By on July 17, 2014

TTAC-2014_Ram-EcoDiesel-front (1)

Although diesel and pickups go together smoothly in our minds, this is the first light-duty diesel-powered pickup truck available in our market since before I was born.

I wasn’t born yesterday.

TTAC-2014_Ram-1500-EcoDiesel-Laramie

The Ram to which I’ve been granted the keys over the last number of days features the enticing new 3.0L turbocharged diesel engine, but it’s also a four-wheel-drive, Laramie-trimmed, crew cab-bodied pickup with a vast array of options.

It isn’t just a pickup. It’s a luxury limo, a work truck, a fuel miser, an all-weather traveller, a style statement, a secure vault, and a family car.

You don’t need your Ram EcoDiesel to be a $70,090 (CDN) Laramie model like the one Chrysler Canada sent me. A Quad Cab will perhaps suffice for those without rear-facing child seats. The V6 diesel is available in trims other than Ram’s high-end Laramie model. You won’t be required to tick off all the checkboxes on the options sheet. And though the new engine can take over a review, the Ram 1500 is good enough that the diesel isn’t the only positive part of the experience.

TTAC-2014_Ram-EcoDiesel-badging
The 240-horsepower V6 diesel generates 420 lb-ft of torque at just 2000 rpm. Not at all unlike other diesels, there’s still a moment of hesitation when the throttle is first applied, during which the owner of a Hemi-engined Ram will say to himself, “I ain’t sure she’s got enough pies in the oven.” Thankfully that moment is brief, and the swell of torque enjoyed when overtaking on a rural two-lane is something Pentastar Ram owners ought to try at least once.

The diesel doesn’t deserve full credit. It works in conjunction with an excellent 8-speed automatic. You’re always in the right gear, and the next gear is only a blink away. Together, they make for a tremendously refined powertrain. There’s a hint of dieselly clatter when manouevring in tight spots, back and forth in a nine-point turn. (Thank-you to the Elantra and Civic drivers in Herring Cove, Nova Scotia, who boxed me in. I needed my father’s help to direct me out, which wasn’t embarrassing at all in front of my wife and mother.) But overall, this diesel has been forcefully silenced with enough sound deadening to hush a crowd of guffawing fishermen.

Better yet, the Ram diesel doesn’t use very much fuel, not by pickup truck or even large crossover standards. In the real world, where I can fill the tank, measure the distance travelled, and then calculate consumption by re-filling the tank, the Ram used 13% more fuel than its onboard computer led me to believe. Yet at 20.1 mpg, in mostly urban driving, we used 9% less fuel than we did in a 5.3L V8-engined GMC Sierra tester last fall, and that Sierra was driven mostly on the highway. (We also used 16% less fuel in this diesel Ram than we did in the Pentastar V6 Ram last summer.)

Then again, for American customers, the EcoDiesel is a $2850 option on this Laramie model, over and above the Hemi V8 and $4000 more than the 3.6L V6.

The premium might not matter as much once you start driving the EcoDiesel, once you see how slowly the fuel gauge needle falls, once you solidify your long-held belief that Truck = Diesel. With our family of three in the cabin, a cooler full of sandwiches and chips and pop in the bed, and Ramboxes full of hoodies and blankets, we picked up my parents for a picnic on a hill high atop the ocean outside the city. But we were hardly consuming any fuel, relative to other pickup trucks, so without a moment’s thought we extended our journey from York Redoubt to three different coves and one little harbour.

That’s the kind of freedom that, once paid for on transaction day, diesel owners enjoy throughout the rest of their ownership period. You don’t convince yourself of the long-term financial benefits of a sunroof, and you shouldn’t need to establish the economic advantages of this diesel, either.
Regardless of the engine under the hood, Ram’s crew cab body, like the full-fledged four-doors from Ford and GM and Toyota, is huge inside. Stretch-out-your-legs huge. The bed is shortened, but the available leg room and under-seat storage is truly luxurious whether the seats are leather-clad or sheathed in cloth. It won’t be long until the feature count of a high-priced premium vehicle of today will underwhelm, but space will always equal luxury.

