By on February 1, 2012

I may be the only auto journalist who hates the Cadillac CTS-V Wagon. Funny, because I like station wagons. And I like the CTS-V. A lot.

At the CTS Coupe launch in June of 2010, a Cadillac exec told me that only 5 were needed to be built to break even, making it effectively a wonderful bribe for journalists. Say nice things about GM products (and hell, maybe even bash the competition) and you can have one of these for a week. Or a year.

I’ve only seen one privately owned CTS-V Wagon ever. By comparison, I’ve seen three separate Mercedes R63 AMG wagons, a vehicle that could only be ordered, not purchased off the lot. It wasn’t long before even menswear fashion bloggers were driving this thing for a week, delivered to their door with a tank of gas and insurance provided. The world kept on buying Camrys. CTS sales were marginal.

Taking a page out of Cadillac’s PR playbook is Mercedes-Benz. A friend of mine uploaded the above Facebook photo – a brown E63 station wagon. The E63 wagon is a special order car. You cannot just walk in and buy one off the lot. The one pictured above is obviously a press car, so somebody at Mercedes PR knew exactly what they were doing – AMG customers, as a rule order their wares only in silver, black or white. So why brown? Simple, car geeks love brown. Liking brown cars gives you a weird, hipster-like status. Precisely because brown cars are considered repulsive to society at large, those who pledge allegiance to brown cars must be true enthusiasts to love such an obscure hue.

Our first review of the $111,665 Teutonic Turd (really, that’s what it looks like) comes from the world’s foremost expert on high performance  wagons. A cursory glance at the article suggests that the E63 wagon is awesome. I may be the only auto journalist to have never driven an AMG car at 10/10ths on an autocross course, but I do know that nightclub floozies from the Commonwealth of Independent States absolutely adore them.

While we at TTAC mock the idea of flying “social media influencers” on charter jets across the country, there’s actually a much cheaper way of bribing social maladroits to say nice things about your company – give them a press car that’s tailored to their geeky, self-satisfied sense of sophistication. Having manufacturers send ringers into the press fleet is nothing new, but tailoring press cars just to suit the tastes of a very small cadre of automotive autistics is something that hasn’t been seen before.

The broader issue here has nothing to do with ethics, or Motor Trend’s relevance, but the evolution of PR tactics in an age where someone with 1,000 Twitter followers (half of them bots for X-rated wbesites) can be considered someone of influence. Pandering to the automotive press used to mean sending call-girls up to their rooms on press trips. Now it means ordering a very narrow interest presser in the hopes that it pays dividends in future.

Is $111,665 really such a big sum to ensure some good press? Compared to the millions of dollars spent on advertising, marketing, PR and/or damage control when one of your execs is caught committing dipping into company funds for personal uses, or bribing 22 foreign governments it’s not such a big figure. Or maybe a drive in the E63 means that your products will get good press, your competitors will get slagged and all of that will help you capture some imaginary, arbitrary bragging rights?

I saw Dave Chapelle in 2007, right after his “breakdown”, and during the performance, he explained why he turned down Comedy Central’s $50,000,000 offer. Dave said that the execs wrote the check and then metaphorically “laid their dick across the table, over the money. To get the money, I’d have to grab their dick, lift it up, and take it.” We all know Dave didn’t take the money. But someone took the keys to the E63.

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80 Comments on “Why Did Mercedes-Benz Build A Brown E63 Wagon For The Media?...”


  • avatar
    28-cars-later

    Pity the CTS Wagon doesn’t look as stately.

    • 0 avatar
      twotone

      “The E63 wagon is a special order car. You cannot just walk in and buy one off the lot.”

      Not sure about that — autotrader.com shows 38 new & used E63 wagons on dealer lots for sale.

    • 0 avatar

      Derek isn’t the only person who hates the CTS-V Wagon.

