By on April 10, 2014

21 - 1963 International Harvester Pickup Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinThere was once a time when you could buy street vehicles made by a farm equipment manufacturer, and IHC products still show up in self-service wrecking yards today. In this series so far, we’ve seen this ’70 Scout, this ’71 Travelall, this ’71 Scout, this ’72 1010 pickup, this ’73 Scout, and this ’74 Scout. The crew-cab Travelette is a machine you won’t see every day, so I shot this ’62 that I spotted in a Northern California wrecking yard.
01 - 1963 International Harvester Pickup Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinBeing a California truck, there’s minimal rust here, but 52 years of hard work have worn everything out.
04 - 1963 International Harvester Pickup Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinHere’s a good old Black Diamond 240-cubic-inch straight-six, rated at 141 horses in 1962. Yes, that’s not much more power than a 2014 Corolla gets; pickup drivers were tougher back when instant annihilation threatened.
14 - 1963 International Harvester Pickup Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinTwo huge bench seats, and a custom shag-carpet headliner.
26 - 1963 International Harvester Pickup Down On the Junkyard - Picture courtesy of Murilee MartinI’m a little puzzled by this bumper extension. Is this to protect the open tailgate when hauling extra-long loads?

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72 Comments on “Junkyard Find: 1962 International Harvester C-120 Travelette...”


  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Wow, this is the first 61-and-up Travelette I’ve seen with a 6′ stepside and not the 6′ Bonus-Load bed.

  • avatar
    Jimal

    I’d love a mid to late 60’s International pickup for weekend Home Improvement Center duties. I just love their simplicity and industrial nature. Old truck like this are an implement, not a status symbol.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      And of course, the inevitable comment on how today’s pickups are nothing more than compensation machines, and how terrible people are for buying something they like.

      FWIW, the Travelette had the shortest bed of any pickup truck when it first came out in ’57; 6 feet is substantially less than the 8 feet every Internet pickup driver insists is essential to actually doing work.

      IH was really an oddball when it came to bed sizes from ’57 all the way to ’68 with no less than 12 unique beds:
      -8′ Bonus-Load (straight-side)
      -8.5′ Bonus-Load
      -9′ one-ton stepside (Did they have any trademark name for this, or did they just call it “standard”?)
      -8.5′ stepside
      -7′ Bonus-Load
      -7′ stepside
      -And a 7′ “Custom” bed for the ’57 “Golden Anniversary” trucks,
      -plus 6′ versions of the last 3 beds for use on the Travelette.
      The super-short 6′ beds were later tacked on to a regular cab to make the “compact” C-900 (although here in the States we only got the stepside bed; you’d have to go north of the border to find a C-900 with a Bonus-Load).
      -Then the 900 series was upgraded to a 908, and that couldn’t have any existing bed, no sir. IH had to make two 6.5′ beds, just to be difficult.

      IH was also the only ones to offer RCSB 3/4 ton pickups, mostly because it was on the same frame as the 3/4 ton Travelall.
      Add to that the fact that you could theoretically order the heavy-1/2-ton 1100 series as a Travelette over 40 years before Ford’s F-150 SuperCrew, and you’ve got one weird company.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        HOW DO YOU KNOW all this?

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          My slightly Aspergian tendencies when it comes to research for a …project… I’m doing. The project started off as fun, but it’s quickly escalated into something else. There was a point where I needed to stop, and I’ve clearly passed it…but I’ll keep going and see what happens!

          Look for my work on Curbside Classic sometime in the future (I really don’t know when). This is not an advertisement/promo for CC, especially since the guys there don’t even know about my work yet.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            I eagerly await seeing this, some love of forgotten makes is always something I support.

            In fact, there’s an oooooold post on Curbside Classic already about a huge old IH truck…

            http://www.curbsideclassic.com/curbside-classics-american/curbside-classic-1966-international-r190-awd-truck-my-current-lust-object/

            Well, this is a re-post.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        “6 feet is substantially less than the 8 feet every Internet pickup driver insists is essential to actually doing work.”

        Well, I can’t speak for them, but I do know the sheet of expanded metal sheet I got a few weeks back was 4×8 feet, and 8 is a bigger number than 6…

        (But then I’d already thoroughly outgrown a 6′ bed before I got an 8′ … and I’m almost certainly an outlier.)