TTAC-2014_Ram-1500-Ecodiesel-Laramie-rotary-shifter
Two-tone paint, heated leather seating up front, dual-zone climate control, and Chrysler’s big 8.4-inch UConnect are key Laramie features. It also says Laramie three times inside and once outside. (This Laramie badging tags along with four “Ram” mentions outside and eight inside, the Ram logo which appears twice outside and once inside, and just two exterior “EcoDiesel” badges, both of which the truck-loving teens on our street felt were the exact opposite of truckish toughness.)
Our test truck, optioned quite nicely by Chrysler Canada’s PR department, included numerous expensive options, which in U.S. speak would cost $1295 (RamBoxes, which we used on a couple occasions for big grocery loads), $1695 (air suspension, which with 5 modes can be rather useful), $995 (power sunroof), $500 (leather buckets), $600 (side steps), and then more than $4000 in smaller options. Plus the diesel powerplant.

The seats won’t massage, the sunroof isn’t panoramic, there’s no blind spot monitoring or adaptive cruise or even a soft-opening tailgate. By the standards of $70,000 luxury cars, this is under-equipped. But it’s still luxury living, particularly when one considers the flexibility of the package.
I remain convinced that by a small margin, Ram offers the best-handling pickup truck lineup. This is most noticeable when encountering the expansion joints of an overpass mid-corner, where the Ram will feel perfectly normal and other trucks skitter, even if only a little. Yet by an equally small margin, the structure of GM’s new trucks feel stronger and more solid, and the overall sensation is of the superior work truck. (This sensation was clarified during back-to-back drives on an off-road course at an event sponsored by, yes, GM.)

We’re hair-splitting now though, and it would surprise me if the new F-150 isn’t the superior truck in most aspects. At least until the Ford’s competitors receive their own updates. And so the cycle goes.

TTAC-2014_Ram-EcoDiesel-Laramie-interior (1)

I prefer the Sierra/Silverado’s rear seat design; the wider availability of F-150 configurations locally available to me; the simplicity of Ram’s UConnect; the exterior design of the Ram; the silence of a Sierra’s cabin; a column shifter rather than the Ram’s rotary dial; the upcoming Ford’s freshness. The Ram’s touch screen needs to be canted more toward the driver, the fuel gauge should be larger, the dual glove compartments aren’t that large, there’s no built-in helper to enable jumps into the bed.

But it’s easy to see why Ram is picking up market share. The aluminum-intensive 2015 F-150 aside, Chrysler has brought Ram to the forefront of truck awareness by offering us things other truck makers aren’t providing, most notably in the form of the 8-speed automatic and this light duty V6 diesel.

With Ram offering the power we require and the fuel efficiency we dreamed of, do we really need to measure the trivial interior quality differences, the slight towing capacity disparities, and the narrow pricing discrepancies?

A diesel engine might just negate arguments that aren’t typically settled in the Ram’s favour. Especially since, where I live, diesel costs 20 cents less per gallon.

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57 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2014 Ram 1500 Ecodiesel...”


  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    If I ever shopped for a truck, this one would be at the top of my list – just not the $70k version, not even close.

    • 0 avatar
      VA Terrapin

      You can’t directly compare Canadian to U.S. prices. Prices for cars and trucks sold in Canada are always thousands higher than prices in America.

      Besides, the Laramie has a lot more upscale comfort and appearance features than lower priced versions (leather, dual zone climate, chrome wheels, etc.).

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        I missed the CDN reference in the story – thanks. Even still, I think the EcoDiesel option is the most important one I’d want – not all the other bling.

      • 0 avatar
        rpn453

        I wouldn’t call those chromed-plastic clad Laramie wheels an appearance feature! Strange that they didn’t spend the extra on making them a nice polished aluminum like they did with the Sport. Even the optional wheels on the Outdoorsman have a much more premium look compared to those shiny plastic monstrosities.

        My buddy recently picked up his custom-ordered, nicely optioned 2014 Sport crew cab with a Hemi and 8-speed transmission for around CDN$41k plus taxes. Basically $10k off MSRP is the going rate. He wasn’t willing to bet on the diesel being as trouble-free as the proven design of the Hemi in the long run. Yes, it does have dual zone climate and heated seats and steering wheel. He skipped the leather though as the aftermarket has better leather available for less money!