      I can’t stand it. And considering you could get the awesome coupe form, I’d never want the wagon. If someone needed a wagon, they’d get more out of the SRX 4WD. Probably for less money in fact. The CTS pricing is too high.

  • avatar

    Hmm Could be a nice Hearse perhaps?
    Saludos

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    ***Sigh*** That qualifies as car-porn for us wagon lovers…

  • avatar
    Type57SC

    The thing is, the CTS-V wagon is orderable by anyone, even if rare, so enthusiast sites should praise GM for making it available. It’s not like they are one-offing a parts bin car that you can’t order from the dealer or showing forbidden Euro fruit. Celebrate it

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      The issue is, there are Euro car lovers, and there are Cadillac lovers. Then there are wagon lovers, and CUV lovers. Most of the wagon variety are also the Euro variety. That’s a problem Caddy has that Benz does not.

  • avatar
    ajla

    Why do auto journalists seem to universally love wagons so much?

    Is it asthetics, CUV hate, contrarianism, or do they they all have hobbies that require the regular transport of bulky but not dirty items?

    • 0 avatar

      It’s contrarianism and CUV hate. When you don’t have money or social cachet to set you apart, the only status play left is to have obscure tastes.

      • 0 avatar

        Either that, or wagons drive better than CUVs, but offer more utility than a sedan or coupe.

      • 0 avatar
        George B

        Or maybe auto journalists have no women in their lives to reject the purchase of station wagons.

        I’ve read that auto journalists put a lot of thought into what colors will photograph well. Brown may photograph well while black looks better at the night club valet stand than in print.

      • 0 avatar
        BobAsh

        Or auto journalist don’t yield to American fashion, which resents the wagons as “uncool”.

        And as for the brown – I’ve noticed that brown “amplifies” the design. Good looking car looks better in brown, ugly looking looks even worse.

        BTW, I’ve driven at least three brown press cars last year. And I see lot of brown cars on the streets.

      • 0 avatar
        baggins

        you are wise beyond your years.

        Here is the SF Bay Area, the attitude you describe above is practically a way of life.

        • 0 avatar

          It’s amusing to watch my generation move on from adopting that attitude to shitty screamo bands, and now applying it obnoxiously to food and consumer goods which are authentic by way of being “local”,”organic”, “sustainable”. Of course they protest when Wal Mart starts carrying organic produce, because when the working poor co opts your status symbol, it’s now a lost cause.

      • 0 avatar
        korvetkeith

        That is possibly the most concise and genius thing you’ve written.

    • 0 avatar
      A Caving Ape

      Speaking for myself – because it’s a brilliant design. It adds a large amount of utility to a car while sacrificing virtually nothing. Maybe a few pounds to curb weight, but any added weight is over the back wheels, at least.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      It’s contrarianism. The market rejected wagons, and we all know that the market is full of idiotic plebs that don’t buy “cool” cars, so therefore wagons are cool and anyone who questions the wisdom of said conclusion is a thoroughly mainstream dolt.

      • 0 avatar

        Comment of the day right here.

      • 0 avatar
        Sundowner

        It’s not contrarianism, it’s simple math. A wagon does everything better than an SUV. A wagon returns the same interior space, better handling, better fuel economy, better performance, and the same or better utility with AWD. The only reason to own an SUV or CUV is a lack of self esteem. This is so true that you can just look at vast majority of CUV’s you can plainly see they are no more different from a wagon than a high top sneaker is different from a normal one. Lie to yourself all you want.

      • 0 avatar
        Nostrathomas

        I resent this insinuation that the only reason to buy a wagon is to be different.

        My love of wagons has nothing to do with being contrarian, and everything to do with being efficient as possible. It offers me the space I need in as small of a package as possible, while still giving me great driving dynamics.

        Being “different” is a small speck of the reason….especially in Canada or Europe, were hatches and wagons don’t really set you apart anyway.

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Dont get me wrong, I love wagons, especially high performance wagons like this or the CTS-V. My wife loves the Corvette Grand Sport, but for my $75k I would take a V-wagon any day.

