By on May 11, 2012

When a new generation of the world’s best selling car, and of the best selling cars of all times (accounts differ) rolls off the line at its factory, then this is usually a big deal. This time, it’s a smaller deal. The 11th generation Corolla that started production today at Toyota’s new plant near Sendai in Japan’s tsunami-ravaged north, is a little shorter than its predecessor. It breaks a tradition of carbloat.

Nevertheless, the new Corolla offers more. It offers it on the inside.  Despite the fact that the car has lost two inches outside, the rear passengers are presented with an inch and a half in legroom. The turning radius also has shrunk a bit, which is appreciated in those tight Japanese parking lots and cramped garages.

In Japan, “Corolla” slowly morphs into a brand in its own right, with “Toyota Corolla” branded dealer channels and multitudes of Corolla models. Today, I saw a new JDM Corolla Axio (the sedan) and its station wagon sibling, the Corolla Fielder. Don’t run to your dealer just yet to buy the car that Toyota has shrunk. That 11h gen Corolla is for the Japanese market only. The Corolla Axio that took the stage today was in some kind of beige – not a derogatory color in Japan. In any case, it wasn’t beige, it was “melo shilubar,” or “mellow silver” in English (who said Japanese is hard?)

Toyota CEO Akio Toyoda today dashed hopes, voiced by a reporter of a Sendai newspaper, that the new gen Toyota built near Sendai will be an export hit: “The Corollas destined for foreign markets are produced at the Tokuoka and Higashi Fuji plants.” To lift spirits in Sendai, Toyoda promised that “some may be shipped to New Zealand.”

Akio Toyoda today added two important tidbits to the storied history of the Corolla:

  • The official total of all Corollas made worldwide stands at 39 million as of today, Toyoda said. Not “over 40 million sold as of 2007,” as Wikipedia claims.  39 million as of today. Source: The boss himself.
  • The first car Akio Toyoda paid for himself “was a pre-owned 4th generation Corolla 1600 GT,” Akio Toyoda admitted today. Just one of the guys.
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96 Comments on “Toyota Launches 11gen Corolla. No, You Can’t Have It...”


  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Despite the drubbing on TTAC the Corolla earned its places as the best-selling car of all time by being the best made car of all time. It is basically a top-end Lexus for most of the world, and manages to be reasonably priced and incredibly cheap to own and operate. It is large, powerful, quiet, smooth, reliable, luxurious, and it gets great fuel economy. It is truly the Panther platform times ten, for a world much smarter than we were in the 1990’s.

    The competition is getting stiffer, sure. But take away our ‘sporty’ pretensions, ‘sophisticated’ tastes in design, and bias towards cruising for four hours at 80mph (how often do we really do that, anyway?) and it’s clear that the Corolla is still more than competitive.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      “the Corolla earned its places as the best-selling car of all time by being the best made car of all time.”

      This kind of STUPID mentality is the exact reason the boring, middle of the pack Camry outsells it’s nearest competition by hundreds of thousands of units. The Corolla is the cheapest and least efficient new compact car on sale in the US today. And by cheapest I mean the most cheaply made with the cheapest feeling materials.

      Over.

      Rated.

      • 0 avatar
        28-cars-later

        Agreed, the Corolla peaked with the 96-02 generation, and even those were only moderately impressive for the money.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        tuffjuff,

        STUPID?

        The Corolla, in spite of being several years old, is still leading the segment.

        I guess America should wake up and evaluate cars by your criteria, right?

      • 0 avatar
        Patrickj

        Bought an 03 Corolla LE as a commuter car, with 140K miles, a few months ago. Nothing wrong with the interior, a velour better than the cloth on most anybody’s car in 2012.

        No reason to think that I and some younger relatives won’t put another 80 or 100K miles on it.

      • 0 avatar
        tuffjuff

        @KixStart

        If by “my criteria” you mean that they can get a car with better gas mileage, a nicer interior and more options for the exact same amount of money, and in some cases LESS money, then yes.

