By on March 12, 2010

Ford’s new Taurus-based Interceptor will be available with the 3.5 liter Duratec, or the twin-turbo Ecoboost engine. Front wheel drive is standard, and AWD will be an option. But then, if you got to use other people’s tax money to buy your work ride, would you really save the few bucks by not buying the 365 hp, AWD version? Of course not. You are the law! Libraries can always have bake sales. [via Jalopnik]

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74 Comments on “What’s Wrong With This Picture: To Protect, Serve And Haul A Little Ass Edition...”


  • avatar
    educatordan

    OK, guys, new set of headlights to memorize. In high school (1995 graduate) I got to the point where I could tell the difference between a Crown Vic and a Caprice Classic at night from well over a block away. It didn’t matter if it was the square or the “areo” models.

  • avatar
    Autojunkie

    I like the new Taurus alot, but it will do about as well as the Impala police cruisers… Marginal…

    There is a reason GM is going back to a rear-drive V6/V8 package. I think the Charger and/or “new” Chevy will take the lead when the old panther is out of the picture.

    • 0 avatar
      Contrarian

      ^Agreed.

    • 0 avatar
      john.fritz

      Yup.

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      The biggest draw for the Fox bodied Fords is that they’re body-on-frame. This means they last a lot longer in fleet use and can take the day to day grind of patrols. However the Fox Fords have had their problems over the years too, a problem with rear end collisions causing fires led to a fire suppression unit being placed in the trunk. There was also a problem with the wheels corroding and causing flats.

    • 0 avatar
      basho

      Panzer, I think you are getting Ford terms confused. The Crown Vic is not called a “Fox body”. First of all, there is no “Fox body”, there is a Fox platform that the Mustang used to use. This is a RWD unibody platform. The Crown Vic is on the “Panther” platform which is shared with the Town Car. This is a RWD BOF(Body on Frame) platform.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      Basho:

      Thank you for making the correction for others.

      I knew FOX platform = Mustang and Crown Vic = Panther, go together like oil and water.

      I’m still glazed over the “concept” of a AWD TAURUS PI against a paid-for Panther.. —

    • 0 avatar
      basho

      Accazdatch, I can’t see many depts ordering the Ecoboost AWD variant. Mostly because of the cost. I agree that it’s strange to abandon the Crown Vic with the tooling most likely paid off. Who cares if cop cars remain the same over years. In this economy with many state governments in the red or close to it, I would think the cheap and reliable trumps new and cool.

  • avatar
    John R

    I know at least one cop who might be interested, http://tinyurl.com/ybetxk8

  • avatar
    bmoredlj

    If it’s priced anywhere near a SHO with EcoBoost and AWD, you’re talking $37,700, a $10K premium over a 2010 PI. Yikes!

    Maybe they should have made it a Lincoln MKS Police Interceptor instead…send some sales Linc’s way…

  • avatar
    pgcooldad

    If you really want to haul ass, you get one of these:

    http://www.allpar.com/squads/police-cars/challenger.html

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    While 365hp probably does sound very appealing to your average police department requisition manager, one really does have to question the durability of twin turbochargers for the heavy use a police department will subject these cars to. Will the po-po be willing to take a winger on turbos AND on the move away from body-on-frame construction in one package? I suppose time and take rates will tell. But you can color me dubious.

  • avatar
    porschespeed

    Here in the midworst, Chargers have become the new go-to ride for smallish munis that generate a disproportionate amount of revenue from speed enforcement.

    Serious PDs know that a Vic or a Capriceabu will get you there just as fast as the ‘bad ass’ Charger – rollin’ code you’re gonna get there quickly in an old diesel Rabbit.

    Beyond the obvious practical aspects, there’s the psych of having your cops in bland, non-exciting vehicles. There’s a reason that most highway patrols got rid of their Mustang/Camaro “pursuit” cars in short order – shockingly, the boys were being very bad, very often in them.

    Another stormtrooper tool. Lovely.