        But CUVs and SUVs have a few benefits that performance wagons do not have. After having an Edge rental I was reminded of how much easier it is to drive around. No worries about curbs, much more comfortable ride, the higher seating position makes it easier to drive in traffic (to see around the other SUVs, pickups, vans, etc. that everyone else drives!), the Edge was far roomier than the 300 we rented for our last road trip, we could pile more bags in it and not have to plan our packing, just toess em in. No minivan stigma. I see why they sell so well to people who could care less about driving dynamics.

        I would drive a sport wagon, and deal with it. I would rather put my wife in a sporty CUV and not worry about curbed rims or complaints about the ride or the view.

      • 0 avatar
        BobAsh

        Well, you’re, on most points, wrong.

        1) CUV do NOT ride better than wagons. CUVs are higher, which means higher center of gravity, which in turn means the thing will either sway more in the corners, or be stiffer.

        2) Curbs. Curbs are problems for the tires, if you hit a curb that a wagon won’t clear with an CUV, you’ll destroy your rim. And most CUVs nowadays have the same stupid low-profile tires as the wagons.

        3) Room. The Chrysler 300 is extremely small inside. Normally, the CUV is about the same size inside as the equivalent wagon/hatch. Sometimes even smaller. Compare BMW 5 series and X5.

      • 0 avatar
        stuki

        There’s something to that, but wagons are generally just flat out better for anyone who cares to not lumber around like a sedated snail stuck in molasses. The low ground clearance on some of the faster, more body clad versions do present a bit of a challenge to their all around utility vis-a-vis a good CUV; but in more sedate trim, and with AWD, their disadvantage rarely amount to more than less room for snow chains under the generally lower wheel wells.

        I do believe the only way to once and for all settle this conundrum would be for Baruth, or someone similarly qualified to test vehicles optimized for hooning, to simultaneously live with the X5M and the new E63 wagon for an extended period of time; trashing the heck out of both on both road, gravelpath, rally course and track. Then you’d have the “best” US available wagon pitched against the “best” CUV in a fair fight. Tested in such important metrics as maximum “safe” pace on a crowded freeway and down a twisty canyon, how stable they are in flight and upon landing and such similarly useful metrics for these vehicles’ target market. Both are about the same price as well. Don’t know if the respective German marques would find this sort of thing a good use of their press fleet, however.

        Am I correct to assume a test drive in a new E63 sedan, combined with a good look at a more sedate E wagon, would provide most of the info needed to make the decision about whether to order the 63 wagon?

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        You are mistaking “ride” for “handling”. A firmly suspended sport wagon like an Audi or CTS-V with low profile tires slams over potholes and crappy pavement, jostles you back and forth, etc. Most SUVs and CUVs are softly sprung and ride better than that in regular driving. They dont handle better, and SUVs with the super low profile tires obviously do not have this advantage. But a basic CUV/SUV with regular tires ride well and the tires are taller so you dont curb your wheels.

        As for room, even if passenger space is the same, the open cargo area makes it easier to load than a sedan, and the X5 has a notoriously tiny cargo and interior, so not a great example. Our CRV is cavernous compared to my GTI, who cares?

        And also, I specifically said I see why they appeal to people who do not care about driving dynamics.

      • 0 avatar
        BobAsh

        mmm4ever: No, I’n not mistaking anything, but you need to compare apples to apples. Of course, performance wagon will usually be less comfortable than a basic CUV/SUV. But basic wagon, with same soft-sprung suspension and similar tires will usually be more comfortable (unless the CUV is allowed to handle MUCH worse – in which case it becomes uncomfortable from the softiness).

        And the same goes about the wheels – if you want to prevent curbing your wheels, buy something on base, small rims. Buying a CUV won’t help you much, as they don’t have that big wheels. Maybe buying a Suburban or Land Cruiser will help, but that’s entirely another kettle of fish.

