By on March 14, 2013

The Range Rover Sport is set to get a total redesign later this year, but pictures of the new car have leaked prior to its New York Auto Show debut. Just as we expected, it looks like a full-size Range Rover got shrunk in the wash.

Expect residual values of the current model to take a serious dive once the new car goes on sale. God forbid anybody should be seen driving the previous generation. An easy giveaway will be the sagging air suspensions, which the new owners will not be able to afford to fix, due to the exorbitant shop rates charged by JLR dealers.

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66 Comments on “Range Rover Sport Residuals Torpedoed By New Model Debut...”


  • avatar
    ott

    Range Rovers don’t need new models for their residual values to take a serious nosedive, they’ll do that all on their own.

    • 0 avatar
      graham

      Exactly. And the same would be true for any image-conscientious vehicle when a new model is about to be released. So the whole point of this article is questionable.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      “Range Rovers don’t need new models for their residual values to take a serious nosedive, they’ll do that all on their own.”

      That’s a good thing about JLR products. You’ll be able to get a V-8 F-type in three years for 40k. Let someone else eat the cliff like depreciation.

  • avatar
    jacob_coulter

    The horrible resale value of Range Rover has got to be hurting new sales.

    In my area, they’ve become the official ghetto fabulous car with the requisite 20″+ rims. I see a Range Rover now, and my first thought is they’re probably on food stamps. They’re stupid cheap used because everyone knows they’re disposable. They’re like a modern fake Rolex.

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      Those are the guys I see buying $10 of gas at a time. Doesn’t go very far in a Range Rover…

      • 0 avatar
        tpepin

        I truly had no idea. A quick search of my local craigslist for “Land Rover” turned up a tremendous pile of ads for vehicles residing on BHPH lots – 2008 LR RR Sport Just $407/month with Guaranteed Credit Approval! Only $2990 Down!

    • 0 avatar
      DGA

      You’d think the shoddy reliability would have done the same, but oddly enough it’s not been the case.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      The sort of people who for the most part who buy Range Rovers new are not particularly value-conscious. They want a Range Rover, full stop. So they lease one, and drive it until the lease is up and get another one, or something else new and shiny. And lets face it, EVERYTHING in the $80-120K range depreciates like it is falling off a cliff, with very rare exceptions. IMHO, anything over $50-60K is just lily-gilding. A 5-series is all the sedan anyone truly needs, paying more for a 7 is just showing off. Same with a Range-Rover or Sport over an LR3.

      And ultimately, even as expensive as they are to fix, it is STILL cheaper to fix an out of warranty Range Rover than to buy a new one, thanks to that depreciation.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Although I agree for the most part on the depreciation

        (one exception 06 H1’s(120k new) still rarely go under 95k, and it’s been 7 years)

        I have to disagree on the BMW, I can barely tell a difference between the 3 ad 5 series, only thing wrong with the 7 series is that it’s extremely overpriced for the quality issues associated. Kinda unflattering though that you would judge what others “need” but then I would be judging…

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The H1 is one of those rare exceptions, helped very much by the fact that 1. they don’t make them anymore, and 2. they have no competition at all.

          Given the 5 and the 7 are on the same platform, unless you are carting NBA players around I seriously don’t see the point. What they all look like is largely irrelevant, they are all “3 sausages, different lengths” at this point. Which I am perfectly fine with, they are all BMWs.

          As to judging, opinions are like @ssholes, everyone has one and they always stink – I am entitled to mine, and you are entitled to yours.

      • 0 avatar
        genuineleather

        What you’re buying with a flagship vehicle is exclusivity. A midsize sedan can be leased for $600-700/mth and thus sells in numbers roughly five times greater than a full-size, which will run $1.5-2k/mth.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        ….The sort of people who for the most part who buy Range Rovers new are not particularly value-conscious….

        How true. In fact, they go out of their way to drive something expensive, knowing full well that it takes a big hit, and they will replace it with another one. Lather, rinse, repeat. Why be so “stupid”? The answer lies in the one-upmanship mentality that feeds in uber-wealthy communities. Yes, buying/leasing a Range Rover over and over is a waste of money. And that is exactly the point. You do it because your husband can afford to do it and the presence of a RR coming and going every three years tells everybody in your incorporated village and high school parking lot that you can. It is as simple as that, folks.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          You got it. And when you come right down to it, they really are VERY nice cars if you can afford one. As Ferris Bueller said of the Ferrari – “very choice, I highly recommend picking one up if you have the means”.

