truck guy, and I found the article a great read.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    Definitely not all 72. The grille with the hole for the plastic insert is 76-79. That color is not from 72. The Scout II sticker and lack of metal Scout II badges on the quarters say 79-80. The “boat” style rockers say mid 1974 and up while the fact that they are on 5 stand rocker shafts says 1976 or later. The rubber knob for the wipers say 76 up. The large diameter temp sender is 78 up. The Bulkhead connector for the engine wiring says 78 up. The fact that the emissions decal says that there was a TVS in the radiator means 79 up. The water pump housing says pre 80.

    So I’d say it is a 1979 depending on exactly how many of the parts present actually came with the truck. Definitely not a 1972 but if it did come from CA I certainly could see someone swapping the data plate from a 72 to avoid emissions.

    • 0 avatar
      snakebit

      http://www.oregonlive.com/window-shop/index.ssf/2011/07/ernie_bisio_who_sold_cars_until_he_was_90_died_in.html

      I was about to list a used IH Scout dealer I found near downtown Portland, OR, when I came across the above news item. I was dumbfounded when I saw this used car lot specializing in IH Scouts in 2008 while I was in town for a wedding. At the time, I thought, “what next, a Checker lot?” I lived there once, and found it to be a car-crazed town that was a secret to anyone living outside the state, with a five-story import junkyard literally downtown on the west side, a Falcon used parts company just blocks away in the northwest of the city, etc.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Ernie was a great guy I spent a number of hours talking with him and the Great Western Binder Bee the year before he finally retired. Great stories that he told. When he retired he was the holder of the oldest continuously operated by one entity dealer license in the state or OR.

        My favorite story was how he became a Light Line dealer. When IH brought out the Scout they considered it a separate “brand”. So they did something very similar to what Ford did with the Edsel and what the Japanese brands did in their early years. They approached dealers that had existing new car franchises. He was not one of those original 3 dealers selected. A Chrysler dealer who was down the street from Erine’s used car dealership was though. One day the owner of the Chrylser dealer asked Erine if he wanted the Scout franchise as his salesmen all dressed in suits and ties didn’t know how to sell a Scout. Ernie took him up on the offer and after establishing himself with that became a full Light Line dealer meaning selling trucks up to 1 ton as well as Travelalls.

        He kept a new 1980 Scout that he finally sold the year before he retired. The brown Scout you see him in front of in the beginning of that video was his, a 1978 Selective Edition.

  • avatar
    DougD

    20 yrs ago I worked with a guy who had been a buyer for IH Chatham. He told me that Scouts rust so much because IH was not able to buy best quality steel as that went to the Big 3. He also mentioned that the tailgates were assembled by using a brazing rod as the electrode in an arc welder.

    Don’t know if that was BS or not, but what’s not BS is that Scouts certainly rusted quickly in the salty northeast..

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Long live the IH Scout, pickup truck and Travelall. Restore them all and long may they roll.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    Someone should be shipping these things eastward, trying to find a Scout that isn’t completely rotted out in Pennsylvania is quite difficult. You either pay 800 for a fixable rust-bucket or $15,000 for someone’s fully restored customized off-road machine.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    If you look at the picture of the engine you will see red paint on the inside of the engine compartment and the carpet inside is red. This Scout was originally red and has been repainted. I think someone rebuilt this Scout with a composite of parts from other Scouts from other years.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    I’ve never seen a ih that rust free in my whole life.

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    Subaru bought the rights to the IH Scout brand from Navistar in 2012, and hasn’t done anything with it yet. Unless Subaru actually has some plans for the mark, I’d like to see it sold to Chrysler since International is part of Fiat.

    • 0 avatar

      I believe Fiat owns Case-IH the old International Harvester, International Trucks are made by Navistar.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      No not by a long shot. International is holding the Scout brand tight and still defends it’s trademark.

      International morphed into Navistar when they sold the agricultural business to Case which was then called Case IH. The Light Line trademarks have been licensed to the Light Line dealers who are authorized to use the name and logos and to sub license it to have reproduction and other items made.

      Honda orignially was intending to sell the Pilot with the Scout name and Navistar the parent of ITEC or International Truck and Engine sued successfully to prevent that.

      Case/IH then produced the side by side Scout utility vehicle (like a JD Gator) and referenced the orignial Scout in advertising. Navistar again sued, since the side by side utility vehicle market is suffeciently different from the market the real Scout competed in they were not able to stop them from using the name. They did however prevail in stopping the use of reference to the real Scout in advertising.