        Americans are idiots when it comes to vehicle purchases. How else can we explain a 2012 Camry out-selling a MUCH more capable Hyundai Sonata/Kia Optima, Chevy Camaro, Ford Fusion, Nissan Altima, etc? Heck, I’m saying this and Kia ripped me off, I hate them, but I’d rather buy an Optima than a Camry. I’ll chance some reliability to get a MUCH nicer interior, more efficient engine, better gas mileage and loads more features.

        My in-laws are looking for a car for their 15 1/2 year old, and refused to look at a Ford Fiesta or Chevy Sonic (or even a stripper Focus or Cruze) because they thought they were too small, and then last night I hear about them looking at a 2010 Corolla for $17,100 used. Two things wrong with this picture – first, the interior room is about the same between today’s B segment and yesterday’s C segment, and also a brand new Corolla similarly equipped, with less miles, the entirety of the warranty and with 2 years of maintenance is only $400 more.

        People are stupid, period.

      • 0 avatar
        Marko

        Needing a reliable, economical car to get to work or school is somehow stupid?

        Also, did the buttons and knobs break off in your hand or something?

        Yes, I’ve driven a Corolla a few times, and no, it wasn’t particularly exciting or luxurious. But it got me where I needed to go. All the controls were easy to use. Even with over 200K miles, nothing was falling apart, burning, or broken. OK, the hubcaps fall off easily.

        And no, I had absolutely no desire to fondle the dashboard. Nor do I in any car. Frankly, materials quality only matters in the sense of 1.) things you actually touch feel durable and comfortable 2.) nothing breaks.

        It’s ironic how the only times I’ve actually had plastic interior parts break on me were in high-priced European luxury cars (and 1980s era American cars, but that’s beyond the point).

        OK, buying a used car for more than the price of a new one is always a stupid idea – no matter the make/model.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        “STUPID?

        The Corolla, in spite of being several years old, is still leading the segment.

        I guess America should wake up and evaluate cars by your criteria, right”

        @kixstart

        If you mean Hertz, Avis, National, Budget, Dollar, etc. as “America” than you’d be correct.

        Last year, the Corolla did NOT break the 200k in retail sales mark despite overall sales of over 240k, so that meant 40k+ Corollas went into fleet.

        And that’s even with the supposed supply issue last year with the aftereffects of the tsunami, so this year fleet nos. is probably worse.

        Also, the ATP of the Elantra is a whopping $1,500 more than the Corolla – so, it’s a combination of deep discounts and fleet sales which is driving Corolla prices and not b/c of the merits of the Corolla as a vehicle within its segment.

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        It’s a reliable, efficient compact car you can often buy with A/C for under $15k. Undercutting the competition works. Not everyone’s willing to pay more to get more.

      • 0 avatar
        KixStart

        bd2: “If you mean Hertz, Avis, National, Budget, Dollar, etc. as “America” than you’d be correct.”

        Really? I’ll see if I can find the figures on fleet but I’ve never been offered a Corolla at a rental car agency and I would jump at it. Last time, it was a Fusion with a V6 and leather interior. Not a bad car at all but we went over 500 miles and I had wanted something with better gas mileage.

        A lot of that mileage was on twisty roads… the Fusion is no corner-carver, either.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        I was offered a Corolla by Hertz just a year ago. I didn’t want it, I wanted the midsize I’d reserved, but they were out (brake recall on several midsize cars in their fleet), and I had to take it.

      • 0 avatar
        Kevin Kluttz

        @28 cars–The 1994-1997 Corolla is the crown jewel of Corollas. My wife and I had the pleasure of owning three of them, a 94, 95, and a 97. The 97 was already falling victim to the decontenting and just did not feel as buttoned together as the first two. But they were all three bulletproof and never even began to try to fail us. I believe in Corollas, but the Civic will always be the leader.

    • 0 avatar
      rentonben

      >>powerful, quiet, smooth, reliable, luxurious.