          And the reality is, even as the car rated the worst for reliability there is, they are still not THAT bad, and if you can afford to buy one new, you can afford to fix one. The trouble comes when some idiot who can barely afford to buy one used does so.

    • 0 avatar
      Ggip

      Land Rover’s Range Rover Sport won Automotive Lease Guide’s (ALG) Residual Value Award in the Best Luxury Utility Vehicle category for the fifth consecutive year. ALG’s 11th annual Residual Value Awards, honors the vehicles in each industry segment that the guide predicts will retain the highest percentage of their original price after a conventional three-year lease term.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Luxury cars have gone from being like fine watches to cell phones.

  • avatar
    Pan

    Are all air suspensions as bad as we read, or is it just the same old mis-information being repeated by lazy publications too disinterested and cheap to do their own research?
    I’ve never seen the issue seriously addressed, even on this site, which frequently has important relevant articles.
    Please, someone, what’s the “real story?”

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      For those who have used them, air suspensions are awesome. The advantages on an SUV-type vehicle are comfortable ride with better handling (that is often adjustable). You can often raise it for off-road use and lower it for highway use. The current ones, which are only really produced by a handful of vendors are much more reliable than those in the past. For example, the new Jeep Grand Cherokee’s air suspension seems to have similar specs to Audi’s and I suspect is made by the same company.

      Nonetheless, eventually (well over 100K generally), you may need to replace an airshock, as is the case for certain other suspension components in non-air suspension cars. Sometimes you need to replace them in pairs (e.g. both fronts need to be changed at the same time). They are dead simple in terms of how they work, but the components are somewhat expensive. Another downside is that dealerships overcharge for any repairs/replacement (probably more than 2X cost for parts + their usual crazy charge for labor).

      If you get an independent mechanic to do the job and buy Arnott replacements, it isn’t horrible, although it’s not cheap either.

      Sometimes the 2nd or 3rd owner will rip out the air suspension and replace them with ordinary coils, as stated on the forums of many cars that can come with air suspensions.

    • 0 avatar
      european

      @Pan +1

      the real story is the review of the new RR a few episodes back in Top Gear UK where the new RR HUMILIATED a military spec mammoth of a army truck over some badass terrain.

      But you won’t read about this @ TTAC. because TTAC writer Dreck, a jewish princess, can’t be bothered to be a proper journalist. or even take a HD camera to an autoshow to, God forbid, take photos. he would rather repost the same PSA article for a millionth time, because it’s easier that way. or just write anything that would get the readers rallied up & commenting.

      life is easy for mr. Dreck, because Bertel has no balls to fire him.

      • 0 avatar
        james2k

        Woah, totally over the line. No need attack the author.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Don’t quite see the need for the hate against Jews, that was totally unnecessary. You act as though the Range Rover is something to be proud of.
        Of course you wouldn’t be man enough to say that Top Gear doesn’t have an EXTREME bias toward anything Rover.
        Range Rover should had died while it still had its dignity, in this day in age, your kidding yourself to think otherwise.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Although the earlier comment about “mr. Dreck” was extremely untoward, I don’t see why everyone hates on the Range Rover. The upper-income society needs something with panache to drive, and the Range Rover fulfills that role quite nicely. I mean, what, do you all want to go back to the agricultural Series-I Range Rover? Sorry, it’s not going to happen; go and get yourselves a stripped Jeep Wrangler. It seems to me that if the members of this forum don’t like a particular car, it’s worthless. In fact, the more popular that a car is with the mainstream crowd, the less you all seem to like it, and shirking such cars in favor of their barebones, do-it-yourself counterparts is every bit as much of a hackneyed meme as anything else you all have made fun out here. The Range Rovers, Escalades, Camrys and Accords may be too pricey, garish or boring for your personal taste, but that doesn’t mean that they shouldn’t exist. Part of any industry is that tastes and needs will change, and the days of the strictly-mechanical car or truck are just about gone. You cannot blame Land Rover/Range Rover for capitalizing on *what the market wants*, but if you want something like your 1980s Bronco, you could probably build it yourself for cheap.

          P.S. And the Range Rover *does* have something to be proud of. Even though 99.9% of them will never leave the pavement, the vehicle was still rigorously engineered to demonstrate the off-road prowess that it promises. That says a lot.

