By on March 20, 2010

“Leading San Francisco product liability attorney, Mary Alexander states if you or a loved one has been injured or killed due to stuck accelerator pedals, break issues, or steering problems prompted by a defective Toyota vehicle, you may have a product liability claim that would entitle you to compensation for your injuries and damages.”


From a press release, dated March 16, but posted March 20, 2010, that broke the shocking news of “61-year-old James Sikes, who was fortunate to have escaped injury when his Prius suddenly accelerated on Interstate 8.” According to the release, ”Sikes allegedly managed to veer in and out of traffic to avoid numerous potential motor vehicle collisions (MVC), as his car sped down I-8 at approximately 90 miles per hour. All efforts made as a means of stopping the out-of-control vehicle seemed helpless as the brakes were defective.”

Would you trust a product liability attorney “with 25 years of experience litigating a broad spectrum of product liability and personal injury claims” who pens that press release several days after Congress and the NHTSA threw Sikes under the bus?

Would you hand your case to a lawyer that can’t even spell “brake?”

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13 Comments on “Quote Of The Day: I Break For Bar Exams...”


  • avatar
    N8iveVA

    my only “break issues” are that they aren’t long enough

  • avatar
    1996MEdition

    I was in my girlfriend’s Prius the other day after class and right in front of me was a sidewalk full of pre-law students. Too bad the brakes and accelerator were working properly.

    Proofreading is a dead art now that we have spell check. Unfortunately spell check doesn’t catch things like break/brake, their/there/they’re, than/then, your/you’re, accept/except etc…… Mistakes like this make copy very hard to read uninterrupted….same thing occurs in this site’s articles everyday….pot calling the kettle black? Guilty of it myself when I am in a hurry. I can accept these errors in user comments, but professionally published materials with simple spelling and grammatical errors drive me nuts!

    • 0 avatar
      porschespeed

      If only we could blame it on spell-check. Sadly, it’s more about the educational system that let little Mary out of second grade because ‘she tried so hard’…

      ‘Idiocracy’ is just around the corner.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      “If you or a loved one have ever been denied employment, failed to qualify for a loan, or even just been humiliated by the reaction to spelling and grammatical errors in your correspondence due the failure of automated edit functions in your word processor to know what you meant to write, you may have a product liability claim that would entitle you to compensation for your injuries and damages. The attorneys at Dewey, Cheetham and Howe are waiting to help you make Microsoft pay for your mistakes. Call now.”

  • avatar
    Robert.Walter

    “Would you hand your case to a lawyer that can’t even spell “brake?””

    In a minute (But only if she was as cute as Debra Winger was in Legal Eagles.)

  • avatar
    Beta Blocker

    1996MEdition, if professionally published materials with simple spelling and grammatical errors have in fact driven you certifiably nuts, you should consider the possibility that you may have the basis for a liability suit against Mary Alexander and her firm, and indeed against all those who inflict these kinds of irresponsibly-prepared materials on a defenseless reading public.

  • avatar
    troonbop

    I had to smile about the so-called pre-law students on the sidewalk. (There’s no such thing as “pre-law” in most places.) When I was completing the bar admissions course we were taking a break on a broad sidewalk sometime driven on by messengers using an illegal shortcut. They usually drove really quick, ’cause they was gonna show us a thing or two – or they were pissed because they were messengers instead of lawyers. One day one of them brushed a student; words lead to words, and the messenger got knocked around pretty bad. Turned out the student was an amateur boxer and tougher than the mouthy punk in the car. Who knew?
    AS for the spelling, yeah, I once had to explain the difference between “liable” and “libel” to a legal secretary.

  • avatar
    ott

    @ BETA:

    HAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHAHA!!! Sign me up!

  • avatar
    kps

    Would you trust a product liability attorney “with 25 years of experience litigating a broad spectrum of product liability and personal injury claims” who pens that press release several days after Congress and the NHTSA threw Sikes under the bus?
    Fixed that for you.

  • avatar
    chuckR

    All efforts made as a means of stopping the out-of-control vehicle seemed helpless as the brakes were defective.

    Efforts can be to no avail. Efforts can be fruitless. Efforts can be many things. Efforts cannot be ‘helpless’.

    Fer cryin’ out loud. I’m an engineer and even I can spot that glaring misconstruction.

  • avatar
    panzerfaust

    Would you hand your case to a lawyer that can’t even spell “brake?”

    No I wouldn’t. Attourneys make their living with words, and the timing shows a level of cluelessness that is immediately disqualifying.

  • avatar
    skor

    Lawyer and a truck driver were stranded on a desert island, when a raft carrying a beautiful blond washed up on the beach. The truck driver looked at the lawyer and asked, “Do you think we should screw her?” The lawyer replied, “Do you think she’s got anything worth taking?”


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