        As for the trunk space – CRV is cavernous compared to GTI. Who would’ve known that?? What about comparing CRV to something similarly large, like, say, Accord Wagon? Or comparing Audi Q3 to A3 Sportback? Audi Q5 to A4 Avant? Volvo XC60 to V60 Wagon… usually it varies from “no difference” to slight difference in both ways…

      • 0 avatar
        mnm4ever

        Dont get all bent out of shape here, I like the wagons too. And all of the points you are making are entirely valid, but you are thinking like a car enthusiast. Most car buyers dont care about any of that stuff. And we dont even have an Accord wagon, the closest you can get is a TSX wagon, which has smaller cargo area and passenger area than our CRV, low profile tires, and costs almost $10k more. Nice though… if it had a stick I might consider one.

        You can argue all you want, my point has already been proven, wagons are most definitely out of favor in the US, SUVs and CUVs are obviously incredibly popular. I was just trying to say that I can see why they get chosen by those non-enthusiasts.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    In my “if I win the lottery” list, the R63 figures quite highly. It’s sliding doors away from perfection.

  • avatar
    Jack Baruth

    For the record, I intended to order a CTS-V. I asked Cadillac to paint it Synergy Green. I indicated that I was willing to pay extra for that. They refused. That’s fine.

    They then simply GAVE one to Motor Trend. What’s a one-year, unlimited-mileage, free-insurance lease on a $77,000 vehicle worth? Go ask your Cadillac dealer.

    I have no intention of paying for something that they are giving away to yes-men.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      Then I expect you will never again buy a new car, from any manufacturer. Let me ask you, why do you blame companies for seeking to advertise their products in the most effective way possible? Journalistic integrity is a matter for journalists. It is not the responsibility of car companies to enforce some kind of vague standard of ethics for autojournos that consists mainly of the ramblings of blog editors. It is the responsibility of of car companies to sell cars, and the chief method of doing that is through advertising.

      • 0 avatar
        PintoFan

        It wasn’t particularly directed at you, Derek. Just at Jack, for thinking that Cadillac (or any other manufacturer, for that matter) isn’t going to provide loaner vehicles as a means of garnering good press. The vehicles are GM’s to sell or give away at whatever price they deem fit, to whomever they choose.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        You’re reading a lot into a simple statement.

        I’m not going to pay my own money for a vehicle which is provided free of charge over the long term to our direct competitors. That amounts to subsidy of the enemy, to coin a phrase.

        The last time I took delivery of new cars — a 2009 Audi S5 and a 2009 Ford Flex Limited AWD — I wasn’t in direct competition with anybody who got one for free.

    • 0 avatar

      (This is in response to the “subsidy of the enemy” comment)

      You consider yourself a direct competitor to Motor Trend?

      Also, aren’t most long-term cars (aside from Edmunds) giveaways? Wouldn’t that require you to boycott every OEM who gives a long-termer to any automotive media outlet?

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      The green Audi was cool, but I’m not sure it would have been as cool if VW was spraying every other Golf that color.

    • 0 avatar
      TheHammer

      At least you don’t let your emotions get the best of you…

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    If I was both fabulously wealthy and mad enough to buy an AMG anything new, I would absolutely, totally get an E63AMG in brown-over-tan two-tone.

    To match my decrepit w115.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    Mercedes is smart to make these special-order only. Why would anyone spending $111K want to buy off the lot? I refused to buy off the lot for my mere $45K purchase. You can have it your way. Color and all. Brown does seem to be the new black though. Bleck.

    I would imagine that for all intents and purposes the CTS-V wagon is special order only as well – only the very largest Cadillac dealers would even think of using floorplan money to stock one, and as I keep saying, the folks who want a wagon, WANT a wagon and will wait the paltry few weeks to get one just they way they want it.