      You were supposed to post that about the upcoming Lexus. This makes us look rediculous. Per our contract, we deduct the penalty amount from your previous earnings.

      -Blog Internet Group / Toyota Internet Team

    • 0 avatar
      Scott_314

      In my opinion it really is (ok maybe it ‘was’ at some point) the best car for people, but I mostly meant middle class people in non-western countries where money and reliability are everything, and for westerners where cars are just another expensive appliance.

      Why do you think it is the highest selling car of all time? Purely based on brand? No.

    • 0 avatar
      supersleuth

      This kind of stuff will get you laughed at by anyone who has actually driven one of these turds.

      • 0 avatar
        MR2turbo4evr

        Have YOU actually driven one of them? As much as I dislike the 2003+ Corollas, and dispite how cheap and ugly the interiors on the new Corollas are, they’re not bad to drive. At least no worse than the competition.

      • 0 avatar
        supersleuth

        Yes I have and no it is not even competitive in comfort (driving position), handling, steering or braking with my Fit, let alone with its actual C-segment competition.

    • 0 avatar
      fredtal

      I don’t understand your comments are you sure you are talking about the compact Toyota Corolla? It’s a decent little car that can provide reliable and economical transportation in relative comfort. It might be living on it’s reputation, but it’s not really as terrible as many here may suggest.

      • 0 avatar
        DearS

        Its consistent reliability and robustness means a lot in the 3rd world. Its not just the car its the idea. When you make $125 a week to feed your family like my family does folks buy Toyota Corolla (2 acutally), for resale value, sound investments, for peace of mind, for competence. It has incredible power. Ask someone you know that drives one. lol.

  • avatar
    mr_muttonchops

    That Corolla wagon looks pretty decent in that not-quite-brown-not-quite-beige color. Frankly I’m glad automakers are trying to make their cars a bit smaller and combating car bloat, even if the car won’t make it to the U.S

  • avatar
    replica

    Hearing about a new model of Corolla is about as exciting as hearing a furniture store just got in its new line of 2012 couches ahead of schedule.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Any ideas what the one that will make it to the U.S. might look like?

  • avatar
    stuntmonkey

    The Honda Super Cub of the automotive world.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Great way to put it. It does its job, nothing more, nothing less. Thats the only lens through which one should analyze it.

    • 0 avatar
      dastanley

      +1. I own an ’06 Corolla and owned an ’89 years ago. They do exactly what they’re supposed to do: provide reliable and economical transportation. Why is that a problem?

  • avatar

    Along with the Prius, this Corolla is the perfect candidate for the driverless car. All hints of sportiness, interest, eye appeal and fun have been carefully removed. I would recommend white and that oh-so-bland ‘melo shilubar’ as the colors to go for when we get to buy our driverless vehicles

  • avatar
    Educator(of teachers)Dan

    Manual transmission, AWD, 200hp, diesel powered, $20,000, whale male member leather interior, wagon?

    NOPE, Toyota Corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      RedStapler

      Mmmmm..the USDM Unobtainium Valhalla mobile.

      The ‘rolla is a ho hum appliance with little appeal to enthusiasts, but for the other 80-90% of the market its a blue chip car. Buy one and it can be expected to last twice as long as the payments without breaking.

  • avatar
    seabrjim

    The best car of all time? The wife and I just bought a 2012 Impreza in February. After test driving a Corolla it seemed that it was 10 years behind the times. The dealer thought we would buy it because it was a Corolla. I told him maybe 20 years ago that arrogance would work, but today it offers very little and most things were optional. After the road test, she and I both agreed there was no comparison as far as driving experience, handling, dash quality and layout etc. Add in the highway mpg and AWD for 21k and it was a done deal. No Corolla for us. Unless this gets imported.

  • avatar
    segfault

    Side profile looks like a 2006 Kia Optima.

  • avatar
    John

    C’mon Mr. Schmidt. You know there is no “L” in Nihon-go.
    “Mero-Shirubar”

    • 0 avatar

      Common myth. There is a sound that sometimes sounds like r, sometimes like l. There is “lain” when it pours. And that car is pronounced “kalohla.”