          • 0 avatar
            thelaine

            Kyree, I don’t see hatred. I see opinions. That is the attraction of TTAC. Fawning over cars is what you see in car magazines. I love RRs, but also love ridiculing them for their historically dismal reliability. I hope they exist forever.

          • 0 avatar
            Athos Nobile

            Mate, the original RR is far from being agricultural. If you ever sat in a Land Cruiser series 60 and to a lesser extent a Wagoneer, you would know the real meaning of “agricultural”.

            I would take a 1st gen RR over a stripped Wrangler any day.

            And since we’re talking cars in this site, can we stop referring to them as farm equipment.

      • 0 avatar
        copanacional

        +1 european

        ZING!

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        Someone seeks the banhammer.

      • 0 avatar
        thelaine

        @european

        “Jewish” is a proper noun and should be capitalized. Normally I don’t weigh in on such matters, but it seems you may have an issue of some sort. This is surprising, considering your normal lack of bitterness and irrational bias. How’s that whole Eurozone common market thing coming along anyway? I’ve been meaning to ask you. I would have emailed you earlier, but my Range Rover caught on fire while I was driving out of the dealership parking lot.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        the ‘real’ story is that the Top Gear show had James May in an new Range Rover versus an experimental DRIVERLESS truck

        however how on earth is that a relevant comparison to the real world

        funny how you didnt mention that

      • 0 avatar
        Monty

        TTAC Rules!

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        Someone clearly wants a lifetime ban. “Jewish Princess”? I suppose it takes a crossdresser to know one?

        Air suspensions suck. They’re nice when they work, but those bags are wear items that cost an arm and a leg at a dealership to replace. Most people just tear them out to save the hassle.

        Or it could be an S-Class, and having a bag go out leads to even more issues…

      • 0 avatar

        I imagine Bertel will be along shortly, but not to fire Derek. I think you can put two and two together just as well as any other person…

      • 0 avatar
        Signal11

        “military spec mammoth of a army truck”

        Are you kidding?

        You mean the autonomous, DRIVERLESS Oshkosh TerraMax?

        The one that was so good at off-road driving, it came in FIFTH place against a bunch of college students?

        The one where all of the college student designed vehicles did the course in roughly 7:00 hours but took the TerraMax THIRTEEN hours?

        That “military spec mammoth?”

        Get real.

      • 0 avatar

        ===================================================================

        To: European

        This comment is in violation of TTAC’s commenting guidelines, which can be found here:

        http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/faqs/

        A FORMAL WARNING is issued. Should TTAC’s commenting guidelines continue to be disregarded, a permanent commenting ban can be issued without another warning. READ and UNDERSTAND the guidelines before making another comment.

        To all:

        It’s not what someone says that can result in a ban. Only how it is said. TTAC is known for the quality of its comments. Rude, aggressive comments diminish the quality and destroy TTAC. They will not be allowed.

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        European: I saw that episode, and if you consider the RR’s win a “humiliation”, well we will just say that our ideas of what a humiliation really is. The RR always was an excellent off-roader, and even its haters have been more than willing to say so, even thought it is usually followed with a “who takes a $90K vehicle through a stream” comment. No, the RR won that competition because it had the ability to go much faster than the truck when conditions allowed. In fact, the truck was able to climb terrain that the RR driver had to avoid. The RR did amazingly well. but please, “humiliate”? Really, have some sense balanced reasoning. By the way, you realize much of that programs’ competitions are scripted, don’t you?

    • 0 avatar
      jacob_coulter

      Air suspensions are horrible unless you’re the type of person that buys or leases a new car before the warranty expires, which is probably most NEW Land Rover customers.

      If you’re the type that buys used, I would avoid air suspensions like the plague. Go price at a dealer what it costs for 4 air bags, plus 4 adjustable shocks that go withe them, plus sensors, compressor, etc. It can get over $5,000 in a hurry. It’s almost like saying do you want a car where you have to replace the engine after 80k miles. We just went through this with my wife’s Lexus SUV.

      You can get a great ride from a conventional suspension setup, and let’s be honest, how many people really need to lift their suspension for ground clearance on a Range Rover. I know they have the legendary off road history, but it’s sort of like someone deep sea diving with a new $10,000 Rolex. 99% of new Range Rovers never leave the pavement.