  • avatar
    PeteRR

    I was talking to a salesman while the Challenger was getting it’s oil changed and in theory you can get the V-6 diesel in a single cab/short bed configuration now.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    That is a staggering amount of money.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Who is the competition? Definitely not Toyota or Nissan.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      I feel like you can’t really appreciate the Light-Duty Diesel in a $70k autojourno special – they’d never do it, but put an absolute stripper in the fleet and use it to actually move stuff other than people and camping supplies around.

      Mind you, not that 90% of private truck buyers in the US ever bother to do that. I just don’t really see the appeal of 1. a Diesel 2. in a truck 3. with wood and brushed trim.

      Stupid Texas truck market…

  • avatar
    billfrombuckhead

    The Ram is also extremely quiet but the ride is far superior to GM and Ford.

    After incentives, a Ram Quad Cab can be bought for around $30,000 with 305 hp Pentastar V6, 8speed and 25hwy mpg

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “this is the first light-duty diesel-powered pickup truck available in our market since before I was born.”

    Apparently you’re under 20. GM offered diesels in the half-ton pickups and SUVs up to 1996.

    youtube.com/watch?v=uZ–JeAE-mo

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Can we assume that when Ram references the “light duty” part of this first-since-the-late-70s equation, which I repeated perhaps too vaguely, they’re referring to both the light duty (half-ton) truck and the light duty nature of the diesel, V6 rather than V8? I should better remember the 90s GM 6.5L diesels, we had one in the family.

    • 0 avatar
      tooloud10

      I’ve never seen a GM half-ton diesel pickup or SUV ever, and I sure can’t find any reference to them ever existing at all. They definitely put the diesel in the 3/4-ton model, and those things are all over.

  • avatar
    VA Terrapin

    I always wondered why diesel wasn’t popular with light duty pickup trucks, even before today’s tougher emissions standards. A lot of pickup trucks are owned by commercial fleets or small business owners. You would think fuel economy would be a big deal to them. A lot of pickup trucks carry lots more stuff than light passenger cars carry, so the added torque of a diesel would be appreciated, while the loss of horsepower wouldn’t be a big deal because who races in a pickup truck anyway?

    Even with the diesel price premium both with emissions controls and at the pump, a diesel pickup truck might still be worth it if you haul lots of stuff on a consistent basis. After all, who complains about spending more money to buy a more powerful, safer or luxurious car?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Even with the diesel price premium both with emissions controls and at the pump, a diesel pickup truck might still be worth it if you haul lots of stuff on a consistent basis.”

      It’s really not worth the money. A turbodiesel is more expensive to make, more expensive to maintain and the power advantage really doesn’t come into play at the loads these trucks are expected to bear, and when you do need to haul those kinds of loads, you’re better served by a super-duty chassis anyways.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Commercial fleets are abandoning diesels in their pickups because a gas engined version is cheaper overall. In the article on Ram starting to use SAE towing rating standards it is noted that you can’t buy the big Hemi in the 3500 DRW pickup but you can get them in the 3500, 4500, and 5500 cab and chassis. The reason you can get the Hemi in those version is because many fleet buyers won’t consider a diesel anymore. For the same reason Ford it offering the V10 in F650 and F750.

      Yes there was a time when the diesel’s better mpg payed off in the long run. However the current premium for diesel fuel in the US, the reduced fuel economy of the diesel that has to meet current emissions standards has negated any savings on fuel so you are left with a vehicle that cost more to purchase, maintain and repair.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        This ^

        And I really hope this will cause the resurgence of the Big block.
        A modern big block could do 80-90% of what the diesel could for 1/4 the entrance price(engine option price that is), an extremely more reliable engine with very little maintence costs after purchase, and 70-80% the fuel economy of modern diesels.

      • 0 avatar
        Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

        Diesels also tended to be more robust and reliable, but if emissions stuff and common-rail injectors have dinged that then the calculus could very well change. Plus, global demand has kept diesel too expensive lately, I remember when its pricing would predictably peak at about as much as premium in winter (competing vs. home heating oil) and at or even below regular in summer. Now the summer valley is around the cost of mid-grade and the winter peak peaks even higher.

      • 0 avatar
        AJ

        My brother’s company supplied work truck is a 2013 Hemi Ram (2WD). He’s commonly getting 25 mpg + with mixed driving. He previously had a Ford and two Chevy pickups, and thinks this Ram is the best truck yet. He was frankly surprised.

