By on August 17, 2013

15 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinHere in Denver, the Jeep DJ-5 often shows up in Junkyard Finds. Another truck that forms a regular part of The Crusher’s diet in Colorado is the International Harvester Scout. Yes, there was once a time when a farm-equipment manufacturer made highway-legal light trucks, and the Scout was (and is) a Colorado favorite. Here’s a battered ’74 I spotted a few weeks back.
02 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinIn this series so far, we’ve seen this ’70 Scout, this ’71 Scout, and this ’73 Scout. Today’s find has a bit of rust, a well-worn interior, and seriously sun-bleached paint.
13 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinOh yeah, and it appears to have had a minor rollover mishap.
10 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinWhen IHC needed to add instructions for window-regulator replacement, they went for combine-harvester-style stenciled instructions rather than the decals that the Detroit Big Three would have used.
03 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinI’m pretty sure this is the 304-cubic-inch IHC V8, but I don’t know enough about these engines to distinguish the 304 from the 345 at a glance. Either way, it’s a little four-wheel-drive truck with farm-grade V8 power!
01 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThe blue-and-white two-tone paint is more like light-blue-and-off-white by now, but it probably looked great when new.
12 - 1971 AM General DJ-5 Mail Jeep Down On The Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinAre there any Scouts without a hunting- or fishing-related window decal? No, there are none.

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111 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1974 International Harvester Scout II...”


  • avatar
    skor

    I remember these things when they were new. Around where I lived, these types of trucks seemed to appeal to a very nasty, unpleasant people….kind of like the people you see driving Hummers today.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “the people you see driving Hummers today.”

      Blonde chicks?

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Yea, those darn Hummer drivers, when will they learn.

      /sarcasm

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Not until they pull the steering wheel from your cold dead hands?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Is this a zombie land reference?

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            um, no… an NRA reference in an ironic twist on your sarcasm posed as a question

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I see, then in that case, yes, I absolutely love them, as well as my scout, and I’ve never been called unpleasent, nor do any of the guys that own them seem to be snoddy or unpleasent.
            Skor obviously is much to good to actually stoop down and get to know one of us horrible people.

            Oh well.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            I’m a CUV driver, I feel your pain

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            I’ve yet to see a Hummer of any description driven aggressively or particularly badly. I don’t know a pool of Hummer drivers to make generalizations about their characters, but I can say that every single person I’ve met that has had a strong negative reaction to them has been a waste of carbon. Vandals are garbage. The H2 doesn’t make a ton of sense to me, but then neither do many fashionable vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        You know everbody has that one giant ass in their life and if you don’t know them, you are that one? Well hummer drivers are that collective group. Poor amounts of real testosterone offset by cheesy machismo built off the suburban/tahoe frame to appeal to wishful military men who conveniently forget that soldiers died fairly often in them….

        I only rag on you because I care. Seriously…cause I do.

        • 0 avatar
          Lie2me

          That really is a broad generalization based on no factual data. I doubt if you’d like someone profiling you in that manner without knowing anything about you

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          I’m reminded of the Allstate ad where the hippie in the knit hat rear-ends the old suit in the Caddy.

          All the hippie’s fault but he’s still smugly patronizing.

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            The best defense is a better offense

          • 0 avatar
            jeffzekas

            The “hippie” didn’t seem patronizing, but rather, kindly: “It’s kinda like we’re connected” is hardly patronizing- it is a statement that we are all human beings, whether in an “old suit” or whether we are in a knit hat… watch the ad again… http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k9EBcNEKkcY

          • 0 avatar
            Lie2me

            Actually, if I were the older guy I would have been embarrassed after seeing what damage the Golf had done to the Cadillac with the Golf showing hardly a scratch

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The damage on the Caddy doesn’t line up with the damage on the Golf. When described as “old suit” I expected him to have a DTS, not the STS!

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          So does that apply to offroad vehicles in general, the H2 has little in common to either the Tahoe or suburban, how do you asses that all owners are a certain way?
          Why do you generalize a group of people? Not all Prius owners are diehard liberals whether or not that fits your generalizations you seem so fond of.

          How are Hummers fake-macho vehicles yet jeeps and land rovers are not? Their all born off ofte ideas of the originals, yet you seem to hate only one?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Hummer H2 is evil, Toyota Landcruiser driven by same soccer mom good. Any questions?

            (not a point of GM or Toyota bias or lack there of, just pointing out the hypocrisy of the Hummer hating but silent otherwise crowd)

          • 0 avatar
            Sigivald

            I half suspect he’ll accuse people in a Defender or Wrangler of lacking hormones and having excessive machismo, fear not.

            At least, if I get to generalize back, from having seen That Sort Of Line Before.

            (And, yeah, the H1 has exactly nothing in common with a Suburban apart from being made by GM.)

            (In the interest of disclosure: I’ve never owned or driven any Hummer, and my F-250 only has 4WD because you can’t find ‘em used without it.