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      The police dept. in my city bought Chargers because they cost less than the Fords.

      When your life or your families lives are on the line you can have the PD respond in an old Diesel Rabbit. The rescue unit can pick you or your family up in a 40 year old Ambulance too, if that makes you feel better.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      My point is, if the responder is rolling code, they will get there about the same time regardless of of the vehicle they drive.

      Just as in many high-power v. low-power contests, one might think the Lambo will beat the TDI Benz – but it often doesn’t. In fact, too much capability often has regressive effects on response times.

      As someone who had several relatives in LE and a few friends still in, I know never to think LE can/will protect me or my loved ones. That’s my responsibility.

      LE exists to solve crimes, it seldom, if ever, prevents them.

    • 0 avatar
      rudiger

      While I have no doubt that law enforcement in fast, stealth cars are prone to breaking traffic laws with impunity, a highway patrol officer once told me he hated driving an unmarked police ponycar because Left-Lane Bandits weren’t as inclined to obey/get out of the way, even with lights and siren blaring away.

      My guess would be that, more than anything else (including load capacity), is why the hotrod police-pursuit Mustang and Camaro generally lost out to the stodgy (but highly recognizable) Panther.

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      Well then, by your argument, a stripped down non turbo, fwd Taurus should be just fine for most PD’s. That’s about as non ‘stormtrooper tool’ as you could get.

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      Yes, a standard Taurus FWD V6 would be plenty adequate. The performance equivalent has been for 5-8 years.

      I base this on a few well-established facts on the ground.

      1. Malibu cop car
      2. Caprice cop car
      3. You can’t outrun Motorola

      If ultimate response time really had results measured in seconds, then all cops should be a on motorcycles.

      Cops, like all of us, like to have cool, shiny tools at work. Tools that, while they may have some esoteric attributes, cost way more than the alternative and don’t perform any better 99.999% of the time.

      This is Snap-On v. Craftsman. The Craftsman tool will do the job just as well in almost any plausible scenario.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Even a diesel Rabbit is faster than a diesel ambulance or fire truck.

      And seriously – how much abuse do cop cars REALLY get? These days, they mostly sit idling at workzones or in the median running speed traps. Real life is not the movies or TV. And given the way most local cops drive, the last thing they need is 365hp.

      Around here, the State Police are not even supposed to use the grass medians to turn around on the highway anymore.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    I think Ford knows they will loose a great amount of the police cruiser business and has determined it wasn’t profitable to offer a RWD platform. IMO the SHO engine and AWD drivetrain are a recipe for disaster in a police cruiser besides the additional unjustifiable cost. The FWD version won’t cut the mustard just as the current Impala didn’t. Ford has to do what’s profitable and apparently that doesn’t include police cruisers.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Yeah, while Ford is talking a good game, claiming they consulted with their Police Board and all that, I think they’ve internally consoled themselves with losing a large chunk of the market. It won’t happen overnight (inertia!) but without a low-cost option anymore there is nothing to make Ford especially appealing to law enforcement agencies.

    • 0 avatar
      mikedt

      I too have to wonder how Ford could possibly NOT make money continuing to sell Crown Vics to just that select group. I know they’ve got some unused factories and the development and tooling has been paid for. Hell they could split it off into a separate division and employ all new workers for less money. As long as each sale covers their variable costs it will make money. It’s not like every Crown Vic made takes valuable resources away that are needed elsewhere. They’re awash in excess capacity.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      mikedt:

      Another poster wrote in a related thread that forthcoming rollover standards will render the Panther obsolete. Ford would rather blow up their headquarters than put another cent into the platform.

  • avatar
    Accazdatch

    I find it interesting.. that the Crown Vic has been paid for for years / decades..

    And they cann it.

    Id also like to understand.. if this is all about Mulally’s ONE FORD, why didnt they bring over the RWD Falcon unit for the cop cars, like GM is doing with the Commodore?