      Interestingly enough International did try to sell the Scout business unit to Chrysler before they discontinued it. Instead Chrysler took notes of one of the revolutionary versions of the Scout that was on the drawing board. They then offered many of the engineers in the Scout Business Unit jobs. Low and behold it wasn’t too much later that they revolutionized the market with a new segment known as the minivan. The one think the left off for many years was the driver’s side sliding door but they eventually dusted the plans off and brought that out too.

      The guy that designed the suspension for the “new” ram was another of the people who moved from International to Chrysler.

      • 0 avatar
        mikeg216

        By the scout was discontinued the Minivan was already in production…

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        Navistar is in somewhat rough shape, though, thanks to their failed engine project (they had to switch to Cummins, and shed a huge amount of market share in the process), and they appear to be for sale. So someone else may yet resurrect the Scout brand.

        • 0 avatar
          NoGoYo

          The only question would be “what could a 2014 IH Scout look like?”.

          It would probably be something of a JK clone, just like how the old Scout was meant as a CJ competitor.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The original Scout was not intended as a CJ competitor. It was intended to be a alternative to a regular compact car. IH figured that the take rate of 4wd would be in the 20-25% range and by the time 1961 was over that was the take rate of the 2wd.

            As to what it would have looked like I’d say there is a 45% chance of it being a competitor to the Land rover and a 45% chance of being a mainstream SUV with a 10% chance of it competing with the JK.

            I’ve got a copy of the Business plan that the Scout Business Unit presented to the board laying out the future possibilities of the Scout.

            When it went out of production the Scout was the premium SUV in the market, load it up and you could spend more on one than a Cadillac. (See the Midas versions and the Monteverdi, they sold for way more than a Caddy)They were considering adding all those luxuries as offered on those models as the standard fare or at least offering it all in house.

            Another proposed option was to introduce a family of products including a “mini-van” body in addition to the 2dr and a new 4dr.

            The report fairly accurately predicted that the new family car wouldn’t be a car but a SUV.

            They did build a number of prototypes for a Jeep competitor however that was always identified as a stop gap until the Scout III, which was put on hold, could be finished. That came very close to making it to market but Coachman industries, who was going to build the fiberglass body and do final assembly, backed out at the last minute. Combined with the strike and other things and the board said close it down and put the agri business up for sale.

          • 0 avatar
            formula m

            I could see it being similar to a 94′ LandRover Defender 90

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          ITEC isn’t doing so well that is for sure but the did not “switch” to Cummins they have made that an option. It makes sense since the majority of the trucks that now have a Cummins engine option are the Diamond Star trucks and the ones that wear the Superduty cab have had the Cummins available for some time. Market share had already started to rebound before the announcement of the Cummins availability.

          Haven’t heard of Navistar being for sale or Navistar offering IC or ITEC for sale. Navistar Defense and Navistar Finnacial are doing very well and without the the T & E parts of ITEC they could kill Navistar Defense.

          Back in the late 90’s early 00’s the ITEC division did do some sketches and design studies of re-entering the Pickup market. The drawings I’ve seen definitely were influenced by the 97 F150.

          • 0 avatar
            th009

            http://www.reuters.com/article/2012/06/10/us-navistar-volkswagen-idUSBRE8590FV20120610

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            That does not say that Navistar was for sale it says that Volkswagen was considering buying some stock in the company which they would have done on the open market. However that article is 2 years old and since it hasn’t happened yet I doubt it will.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    My crazy recluse great uncle has an ’80 Scout that he bought brand new. It was his daily driver until it rotted out, then he spent a not-so-small fortune on a frame-off restoration of it. I saw it a couple of years ago, and it was probably nicer than any of them ever were new. He only drives it in the summer now.

    My great uncle lives in an “off grid” cabin up in Western Maine, with a TON of guns including some kind of WWII towed machine gun that he had to get a special permit for. I fully expect to hear of a massacre at the local town hall someday with all his neighbors saying on the news “he was a quiet man who kept to himself”… He’s probably pushing 75 now.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    The tin worm gets ‘em all in the end….

    A sad thing , this one looks restorable to me .

    FWIW , NO ONE actually wants rust free old Scout (or anything else) bodies ~ I grew up Down East and so know rusty vehicles very well , when I moved to So. Cal. , I decided to try selling old rust free if raggedy collector vehicles and wasn’t even able to GIVE THEM AWAY ! current tags & titles even .

    I parted out most of them and so didn’t loose my @$$ but it was a real eye opener as I’m always building up some old nail or another and the body & rust are the primary lookouts to me .

    -Nate


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