            Also, I do actually occasionally drive it on a field or pasture, so I could maybe justify that once a year if it came to it…)

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            http://www.lynchhummer.com/h2pages/h2chassis.html

            http://www.amgeneral.com/vehicles/hummer/

    • 0 avatar
      Pig_Iron

      Holy cow! My remembrance is the exact opposite. It was mostly rural folks who wanted a simple, tough, reliable machine to use year round. It had a little more space than a CJ, and wasn’t as homely as the Bronco. The people I remember totally unpretentious people picking up supplies at the local farm co-op or feed mill. A fellow down the road had a Travelall that must have been twenty years old, and it still ran like a top.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        I’ve always wondered where one bought IHC trucks. Tractor dealerships are pretty uncommon unless you live in a huge farm area, so did IHC form partnerships with car dealerships?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          My father sold scouts through his tractor dealership, he sold IH alongside New Holland, Ford, kubota, Case, and maybe another I can’t remember right now.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            That would be an interesting picture. Tractors, lawn mowers, hay balers, etc…and then a line of trucks.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’m pretty sure the “last” scout/IH vehicle line dealership closed in about 2009 selling restored and decent condition IH vehicles

          • 0 avatar
            Pig_Iron

            The biggest one near us was an IH truck dealership. It’s still around, but it’s Navistar now. I don’t think they even have a cab-over line anymore.
            :-(

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @ Hummer, the Last Light Line dealership was Bisio Motors in Portland OR I think you are about right as to the time he didn’t renew his dealership license. It was the oldest dealership license continuously held by the same person in the state. By that time Ernie sold very few vehicles and mainly just did repairs. I never saw a “restored” vehicle on his lot though he held on to 1 1980 Scout that was sold “new” in the mid 00′s. There were a couple of interview with him on Youtube a couple of years back.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          There were IH Light Line dealers that carried Scouts, Travelalls and pickups up to the 1510 2 1/2 ton series. My Scouts and Travelall were bought at such dealers that were located in the heart of Portland OR, Burien and Everett WA. There were also dealers that carried the Light Line and heavy trucks, dealers that carried Ag equipment and the Light Line and some that carried all three lines.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Those are probably still the same people he’s referring to. To you and me, they’re likely known as neighbors. To people like him, they’re nasty hicks.

  • avatar
    Wheeljack

    A guy in my high school had a final model year (I think 1980) Scout II with swivel bucket seats in it. It was a pretty sweet truck.

    The one lasting memory I have of these old Internationals (Scout, Travelall, etc) is that the IH V-8s (266/304/345/392 SV “Commanche” series) are the smoothest running engines (when properly tuned, of course) I’ve ever seen. I seem to recall they timed off the #8 cylinder too…

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    My grandmother’s second husband worked in the Fort Wayne factory that built IH trucks right up until the truck line shut down and he was given early retirement and walking papers. I’ve always heard that IH had labor issues but never heard anyone say that IH trucks had build quality issues like the Big 3.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      About what year was that shutdown?

      IHs were the cockroaches of US Steel in Gary and South Chicago. The first big drop in basic steel orders came in ’75 when we lost frames & bumpers for Detroit, beginning with Chrysler.

      I wonder how much losing fleet sales to rustbelt companies hurt IH. Probably hugely, as I never saw many privately owned Scouts or pickups on the road in Indiana even with all the farming & hunting.

    • 0 avatar
      ranwhenparked

      Both of America’s smallest independents (IHC and Checker) had atrocious labor relations. There was a long strike from like the fall of 1979 to the spring of 1980 that brought all IHC production to a standstill. The company never recovered financially, and the planned 1981 Scout was one of the casualties.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        Thanks, both.

        All of a piece. And polyester, too.

      • 0 avatar
        Maintainer

        The strike had little to do with the death of the IH light duty trucks.
        From 61 to 69 Harvesters LD market share dropped from 7% to 4% and hit 1% by 1979.
        People weren’t buying their trucks from their local Farm Implement store any more. They were buying from the same store that Mom got her Country Squire.
        For a brief time IH sold through some Buick/Olds/Pontiac dealers and that helped keep the ship afloat for a while but eventually GM would quash that deal and pair GMC with BOP stores to keep GM all GM.
        Did the Strike hurt? Absolutely, as did Archie McArdel’s hatred for the Union. But it wasn’t the cause of Scouts death.

        • 0 avatar
          ranwhenparked

          The strike affected the whole company, not just the light truck division. It was a major factor in the decision to shut down the light truck division and sell off the entire agricultural division within a few years and downsize to just medium/heavy trucks and buses as Navistar. They had planned on producing the Scout for at least a few more years, not making any major updates or improvements, but coasting along for as long as it was justifiable financially and then shutting down. Had it not been for the strike, IHC light trucks might have survived into 1983 or ’84, the decision to stop in 1980 was entirely strike related.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            The decision to stop production of the Scout didn’t have anything to do with the strike. CAFE and the EPA were the main reasons. If they hadn’t made the decision to sell the Scout Business Unit the 1981 would have had some significant revisions. There were a number of possibility offered in the SBU’s presentation to the board as to what exactly to offer for 1981. One thing that was certain was that the IH V8 would not have made the cut as they did not have the money to make it clean enough to meet the 1981 emissions standards. They had inked a preliminary deal to put the Chrysler slant 6 in as the base engine and were working on sourcing an emissions certified “automotive” V8 for the optional engine with the 318 being the most likely choice since they were going to buy the 225 and they had been using the 727 transmission for years. The Dana 44 axles would have been replaced with Dana 30s. They also would have most likely offered the SSV or Scout Supplemental composite bodied vehicle one of the prototypes of which still resides in the Auburn/Cord museum.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          By the late 70′s Detroit, and to a lesser extent the Japanese, were all getting into the personal 4×4 game in a big way. So it’s unsurprizing that IHC lost market share with an outdated product and fewer resources to update it.

    • 0 avatar
      Lie2me

      My uncle was right there with him. My uncle was with them for a long time and always had a company supplied vehicle. I don’t remember anything negative about them. Seemed on par with similar vehicles at the time

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        My dad had an IH as a company truck from his employer, Wm. A Pope Construction that was sited on mill property. Always a red 1/2 ton with white trim, changed out every couple of years.