    In some way.. It makes sense.
    Utilize an existing platform.
    However…

    Who would have thought an existing Volvo setup is going to be beaten to within an inch of its life as a cop car.

    Then there are debates about why the damn Taurus is so damn big, when its knocking on the door of the Vic. Is this / that on purpose? I have to think they wanted to cann it from the beginning of this Taurus’ development.

    • 0 avatar
      Paul Niedermeyer

      The Ozzie Falcon is not federalized, and it would cost way too much to do so.
      GM’s Ozzie Caprice rides on the back of the G8’s federalization

  • avatar
    Stingray

    I doubt ANY fleet manager will like the AWD/turbo combo. The transfer case is an expensive part to replace if it explodes, and turbos require FREQUENT oil changes (which raises their costs).

    I think this people will sell them in FWD configuration.

    Also, it seems the dashboard and interior became plastic-fantastic. As posted over in Jalopnik, 90% of the interior was revised for the car.

    Chrysler and Chevy will make a fest of this. They should have brought the Falcon (some of the aussie mates in another forum says the police down there uses the XR6T versions, WIN).

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      This AWD false sense of control b.s.. feeds into a massive mess of shit, that you actually need AWD when snow tires are just fine.

      In the northeast, ya (for cops, their fleet service) can swap out a set of tires (rears) or put on chains and do what ya have to do, with out all of the weight and b.s that the awd unit is prone with.

  • avatar
    tedward

    I doubt this will be that successful. I saw a local cop upstate a few weeks ago driving an Impala and I asked him over coffee what the deal was with the FWD shitbox (exact phrasing). He laughingly pleaded cost considerations, and admitted that the car dosen’t handle on back roads nearly as well as it should. NYC cops also drive Impala’s, but I only see Chargers and Vics on highway patrol (every day), so I’m going to assume that they find the FWD unsuitable for high speed pursuit.

    So if Ford wants to sell a FWD cop car I’m going to go out there and predict failure for it unless the cost is way below that of the better performing RWD competition.

  • avatar
    wsn

    Why not use a V6 AWD Fusion?
    90% as useful at 60% the price.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      Fusion is probably too small.

      Check out this article starring the Charger.
      http://www.nytimes.com/2010/03/11/technology/11distracted.html?ref=automobiles

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      Too small on the inside. The Taurus us going to be a tight squeeze as it is.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      I agree with the fusion. In Chicago they’re replacing all the crown vics with Tahoes, which is maddening. The cops claim its from inclement weather, but I think most are RWD Tahoes, so how does that perform any better than a Crown Vic? Chicago cops wasting money and resources on the worst possible option isn’t anything new, unfortunately.

      I thought the Pontiac Vibe AWD would be the ticket. It’s fuel efficient, reliable, and can fit perps in the back seat and still have access to a large rear storage area. It would work well in snow and ice and rain. I don’t know what cops need absolutely enormous sedans. I understand wanting a V8 and RWD for highway patrol/pursuit uses, but in a metro area these bloated boats are totally unnecessary.

      Cop car choices seem to be as meat headed as many (most?) cops: they just want to appear big and tough and push people around, but really don’t perform well or accomplish much. I’m speaking as a bitter Chicago resident and hopefully PD’s elsewhere are a little more committed to service, protection, professionalism, and results.

      Maybe if they made the cops run a few laps and eat right they wouldn’t struggle to fit their rotund bodies into already generously sized vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      I have sat in a Fusion before. I am 5’11” and fits fine. If there were no sun roof installed, a 6’3″ can get in no problem.

      If it’s “too small”, then the police departments better stop hiring obese people.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      WSN:

      Go put on a standard development house toolbelt, loaded with every tool needed:
      Hammer of diff sizes, measuring tape, pencil, plyers, coupla wrenches, pile of nails, nail gun, screw driver (flat head and phillips of diff sizes) along with auto unit and spare battery… and then put on a thick 20lb VEST along with a hat on top…

      And go get into that Fusion, right next to a cop light out the A pillar, a laptop computer next to you, a bunch of scanners / radios… right in front of a plastic division to keep the perps secure…

      And you will find the Fusion.. isnt right for the job.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      People, read the linked article before replying.