    And as for the desirability? There is no downside to a wagon, only upside. You can fit things in it that simply will NOT fit in a sedan (especially in this age of stupidly coupe-like sedan rooflines), and the better weight distribution usually outweighs the slight weight penalty. And to my eye, the wagon is nearly always better looking than the sedan – stylists always seem to lose the plot at the trunk these days.

    As BMW and Porsche have proven, you can make a fast SUV, but the same go-fast bits in a wagon will both go faster and stop and corner better. Nothing like loosing 500-1000lbs of faux-offroad ability to make the drive better.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    Brown just works on wagons. The Flex, Mini Clubman, that Mercedes, heck my dad’s Pinto Country Squire, brown looks fine. Don’t know why. But a brown sedan or hatch is just nasty.

    • 0 avatar
      Flybrian

      My Musket Brown ’76 LeSabre tells you to go to hell…and also lend it money for gas.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        As the former owner of both a brown wagon (’63 Dart) and a brown hatch (’83 Accord), I have to agree, brown looks better on a wagon. Both were repainted by the previous enthusiast owners. I didn’t have to beg for gas money for either one, though when I owned the Dart, gas was 33 cents/gallon, so a fillup cost about $5.

  • avatar
    The Doctor

    Why did Daimler give journos a stool-coloured E63? Because it was the only one to hand and they got a few horselaughs out of seeing journalists try and rationalise the colour choice as being “for enthusiasts”…

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    How about the fact that subdued colors as dark brown and dark green sell more during tough economic times?

    • 0 avatar
      FuzzyPlushroom

      Dark green, as much as I love it (my 745 is Tropic Green), is essentially the defining automotive paint hue of the late 1990s – the midst of the dot-com boom. Nowadays, in a more difficult economy, we’re lucky to be offered red or navy blue alongside our greys and beiges.

  • avatar
    benzaholic

    Mercedes has made some great brown cars in the past.
    Perhaps in the same way that AMG called that previous engine a 6.3 even though it was barely over 6.2, but “6.3” has history.

    Look at the lovely brown W116 450SEL 6.9 in the movie Ronin.

    Just be really glad they didn’t dip into their other old paint bin and give you something in avocado green.

  • avatar
    SV

    “I may be the only auto journalist who hates the Cadillac CTS-V Wagon.”

    You are now my mortal enemy. (only slightly kidding)

    On another note, I’m not a fan of the current E-Class in general, but that particular example is quite nice. The brown helps.

  • avatar
    racer-esq.

    “Having manufacturers send ringers into the press fleet is nothing new, but tailoring press cars just to suit the tastes of a very small cadre of automotive autistics is something that hasn’t been seen before.”

    *Maybe* not with a special order color. But all the time with cars with only the performance options, that you will only be able to get with special order.

    Go on cars.com or autotrader and find a base V6 Mustang with only the Performance Package, or a stickshift BMW with no options. Yet these always get tested.

    • 0 avatar
      PintoFan

      Your point is valid, but I don’t think anyone beyond the most delusional “car guy” expects those two models (or similar unicorns) to be available in any quantity in the real world. We should be self-aware by now that the market does not cater to enthusiast tastes. We simply expect that the journalists will inform us of what’s out there, and how well they liked it.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      By the way, I’m a fan of brown, but this looks way too maroon.

    • 0 avatar

      The Toronto press fleet is different. We never get “journo spec” cars like that. We also have to pick them up and drop them off ourselves, re-fill the gas tank, wash them (unless stipulated not to by the OEMs, which happens) and our own insurance policy is required.

  • avatar
    mitchw

    At the DC autoshow this week, you’ll find two upscale cars painted lush brown. The Mercedes SLS roadster, and the Lincoln MKZ. The Lincoln guy will say the color is actually ‘Bourbon.’ And I recall seeing that Acura CUV monstrosity in brown last year.

    I don’t get it either, Derek.

  • avatar
    hifi

    I love the Cadillac CTS-V wagon. I’ve seen two V’s and several standard CTS wagons. Damn sexy. I also like Mercedes wagons. They are more conventional looking and very stately and WASPey.