        It was the only vehicle at home I never even thought of sneaking out and sampling. The consequences of being caught…

        Too bad as the ones I drove in the mill were all uber-dilapidated and checking out a fairly pristine version would have been cool. I used to wash it and clean the inerior. Even though it suffered no mechanical abuse it still was marked by the clinging smell of burnt steel/heavy grease that marked every vehicle to venture within the plant gates.

  • avatar
    NeinNeinNein

    I had a IH straight 6 powered pickup as my first car—err truck. The thing was slow, loud and handled like crap. But it was mine. It originally had a 3 speed manual column shifter (3 on the tree) that my old man converted to floor mount due to all the issues it was having….still had issues. Stranded us 80 miles from home one evening…my dad had to drive out in the middle of the night to monkey around with the linkage. It ended up being one retaining bolt, that had I got my a$$ under the truck,,I could have easily hand tightened and been on our way. The truck died an ignominious death….while “offroading” the battery came loose….flying out inside the cavernous engine compartment …it’s corner landing, unbeknownst to me, squarely on the oil filter…..draining the engine of its precious black goo. I drove it many miles home till i noticed a weird sound from the hood, oil spray on the windshield, a loss of power and thE telltale sounds of thrown bearings. RIP old Yellow.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      “RIP old Yellow”

      Yeesh… blast from the past. All the steel mill IHs were yellow and given the abuse they daily took, I can’t for the life of me conjure up an image of one that wasn’t bashed, sprung, filthy with greasy red dust and absent any trace of yellow in the bed. Scrap in two years.

      Kinda skewed my concept of “working truck”. More like kamikaze truck.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Blast from the past, indeed!

        I owned a few used Scouts with the 345 in that past, and we used them to go mudding in.

        On several I had to weld the rear differential so both rear wheels would be spinning all the time to dig into the mud. This caused hops and skids when turning on hard surfaces, but worked great in mud and snow.

        IH made some good stuff back in those days. I was a fan. I owned a new 1971 TravelAll with the 392. Bigger than the Suburban of that day even. But too big to take to the Germany (and Europe) of the seventies with me.

        Prior to that, the used Air Force four door flightline IHC pickup trucks were also much in demand and could be bought dirt cheap through Air Force Redistribution and Marketing when the trucks were retired from flightline use.

        Trouble with all vehicles of that era, they were trouble prone, required lots of preventive maintenance and often required carburetor rebuilds, waterpumps, fuelpumps, points, plugs and distributor caps replaced.

        Nice thing about all IHC vehicles was you could get much of the hardware used in them at the local hardware store and/or auto supply store.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          “when the trucks were retired from flightline use”

          How much was left of them at that point?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Back in those days, 1965 – 1969, these trucks had very low mileage on them because they never left the flightline nor did they ever leave the base.

            They were used to ferry maintenance crews and gear from ops to the flightline, or tow loaded utility trailers.

            At that time there was a system in place that retired AF trucks after 5 years regardless of condition at which time they were replaced with brand new ones, usually Dodge in that time frame IIRC.

            I paid $300 for one that had a straight six and a four speed manual floor shifter and put another $200 into it but did the labor myself. The DC generator was the first to go. Then the water pump, and later the fuel pump.

            I don’t recall how many miles were on it when I bought it, but it ran, smoked a little, and I drove it home to my barracks on the base. I got around the smoking by using 40Wt HD engine oil instead of the 30Wt that came in it.

            I did all the work on it myself at the Auto Hobby Shop and sold it for $500 to my roommate in Dec 1966 before I went to Viet Nam.

            Those trucks were sparsely furnished, no AC, no PS, no PB, but they were good, solid transportation.

            For as long as I had it, I was the most popular airman anytime someone need a truck to move their stuff. I got paid with a lot of beer and a full tank of gas.

            Aside from the 40wt HD oil in the engine, I never did anything major to it for the time I had it, like ring and valve, or bearings or clutch, or brakes so I say that I got plenty of usage out of it.

            Much of that stuff had already been done as part of the regular maintenance program at Transportation.

            I don’t know how much was left in the truck after I sold it since I lost track of the guy I sold it to, in 1966. I do know he got out of the service as I went on my merry way to Viet Nam.

            I say I got my money’s worth. It beat walking or bumming rides.

          • 0 avatar
            Kenmore

            I figured a flightline truck would have been about as gently used as any fleet truck could be. Great story, thanks.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @Highdesertcat
            Flightline vehicles!

            I would never buy one. We use Hiluxes here and boy do they take a fizzling. The vehicles mainly drive around at most in 2nd or 3rd and only reach speeds of above 60kph when the guys (and girls now) go to the mess or canteen.

            I’ve witnessed a Hilux tow a genset and hyd rig, each weighing over a couple of tons each out to a job. The little 2.7 litre 4 cylinder and drivetrain earnt its living. I don’t think Toyota envisioned and designed the Hilux to pull over 10 000lbs.

            Back to the Scout, we used to have them here and I think they only came with the 345′s in them. We had IH sand trucks (dumptruck or tippers as they are called here) with the 345 and they used to carry 12-15 ton of sand. Extremely slow.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            They used a Tundra to tow the 145 ton space shuttle, so 10,000 lbs shouldn’t trouble a HiLux. As long as they’re towing on an airport tarmac, the work involved isn’t exactly the same as towing a similar load somewhere with hills and bumps.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            BAFO, I was young and I was poor back then. I had one stripe on my arm and was single at that time.