      Cops and all their gear will not fit in a Fusion.

      edit: beat me to it Accaz.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    One of the areas that we’re not considering is that with the end of the Crown Vic line the St. Thomas, Ontario plant closes and lays off about 1400 Canadian employees next year. My guess is that where the new Taurus is made had as much to do with its selection as anything else. This move may save Ford more money than it loses in fleet sales. The Dearborn brain trust is probably looking at this from a completely different perspective.

    Anyone know how many police cars are operated in the U.S.? I’ve been trying and the best number I got was 420,000. That sounds a bit low, but I was wondering what size of a market are Ford/GM/Chrysler aiming at?

    • 0 avatar
      crash sled

      “Anyone know how many police cars are operated in the U.S.? I’ve been trying and the best number I got was 420,000. That sounds a bit low, but I was wondering what size of a market are Ford/GM/Chrysler aiming at?”

      .

      .

      The Det News article said that Ford sells 45,000 Crown Vic cop cars every year, which gives them aboout 75% of the total yearly market.

      They’d have to redo the platform to continue to sell Crown Vic to the public. Anybody got a spare $2-5B to loan Mullaly? If not, then a stand-alone 45,000 cop cars per year likely is not enough volume to run that line profitably. Bub-bye, Crown Vic. Alan the Knife is making the correct call here, I suspect.

      Hey, Ford will probably sell some thousands of Taurus cop cars, profitably. And if they shake out as maintenance-cost-competitive, they might even get back up to current volumes, who knows?

  • avatar
    EricTheOracle

    You listening, Bronze? I am the Nightrider! I’m a fuel-injected suicide machine!

  • avatar
    getacargetacheck

    Success will depend on pricing. Roomier than a Charger or Impala and at least as capable. Can it ride curbs? Will it be durable? Time will tell. Lack of body-on-frame is not as important as Panther fans say: police forces the world over do fine with FWD and/or unibody construction.

    • 0 avatar

      Cops around the rest of the world don’t have chase down trucks and SUVs on terrible American roads at 50+ mph speeds for many, many miles. Bad guy in a Tahoe jumps a couple of curbs to evade a FWD Cop Car. Said cop car jumps a curb and loses a CV joint.

      Impalas are few and far between in my area, and I doubt I am the only person seeing that.

      I wish I had that TTAC link handy, but we’ve already heard that NYC cabbies are pissed about the parts replacement costs of Escapes and Prius’ suspension parts so much so that the mayor’s eco-friendly taxi initiative is in trouble…I’d really like to hear an update on that!

    • 0 avatar
      wsn

      1) That’s like buying a full size SUV for single person commuting. Isn’t it common knowledge that you should buy for average usage, not extreme usage?

      2) Even if you absolutely have to jump curbs, Taurus or even the old CV may not be good at it. You need an Outback maybe.

  • avatar
    Deaks2

    If I had an SHO (or any other current Taurus) I would wander to the Ford parts counter and order that grill ASAP. Much better than the chromed cheese grater.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      Well, if you are going that route…

      Have the tires changed too, to the dog dish caps.

      Have the car resprayed in a primer black with the covers over the top of the wheels in the back…

      Man you do that.. and I might actually be interested in that bloated car.. with that done to mine,– I said might.

  • avatar
    moedaman

    I really resent the line about “Libraries can always have bake sales” because your implying that city priorities are skewed. Yes, I agree that every government dept and agency should be frugal and spend money wisely. And I also agree that local governments do a damn poor job doing things efficiently (but clearly better than the federal government). But the fact remains that the primary job of local government (cities and townships) is to protect it’s citizens (police and fire) and keep up with infrastructure (roads and sewers). After that stuff is budgeted, everything else (community/senior centers, pools, parks, libraries) is a luxury that can be paid for with what is left over.

