By on January 12, 2010

2010 Cadillac XTS Platinum Concept

The Cadillac XTS Platinum Concept, which debuts today at the NAIAS, is a look at the new Cadillac flagship which goes into production in early 2012. The XTS’s brief is to replace the moribund DTS and STS sedans, a task that Cadillac desperately needs done properly if it wants to be taken seriously as a luxury competitor. So why is the XTS concept little more than a glorified Buick LaCrosse?

2010 Cadillac XTS Platinum ConceptThe XTS has the exact same 111.7 inch wheelbase as its LaCrosse cousin, bringing it in several inches shorter than the “entry” Cadillac, the CTS. This is no surprise, considering the XTS will be built on an AWD version of the same Epsilon II platform that underpins the LaCrosse, Regal and Saab 9-5. We had heard that a stretched “Super Epsilon” platform was being developed by Holden, but based the dimensions of the XTS, it seems clear that this is a plain-Jane midsized GM sedan under the skin.

To make up for the pedestrian underpinnings, Cadillac designers stretched the XTS out to 203.5 inches. The fact that much of the extra length is in the rear overhang might be Caddy’s attempt at fixing the EpsiII’s legendary trunk shortcomings. One thing is for certain: a LaCrosse with more weight and longer overhangs isn’t going to exactly embody the dynamic-forward, BMW-competing brand values Cadillac is supposed to be cultivating. And at 74.8 inches, it offers only 1.7 inches of width advantage over the LaCrosse, so it’s not exactly a stately cruiser either.

According to Cadillac’s release:

The XTS Platinum Concept design artfully conveys its focus on functionality through technology. It is the antithesis of the conventional three-box sedan, suggesting the active evolution of Cadillac’s design language.

Which means that it looks like a larger version of the Cadillac Converj, no bad thing in and of itself. But if you cover up the fascias, it’s harder than ever to shake the feeling that this is just another midsized car. But, says Cadillac, the XTS was an “inside-out” design. With an interior inspired by the natural beauty of an orchid, Caddy is banking on the XTS’s in-car comfort and “Platinum”-level luxury, including touch-screen navigation, laser-etched suede seats, other “hand cut-and-sewn” materials and organic light emitting diode displays. 2010 Cadillac XTS Platinum Concept

The concept has a theoretical plug-in hybridization of Cadillac’s famous 3.6 liter engine, making 350 hp and 295 lb-ft of torque. What, you were expecting a V8 in Cadillac’s flagship? Magnetic Ride Control is another technological add-on that might make the XTS somewhat distinctive from its Buck brother.

Still, the contrast between the XTS concept and the production version of the Lexus LS or even the Hyundai Equus is stark. GM is clearly spending its Cadillac development money on the ATS BMW 3 Series competitor, rather than trying to keep up with the high end of the luxury flagship market which already has strong contenders on the value (Equus), technology (LS) and snobbery (Merc S-Class) fronts. But then, the 3 Series segment isn’t exactly short on competition either. And without a flagship that screams Cadillac brand values, it’s hard to see where the brand has to go.

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103 Comments on “Cadillac XTS: The Phantom Flagship...”


  • avatar
    Richard Chen

    XTS: LaCrosse as MKS: Taurus

  • avatar
    Alexdi

    I disagree with the tenor of this review. This car is a stunner. The dimensions are similar to a long-wheelbase 7-series, and while I doubt it’ll be quite as sporty as that one, I also doubt that prospective buyers will care. By comparison, the LS is bland and the Equus unforgivably awkward for a luxury car. I can’t speak ill of Mercedes, but their equivalent will probably cost $30K more than this car.

    Incidentally, I appreciated the larger pictures. Very nice to see the grain of the interior materials.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      Alexdi: The problem is that this is Cadillac’s flagship sedan and it is based on a FWD family sedan platform. Don’t get me wrong, the Epsilon II platform is nice platform and a good competitor to the Taurus and Avalon, but given that this car will compete with the S and E class and 5 and 7 series, this simply isn’t competitive. This is more of the same like the current (and very uncompetitive) DTS. Either Cadillac needs to invest in a real premium platform or not bother with a flagship sedan at all.

    • 0 avatar
      Alexdi

      This flagship labeling seems to throw people off. Cadillac’s flagship hasn’t arrived yet. GM has to build a new OHC V8 design before that can happen. This is just the next block in a methodical rebuilding of the brand, and if it isn’t usurped by Buick, it’ll probably be a success.

      It would seem the top choice for those who want value and style in the same luxury car. It’ll be one notch above the CTS, priced like a 5-series with the size of a 7-series. This XTS won’t be a true competitor to the 7 any more than the CTS is to the 5, but twenty or thirty thousand dollars can smooth a lot of concerns about the pedigree of the platform.