      The mellow silver transcription is by Frau Schmitto-san, who I rove a rot.

      • 0 avatar
        John

        Well, I kind of agree. It depends a lot on which city you come from. For example, I have a friend from Nagasaki who uses L perfectly. On the other hand, I spent six months teaching a friend from Osaka to say “Earl Grey Tea” correctly. I am told that Japanese folks can tell exactly what city someone comes from from their accent. It’s the same in England, where I lived for a year. Skype-ing with my friend in Saitama tonight, and he cannot say “L” to save his soul! There was a scientific study published that found that Japanese folk who are not raised with the “L” sound cannot distinguish it from the “R” sound as adults. I have had this confirmed by various Japanese friends.

      • 0 avatar
        onyxtape

        The Japanese word for Corolla is カローラ (ka roh ra). Though the ‘R’ sound has a small element of ‘L’ sound in it too, as you stated.

        Rule of thumb – northern Asians can do ‘R’s better than southern Asians. Mandarin speakers in northern China, due to linguistic influence from the Manchus, will add ‘R’s and tongue rolling where there needn’t be. (“Hello, welcome to Chinar.”) The whole “fly lice” thing is from generations of Chinese immigrants coming to the West exclusively from Guangdong province in the south (and specifically one town in particular – Taishan) and dominated Chinatowns in huge numbers until the liberalization of mainland China in the last 15-20 years – now those people have a much more difficult time with tongue rolling and ‘R’s.

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        How far north do you have to go? Philippines here, and near 100% EngLish penetration…

        :p

      • 0 avatar
        carlisimo

        Romanji uses ‘r’ even if can be pronounced as an l, r, or rr.

      • 0 avatar

        +1

        May you and Frau Schmitto-san rive in the rap of ruxuly.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    “Toyota Launches 11gen Corolla. No, You Can’t Have It.”

    That’s OK, I don’t want it.

  • avatar
    210delray

    I don’t really get all the scorn heaped on the Corolla. It’s really the latter-day equivalent of the VW Beetle. No one called them sporty or exciting either, but consider the huge number sold!

    • 0 avatar

      I feel like defending the Corolla. But all I can say is it’s a reliable and economical transportation pod. But then, so much of what is available today is naught but a transportation pod. Like the Mazda2 I rented the other week. Neither holds a candle to my ’08 Civic (stick).

      Still, I think it will be a big deal if gen11–downsized as in Japan–comes to the US.

  • avatar
    daiheadjai

    Now now, if you don’t bash Toyota, the entire internet will know that you’re not a REAL car enthusiast.

    What were the AE86s based off of?
    What was the 1998 WRC champion based off of?

    • 0 avatar
      replica

      I’m not a real car enthusiast for buying current Toyotas based on internet mythology about 2 cars from at least 15 years ago, both requiring modification to be interesting?

      Well, if that’s how it has to be. So it goes.

      • 0 avatar
        daiheadjai

        Just sayin’ – it seems on teH Internets, if you don’t bash Toyota, you’re not a legit car enthusiast.

        For what it’s worth, no I wouldn’t buy any Corolla for myself, but for friends who don’t see driving as anything but a chore to get from point A to B, there isn’t anything wrong with the venerable Corolla (or garden-variety Civics for that matter).

        Niky – true, but since the WRC cars are still homogolation models (i.e. you still have to make a few road-going production versions for sale), the WRC Corolla is STILL a Corolla.
        Not a popular one (sadly), but a Corolla nonetheless.

        Ditto the AE86. Still a Crolla.

    • 0 avatar
      niky

      The AE86? Bastard love child of the 1970s rear wheel drive Corolla and the 1980s unibody front-driver. In other words, it’s a twenty year old car with a thirty year old drivetrain (okay, the engine was something good…)

      The 1998 WRC champ was a Celica All Trac drivetrain shoved underneath a Corolla body.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Ya, and the ’64 GTO sure was somethin’

  • avatar
    Oren Weizman

    They are sturdy, no one is saying they aren’t

    but why do they have to be soooo ugly

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      Or better yet, in the year 2012 please show me a C segment car that is UNreliable?