            Beggars can’t be choosers and I was making $119 every two weeks. Money was scarce. Buying that truck seemed the right thing to do, and I’m glad I did it.

            All it really took was a lot of elbow grease to keep it running. I could steal most everything I needed with the help from my buddies who worked at Transportation, like hoses, belts, etc.

            I was using the ’60 Mercury Montclaire my dad had sent me off with but I knew my dad could really use those wheels back home since my brothers would also need wheels eventually, and soon.

            While I owned that IHC truck I also bought a ’57 Pontiac Chieftain Hardtop from a guy I worked with who was leaving to go overseas. So I had two rides – one to go party with the guys and the Pontiac to take the girls out in.

            And after I came back from Viet Nam in 1968 I bought another IHC flightline truck from the Air Force with a straight six and three-on-the-tree this time. I kept that one longer than the first and sold it to a buddy when I bought a used Dodge 4-door Prospector pickup truck dirt cheap.

            Sometimes you have to play the cards you are dealt, and sometimes you have to party with the car that brung ya’.

            As long as I had wheels to get around I was better off than the guys without wheels. And MOST young single guys back then, 1 and 2 stripers, didn’t have a car on the Air Force Base.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            @HDC
            Boy, have times changed. When I was at our training college a couple of years back we even had some young guys with BMWs and HSVs. One even had a Porche. Most every trainee had a big bike or relatively good car. Not like when I joined.

            I do know what you mean, it was the same when I was young. But after several years you learnt that pi$$ing your money away would get you nowhere.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            BAFO, at the risk of boring ttac’s best&brightest I would like to add that things have gotten much better for me over the years as well.

            In 1985 after I retired from the USAF and my wife went back to college full-time to get her Bachelor’s and Real Estate Broker License to work alongside her mom and dad in their Real Estate office, things got really good.

            In that business it is feast or famine and during that time frame (1985-2007) it was all feast all of the time.

            Now we don’t buy used vehicles any more and we don’t keep our vehicles beyond the factory warranty period so I don’t have to get low down and dirty tooling and wrenching on them anymore either.

            I’m too old for that sh!t now.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    My father used to sell these he had several for himself as well, including a diesel, I would love to find another, but mine is one of the few around here

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      There still are a few running around the Great Southwest, primarily because there is no rust here.

      The fellow who bought my 1971 TravelAll 1110 still owns it today although the Blue Metallic paint has been completely bleached out by the sun and the “woodgrain” vinyl side appliqué is now reduced to flaky charcoal.

      Although this same guy also owns a 2012 F150 Ecoboost 4-door 4×4, he is not willing to part with the old TravelAll.

      It may be a rude, crude and socially unacceptable vehicle these days but with a little care, they keep going and going and going.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Exactly, I love them, I don’t have to drive it all the time, but that makes it ever more sweet when I do.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Have you tried Googling various IHC forums to see if you can locate any?

          I bought two of my Scouts (way back when) at Estate sales, where the primary owner had died (usually of old age) and the widow and/or family members would sell off the guys’ most valued possessions.

          Man-things like cars, trucks and motorcycles often sell like hotcakes when they’re snatched up by like-minded people.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            I’ve looked at a few forums, but many times they either aren’t nearby or not what I’m looking for ~manual, 4×4, any v8 as there all easy to swap as long as it was built with that engine variety.

            They all either have too much rust, are too far away, or are overcustomized, see 20k special paint job, or low quality shade tree guys who puts carbed 350s in everything.

            One day I’ll find something.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I got these web sites from my youngest son in South Texas:

            http://scoutsforsale.tripod.com/

            scoutparts.com

            scoutconnection.com

            oldtrucksforsale.net/international-scout-for-sale

            anythingscout.com

            ihpartsamerica.com

            4x4offroads.com/1978-ihc-scout-ii.html

            desertclassics.com/IHC62sct.html

            desertrat.com/products/?id=8118

            He owns a 1972 Scout 4×4 345/automatic that was the last one I bought (used) in 1980 for him to use as his daily driver when he still lived at home and for after he left home when he joined the Army.

            He retired in 2012 as an Army Lt Col but still has that old Scout. And it runs good.

            He is not interested in selling it but uses it in South Texas as his Sunday-driver to ride around town in and attend the local Demolition Derbies they hold there from time to time.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            Very nice, and thanks I’ll look them up.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Do not buy anything from Scoutparts.com their prices are usually twice what the other guys charge and their customer service is the worst. IHPartsAmerica.com are great guys as are IHONLY.com and Superscoutspecialists.com the later being the person who bought all of the inventory when IH had fulfilled its requirement to provide replacement parts. He supplies the other guys with the NOS and reproduction parts. The biggest and best forum is Binderplanet.com.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Scoutdude, thanks for the additional sites for parts. I have extracted and forwarded to my son.

            He agreed that some places charge an arm and a leg but sometimes it is just easier to go with it if you need the part.

            Besides, money is relative. In his case, he’s a retired Army Lt Col and employed with Texas State Law Enforcement. He’s just happy to find what he needs, at any price.

  • avatar
    friedclams

    That stenciling is badass. It makes me think of what the entire truck would look like if service instructions were stenciled everywhere.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I saw a poor forlorn Scout II in the back of this strange sort of junkyard today…probably too far gone to save.

    Then again, the guy also had a completely rust-coated but still very salvageable 1960 Chevy wagon, so maybe the old Scout could be resuscitated.

    IH anything just seems quite uncommon in Pennsylvania, even tractors. Allis-Chalmers, Massey-Ferguson, and John Deere stuff is more common on the farms around here than International Harvester.