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          I think you misunderstand (my writing style can be confusing at times, and I don’t mean because you’re stupid or anything). My comment was a barb at those who immediately decry all modern pickups as compensation and not for “real” work because they don’t have a full 8′ bed. Meanwhile, in 1957, IH was making a 3-door (4-door in ’61) pickup with a 6′ bed–positively dinky for the times when you could get a 9′ bed on 1-ton trucks. Did that mean these were useless? Of course not.

          The real problem is one that’s actually not bad to have–within the past 20 years, cars have gotten so reliable that if you want a work truck, you can find a used one in good-enough condition for less than $10K, so why would you pay $25-30K for a brand-new work truck?

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The 1100 is not a “heavy” 1/2 ton it is the straight axle/4wd version of the 1/2 ton. The 1100 series trucks have the exact same starting GVW as the 1000 series trucks which had the torsion bar IFS. There were a number of 1/2ton crew cabs ordered over the years I’ve actually seen a IFS long bed Travelette but the majority of the 1/2 ton crew cabs were short beds.

        IH also offered 5,5′ beds in a couple of years on both regular cabs and Travelettes.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Unless you restore it, and then it becomes Grand Wagoneer status.

      • 0 avatar
        raresleeper

        Love the Grand Wagoneer, my man.

        BUT… is it wrong to love the last of the Grand Wagoneers MINUS the false wood appliques?

        I’m conflicted.

        This is subjective here, forgive me… the Travel-All is interesting, but still an ugly beast, unrestored/original or full frame off resto (although I wouldn’t mind a trusty Scout in my garage… it would still get old adjusting the carb every month or two, and dealing with sh*tty ignition points).

        But not nearly as ugly as the ’61-’64 Dodge D-Series. Who the hell thought America needed that thing? Ugly creature.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Why has the D-Series got so many fiddly details on it?!

          I think the restoration + rarity makes it cool. Though I like the Travelall Suburban 110 thing better. In orange or brown.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            I think the boys down at Gas Monkey Garage did one of those Dodge D’s as a project, with that weathered/aged paint job special.

            It was so hideous, it was charming. The performance mods more than made up for the overall ugliness.

            All other D trucks must burn at the stake. No exceptions.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Why suffer with points and a carb. Put modern fuel injection and electronic ignition on that bad boy.

          My ’74 Spitfire came with a Crane ignition setup on it when I bought it 18 years ago. I have changed the plugs a couple times, just because, but that is it. Of course it also has SU carbs, which once rebuilt correctly are absolutely bulletproof. I haven’t touched them other than to top up the damper oil in a decade.

          • 0 avatar
            raresleeper

            I haven’t tinkered with any carbed motors for 10 years.

            Last carbed car I had was a 72 Mustang. Had a Holley 750 double pumper with a 302 with a mild cam job.

            Was it overcarbeurated? Absolutely. Ran rich as could be.

            It did have an electronic ignition system, and I slapped a Mallory HighFire box on it.

            Again, I’ve had FI cars for the past 10 years. Haven’t looked back, either. :)

            EDIT: Man… really missin’ that fimiliar smell of a carbed car.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            The keys to SU carbs is making sure the throttle shaft bushings don’t leak air (either get new ones or make your own), metering needle wear, and main jet wear. Stay ahead of these three problems and they do indeed run like new and will run well indefinitely.

          • 0 avatar
            IPFreeley

            I don’t know about now, but there used to be a Weber-Dell’Orto single-carb conversion, at least for the 1275cc Spitfire and Midget engines. I had one on my MG, and it ran better than it ever did on the SU’s.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          It is a Travelall and no if you do it right you do not have to fiddle with the carb every month of two nor mess with points that frequently if you use quality parts.

          I haven’t touched the points in my 73 Scout with the CabTop in about 5 years. No it is not a daily driver it only goes about 3-4,000 miles per year. Every spring I do put the dwell meter on it after its annual oil change and other checks before it gets put into its heavy use season. The manual choke does need a little WD-40 every year to keep it easy to operate. It probably wouldn’t be so bad if I’d drive it more regularly throughout the year.

          My TravelTop equipped 72 Scout sees about twice the mileage per year and its points are about 3 years old and I haven’t touched its carb in a similar amount of time.

          • 0 avatar
            -Nate

            “Carburator” is a French word meaning : LEAVE IT ALONE ! =8-) .

            Seriously , once it’s cleaned and adjusted with a proper micronic paper element filter in front of it , they never , _EVER_ go out of adjustment .