      That song and dance may have worked in 1995, but it doesn’t hold up today.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Exactly. The gap in quality from the top to the bottom in the C-segemnt in 2012 is so narrow. The Corolla is a reliable primitive boat anchor compared to the competition. It gets some of the worst MPG in the segment, has the least HP, is the only one saddled with a 4-speed automatic, and has an interior swathed in mouse fur and hard plastics provided by Coleman cooler. It doesn’t have a performance advantage. It doesn’t have a price advantage. It doesn’t have a technology advantage. It doesn’t even have a roominess advantage in the segment. It is squarely in the back of the pack, resting on its laurels like an overweight football star waving their Superbowl rings from 10 and 15 years ago in everyone’s face.

        NONE of the cars in the 2012 C-segment in the United States are bad cars. None of them. But you can do so much better than a Corolla when you weigh all the factors.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        You can’t declare the MY2012 quality gap is narrow. That won’t be known for years. All there is to go on today is historical track record. Toyota is the gold standard there.

        Cost of ownership is the only reason to punish yourself by being in this segment at all. If you’re defining a good economy car by fast and fun to drive with soft touch plastics you don’t get it.

      • 0 avatar
        Jamez9k

        Every 5 years or so we get to hear about how the domestic have caught up to the Japanese in terms of reliability and so far it’s never been true. While I’ll readily admit that they have caught up or even surpassed them in overall perceived quality and have very competitive products I still have my doubts about their durability.

        Personally I wouldn’t own a Corolla but I totally respect why people buy them. There are very few if any bad cars out there today; only cars that fit different needs and the Corolla happens to fit the needs of a lot of people.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    I like the tidier proportions. Considering the old Corolla Axio (Akio? Axio? Coincidencio?) was essentially identical to the US Corolla, I suspect we’ll see something like this on our shores before too long, perhaps with a different face. Just not yet, and no wagon.

    BTW The supersized Scion xB is called the Corolla Rumion in Japan, which I feel is actually a more fitting name.

  • avatar
    Stevo

    Bertel, love these updates. Might not be an “exciting” vehicle but the influence of the Corrola cannot be imagined away. All vehicles today are better due to the (over) engineered Toyotas (and Hondas) of yesteryear. Love that little wagon. Reminds me of my mom’s 71 Squareback that I grew up with.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      Indeed. I’ve yet to see the sentence (or words to the effect), “I used to have a Toyota Corolla, and it was one of the worst cars I ever owned”. The same cannot be said for cars domestic in origin.

      More likely, a description of a previously owned Corolla would be, “I used to have a Toyota Corolla, and although it wasn’t particularly exciting or fun, it started, ran, and got me where I wanted to go with a minimum of drama or excessive expense”.

      In short, the Corolla has been (and Toyota would certainly like it to continue to be) the best example of ‘car as appliance’ to date, i.e., a well-built toaster on wheels. For many, that’s more than enough for their basic transportation needs.

  • avatar
    icemilkcoffee

    Wow! It looks way worse than the current generation. It’s like they are marching backwards. It looks as dorky as a 2002 Hyundai Accent.

    Whoever designed this turd needs to be checked for radiation poisoning. I am so glad the Toyota USA has the good sense to say no to this loser.

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    I closed the door on my cousins 2010 Corolla. It sounded like a hollow tin can. Wrapping knuckles on the plain slab sided door panels almost sounds like nothing is even in there. These cars are built to a very cheap standard and I suspect the reason they last may have something to do with the mostly elderly drivers that barely put on any miles. If this car were mine it would be falling apart after 5 years.

  • avatar
    niky

    It’s sad that both the Corolla and Camry have been on the engineering and accessory decontenting train for over a decade now… But though 96 may have been a high water mark for the line-up, the previous generation was in no way a bad car… And with three generations of stable specifications, the ZZ engine series benefits from the mature supply train the 90′s Corollas did.