  • avatar

    AWD is a joke, no fleet manager with any level of accountability is gonna buy that. Not to mention the cost/benefits of a turbo cop car are questionable at best. CVPIs aren’t cheap, but imagine buying new cruisers that you cannot interchange all the lights/sirens/computers from the old one. That’s more wasted money, tax payer money at that.

    I can’t believe Ford got enough positive responses from fleet buyers (a few months back) to even green light this project, considering making a column shift Taurus isn’t free. And why is there still a frickin console there? Plus, we already know how great the GEN I and II Taurii did in this market.

    Better to test the market now, before the Crown Vic factory closes (?) next year. If the Taurus PI flops (how could it not?) maybe there’ll be a business case for a Mexican made Panther Chassis.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      Quiet Sajeev! Can’t you see the learned ones are using this discussion as proxy for saying “get over it, FWD unibody is here to stay, losers!” in the general sense? We’ve had our fun, now let them have theirs… :)

      On a more serious note, I agree with Sajeev’s comments on the switchover for equipment – could the (economic) timing have been any worse? I think you’re going to see STAP running full tilt next year and the sunk costs for the Taurus PI become another D3 debacle. Sure, it’s the inescapable “future”, but short-term it’s going to hurt more that one party in this matter.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      86er

      Id even bend so much to say…

      RWD for cop cars with snows (preferably because of lower mait cost)

      Or

      FWD for cops cars with snows.. (for ease of repair..)

      But AWD.. loses both ways. Weight + complications of equipment that I dont believe is designed for cop use, ntm higher repair costs.

      [Elwood Blues Jake Blues has a fight over the police car Elwood Blues got after he traded away the original bluesmobile for a microphone]
      Elwood: You don’t like it?
      Jake: No I don’t like it…
      [Elwood Blues floors the pedal and jumps over an open drawbridge]
      Jake: Car’s got a lot of pickup.
      Elwood: It’s got a cop motor, a 440 cubic inch plant, it’s got cop tires, cop suspensions, cop shocks. It’s a model made before catalytic converters so it’ll run good on regular gas. What do you say, is it the new Bluesmobile or what?
      [a brief thinking pause while Jake attempts to light a cigarette]
      Jake: Fix the cigarette lighter.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      I have a question about this car and I guess all AWD cars. Why can’t it be set up as RWD? If AWD is an option it can accommodate a drive shaft, so why can’t they just use a beefier drive shaft to carry all the power to a beefier rear differential?

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk:

      Alright…

      AWD incorporates more movable parts doing more work. Its “fine” for normal shit cars — that don’t use / need the system anyway (no snows).

      Its another to put that concept into a COP car.. and expect it to work properly.

      If they upgrade the rear diff and or the equipment to operate the system… the;yd have to do that for all of AWD Taurus, and all cars on its frame… (about 10 so far) to save money, from going back and forth depending on the vehicle.

      But I also don’t see a value in upgrading to a tougher unit, that’s more weight, more wear and tear, ntm cost to ME = taxpayer (for some heavy-duty diff in a AWD Taurus!).

      Its just plain not feasible or smart to go with a AWD unit and most definitely not for a high use, high abuse, high turn over cars that are run.. 24hrs a day.. for hundreds of thousands of miles.. every year.

    • 0 avatar
      Dr. Nguyen Van Falk

      Accazdatch: You misunderstood my questions. I’m wondering why this vehicle can’t be rear wheel drive only. It can accommodate a drive shaft, so get rid of the front wheel drive components, beef up the transmission (or just use the Crown Vic one) and have the power put straight to the rear wheel with a beefed up differential.

      I’m wondering why an AWD car can’t be easily converted to a rear wheel drive only car by deleting the front wheel drive components and making the rear drive components more robust to handle 100% of the engine output.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      You can fit a driveshaft sure but not a RWD transmission

  • avatar
    davejay

    From the press release:

    “Continuing Ford’s safety leadership includes engineering the Police Interceptor to pass 75-mph rear-end crash testing. Currently, the Crown Victoria Police Interceptor is the only pursuit sedan to meet this test.”