        Oh, and his truck will have 200,000 miles on it in about 6 years.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @VA Terrapin – big fleets want cheapest purchase price first and foremost. They don’t usually care about mpg. They will never recuperate the cost of the diesel because fleet trucks tend to live short hard lives (at least the one’s in my part of Northern BC do)

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Big fleets want lowest total cost of ownership. That is why they bought diesels in the past. Yes they were more up front but the lower operating cost and the fact that diesels held their value well made up for it. Now diesels do not have lower operating costs (in the US) so fleets are going for gas or more and more CNG.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Scoutdude – I live in Northern BC Canada and big fleets here have never purchased diesels unless they are in chassis cab trucks with heavy work bodies. That would be 1 ton and larger.
          Trucks do not live long enough to get a return on investment. My brother gets a new truck every 2-3 years. They used to replace at 100,000 km (62,500 miles) but the bean counters made them stretch to 160,000 km (100,000 miles). At that mileage most of the trucks in the hands of field operations are completely beat to death and have to be sold “as is where is/you tow away”.
          His driving is primarily on gravel industrial roads.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    One point not often brought up is that, if you want a cheap truck that seats four or more, the Ram (and the Tacoma, fwiw) is the only choice. At least in Canada, Ford and GM don’t offer base-trim or near-base-trim access- or quad-cab models.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      GM offers the base 4 door truck (from what I saw) in the US, unfortunately its priced over 30k with the 6 cyclinder and 2wd. So not really at a price people in many fleets would be willing to pay.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Ford has offered a SuperCrew in the XL base trim since 2008, and a SuperCab base model since…at least 1982 (had to go and check the brohure). I can’t speak for GM, but I do know our local highway dept. has an ’07 Silverado WT crew cab. Of course, this may all be moot since the Canadian models could be completely different.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Drzhivago138- XLT is the base SuperCrew available in Canada. You can get XL in regular cab or extended cab.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        As far as I can tell—in Canada—Ford makes you add a whopping $13K to base, or $33K, to step up to the quad-cab; GM asks a little less, but is still over $30K. You have to take a bunch of options with both, as well. No strippers.

        Chrysler will let you have a 4×2 Ram 1500 in either access or quad-cab form in base trim. Only the Tacoma is cheaper, and it’s pretty cramped in the back unless you opt for the crew cab (which requires you take 4×4, which requires the V6, at which point you’re well over the price of the Ram).

        I would probably, if it were my money, get the 4×2 Tacoma, but it would be a hard choice.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @psarhjinian – Ford Canada does not offer a SuperCrew in any trim package less than an XLT.
          If one goes to Ford.ca and pulls up an XLT 4×4 this is how the pricing breaks out:
          reg cab – 26,740
          Ext cab – add 2,850
          Crew cab – add 5,750

          Ram will allow you to spec a crewcab in ST trim.
          GM also allows you to get base trim in a crewcab.

          Who buys a base model truck other than fleets?

          4×2 – only if you live in a good climate.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      For what it’s worth, I just priced out Canuck variants of each of the 3, pretty much as base as possible (I think I went with the V8 across the board since it appears to be the cheapest option in the Ram ST now), and for both double/quad and crew cab versions, the Ram seemed to come out most expensive. Ford won’t do a SuperCrew XL (although you can for the extended cab), but the XLT F-150 still comes in for less than the crew Ram ST.

      That said, the Ram seems best at hiding its cheapness, so that might account for something.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Maymar – I have noticed the same thing. It depends on package options. It pays to shop around and stick to trims that are the most popular. The majority of F150′s I see are SuperCrew XLT’s with the STX package. In the USA the STX package is a stand alone trim but in Canada it is an upgrade to the XLT base trim. It would be comparable to the Convenience and Appearance packages available for the XLT in the US.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    I expect to see a few of these at the county fair this year, and a lot more next year. A diesel with a quasi-luxury interior that can (gasp!) haul a stock trailer. Or haul someone’s camper or the trailer for their race car. The interwebz expert will rail on about the cost of diesel, extra maintnenace, what really is the 3,847th digit of pi, ahould’ve got a heavy-duty dually, etc. Those who haul appropiate things and enjoy having their their families in comfort and safety will be buying and driving these.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      The RAM Ecodiesel is tow-rated at 9,600 lbs, less than some of the other RAM half-tons with the V-8, which go up a little over 10,000 lbs.