    The current (non Axio) Corolla is relatively reliable, robust, has widely available parts (thanks to inter-generation parts commonality starting from the 02 model), is big inside, and now that the Civic has finally given in to model bloat, is also likely the lightest in it’s class. This has earned it a not unenviable reputation of being cheap to run and having terrific real-world fuel economy.

    http://www.consumerreports.org/cro/cars/new-cars/buying-advice/best-worst-cars-review/best-worst-fuel-economy/best-and-worst-fuel-economy.htm

    Yes, fudge what the EPA claims. The Corolla’s small, torquey motors and light body make it much more efficient in traffic than newer competitors with more tech, more gears and better EPA numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “But though 96 may have been a high water mark for the line-up, the previous generation was in no way a bad car”

      I don’t believe this. I spent a lot of time in the 96-02, and it wasn’t a nice car at all. Rock-reliable, yes, but the powertrain had a rubber-band feel and the seating was ass-on-the-pavement awful.

      I’d take the 03+ any day. There’s something to be said for the seating position in a modern subcompact: designers finally learned that a C-segment car doesn’t have to be a proportionately accurate, 7/8th-scale version of it’s D-segment sibling.

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      “The Corolla’s small, torquey motors and light body make it much more efficient in traffic …”

      Checking on fuelly.com, the 2010 Corolla averages 7.7 L/100 km. Its competitors (Civic, Versa, Accent, Versa, gasoline Golf, Cobalt) are all around 7.5-7.8 L/100 km, so the Corolla is surely not “much more efficient”. Unless you compare it to a Caliber, that is …

      • 0 avatar
        niky

        Versa, subcompact. Accent, subcompact, Cobalt… XFE? No idea, it’s not sold here… Neither is the current Golf… Which is a hatchback, not a sedan.

        The Civic, back in 2010, still matched the Corolla pound for pound in lightness. The new one is significantly heavier.

        The Caliber? It’s amazing that they actually made a car so much heavier and bulkier than the Neon, yet so devoid of any real interior space. My head hurt for weeks after my last Caliber test drive.

        Is 2010 the year they introduced the 2.4? Corollas with the Camry motors suck in terms of economy… They really should’ve just stuck with the high revving ZZs…

      • 0 avatar
        th009

        @niky, I don’t know Corollas well enough to know their engines. I picked 2010 since it was recent and had a large sample size on fuelly.com.

        Don’t know where you are if you get neither a Cobalt nor a Golf in your market (and hatchback vs sedan does not have an appreciable inherent fuel economy advantage). Golf (or Jetta, if you prefer), Civic and Cobalt certainly have similar interior space to the Corolla. Not sure about Accent or Versa.

    • 0 avatar

      and to put it another way, whilst living in the desert you can sip green tea. Myself I like to drain the oil wells and live off vodka

  • avatar
    Omoikane

    Corolla is and will always be the most reliable car in its class, a leader in mileage and fit-and-finish.
    The new Corolla is designed to do what the new Camry is doing: humiliate the competition and re-affirm market leadership.

  • avatar
    TireIrony

    Is that the new Coda?

  • avatar
    Illan

    Its Blandtastic

  • avatar
    Illan

    i always said that the Corolla is a Woman’s cars, some of the reasons:

    -toyota reputation between the ladies
    -maintenace is quite cheap
    -they are reliable
    -many female drivers

    I cant say i would not buy one, but a 2006 XRS VVTIL is a worthy consideration

  • avatar
    Charliej

    Internet children who can’t think for themselves. The group think is that any car that their parents liked is the spawn of Satan. Also, any car that is the least bit useful is to be scorned. All cars must have 500 horsepower or they are for losers. Let me tell you, children, you are not cool. The coolest car in the world will not attract a woman for you. You need a personality for that and you don’t develop a personality trying to impress people on the internet. When you grow up, you will understand that adults use cars, they don’t worship them.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    “I closed the door on my cousins 2010 Corolla. It sounded like a hollow tin can.”