            I’m working on a Midget 1275 C.C. engine right now , it’s in my 1961 Morris Minor , I know Dellortos are wonderful carbys having used them over the years , co$tly yes but you get every penny you pay for and then some .

            SU’s are the only true variable venturi carby and once tuned and balanced they’re fantastic , delivering both maximum power and vastly increased fuel economy as long as you keep your foot out of them .

            -Nate

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Does this yard sell complete vehicles? Does anyone know the yards number, seriously considering going through the trouble.. Looks good condition and they’re hard to find.

    • 0 avatar
      Battles

      Your success in locating this truck will depend when the photos was taken, some of them are very recent and some are months old when they appear here.

    • 0 avatar

      This truck is located at the Newark (California) Pick-N-Pull, and I shot the photos just over a week ago. It should be there still. However, PNP generally doesn’t sell whole vehicles once they’ve been put out on the yard.

    • 0 avatar
      stationwagonguy

      https://oklahomacity.craigslist.org/cto/4380065916.html

      Boom.

      As mentioned in the ad for this truck^, the bumper extension was something for a camper, apparently. I guess it was meant that if the camper stuck out farther than the bed, the bumper could be moved into place? Interesting, apparently factory.

    • 0 avatar
      namesakeone

      According to “Row 52″, it’s still there. http://row52.com/Search/?Year=1962&LocationId=0&ZipCode=&Distance=50&MakeId=150&ModelId=&Page=1

  • avatar
    I've got a Jaaaaag

    Interesting the Fuel filler is in in the front fender, where was the gas tank located on these trucks?

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      It had two gas tanks – one in the front and one in the rear with the fuel filler of the rear located on the driver’s side on the rear quarter panel.

      I bought one of these used from the Air Force that had been doing duty as a flightline truck. I liked International Harvester enough to buy a new top of the line 1971 TravelAll, and later used Scouts for the mud races.

      While I owned the six cylinder engine, and had the 345 in the Scouts, my favorite engine was the 392 in the TravelAll. However, as was common in those days, even these IHC products had lots of problems.

      I ended up selling the 1971 TravelAll and buying a 1972 Olds CustomCruiser to take overseas to Germany with me, because I did not want to be stuck overseas with a trouble-prone TravelAll and no support structure in place.

      • 0 avatar
        Joe McKinney

        The USAF used a bunch of International and Dodge crew cab pickups in the 1960’s and 1970’s. YouTube has some videos of period SAC drills which show the aircrews being driven to the flightlines in these trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          Their use of IH and Dodge wasn’t necessarily for any mechanical advantage in those vehicles, but because Ford wouldn’t offer a factory crew cab until 1965 and GM not until 1973. GM was always a Johnny-come-lately with their cabs; they didn’t even offer a full-sized extended cab pickup until 1988 (but when it came out, it was the largest extended cab until Dodge’s Quad Cab in 2002).

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The regular cab and Travelette had their cab located under the cab outside the frame rail. With the regular cab the main tank filler was behind the passenger side door. In the Travelette that wouldn’t work so it went in the front fender just like they put the aux tank on the Traveall. The aux tank on a regular cab pickup or Travelette had its filler in the driver’s side front fender and that tank was also located under the cab outside the frame rail. The Traveall had its main tank in the body behind the driver’s side rear wheel. I have at least one of all three versions.

  • avatar
    CarrollGardener

    Surely that bumper extension (and 2×6 wooden rails on the bed) are for a camper.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    So by the late 60s, was there any incentive to choose an IH over a GM/Ford truck item? Weren’t they less reliable? Less dealer support? Weird combos like this short-bed crew thing?

    I’m really surprised they weren’t purchased by Chrysler in the 70s. Seems like something they’d do.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      They were pretty easy to fix. I was an 18-yo kid living in an USAF barracks back then and I had NO problems finding parts, even carburetors, fuel and waterpumps.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      IH trucks were build for real work and a number of things were much more durable than they competition. Many of the components were designed to stand up in MD truck usage so they were way overkill in a pickup so they lasted a lot longer than the car based components used in the other pickups.

  • avatar
    Pan

    In my part of the country they were nick-named “Corn-binders”; but, I’m not sure why.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Because IH made combines as well?

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        Yes , IH & Case were combined for many years .