  • avatar
    AMC_CJ

    My grandfather had one, early 70′s, orange and white two tone job with Civil Air Patrol stickers on either doors. It looked really awesome. Was his daily driver back in the 80′s and early 90′s until he got sick and passed. Despite his wealth, he always had a old 4×4 he drove around in, and kept the Packards/Lincolns in the garage for special occasion.

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    I spent four years in the Panama Canal Zone as a Navy Hospital Corpsman. I held sick call in four different areas and traveled between them in a 64 Scout.

    It had the thirst of a V8, the reliability of a Yugo, and the speed of a moped. Might have been the mechanics fault about the reliability. Spent a fair amount of time using my MGB because of that reliability. That thing would pull tree stumps but I never wanted to buy one after that experience.

  • avatar
    MK

    There was also a time when that same farm equipment manufacturer made M1 Garand rifles…apropos of nothing they’re now quite collectible due to the low volume and high number of variations made during their run.
    I’ve only seen.a few of these on the street during my lifetime in the Southeast, they never particularly stood out so that may be part of it. They were popular in highschool since the top could come off and they were already several years old. I too like the farm equipment stenciling an just general 70s industrial grade look.

  • avatar
    Scoutdude

    The trim around the headlights and the holes where the chrome overlay that was part of the deluxe exterior package indicate that this one is a 1975. The engine is the 345 as evidenced by the bypass hose and overall height of the intake.

    Looks like there are quite a few good parts on this and certainly was salvagable and is sad to see it waiting for its turn in the crusher with so many good parts still on it.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      Yeah, this thing deserves salvaging.

      But now I’ve noticed that every Scout was a 2-barrel…IH never made a 4 barrel V8?

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Yes there were 4bbl V8s. The 392 which was never put in the Scout from the factory was always equipped with a 4bbl. The 1979 and 1980 Scout with the 345 was equipped with a Thermoquad 4bbl. Some of the 74 and 75 345s and 392s put in the pickups were also equipped with the Thermoquad while the rest had Holley modular 4bbls. You can put a 392 manifold on a 345 so there are some out there now and there is an aftermarket aluminum 4bbl manifold in both 266/304 and 345/392 versions, they even have bosses should you want to go with port fuel injection though the way the stock manifold is made it is easy enough to fit port injectors on them.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Hey Scoutdude! I figured you’d chime in on this article.

      It seems our love of old IHC stuff finds us on similar threads.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        I had my granddad’s 63 step side IH 1,000 Series with a straight 6, 3 on the tree, manual choke, and oil bath filter. I regret selling it (only 58k miles). IH was a work truck with no radio and a heater that was not the best but it ran good and was easy to work on. The tin worm would usually get them before they wore out. I have a special place in my heart for old IHs, my very first truck.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Jeff S., the IHC I bought used from the AF in 1965 was also MY very first truck in the sense that it was bought with my own money, and not one of my father’s old hand-me-downs.

          Prior to the IHC, I always had a vehicle for my own use that belonged to my dad, and had to be given back to my dad when I was done with it so my next brother in line could have it for his use.

          It was a pretty good system. As soon as we got our drivers license we got a vehicle to drive, and by the time I left home there were several vehicles we could choose from, all with the stipulation that we had to give it back to ‘dad’, for redistribution to the other sibs.

          That old IHC I bought was painted OD (Olive Drab) and once I got the mechanicals the way I wanted them, my room mate helped me put a fresh coat of genuine AF-issue OD spray paint on the truck, mainly to hide the blacked out AF vehicle numbers.

          One good thing was, I never had to worry about washing it or waxing it. It always looked OD, no matter what.

          I will always have a special place in my heart for that old truck as well. It’s been said that you always remember your ‘first’ anything. And I do.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        I can’t stay away from a Scout JY posting that is for sure.

  • avatar
    lojak

    This makes me sad. These should never wind up in scrap yards.

  • avatar
    SixDucks

    IH made a few of these with 6 cylinder Nissan diesels in later years.

    • 0 avatar
      JD-Shifty

      I think they were Isuzu diesels (?)

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Nope, Nissan (UD) SD33s. Even had a turbo version for the final year.

        • 0 avatar
          Defender90

          That sounds like a really good combo – Patrols were super durable but the leaf sprung Patrols were very unspecial off road. (Surprisingly heavy and difficult to dig out too)
          Those straight sixes were a popular choice to transplant into Land-Rovers before the appearence of a properly made and designed Tdi so the Land-Rover like Scout with a good tough diesel sounds like an absolute winner if you like simple utilitarian trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Technically they were Chrysler Nissan diesels as Chrysler was the authorized distributor for Nissan Diesels in the US when IH first started installing them. For the final years they started buying them directly from Nissan. Yes they were the same SD33 as used in the Patrol and CJ10. With 2 cyls cut off it was the SD22 offered in the 70′s pickups. Because Chrysler was the distributor if the vehicle was equipped with an Automatic the bell housing had the Mopar Big Block pattern, so fab some engine mounting brackets and you can bolt in a 440. Manual trans engines were equipped with an SAE bell housing.

  • avatar
    tucson

    many of the old Scouts had Dana 30 front axles, a dana 20 transfer case, etc. just like Jeeps of the era. The positive thing about that was that the IH truck dealer’s shop was open all night so we could get parts for our Jeeps in the middle of the night (we did night runs).