    But look at it this way, Cadillac could not do a conventional design for their first wagon. It would have drawn-out so many hearse comments, which would not have been good. So it was necessary to do a completely unconventional, swoopy rear end design. And I like it.

  • avatar
    BobAsh

    So, the whole article is about print journalists being pricks, because they take long-term loaners and have their short-termers delivered, fueled and insured (while you don’t, which is because you live in Toronto, not because you don’t want to) and painting a press car brown is a definite proof of inherent wrongness of PR cars, right?

    Well, I have never seen a Genesis Coupe in this country, other than press and demo cars. Is it proof that it’s “journo-specific-bound-to-be-a-bribe car?

    And to explain why journos love wagons – because wagons are just better than CUVs. People buy CUVs just because they LOOK bigger and allow them to sit higher. In every other aspect, like fuel economy, handling or performance, wagons are superior to CUVs. And journos know it, because they drive a lot of cars (provided by automakers – the same way as cinema critics get free tickets…). By the way, not everywhere is the mythical diesel wagon with manual transmission just a journos wet dream. There’s a place called Europe, where people still buy wagons, although they have lots CUVs to choose from. So maybe there’s something more about wagons than motoring journalists’ need to be “different”, and “hip”.

    And by the way, I see quite a lot of brown cars lately. Many of them are, as you may guessed, E-classes…

  • avatar
    Wagon Of Fury

    The brown is an homage to Ronin, another car-geek inside reference that only enthusiasts will get

  • avatar
    replica

    I didn’t really process things that far. I just think it’s a great looking wagon. Extended love from my appreciation for hatchbacks.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    As the former owner of a metallic brown (a mind-twisting idea in itself) 2000 Taurus Wagon, add me to the list of those who think it works better on a wagon.

    But then *everything* works better on a wagon. Wagons are like superheros. In normal day-to-day, they work like sedans. But when you need to carry something big or ungainly, they become worth their weight in gold.

    Wagons, like convertibles are special. The Taurus was such a meh car. But as a wagon it was an American jewel, incredibly functional which made up for the meh factor and then some.

    Our current CTS wagon isn’t equipped exactly as I would wish. The V was just out of the budget and as we were looking for a CPO example, it’s a something of a rara avis. So we make do with the 3.0 instead of the 3.6 or 6.2. But it’s so damned practical and good-looking that it would be missed if we had to back to a sedan.

    • 0 avatar
      Bimmer

      I just wish Ford had redesigned rear end from ovoid Taurus, when MY 2000 Taurus rolled out. That’s why I disliked Taurus wagon and the only other wagon that I dislike is CTS. Every other car I would take as a wagon over sedan.

  • avatar

    “…evolution of PR tactics in an age where someone with 1,000 Twitter followers (half of them bots for X-rated wbesites) can be considered someone of influence. Pandering to the automotive press used to mean sending call-girls up to their rooms on press trips. Now it means ordering a very narrow interest presser in the hopes that it pays dividends in future.”

    You have a straw-man of a social mediaite/blogger person that you love to pummel…why not cite actual examples (as Jack is wont to)?

    The implication that enthusiast car access is a bribe or reward for good coverage should be easy enough to find evidence of. After all, the reviews are out there to be cited.

    In the absence of more specific examples, these articles read more like cranky-old-man-ism or petty jealousy. I know you’re above the latter, but it’ll take a change of tone and some more substance to get past the former.

  • avatar
    svenmeier

    Are you sure that’s brown? To me the color looks like maroon red. Either that or it is brown and the sunlight glare makes the color look red.

  • avatar
    V16

    I would argue that ‘Espresso Brown’ looked GREAT on the 2011 Buick Regal. Looks like it was dropped for 2012.
    “Mocha bronze’ is available on the new Verano.