      • 0 avatar
        Hummer

        Depends on what type of Air suspension we’re talking about, yea RR can’t build for crap, but I’ve seen a town car with over 180k on the original 1991 entire air system that is in perfectly good functioning shape

        I don’t see why one would/should avoid air suspension, if it stops working anyone with a jack can change it over to coils in an hour

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          Re: the longevity of the Town Car air suspension, I’m not surprised it went 180K at all. However, you do have to remind anyone who puts it on a lift to put the air suspension in jack mode.

      • 0 avatar
        corntrollio

        “Go price at a dealer”

        There’s your first mistake. It doesn’t have to cost that much. Also, you rarely ever have to replace the whole system at once.

        I don’t disagree that you have to be dedicated to having one and you have to be willing to pay for it.

        • 0 avatar
          jacob_coulter

          Aftermarket solutions are scarce for high end luxury vehicles with air suspensions. It’s not something you’re going to find at NAPA, much of it is dealer only. I know for my wife’s Lexus, we did look around.

          I know for some higher volume cars like Lincolns a popular solution is just to pull them and put in conventional steel coils. I wanted to do that with her Lexus, but it would require some welding for clamps to hold the springs.

          Air suspensions simply wear out, some may be worse than others, but they’re going to eventually develop leaks. I think the costs outweigh the benefits, I’ll take steel coils.

          • 0 avatar
            BeyondBelief

            Scarce? Not hardly. I replaced the rear air bags myself a few weeks ago on my ’96 RR P38 with step by step illustrated pics I got off the internet. Total outlay was less than $200 for the pair from an eBay retailer.

            It was an odd installation though…the bags are held in by what is essentially just a large bobby pin, and the air line is simply jammed back on. It all seemed very…not robust. Seems to work fine though.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            It’s doable for other luxury cars. As I mentioned, Arnott alones carries air suspension parts for the German ones, as well as for Land Rover/Range Rover. Some of these vehicles are likely much more rare than your wife’s Lexus. They used to have Lexus air shocks too, but now it appears they only have conversion kits for Lexuses.

            Lincolns are hardly high volume these days, btw.

          • 0 avatar
            salhany

            Arnott carries a complete coilover conversion kit for the Jaguar XJ.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      Re: air suspensions. Whether you have Town Car, Land Rover, Grand Cherokee, Navigator, or an E-class, air suspension components tend to leak when they get old.

      They really aren’t that bad to deal with if you are diligent about doing the leak diagnosis (soapy water and patience). The control/epectrical side of the systems really aren’t all that complicated. They usually employ 3-4 height sensors on a 4 wheel system, and a control module that that triggers the compressor and vent valves.

      Open systems that just compress air tend to get moisture in the system and employ a dryer, but eventually moisture will take it’s toll on the components.

      Systems like the Grand Cherokee are closed and are charged with nitrogen. This system should last longer, but leaks are still inevitable.

      If you ever get tired of chasing the issues, Arnott mades a wide selection of regular spring replacements at reasonable cost, as someone already mentioned.

    • 0 avatar
      df

      It’s total misinformation. The author of this article is theorizing without any kind of objectivity and lame lemmings are jumping on the bandwagon with no actual knowledge or technical education.

      The old design involved air bags at each corner that were exposed to the elements and subject to dry rot and wear. In pre-2003 Range Rovers, this would also fry the compressor and was a reason for the coil conversion. The 2003+ design was better, but on average, the corners would need to be replaced at 75,000 miles or 5-6 years. For the highest-end luxury vehicle, with mountain goat capability, this is no different of an investment than tires every 8000 miles on a Porsche 911.

      The new design, on the 2005 LR3 and the 2006 Range Rover Sport, and now the 2013 Range Rover are encased in a metal housing. The replacement rate for these independent suspension components is very, very low. It is well under 1% for over 100,000 miles. The compressor,which costs about 800, occasionally will to bad, but so will any other pump on a car over time, on a random basis, like a water pump, air conditioner compressor, etc..

  • avatar
    ktm_525

    In my experience they are finicky. A few years back I was looking into Lexus LX 470s. Even most of these either had air bag issues or had them addressed multiple times in their history.

    My current LR3 has 170k kms on the clock and I have had to replace a few height sensors (cheap) and one air compressor (not so cheap). All in all not too bad…

    The upside is that the ride is smooth and I have 2-3″ extra lift when required and 2″ less when loading Grandma or in a low garage.