    • 0 avatar
      carguy

      “This XTS won’t be a true competitor to the 7 any more than the CTS is to the 5, but twenty or thirty thousand dollars can smooth a lot of concerns about the pedigree of the platform.”
       
      Isn’t that what Buick is supposed to be? Cadillac is not supposed to be a mid range brand like Buick – it is GMs premium luxury brand. If the XTS is not a S or E class competitor then it should be a Buick not a Cadillac. Going down market is not building the brand – it’s the opposite.

    • 0 avatar
      crush157

      So, Cadillac will not build a true large sedan. The wheel base will be to short to compete with BMW7/Merc S-Class. BMW7 = 126.4, Merc S=124.6. Total car lengths for both are about 205″. These cars have 13 to 15 inches more of rear seat room than the caddy. Why would anybody looking at large sedan want that?
      This car is very nice to look at with the lines they used. The profile is very similar to an S-Class (plagiarism is the best form of flattery) but with less muscle on the fender flares. They will compete on price against the others with people that don’t know better and probably would never compare the rear portion of the interiors to the imports.
      I bought a 2004 S-Class for the very reason of the wheelbase that gives the back seat passengers unbelievable amount of leg room with a tall driver up front. I’m 6’4″ and my boys are both 6’1″. Used S-classes are a good buy now if you don’t mind the maintenance penalty.

    • 0 avatar
      no_slushbox

      GM won’t get 5-series money for the XTS, or 3-series money.  GM will be very lucky to get $30K after incentives. 

      Overall length doesn’t really matter, wheelbase does, and this thing has a .6 inch shorter wheelbase than a Chevy Malibu (a Malibu has 112.3 inches).  The XTS wheelbase is 14.7 inches shorter than a LWB 7-series, or 9.2 inches shorter than a regular 7-series.  I don’t want to be all negative, so I will say the XTS has a 10.5 inch longer wheelbase than a Cimarron.

      GM would have been wise to keep the DTS going until it had the money to develop a real Cadillac.  At least the DTS does a good livery/limo/hearse business.

      There’s nothing wrong with platform sharing, but to make a premium car you are supposed to stretch the wheelbase and track, not just the ass.

      This car’s competition will not be the Germans, it will be a loaded Ford Taurus or Buick LaCrosse, the Lexus ES, and the replacement for the Kia Amanti.

  • avatar
    Ingvar

    Early 2012? What happened to, like, right now? It’s presented at a car show. Either it’s a show car that won’t get into production, or it’s a car that will, like, right after the show. What happened to presenting cars that will actually be for sale? It only took close to three years or whatever before the Camaro could actually be spotted in real life. On the other hand, we are talking about a company that will take another two years to federalize the Cruze, a car that already has been for sale in the rest of the world for close to one and a half year.

  • avatar
    mjz

    Mikey don’t likey. What a major disappointment this is! Both the exterior and interior are very bland. I was hoping for something like the Sixteen concept. This is suffering from the same Dull Flagship Syndrome as the new Audi A8.

  • avatar
    Porsche986

    It is a pretty balanced design, in my opinion.  But, when will designers get over the triangular console?  It is on EVERY car coming out these days.  It almost could be interchangeable with the Equinox, Buicks, etc.

  • avatar
    ott

    I agree with Alexdi. This is a beautiful car. and as for being built on an existing platform, I would think that you of all people would applaud that move, as GM needs every cost-cutting measure it can find. Why develop a whole different platform when they have a perfectly good one available? This is a beautiful car, and the people who buy it won’t be cross-shopping it with anything from across the pond, IMHO. Nope, most of these will go to people who already have a DTS/STS in the driveway.

  • avatar
    superbadd75

    GM just seems bound and determined to use the EpII platform to death, putting at least one version in every brand’s showrooms. The biggest problem with it in this application is that this vehicle doesn’t really seem to justify much, if any, extra expense over the CTS lineup. If the CTS tops out in the 60s, where’s this thing going to max out? And how does this vehicle take over the DTS/STS models if it’s not much larger than a LaCrosse and offers no V8 option? This is a mistake. If this is the best “flagship” GM can offer for Cadillac, they’re screwed.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      The CTS isn’t a very large car, especially in the back seat.  This car is likely to have more toys and space available on it.  I do think that a V8 is needed for this vehicle to be in show rooms.
      I also have no problems with GM using different versions of the car in every show room as long as they aren’t the rebadges GM is famous for.  So far, it doesn’t look like there is a single rebadge of the EPII car yet.