    Reminds me of the Corolla I rented while on vacation. That thing creaked and groaned every time it hit a bump in the road. What a miserable thing to drive. I’ve never been so happy to get rid of a car in my life and I only rented the little turd for a day!…..LOL

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    All this negativity about this car and yet I see tons of them out there running around some as old as from the early 90′s I guess there are a lot of stupid people out there including myself!

  • avatar
    mic

    Is it just me or does this new Corolla look a bit like the new Versa. I just read that Nissan was #1 in profits among the Japanese carmakers so Toyota makes a car that looks like the Versa. Things that make you go HMMMMM.

  • avatar
    Speed3

    Sorry I don’t want it.

  • avatar
    jetcal1

    It is an inexpensive appliance used by people who either;
    1. Cannot afford what most readers here would consider a car.
    2. Have no desire to spend lots of money on a car.
    Since it is built to a price point, people need to remember that comparing Pioneer electronics to Cary electronics will produce the same results.

  • avatar
    redav

    It’s bland, not ugly.

    The Juke is ugly – big difference.

  • avatar
    spw

    Few people need to realize that NA Corolla is decontented world Corolla. In other parts of the world, Corolla is considered luxury car and comes with leather interior, etc.

    European one has Xenons, 180hp diesel engine, Digital air, alcantra seats, navigation, even double wishbone suspension.

    This new Japanese only model is important for few things:
    1. Weight reduction – seems that they reduced weight a lot, by up to 150kg.
    2. Fuel consumption improvements – with same engines, it now gets same fuel mileage as new Yaris. Which means around 10-15% improvement over old one.
    3. Interior will be largely similar to worldwide Corolla.

    • 0 avatar
      jimmyy

      The more decontenting, the better. Personally, I hate all the useless high tech garbage manufacturers are pushing in order to raise their profit margins. I always buy the most decontented model available. In my opinion, the decontented versions of most vehicles lack a lot of tacky chrome and oversized wheels which makes them look better.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Toyota Corollas appear to be showing up with drivers from the hipster scene … up and down the east coast.

    My personal choice in this segment is the Civic SI. I think this vehicle far outclasses the Corolla, and everything else in the class.

  • avatar
    Enrique

    here in Louisville,KY the Metro cops are the worst driving cops ever, they’ve hurt more people than I’ve ever seen in the last 15 years that I’ve been down here,and always break the legal speed limit religously !…upholding the Law my ARSE!

    • 0 avatar

      Dear alleged Automotive Expert:
      If this blogger is so so wrong, then the CEO of Toyota would be likewise misled. I placed a link to a sound file under “The 11th generation Corolla” in which Toyoda-san repeatedly talks about a “new generation Corolla” which “actually is the 11th generation Corolla.” If you think he is wrong, I suggest contacting Akio Toyoda instead of complaining here. Granted, one man’s refresh is another man’s new generation, but if Toyota calls it a new generation, so can I.
      The fact that this is a model for the Japanese domestic market has been amply covered, from the headline on down. It also has been explained that these days, “Corolla” means many things to many people.
      As far as doing more research goes, I went to the event with the recorder whirling and the camera blazing. Of the Western media, only the Wall Street Journal, Automotive News, and the wire services did same.
      If you still think that this is “completely irresponsible,” then please explain.

  • avatar
    Volt 230

    Seems like every time they make some changes to a model, they refer to it as a new gen, when in actuality since 1993, there have been only 2 completely new from the ground Corollas, the 93 continued with the same basic architecture till 2002, they are still using the same platform from 03, albeit modified a lot, I had hoped for an all new architecture since they seem to come every 10 yrs, but I guess it costs too much and Toyota felt they one they have now is good enough to continue for at least another cycle.

  • avatar
    AnsonYu

    They might be bland but they are fairly reliable. My family has had countless numbers from a original 66′ to a brand new ones. FYI Over here, even 1966 corollas can still be seen.


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