        -Nate

        • 0 avatar
          Drzhivago138

          As a farm kid, I have to step in here. A “Cornbinder” is an old piece of farm equipment (like, horse-drawn old) that would snap cornstalks at the base and bind them into a bundle. Use of the name to refer to IH pickups and trucks came from their agricultural roots AWA their reputation for being durable, if slightly outdated compared to Ford/GM/Dodge.

          J.I. Case and International Harvester were two separate companies until 1984, when they became Case-IH. (The 80’s were a hard time for even the largest of farm companies; everyone except John Deere got bought out, merged, or broken up.) By then, IH’s light-truck production had long since ceased.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Ford, Case, and John Deere survived as good or better than they started the decade, while International Harvester and White got bought out and Massey Ferguson got bailed out by the Canadian government. Of course, by the 1980s, John Deere, Ford, Case, International Harvester, White, and Massey Ferguson were the last major brands standing already…

            I like tractors, specifically older ones. I just love the old school squared off sheetmetal and simplistic style of a 60s “New Generation” John Deere or a 66/86 series IH.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Where was Kubota at this time? I know not much about TTAT.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            Kubota apparently jumped to America in 1972, but they’ve always made small utility tractors and lawnmowers as opposed to huge farm tractors. The recession that crippled the farm equipment industry wouldn’t have affected Kubota much, if at all…

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            Kubota has never been more than a bit player in the agricultural tractor market, mostly because the amount of brand loyalty dwarfs pickup trucks in comparison.

            Ford stumbled through the 80’s and only survived by merging with Sperry-New Holland, which made skid loaders and hay equipment (probably the best hay equipment out there, along with Hesston and Kuhn out of Germany), and buying Versatile, who made bi-directional and 4WD tractors. The newly-christened New Holland was later bought by Fiat, who also bought Case IH and sells them both under the banner of CNH Global. Several models of both New Holland and Case-IH tractors are now produced on the same line at the former Case plant in Racine, WI, just with different hoods.

            Through a convoluted mess of absorptions, buyouts and legal acquisitions, White Farm Equipment (formed in the 60’s through the acquisition of Oliver, Cockshutt, and Minneapolis-Moline), Hesston, Allis-Chalmers, Massey-Ferguson and various other smaller companies eventually became AGCO in 1991. Dozens of other even-smaller operations died out entirely. The 80’s was a hard time for the farmer; it was a harder time for the companies that depended on the farmer.

          • 0 avatar
            NoGoYo

            There must have been some kind of recession in the 1960s as well, unless Oliver and Minneapolis-Moline were just really uncompetitive. Maybe they were, because I can’t say I’ve ever seen a M-M tractor in person and probably wouldn’t have known Oliver existed for a while if my uncle hadn’t had one. Granted, this is the same uncle who bought a Kubota utility tractor in the 80s and a Kubota diesel zero-turn mower…

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            I’m not entirely sure what caused the White acquisitions in the 60’s; I know M-M had all sorts of union disputes in the years leading up to the buyout, but otherwise your guess is as good as mine.

  • avatar
    raresleeper

    I can hear my coworker’s country music as we speak:

    “in my International Harvesterrrrrr…”

  • avatar
    -Nate

    A nice if battered old ‘Binder .

    This one appears to have been a Cal Trans rig when new , that would explain the base level crew cab .

    -Nate

  • avatar
    bullnuke

    Travelalls were fairly high dollar and high end IIRC. They were built at local plant near here where my high school buddies, and, pretty much everyone else in town, worked. These high dollar vehicles could be had with unlisted optional features courtesy of the line workers; empty beer cans in the front fenders for that special rattle, nuts and bolts in the mounted tires and various other delightful features.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s just inexcusable.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      TravelAlls were pretty costly back then. My 1971 retailed over $6K back then in an age when the Olds Custom Cruiser station wagon with the 455 had an MSRP of ~ $4700.

      I was working part-time for an IHC dealer back then and got my TravelAll for a lot less.

      But it did have problems, rattles, squeeks, carburetor-float sticking, among them, but I/we didn’t know better back then.

      • 0 avatar
        Drzhivago138

        The price was also why a commercial-spec Suburban costs almost $40K today–it’s just a lot of material to make one, and it has a lot of capability. What other vehicle can tow 7,000 lbs. and haul 9 people and all their luggage, and have available 4×4?

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          A friend of mine who works for GM told me that you never see new Suburbans advertised.