    It is interesting how the Scouts did off road using the same axles and xfer case….really poor compared even to a stock jeep. They were medicore+ on the road in the snow in Colorado….that’s why there are so many around Denver….Jeeps were too small for everyday use so the Scout could hold more stuff.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesertcat–Mine was light metallic blue with a grey cloth interior. It had been my granddad’s, who had been a farmer. I learned to drive on the old IH on every hilly curvy road in Northern Kentucky. Today’s vehicles are better in every aspect but I will always have a soft spot in my heart for any old IH vehicle and will look for them in any old classic car and truck show. Call me sentimental.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    We had an early (? ’64 maybe?) Scout on the farm in New Hampshire , about 1967 , it had the awful sliding door windows in aluminum frames that snapped off if you slammed the doors too hard and we were all rambunctious kids so they’d break a month after replacement , the grumpy old men in charge decided we must have liked the cold air ’cause they only replaced them once or twice , the heater didn’t work anyway so we froze our butts off in it .

    One day in summer down by the upper lake , Scully opened the passenger side door and it fell off , the rusty hinges gave up ~ the fix was simple : close the door and lock it , remove the inside handle , fixed .
    Once spring when it was time for the annual safety inspection , Harris tack welded the socks back on and limped it down the Highway into town on the shoulder @ 15 ~ 20 MPH or so , got the inspection sticker and headed back , by the time it was parked next to the barn again , the shocks were broken off again .

    These were slow but tough as nails trucks , sadly even here in sunny So. Cal. they rust out by the gas tank as it’s poorly designed and holds dirt , sand or whatever forever , _forcing_ it to rust .

    Agreed , this one looks too good to be scrapped , the engine looks suspiciously clean and shiny .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesertcat-Rereading your post I noticed the part about your father’s hand-me-down vehicles which is similar to what I went through. Mine was a Roman Red 62 Chevy II 300 four door with Powerglide and AM radio. It went through 2 older brothers when it was new and by the time I started to drive it it was 8 years old. My father was very thrifty so I had to patch up the headline which I painted with white and cut out happy faces and glued them to the ceiling. I patched the floor board with a piece of metal which would make a buckling sound when I went from the accelerator to the brake. I kept that car waxed up (original enamel paint but in like new shape). It had a red interior which I bought a tweed red front seat cover from Western Auto to cover the worn and split seats. I have fond memories of that car. I used 40 weight recycled motor oil because the oil would leak out of the rear main bearing. The heavy oil slowed the leaks down and in Houston it was warm enough to get by with the heavy oil. The 196 ci straight 6 was surprisingly smooth. The car actually looked good with very little rust and the original paint which I waxed every 3 months.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Jeff S, your comment brought a smile to my face. Your story could have been my story.

      My dad was a dirt-poor immigrant from Portugal in 1946 and didn’t even have a pot to p!ss in when he came to America. But he worked hard and took everything out on the installment plan, especially cars.

      I have four younger brothers and two sisters and the rule of the ‘house’ was that we would look out for one another, no fighting about cars, share rides, etc., and that we would maintain the cars so they would last for the next person to inherit it. Either that or hoof it.

      I was the oldest so whatever car my dad replaced went to me first, although sometimes I would get my mom’s car, like that ’62 Falcon we had, when she got a new one. That was one of the cars my dad bought brand new, six cylinder, three on the tree.

      When I joined the Air Force in 1965 he sent me off with a 1960 Mercury Montclaire, with the (4-bbl) 430 in it and NO Air conditioning, since it was a Huntington Beach, CA car that never needed air conditioning that close to the Pacific Ocean. Besides, AC was a luxury back then, and he had bought it used from a private party.

      Our family’s cars were never fancy and some were bought used, some were bought new. With the money I made working part-time at my HS Cafeteria as a Sophomore I bought a ’49 Buick Straight 8 with Fluid Drive from a HS senior, for 300 bucks IIRC, when I got my license.

      I doctored it up up and kept it running all through HS, and then my younger brother inherited it for his stint in HS, while the car he had been driving went to the next younger brother, and so on.

      That system worked so well that I adopted it for my own use with all the kids that grew up in my household between 1980-1996. And we had a bunch. Not all ours, but we had a bunch. That’s why I kept expanding the house we built here in 1980, adding rooms, bathrooms and additions.

      My wife and I had three boys and one girl of our own, but we also raised her niece who got knocked up in Chicago and got an abortion in a Ciudad Juarez, Mexico, Hospital we paid for; plus we raised the son from one of my wife’s cousins in Germany, and the daughter of another one of my wife’s cousins in Germany, and the son of one of my cousins in Portugal and the son of another one of my cousins in Portugal.

      So transportation was always critical for us because we live in the High Desert of Southcentral New Mexico, 26 miles from the nearest town and schools.

      And the story repeats today. Now we have a 21-year old grand daughter from my oldest son living with us, and also the 16-year old grand daughter from our only daughter, and they each need wheels. Hence the Elantra for the 21-year old and the Highlander for the 16-year old, Mom’s Grand Cherokee and my Tundra; and the need to store two 55-gallon drums of Premium Unleaded gasoline on the premises. We burn some serious gas!

      You’re probably wondering, “why are these kids not living with their own parents?” That is too long a story to get into here and this is not the venue, except to say, regardless of reasons, they each need wheels to get to school/college/work, etc.

      You gotta do what you gotta do, and my dad with his hand-me-downs-idea had the right idea although his family in Portugal never owned a car of their own, ever.

      We see, we adapt, we overcome. Whatever works.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        You Sir ;

        Define what ‘ assimilate and prosper ‘ means in America .

        Kudos to you for not turning your back on those who came behind you .

        -Nate

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        @HDC….”We see, we overcome. Whatever works” How true.