  • avatar
    SherbornSean

    Flagships:   you either do it right or don’t bother.
    This just isn’t good enough to interest people looking at a 740/S550/A8/LS and lacks the size and V8/RWD to placate the traditional buyer of American luxury.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      The only think I think it is really missing is a V8.  AWD will make most happy.  I don’t think most luxury buyers care that the car is FWD or not.  But, I do think the V8 is important.

  • avatar
    Mark MacInnis

    Most.  Beautiful.  Cadillac. in.  38.  Years.

    May have to put this on my list when the time comes…..if built as shown.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Hey…..hey! mjz. Only room for one mikey here at TTAC,and the real mikey,does like it .

    Just a question here folks. Is GM the only car company that stretches and twists one platform to make several models? Is the Lexus a Lexus,from the ground up?  An Acura TI isn’t built on  a Accord platform is it?

     Just wondering,woudn’t such information be fair,in the name of balanced journalism?

    • 0 avatar

      Mikey: Irrelevant.  The imports never made cars like the DeVille, Eldorado or my Fleetwood Series 75 mini-limo. 

      The XTS replaces what used to be the Seville and DeVille. Who wants another import-wannabe from Cadillac, especially at this price?

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Sajeev, what car company today doesn’t platform share?  And just because GM did it years ago doesn’t mean that they can or should keep doing it today.  The question is very relevant.  Platform sharing and global cars are the present and future for many auto manufactures.

  • avatar

    Terrible, deplorable chassis hard points, especially at the firewall and the dash-to-axle ratio. This would be an elegant concept with 3-5″ more wheelbase and a lower cowl.

    And people wonder why some still cling to what’s left of the Lincoln Town Car…

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

                      No kidding. Antithesis of the traditional three box sedan, indeed. With cowl and trunk that high, it’s more like a one box sedan.

  • avatar
    thalter

    I am actually quite impressed:  As a current Lexus owner, I would actually consider getting one.  Unfortunately, this has the same  hurdles to overcome that all large Cadillacs have:

    1. Association with the Octogenarians who typically buy the large caddy (DTS/Deville)
    2. Association with the fleet models (Cheesy stretched prom limos and hearses).

     Unfortunately, I am  neither an octogenerian nor a livery operator.

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    This car is full of s***. I love my Town Car. As far as Cadillacs go, I have purchased Fleetwood Broughams in the past, RWD Devilles, and even swallowed the FWD pill with the most recent Deville model. I am not buying another FWD car ever again. Handling and turning radius suck. I want a full size car and Cadillac does not want to produce, so see ya Ed Whittacre! You suck more than Rick Wagoner!

    • 0 avatar
      mikey

      Maxb49, and Sajeev For what its worth, I agree with both of you, I’d love to see a big RWD  Caddy. But in the new automotive world ,it ain’t gonn’a happen. Even if GM did have the dough for the r&d,who T.F. is gonn’a buy e’m, in enough volume to turn a profit?

       

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

       But in the new automotive world ,it ain’t gonn’a happen.

      Guess what else ain’t gonna happen Mikey? Me (and like minded friends of mine who love our Town Cars) buying their midsized V6 crap. Ha ha. You lose Ed Whittacre.

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    And people wonder why some still cling to what’s left of the Lincoln Town Car…

    Because it is simply the best luxury car on the road. The ride is unbeatable; comparable to a Bentley for hundreds of thousands less.

  • avatar
    NN

    GM is taking all of the best stuff on their component shelf and putting the best Cadillac flagship on the road with them that they can.  Given their financial constraints (since there is no way they can justify developing a new platform for this), this car is a brilliant move.  This isn’t a cheap rebadge of a Lacrosse.  With a 3.6L V6/plug in hybrid powertrain (should it really be used in this vehicle) and AWD, it will be selling a very sophisticated powertrain at what should be a profitable price–unlike the Volt.  And they can increase the differentiation by building a beautiful interior of very high quality.
    This car, with AWD, and excellent fuel economy, I think would be very competitive and would differentiate enough to be in consideration with the other top-end marques; regardless of the origination of it’s chassis.
     

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I don’t get this.  The STS was only an interior re-do (and possibly a small wheelbase stretch) away from being a competitive car, and Cadillac has proven—twice—that it can pull of a world-class car in the form of the CTS (three times if you count the not-too-bad Catera).  So what’s with the utter inability to come up with a XL CTS?
     
    Near as I can tell, GM finds the STS too expensive to make, so the solution is either to sell the car with an interior and chassis tuning that’s a step down from the CTS, or improve the interior but drop it on a plain-jane platform that’s several steps down from that used on it’s smaller brother.
     