    I like air suspensions and I like low residuals on Land Rovers although the LR4’s seem to be hanging in there better. Darn.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yep. I was seriously considering buying the last great Lexus made (assuming one does not think a $350,000 LFA-Celica is a great Lexus; I don’t); a 2005 LS430 with air suspension, and then I started to read up on not just the problems associated with them, but more significantly, the costs associated with repairing/replacing these components when the bell tolls.

      It was a used one, with a mere 27,000 miles on the odomoter, too, one-owner car, verified no accidents, like new, for $21,000. This was during early 2010, in the wake of the financial crisis (the price of similar used LS430s have risen since then).

      By the time I hemmed and hawed over the air suspension issue, it had already been sold by hours.

  • avatar
    lon888

    The neighbor kid got a new Range Rover when he graduated from college 3 years ago. The past 2 months there has been a dealer loaner in the driveway a couple of times. Last week he got rid of it and bought a Subaru Outback. I think the lack of reliability and his warranty running out prompted his decision.

  • avatar
    corntrollio

    Not sure if european is long for this thread (TTAC Law, and what not), but the Top Gear Range Rover vs. Terramax video is available here:

    www dot streetfire dot net/video/new-range-rover-vs-terramax_part-1_2421403 dot htm

  • avatar
    Tstag

    Land Rover succeeds because the Germans can’t make a good luxury car that’s anywhere near the good offroad. The Americans can make great offroaders but the quality is appalling and the looks are too in your face (e.g the new Jeep and the awfull Navigator). The Japanese can make good offroaders but they look awfull and have no luxury.

    Land Rovers may not be the most reliable but if you want style, offroad ability and Luxury there is nothing else. Or not until Jag recycle a Land Rover but get the quality right….

    • 0 avatar
      corntrollio

      “Land Rover succeeds because the Germans can’t make a good luxury car that’s anywhere near the good offroad.”

      G-Wagen?

      • 0 avatar
        Robert Gordon

        As a product of Styr-Puch’s loins, the G-Wagen is in fact an Austrian vehicle.

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          The G-Wagen is produced by Magna Steyr in Austria, yes. However, it was engineered by Mercedes-Benz, and Magna Steyr builds it under contract. Note that Magna Steyr owns what used to be Steyr-Daimler-Puch, which signed the original agreement With Mercedes in the 70s. I believe current development is by Mercedes’ subsidiary in Austria.

          I’m not sure that makes it any less a German vehicle. Is an Audi TT not a German car because it’s made in Hungary?

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        The G-wagen is a GREAT off-road vehicle, but it is a pretty wretched luxury car. Not terribly surprising given that it is, in fact, a leather-lined army truck.

        I would put up the VW Toureg/Porsche Cayenne as just as good as a Range Rover at both on-road and off-road luxury. Slightly different biases between the two, but both are very capable vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I don’t think Germans focus on Offroading so they don’t really count, American quality depends drivetrain/engine etc, I’ll take American pushrods over a LR or RR, anyday.

      EDIT Corn just proved me wrong on the German focus assertion.

      Also the new jeep is not meant for offroad so that is a non comparision
      And I’m guessing your not from America, the Navigator is a luxury SUV, I doubt you can even get it in 4×4.

      Therefore I feel your trying to compare the Range Rover to things it doesn’t even compete with, might as well compare it to a Ferrari.

      Also, I may be wrong but I’m pretty Sure land Rovers are made by Toyota, a Range Rover is something different

  • avatar
    BigDuke6

    Could we please officially ban the word “awesome” from this website? Thank you.

  • avatar
    Flybrian

    ’12 fullsize Range Rover’s aren’t losing demand one iota. Since the ’13s are all but accounted for, ’12s are commanding a premium versus what they normally would, especially S/C RRs in dark colors with heavy loadouts.

  • avatar
    vent-L-8

    Anyone else notice the 1980s Jeep Grand Wagoneer in the background? Learning how to make a real luxury off road perhaps?

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    Ugly. Should sell well. Next.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    A Range Rover isn’t an immediate sign of someone who can’t get his finances together. Most of the people I see driving them truly are well-off, and are just treating themselves to something nice, as well they should. Let’s all stop hating…

  • avatar
    Joss

    Range Rover is the Jaguar of SUV’s. How British is that? All the way back to BMC hydrolastic. Hindustan Motors has outlived BMC.


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