  • avatar
    npbheights

    She’s got big thoughts, big dreams, and a big, brown Mercedes sedan …

  • avatar
    acuraandy

    From an owner of a Amber Bronze/S*** brown Malibu, I must say, that car looks real nice.

    This may stem, however, from growing up in my parents Brown/Brown ’78 Plymouth Volare.

    Or ‘The Turd’ I had in high school. ’83 Ford Mustang, 2bbl 3.8 V6, Brown/Brown (and I mean BROWN, not Tan, inside and out).

    With that said, you just can’t polish a turd…

  • avatar
    kkop

    Don’t write for a blog, magazine, or even just for fun on Facebook. But I did get to drive the CTS-V and CTS-V wagon on the local racetrack last year.

    The most fun I’ve had on 4 wheels. In my life. I know, compared to the writers here I’ve led a sheltered life, automotively speaking.

    Can’t get it in green? Who cares? You can’t see the color when you’re driving anyway. Not feeling the outrage really.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    If I had 100 grand, I’d buy one. And in brown. I like the 5 series wagons more, had one all thru college, but they’ve been killed off for the lumpy ugly-ass Grand Touring. If they ever offer an M5 Estate in the States I may need to sell the house to buy one.

  • avatar

    I may be the only auto journalist who hates the Cadillac CTS-V Wagon. Funny, because I like station wagons. And I like the CTS-V. A lot.

    I’m in with you on this one, and I own a CTS myself. I thing the Wagon is fugly.

    • 0 avatar
      bunkie

      Nah, the wagon is way cooler than the sedan. The sedan screams “leased” in contrast to the way the wagon is all about recognizing a rare combination of style and function that’s worth hanging onto.

      • 0 avatar

        “The sedan screams “leased” in contrast to the way the wagon is all about recognizing a rare combination of style and function that’s worth hanging onto.”

        Ah the typical fallacious trap that car enthusiasts are prone too. You think your choice is so distinct and avant-garde and sends a certain message about you to the outside world…but they are indifferent at best, contemptuous at worst.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        An interesting point here. When I bought my 3-series, the dealership finance guy mentioned that wagon buyers (what few there are) never lease them. SUV buyers almost always leased them, and the rest were in the middle, but more leases than purchases by far.

        I get all kinds of unsolicited appreciative comments on my car at gas stations and whatnot. One of the most common being “I didn’t know BMW made a wagon”. So if the word is not spread, is it any surprise that not many are sold? When was the last time you saw any sort of marketing for the wagon version of anything? Though realistically, BMW would prefer that you buy an X3, they are cheaper to make but sell for more money.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        Derek-

        Having had two sedans in a row and, having had a hell of a time carrying anything useful and, hating the ponderous nature of SUVs, this has nothing to do with anything except wanting to ge the most of my car dollars. What you call “fallacious”, I call eminently practical in a world where many other people imagine themselves as world-explorers needing giant SUVs when all they really need is a wagon.

        And, the buying public being what they are, I expect Cadillac to discontinue the wagon any minute now. I expect to hang onto mine for a while.

      • 0 avatar
        akitadog

        “Ah the typical fallacious trap that car enthusiasts are prone too. You think your choice is so distinct and avant-garde and sends a certain message about you to the outside world…but they are indifferent at best, contemptuous at worst.”

        Derek,

        I didn’t see anything in that post that spoke to how others view the CTS-V wagon owner, rather that the wagon owner recognizes the value of the combination of performance and practicality. Why are you attributing such sentiments about others’ perceptions to bunkie without any evidence?

  • avatar
    86er

    I nearly forgot to compliment you on the “Commonwealth of Independent States” reference. I haven’t seen that since 1992.

  • avatar
    nrd515

    I like the car itself, but I would never have a brown car in my garage, unless it was an old musclecar and I was going to repaint it. Brown/beige, gold, bronze, lighter greens, and pink are “NEVER!” colors for me. White is tolerable on some vehicles, but is never one of my color choices since anything other than the above list is preferable.


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