        I hope you don’t mind , but I just wrote those words down in my Day timer/diary. Without going into details, the last couple of years have been tough. The future is only going to get tougher. Those words are very inspiring.

        You know how they say ” when the going gets tough…..” I guess I better get going.
        Thanks
        Michael

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Mikey, I don’t mind. In fact, I encourage all people to seek a way to enrich their own lives as well as the lives of the ones they love. If that can be done through the words of others, even better.

          What I am vehemently opposed to is the total dependence on handouts and “freebies” that the current US Government seems to encourage, which as a matter of fact, also includes….. cars, specifically EVs/PEVs and Hybrids with the tax incentives and tax payer-funded subsidies.

          Compared to the heyday of when Scouts freely roamed the earth, the current crop of cars and trucks may be more refined and emasculated, but they’re sure not as earthy and grunty as those Scouts of yesteryear or their peers, like the old Broncos, Cherokees, and Wagoneers.

          I understand about things being “tough” having also experienced some rough patches with me and mine on both the health and financial fronts.

          But what ultimately carried the day was to tackle the challenges one challenge at a time, one step at a time, one day at a time.

          Once you get that sorted out and apply it to your own life you gain a new perspective.

          And it works equally well when buying cars or whatever.

          When I bought my Wife’s Grand Cherokee I was fully prepared to walk away from the deal because I told the sales manager, “You tell me what you need to sell it for, and I’ll either buy it or decline.” If at first I had not succeeded, I would have pressed on to other things, other dealers.

          Amazingly enough, without haggling and without p!ssing and moaning the guy shot me a price I could live with, almost $4K off MSRP. First shot! And everybody was happy.

          The slogan “We see, we adapt, we overcome” came from my two sons when they were Marine Corps Infantry Officers with 3/7 at Camp Pendleton, CA, many years ago.

          They each have a 16″ plaque commemorating their days in the USMC that features the Marine Corps emblem with these words underneath it.

          I’m sure it still serves as an inspiration to them as well, to this day.

          • 0 avatar
            Hummer

            God bless you.

            This my friends, is what makes America great.

          • 0 avatar
            mikey

            @HDC…. I guess it an age thing. I agree, vehicles today are way more advanced,and sophisticated. I remember those Scouts quite well. Yes, and the Broncos and Jeeps. Even in our harsh climate, properly maintained, you could get years, and years of service.

            I own three cars,and my wife no longer drives. If I ever buy another vehicle. I will dump all three of them, and buy a long box Chevy with 4×4 smallest V8 I can get and A/C. No other options. I think I’d be a happy to drive that till they take my license away.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            mikey, a long box 4×4 Chevy with sidesteps for easier access is the choice of many. It’s a go-anywhere, anytime vehicle. If a person can only have one vehicle, a truck is the way to go. A four-door 4×4 truck is the ultimate all-purpose vehicle.

            Now they even have engine and cylinder management to help save on gas for the gingerly-footed. I was born with a lead foot.

            My ’88 Silverado, the first-ever new V8/automatic truck I ever owned, was an ExtCab LongBed 2WD with the 350 and it served me long, and it served me well (1998-2011) before being replaced.

            It’s still serving the Mexican guy I sold it to, South of the Border.

            Some time ago I wrote about people aging and ultimately buying their “last” car or truck. My generation is also beginning to drop like flies in a Raid factory.

            The brute, grunty vehicles of the past, like the Scout, played a huge role in my life’s experiences, and maintaining them was just par for the course.

            Now that I’m too old for that, suffer from spinal compression due to years of abuse by cars and motorcycles of their day, I’ll look at Scouts and remember the fun we had with them, and then snap back to reality and look for totally different things, (not luxuries), I want in my current or next vehicle, as we progress to that last and final vehicle purchase.

            It’s gotta have Air. It’s gotta have Cruise. And it must have a fully adjustable driver seat so both my wife and I will be able to drive it.

            Regardless of what a man decides to drive, and I have my own favorites, the bottom line remains that it has to work for them. Not someone else.

            That’s why Buick, Avalon, the Chrysler 300 and maybe even the new 2014 Impala, should remain very popular with the aging buyers, as well as trucks.

            At 67 I’m not quite at the threshold of buying my final vehicles but I see others around my age getting there ahead of me.

            We discuss cars and trucks at our gatherings and poker-playing nights, and the opinions of what works for each differs as much as it does in the ttac comments.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesertcat-My older brother bought a black 4 1949 door Buick Roadmaster with a straight 8 and 3 on the tree as a second car in 1965 for $150 after having his first child. Since it was long and black we called it Warren’s limo. These stories bring back some good memories. Many of today’s kids tell their parents what cars to buy and expect a new or very nice late model car. I was just happy to have a set of wheels and doing the maintenance on the family vehicle was a good deal for me and for my father. If my father need the car I would ride the bus to school. I had classmates that bought 442s, Roadrunners, Mustangs, and Camaros and worked night jobs to pay for them. I saw one of those guys sacking groceries who had to sell his 442 to get a VW. He said he wished he would have gone to college instead of spending money on a car. I am glad I got my college education and now I can afford whatever vehicle I want. I learned some life long lessons from my parents which you cannot put a price on. I also learned a lot from my grandfather who was a farmer in N KY. He was an honorable man who kept his word and was a true role model. I refer to my grandparents as the Norman Rockwell grandparents, I could not have had any better grandparents.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      My wife and I are trying very hard to be there for our kids and grand kids because in today’s America a kid needs every assist they can get just to stay ahead of their competition.