      More important, because all of the RAM half tons have the lowest cargo capacity of any half-tons, by the time you add the tongue weight of the trailer (typically 10-15% of the trailer weight) and the weight of a few passengers, you’ve just about maxed out the cargo capacity of the vehicle.

  • avatar
    jdash1972

    The 15% premium in the price of diesel plus the premium charged for the engine option negates the diesel engine as a cost saving measure. Buy the diesel because you simply want it, just like you buy a truck you don’t really need in the first place, just because you want it.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      It could theoretically break even over a loooong period of time, but yes, a majority of EcoDiesels will be sold to those who “just” want a 1/2-ton diesel, and a majority of those buyers probably buy a new truck every 2 years anyway.

  • avatar
    jjf

    That ridiculously huge front center arm rest is just begging for a bench seat. Safety standards probably discourage it, but it would be nice if a huge crew cab could hold as 6 passengers like an old k car could.

    Can pickups be still be ordered with benches?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Yes, and they always will. Even if it’s on a stripped-out fleet model no-one buys, they will always be offered (mostly because no one wants to advertise a full-size truck that only seats 2 people, F-150 Tremor notwithstanding).

      Personally, I’ve made it a principle not to buy any full-size pickup or SUV without a front bench. Even if it never gets used for seating, a flip-down console is just better. You don’t buy a vehicle that wide and not put in three-passenger seating up front.

      This is one of those really weird market changes, in that people aren’t buying benches mostly because they don’t want them, or rather they’re just not offered on the high-end trim levels (nothing higher than Lariat, Laramie or LTZ has anything besides a giant console). No governmental safety regulations play into it. But that’s all okay, since I’d never buy any higher than a mid-range (XLT, SLT, LT) anyway.

      Part of it might be because the average buyer of 2014 is significantly more…robust than the buyer of a 1984 K-car. But even then, ChryCo advertising 6-passenger seating in the Reliant with 6 smiling adults–you could see the false happiness in their eyes. No 6 adults would want to ride in a K-car cross-country.

      • 0 avatar
        jjf

        I checked the configurator and indeed you can get the a stripped lowest trim level(Tradesman) with in crew cab, front bench, and a diesel. All this for the bargain sum of $40K. There is a already a 3K rebate in my region.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          3K on all Ecodiesel Rams or just select trims that no one wants, like the Tradesman? Either way it sort of negates those claims of “it’s already sold out” “they are selling quicker than they come into dealers” ect.

          • 0 avatar
            jjf

            It included the 3K rebate in the car I configured so I think it applies to all.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Scoutdude – I wanted to test drive one. The local dealer told me that they were hot sellers and the only way would be to put a $500 deposit on one. I declined and a week later they called and said they had a few on the lot that I could come in to test drive………… the lying bastards.

            They did try their best to sell me a Pentastar Ram. It had decent power and shifted smoothly except into first at a light. Twice the thing shifted down so rough that it sent a noticeable shudder through the truck.
            The tailgate rattled like it was full of marbles when I drove a few 100 feet down a dirt access road.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            @Lou, that is crazy that they tried to get you to put a deposit down to test drive a truck, never heard of anything like that for that kind of vehicle. I’ve heard of them wanting some proof that you had the means to buy the car when it was something really expensive or was truly a limited production vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      Just flip it up if you want to use the center seat underneath. It becomes the seat back. That’s how it was on the previous generation, anyway.

      The previous center arm rest was even bigger, and more comfortable. Not sure why they trimmed it down a bit. I now have to lean farther over to use it. I can’t use the armrests on both sides comfortably at the same time anymore. They must have needed more space to accommodate obese people or something, because I have fairly broad shoulders. That big armrest was one of the things that made the passenger seat of the previous gen the best long road trip passenger seat I’ve experienced.

  • avatar
    downsizing

    A word or two on payload and tow rating would have been helpful.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @downsizing – the Ram Ecodiesel in a crew cab has one of the lowest cargo ratings in existence for a pickup. 1,233 lb for a base model short box crew 4×4 and 881 lb for the full bling Laramie. Towing is 8,750 lb for low end trim and 8,400 lb for Laramie full bling trim.