          That’s because they sell each and every one of them.

          Makes me wonder why Ford gave up on the Centurion and later the Excursion, because there is a market out there, and GM has it all to themselves.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            GM doesn’t have a 3/4 ton SUV anymore either. Unless there are still 2013/14 models out there.

          • 0 avatar
            Joe McKinney

            I didn’t realize the new Suburbans were out until last night at church when one of my parishioners arrived in one. I did some checking and found they began shipping to dealers last month.

          • 0 avatar
            Drzhivago138

            The Excursion was mismarketed. If it was sold as the “F-250 Wagon” and aimed more at commercial buyers instead of soccer moms, it could still be around today.

  • avatar
    Pebble

    Simply, this rules. This kicks the rear end of any modern extended cab truck, for sure. Long live the Travelette/Scout/Travelall/IH pickup.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I liked them. But when compared to what is available now, I don’t want to revisit those old times. That was a long time ago in a place and automotive market much different from what it is now.

      Closest thing to the TravelAll today would be a Ford Excursion. Even the Suburban today is a bit smaller than the boxy, high roof TravelAll.

      I could put my Yahama 2-stroke race bike upright inside the TravelAll and did so many times for races. No way you can do that in a Suburban, not then, not now.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Yes, that’s not much more power than a 2014 Corolla gets”

    This engine actually has coonsiderably less horsepower than a modern Corolla. The Corolla’s 1.8 litre 4 cylinder engine is 132 NET horsepower; this International engine is 141 GROSS horsepower which is roughly 113 NET horsepower in 2014 terms.

  • avatar
    55_wrench

    Funny, I just saw the panel version of this (in pretty good shape, too) going down US 101 yesterday..first time in a few years I’ve seen one actually running.

    It’s weird how the styling was so disjointed, not near as well integrated as the ’48 KB-1 we moved out to California in over 50 years ago–and not near as nice as this:

    https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcT0QBVtpMBKr-usgEn2XLqsw3l2JusaQVZ_ZbLHRlGcl16ENm9g0Q

    Seems like the ’62 and its cousins were trying too hard to look like a car. But at least you can see out of them!

  • avatar
    fincar1

    My guess is that someone used this truck to carry a camper that extended from the pickup box far enough that he considered a bumper extension necessary.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    I’ve met a guy with an old IH dump truck (looked to be an R series from the 1950s like this http://www.imcdb.org/vehicle_12384-International-Harvester-R-Series-1955.html) and at least three Scouts, but I’ve never seen a Travelall or an IH pickup…I kinda really love these old IH trucks for some reason, and if I could find one that was worth fixing up, I’d probably buy it.

  • avatar
    matador

    Seems odd that International pickups never caught on. Farmers out here buy a lot of trucks, so why not an IH?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Oh, they caught on–just not enough. Most farmers went for Fords or Chevies because of the large, well-equipped dealer network, plus IH pickups were always a few years behind in terms of comfort. Any farmer who didn’t use an International/Farmall tractor probably didn’t drive an International pickup. Among the medium trucks, though, IHC was king.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Many a school bus, small semi, box truck, and rollback car hauler show the enduring success of the International medium duty truck.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          Amen on the Medium Duty trucks.

          I drove a pickup/delivery “truck” for a local farmer. For large loads of seed and feed, they used an old Wayne school bus with a Loadstar chassis.

          It felt primitive and simple, but it would always get the job done. A school bus seemed like a box truck, without a bulkhead divider behind the cab. Big deal.

          I am looking for a larger box truck in about a year or so for our business. We currently use a 14′ E-350. I’m seriously considering the IHC 4700. Is there really anything better than a good old IH diesel?

    • 0 avatar
      jim brewer

      I think it depends on where the farm is. Nebraska? You bet. Texas or California? Probably want a Ford or Chevy.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      There were a few years where IH pickups actually outsold Dodge. Among Farmers IH pickups were popular because you could buy it at the same dealer you bought your Loadstar grain truck and Farmall Tractor. A big plus was that the pickup and Loadstar could have the same engine so one set of spare parts would cover both vehicles. In a couple years you could even order your combine with the same 345 as used in your Loadstar, Pickup and Scout.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @highdesert cat–My granddad’s 63 IH 1000 series step side had the same body style but it had single headlights. I am sure it had this same 6 cylinder engine with a manual choke.


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