      There were times when my wife and I bled green, I mean like all we had left was a couple of bucks between us in the checking account, all because we wanted our kids to have every advantage that would allow them to be successful in any and all endeavors they chose to pursue.

      They still had to compete, but they weren’t held back by anything either. If they made it, they made it on merit alone.

      It’s like when we used our Scouts and Wranglers to go mudding, back in the eighties. It wasn’t unusual to shatter hubs or snap half-shafts and even break differentials and transfer cases when you beat those machines to a pulp trying to go as fast as you can around the mud track.

      That was part of the cost of growing up, experiencing the lateral things in life, like competition, winning and losing, away from the workplace.

      And our philosophy continues to this very day, each time that we do something that drains our bank account to support one of our kids or grandkids.

      My wife and her dad recently bought a home in El Paso, TX, for our daughter who was going through personal problems with her ex-husband, and a move from CA to take a new job in El Paso.

      It’s too deep a subject to go into here and this is about cars, not sidebars into the real world of life and all its ignominies.

      But the bottom line is that I am very fortunate that I am able to do what I do, even at great personal expense to me.

      You can always make more money, but you can’t ever make more time or revisit wasted opportunities. You only pass this way one time!

      Seriously!

  • avatar
    -Nate

    Of course , now that I read this article , there’s a decent 1971 IHC Scout II on craignslist in the IE , it has the I6 engine , a much better choice .

    Not too rusty and only asking $1,000 .

    I bought an old Motocycle instead .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The 258 is not a better choice, it is a very bad choice. They do not get any better MPG than the 304 and since they decided to offer that engine in the Scout II really late in the developement the engine mounts are not properly engineered. They well onto the corner of the frame tube and every single one I’ve ever seen was cracking and destroying the frame. IH V8 all the way, I only buy one with a 6cyl for parts rigs.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’m not sure if anyone can answer this for me or not…

    But was IHC’s V8 a purpose-built light truck design or taken from the tractor line?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The SV or Small V as IH called the 266, 304, 345 and 392 engine family was a purpose built Medium Duty truck engine though they did stick the 345 in a few Combines. That is a big reason that they are sooo heavy, starting at ~750lbs, and also why they will do 500K since they are intended to move Loadstars, School buses ect. With the right combination of the rest of the drive line the 392 in a Loadstar was rated for a GVW of over 60K so moving around 4K worth of Scout it is seriously under stressed.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Good post highdesertcat. I enjoyed reading it. I am younger than you by a little. I am 61 going on 62 in February. My needs have changed as well and my body is not what it use to be. As Mae West said, “gettin’ old ain’t for sissies.” I do like the comforts of air, cruise, and heated seats. I also like a vehicle that requires less maintenance.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yeah, those “Golden” years I heard so much about…..

      Now I understand why my dad made all those ‘old man’ noises when he rolled out of bed each morning. I’m making those same noises today.

      My mom and dad spent almost two years with us, on and off, when I was stationed in Germany with the US military. They visited and stayed with many of my mom’s relatives in Germany for weeks at a time and my dad’s relatives in Portugal for weeks at a time, and then with us for a week or so before heading off to somewhere in Europe.

      That’s why I bought that tax-free ’72 Mercedes 220D at Schiphol, NL. It was bought with my dad’s money and registered in my name on post so I could buy Esso Diesel coupons for it at considerable savings at the Post Exchange.

      But when my parents stayed with us I always heard those old man noises when he rolled out of bed. Age takes its toll.

      Like I said, we all have our favorite vehicles, and I certainly have my favorites, but ultimately, whatever a person buys has to work for them.

      We can each extol on the virtues of our own favorite brands but opinions differ. I respect that. Others not so much.

      The vehicles I have in mind for my “last” vehicles are a 4×4 SUV/CUV for the wife (maybe a 2015/2016 Sequoia) and a 4-door 4X4 truck for me with the biggest V8 I can buy in that model line.

      In the worst case scenario if CAFE standards and EPA mandates destroy the large V8 category in half-tons, I’ll have to step up to a 3/4-ton.

      I would love to have another F250 V10 4-door 4×4 in the XLT trim, with running boards. Even more than another 5.7 Tundra half-ton.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        LOL ! .

        I’m not yet retired and I think the ” golden ” part is really rust or summat as I have non ending chronic pain too , I figure this is the result of a life well lived , I hope your folks felt the same .

        When it’s bad , I _can’t_ get out of bed to go to work .

        -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Nate wrote: “I hope your folks felt the same ”

          Yes they did! They both recognized that they had truly miraculous lives considering that my dad came to the US from post-war Portugal and my mom came to the US from pre-war Germany.

          Both of them came here legally, each sponsored by a different Ecumenical Council of Churches.

          When they teamed up, the sky was the limit! And their work ethic lives on in their kids, grand kids and great-grand kids.

  • avatar
    ICARFAN

    Had one of these in the family, even powder blue, but with a different stripe. V-8 and 4-speed all restored or rebuilt, canvas top and roll bar. Loved it for off-roading and top down cruising in the summer. But while driving it on vacation I got stuck in a traffic jam and working that clutch for 45 minutes in stop and go traffic was enough for me not to buy it when it was sold. So these basically are a redneck convertible for me, nice for the weekends, but not a good daily driver.

  • avatar
    JD MAINT

    drove one on the farm as a teenager in the 70′s the dang thing out climbed almost any other vehicle on the farm including the old K-5 Blazer. I tried to drive it threw a brick wall once after an argument with my dad but the whole wall fell down. I scratched the paint a little. on the old beast. I was tring to prove the point an Old timer told me, “you could drive them things threw a brick with barely a scratch.”


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