      I had high hopes for the Ecodiesel but 1,234 lb cargo in a base truck kills it for me. If I add any extra’s I’ll be down to 1,100 lbs.

      I weighed my tool box and off-road gear and it was a bit over 500 lb. You add a family, camping gear, my 12 ft. Lund and Johnson outboard I’m easily over 1,500 lbs.

      I’ve read reports about the Air Ride. It is great if you don’t run the truck too hard off-road or you’ll get suspension overheated warning lights and if you ignore them, limp home mode.

      I would of expected better mpg.

  • avatar
    Wraith

    I’m not really the market for a truck, but I am kind of curious about the EcoDiesel. I’d like to at least test drive it, in lower-priced trim.

    Was wondering about the air suspension option. (http://www.ramtrucks.com/en/ram_1500/capability/) The official page says it can raise/lower the truck to five different height settings, and can “automatically lower truck at highway speeds to help reduce drag and increase efficiency.”

    So if you were using it, say, for a daily commute, could you just leave it at the lowest height setting? And then change it when you needed it for towing/hauling? Is it like a few inches lower than a truck without the air suspension feature?

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I think it makes perfect sense. Diesels are for towing big loads, such as horse trailers or larger ski boats. Around 8,000 pounds are so. In the past, that was 3/4 ton country. The half tons are so brawny now that Dodges are right in that area for almost all of their half ton pickups.

    A guy who wants to pull a horse trailer or a slightly large boat but doesn’t want a 3/4 ton is going to have a good practical reason to get the diesel. $4,000 is a lot of money for the diesel, but as so many have pointed out its available in some of the lesser trims. I’d argue it makes more sense for most people than 4×4, which is about the same price.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    I think it makes perfect sense. Diesels are for towing big loads, such as horse trailers or larger ski boats. Around 8,000 pounds are so. In the past, that was 3/4 ton country. The half tons are so brawny now that Dodges are right in that area for almost all of their half ton pickups.

    A guy who wants to pull a horse trailer or a slightly large boat but doesn’t want a 3/4 ton is going to have a good practical reason to get the diesel. $4,000 is a lot of money for the diesel, but as so many have pointed out its available in some of the lesser trims. I’d argue it makes more sense for most people than 4×4, which is about the same price and hurts your mileage instead of helping it.

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      Jim your right on.. Add to that snowmobilers with enclosed trailers and people with RVs. Racers of all kinds who tow enclosed trailers, or the equivilant of pulling a billboard down the highway. Often more than moving the weight it is pushing the air out of your way when towing. The torque of a turbo diesel is perfect for this. This truck will steal sales from 3/4 ton diesels.

  • avatar
    Carrera

    This light duty Ram must have a severely limited production or selling like hotcakes, or combination of both. I did a quick cars.com search near my area ( town of 1 mil people) and all I could find were two vehicles, both crew cabs!! One was for 49K, the other for 56K.

  • avatar
    kkop

    I love our Ram and its legroom, but the lack of a telescoping steering wheel means my arms, long as they are, can’t reach the wheel when I adjust seat for my long legs. Ours is a basic Express model, but I don’t believe the telescoping wheel (that we do have on our Challenger) is available on any trim of the Ram.

  • avatar
    Fred

    My 1999 Silverado 5.3l get 19 mpg avg, so I’m not seeing the value of a diesel truck that only gets 1-2 mpg better considering diesel is close to premium around here.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      The Ecodiesel in this test pulled 20mpg in mostly urban driving. Is the 19mpg figure you quoted from your 5.3L highway or city? I’d be surprised if it is city.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Like fetch said, it’s unlikely that the two drive cycles being compared are similar. To know what you’d net in the Diesel Ram vs. your Silverado, you’d have to drive it under the same conditions. In my experience, 19mpg average in a 5.3L GM 1/2 ton indicates a bias toward highway usage. If that’s the case, the Ram diesel 1/2 ton will likely net closer to the 25 mpg mark.

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        You are all right I do mostly rural highway driving. When I did the math a few years ago 25 mpg gets me about a 5 year payback. Still after 16 years I would expect more economy from a 1/2 ton truck. Sorry, I’m disappointed in new trucks.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    If I spend that much on a truck, I wouldn’t want to put anything dirty in it anyway because I had just spent SEVENTY grand! Might as well get a fancy SUV.


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