By on August 31, 2010

Toyota’s Verso S will debut at the forthcoming Paris Auto Show, and these first pictures show that iQ-inspired styling is starting to creep across the Toyota small-car lineup. So does the edgier (by Toyota standards) iQ-inspired design language mean the shortest micro-MPV in Europe (at under 4 meters) might make it stateside as a Scion-branded van? Anything’s possible, but Toyota ain’t saying… for now.

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26 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: Toyota’s High-iQ Minivan Edition...”


  • avatar
    jkross22

    Look! Toyota stole the designer of the Juke from Nissan!

  • avatar

    This looks like a knock-off of Fit, and hardly an MPV like Mazda 5. Which would not be a bad thing for Scion, because it goes a long way to make amends for the 2G xB.

  • avatar
    mjz

    God knows Scion needs something to boost sales. Mini minivan sounds like it would be a great addition to the line. However, the front of this thing looks like a Japanese cartoon character!

  • avatar
    slavuta

    I like this automobile, design wise.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I love it. I love everything about it. About the only thing I can’t tell is home many rows of seats it has, but looks like a great alternative to the space-wasting Matrix and slots neatly between the Yaris and Venza/Sienna.

    The detailing is close to the Camry Hybrid and Prius; I’m wondering if this will sport a hybrid powertrain as well?

    • 0 avatar
      th009

      At under 4m long, it’s sure to be two rows of seats (the VW Touran is 4.4m long and is one of the shortest three-row MPVs).

      But it’s a very nice, fresh design, one of the best-looking Toyotas in quite some time.

    • 0 avatar
      Sammy B

      So how would you fix the Matrix then? I know it’s a fairly small car to begin with, but what makes it more space-wasting than others on the market?

      For what it’s worth this stretch iQ could be interesting. I wonder, though, if the option of a bigger version might deter the masses from picking the smaller/standard version.

      Either way, give something like this to Scion or kill it. They need some unique/different vehicles.

    • 0 avatar

      Matrix is a Corolla platform with good front-impact safety. It’s a decently sized snout. Also, its under-hatch space is quite decent.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Have a look at the trunk of the Matrix and then that of the Fit (or Elantra Touring, for that matter). The high load floor and low roof of the Toyota badly compromises useful interior space.

      The Fit is a whole class smaller of a car, and yet it easily outclasses the Matrix in space for people and stuff in every dimension save hiproom. I llike hatchbacks, but the Matrix is pretty compromised. The prior model at least boasted good headroom, but the seat and roof in the new model take much of that away.

  • avatar
    BobJava

    This looks like a great design. With the tC’s redesign, it certainly looks better than anything Scion has right now.

    My only worry, aside from it never making it here, is that it makes it here with an extra several inches on the front overhang (ala the Jazz-to-Fit uglification).

  • avatar
    grzydj

    Would be a nice replacement for the much maligned second generation xB. I think it looks pretty neat.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Toyota had been promising a hybrid minivan — I hope this isn’t it, as I had been hoping for something Sienna sized.

    Otherwise, it looks like the replacement for the Auris/bX/Matrix, no?

    Whatever it is, it’s one of the better looking people movers Toyota has shown in a while.

  • avatar
    joe_thousandaire

    Perfect design direction for Toyota, it already looks like it hit a brick wall going 70mph.

  • avatar
    V572625694

    Is there some functional reason for extending the silvery light-surrounds and plastic covers so far from the actual light sources, or is it just pure “style”?

    That said, this a pretty stylish looking Toyota.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    The only thing wrong with the picture is that it looks too much like a Honda Fit.

  • avatar
    i_godzuki

    Verso has three rows of seats: http://www.toyota.co.uk/cgi-bin/toyota/bv/generic_editorial.jsp?navRoot=toyota_1024_root&nodiv=TRUE&fullwidth=TRUE&forceText=%3Cnone%3E&edname=CV4_CarChapter&id=CV5_gallery_new&zone=Zone%20NG%20Verso&deepLink=CV5_gallery_new&navType=Internal&sr=Mall

    A bit like the Honda Freed rather than the Fit.
    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Honda_Freed

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    …iQ-inspired styling is starting to creep across the Toyota small-car lineup…

    Based on what I’m seeing in that picture, ‘slither’ or ‘ooze’ might be more appropriate.

    Yeah, it’s stylish all right, if that means that it’s got a lot of style. Unfortunately, it has as much style as three or four different manufacturers. It looks like someone took a 3d model from a normal car, grabbed random points, and stretched them around until their mouse hand got tired.

  • avatar
    OldandSlow

    It’s small whatever it is – with two rows of seats and then a hatch. I don’t see much room for a luggage compartment. I hope Toyo can package the rear seat so that it is as versatile as the Honda Fit.

    I think this rendition looks better than the second generation Honda Fit/Jazz.

  • avatar
    HoldenSSVSE

    A Scion branded minivan?!?!

    I didn’t know generation Y was into mom-mobiles.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      I’m right on the border of X and Y and have two kids. Recall the G-Y is ~1977 through to ~1990. Most of those people at least 20, and Y is generally having kids earlier than X or the Boomers did.

  • avatar
    amac

    I dislike Toyota designs. Homely and awkward.


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