    Also:

    “To meet the rigors of the durability testing, the brakes have been increased in size and performance.”

    I’m gonna go on record that the non-turbo/AWD setup is going to be the preferred one for departments that don’t like FWD, the non-turbo/FWD setup is going to be used for most low-stress work, and a few turbo/AWD ones will be bought for pursuit work (but very few overall.)

    You can also expect the utility pursuit vehicle to be on the same (D3) platform, which means the mechanics can work on both cars with (mostly) common parts.

  • avatar
    Boxofrain

    Why not continue to make a vehicle that suits police needs, even if it is an old design such as body on frame, rear wheel drive? You would think between police departments, taxi companies and a few others there would be enough business to justify it. I mean, they still make the E series vans and the Ranger pick up which haven’t seen any upgrades in years.

    • 0 avatar
      panzerfaust

      As I recall the Ranger Pickup is going out of production as well. Maybe the cab companies could drive E150’s instead? (just kidding). However I’ve seen plenty of cab companies use minvans alonside the Crown Vics.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      panzerfaust:

      Ranger pickup is only going out of production for the U.S..

      The Aussie version is far more current and good looking.
      http://www.ford.com.au/servlet/ContentServer?cid=1248849355441&pagename=FOA%2FDFYPage%2FFord-Fullwidth&c=DFYPage&site=FOA

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      “Why not continue to make a vehicle that suits police needs, even if it is an old design such as body on frame, rear wheel drive? You would think between police departments, taxi companies and a few others there would be enough business to justify it.”

      Because Ford would have to spend money on a severely outdated platform with insufficient sales to cover required safety and possibly emissions upgrades. Ford is correct to focus development money on >100k volume retail sales opportunities and throw police departments the leftovers. On top of the low volume, it’s not like Ford is going to get full retail price on government fleet sales.

      Just last week I saw a yellow Toyota Camry taxi. 4 cylinder. In real world fleet use, operating cost is more important than performance.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    I guess the real test will be whether or not it can stop an out of control Prius!

    Seriously, it may be fast but I doubt it will hold up to the rigors of copdom driving.

  • avatar
    Matthew Danda

    I would bet that a Taurus is more durable than a Charger!

    • 0 avatar
      Patrickj

      I think that’s a given. The Charger is also not very roomy.

      Ford could have cost problems with this Taurus, but injury lawyers would probably pick police departments apart eventually for the Crown Vic not meeting modern crash safety standards. More police officers die in the line of duty from car wrecks than from gunfire.

      I know this will get a lot of disagreement, but cops will be safer in the Taurus. The cost of a few unstraightenable wrecks will be exceeded by far by lower injury compensation costs.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    I don’t think there’s anything wrong with that picture.

  • avatar
    basho

    Very few cars are as reliable and durable as the Crown Vic. Nearly all replacements are going to be inferior in that respect. The Vic may not be pretty, but you can beat the crap out of one and it will still just keep doing it’s job.

    • 0 avatar
      Accazdatch

      I can just imagine the hundreds of cop shops supporting every cop stop everywhere in the country having plenty of parts easily to switch on and switch off.

      Personally..
      I was hoping for a redone Crown VIC
      http://jalopnik.com/5404158/hello-officer-ford-announces-new-police-interceptor-for-2011

      I also now think its a crock of shit, to put the Taurus into cop duty, AWD especially, against a frame that’s been paid for!

    • 0 avatar
      Sinistermisterman

      +1
      I thought Police departments the length and breadth of the land loved the Crown Vic because of exactly that? How long do you think a Taurus will last compared to a Crown Vic in police work? Also how easy is it to straighten out a damaged Taurus compared to a Crown Vic?

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Irvine

    To those asking about the Aussie Falcon. It would make a great cop car but I think you’ll find they are yet to engineer a left-hand drive version. Unlike the Commodore which was sold in the Middle East as a Chev Lumina even before it became a G8.
    http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3292/3047767850_a4eb63c1c5.jpg

  • avatar
    reclusive_in_nature

    Somewhere a crook with a 4X4 SUV is laughing his ass off.

  • avatar
    Joe_Gamer

    Is a $40k car really necessary for most police work? Give em a Chevy Aveo and see what they can do with that.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    “Dear Ford,

    Thank you for building such a mediocre appliance. We sure appreciate being handed the police market on a silver platter. It will go well next to the ambulance market you handed us.

    Your friend,

    GM”

    • 0 avatar

      Arent police cars supposed to be appliances? They are not supposed to be personal, they are supposed to tools you use for a job, aka an appliance. If this PI Taurus will be built in the Chicago plant, they will for sure be bought by the Chicago Police Department or else Daley will have a lot of pissed off UAW workers come election time. How do you know the police market is so profitable? Taxis are moving away from large rwd sedans and its looking like police fleets might be as well. As for the ambulance market, I still see Ford E-series here in Chicago and barely any Chevy ones.

    • 0 avatar
      rmwill

      Sorry to bring a little reality to the discussion.

      GM and its clueless leadership under Aztek Mark Reuss have decided to use a hopelessly unprofitable Austrailan platform for their police car base. They will lose money on every one they sell.

      When will those idiots comprehend that developing a car in Aussie dollars is a guaranteed loser, just like the bland GTO and the UGLY FAIL G8.

      Reuss has the negative Midas touch, much like is daddy Lloyd did.

    • 0 avatar
      Z71_Silvy

      Nate…here’s the deal:

      The Taurus itself is a bland appliance…but all of the changes necessary to make it a squad have made it heavier, more thirsty for fuel…and STILL not as good as the Crown Vic (when you take EVERYTHING into account). Sure the Taurus can probably do the job (about as good as an Intrepid anyway), but when it comes to repairs–both in cost of parts and labor time–the Crown Vic has it beat every time. Add to that the price increase over the Crown Vic and this thing is destined to fail.

      With this (rather poor) Taurus squad…there is no reason to stick with Ford…with the Crown Vic, there was.

      My public safety agency just paid 23K apiece for some new Crown Vics. I have talked with employees at the Crown Vic factory who say that it costs around $12,000 to build a Crown Vic. Do you think this Taurus has that kind of margin? Hell no. Ford is still paying off the initial investment into the (failed) D3 platform/Five Hundred and it’s counterparts. They have yet to pay for the (failed) Flex, (failed) 2008 Taurus, (failed) 2008 Sable, (failed) Taurus X, (failed) Flex, (failed) Lincoln Taurus, (failed) 2010 Taurus…or Taurus III, (failed) Lincoln Flex.

      And why Ford would want to fleet dump their so-called “flagship” is beyond me…Ford spent millions repairing the damaged they caused to the Taurus name…and now, they are going to damage it again because of this.

      As for the ambulance thing…Ford is trying to con EMS agencies into buying an E-Series with the boat anchor V10…and they are saying “HELL NO” in droves. My Public Safety agency is now buying a Chevrolet ambulance with the D-MAX (better then Ford’s diesel anyway) and upon hearing that the new Taurus squad is FWD (frail wheel drive), we are now going to be buying the new Caprice when it arrives.

      —————————-

      rmwill:

      The Caprice is not unprofitable. It uses American engines in a platform that is sold all over the world. The tooling is paid for, the engines are paid for…and it was federalized on the back of the G8.

      GM was just handed the police market on a silver platter.

  • avatar
    Ion

    Whether this will sell or not probably will come down to how it does in the reviews that police academy publishes.

    I don’t read about the Charger’s IRS breaking under police use so I doubt FWD will be an issue outside of pit maneuvers.

    Sure precincts have stayed away from FWD cars in the past but those were all shitty cars to begin with. The Impala and Intrepid were/are garbage in civie clothes I doubt they could polish those turds much for police use.


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