    I don’t particularly mind that the car is based on a front-drive chassis, but it’s not going to get a whole lot of love from the enthusiast market for doing so, either.  It smacks of compromise, and it will be very hard to sell Cadillac as the ne plus ultra of GM (and Buick as an erstwhile Lexus competitor) when neither brand is selling something that can beat even Lexus’ “meh” GS, let along the LS, S-Class or 7-Series.
     
    It’s hard for Audi to pull this off with the A8, and they at least have some cachet.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    “It is the antithesis of the conventional three-box sedan, suggesting the active evolution of Cadillac’s design language.”
     
    It also means you can kiss rear headroom and ease of entry/exit goodbye.

  • avatar
    Paul Niedermeyer

    The Caddy Malibu has arrived!
    What hasn’t been talked much about here is the problem of width. These Epsilon II cars are all quite narrow, and feel anything but luxurious in their spaciousness side-to-side. Look how narrow the console is to minimize this problem.
    The EpII platform/hard points are very European in origin/feel; when you think about the typical buyer for this car, it’s going to be like trying to put a slim European suit on him.
    To the commentator who said this will be like a BMW 7/MB S-Class competitor, I suggest you go sit in a Malibu or LaCrosse for a while.

    • 0 avatar
      86er

      What hasn’t been talked much about here is the problem of width. These Epsilon II cars are all quite narrow, and feel anything but luxurious in their spaciousness side-to-side. Look how narrow the console is to minimize this problem.

      Thank you!

    • 0 avatar
      Quadrifoglio

      Paul, you nailed it on the width issue.  Styling – even axle/cowl ratios, which I agree are the biggest “luxury car” cue I notice – pale in comparison to having room.  In particular, at the intersection of one’s elbow and one’s passenger’s. 

      I first got into German cars when I realized my prodigious austro-francophone rear end fit better in a Benz or Audi.  And the width issue alone got me into an A8 over an A6.

      My wife is tired of me saying “I want to WANT a Cadillac”, because I have sepia-toned memories of my grandfather’s Sixty Special, back when they were luxurious and high-status cars. If they can’t make one I can really salivate over while I’m still in my forties, they’ll lose me.  And a lot of other commenters, from the looks of it.

    • 0 avatar
      Alexdi

      This car is 4.5″ wider than the Malibu, 1.5″ wider than the Lacrosse, and within a tenth of an inch of the 7-series. I’d suggest waiting for it to arrive before judging it. I also hope the inevitable review will explain the difference between intimate and cramped, as the choice of words seems intertwined with the reviewer’s mood and brand preference.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Can you be more specific the width issue?  From the information I have…

      74.8 Inches Caddy XTS
      73.7 Inches MB S Class
      74.9 Inches BMW 7 Series
      74.6 Inches Audi A8 (2010 is 76.7 Inches)
      73.8 Inches Lexus LS
       
      Now, it is important to know how the space is used, but this isn’t exactly narrow compared to the competition.  Also, the Malibu is still on EPI, LaCrosse is on EPII, and I have sat in one.  I don’t think it is narrow at all.

  • avatar
    86er

    This is the picture of Cadillac dying.

  • avatar
    mtymsi

    Cadillac will sell this car to the traditional DeVille/DTS buyer. It won’t compete against highlevel BMW/MB/Lexus models but Cadillac doesn’t now either. I think the fact of the matter is a DTS replacement is sorely needed and this fills the bill on a very limited budget. It will no doubt be priced at least $20k less than the 7/S/LS offerings. Cadillac does in fact have their own market niche for this class of vehicle. They won’t make any headway against the imports with it but they won’t lose their traditional buyer base either.

    • 0 avatar

      Not sure about that. The XTS looks like a GM version of the Lexus ES350, which makes cross shopping them more than easy.  This car is asking for a beatdown, at least the DTS/STS looked somewhat American and had a Northstar V8 under the hood. 

      Then again, not having a Northstar is probably a good idea.

    • 0 avatar
      mtymsi

      I can’t say for certain but I really don’t think the traditional Cadillac buyer in this segment cross shops the Lexus ES 350.  I don’t think they regard the ES 350 as a comparably prestigious car, the LS yes but not the ES 350.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

       
      I can’t say for certain but I really don’t think the traditional Cadillac buyer in this segment cross shops the Lexus ES 350.
       
      The traditional Cadillac buyer that would have made that distinction is either dead, hauling the dead, had his/her license suspended, or driving an E-Class.

    • 0 avatar

      You beat me to it. And Cadillac is gonna have a tough time luring new buyers in with more of the wanna-be Lexus cars that Detroit’s been throwing out there for the past 5-10 years.

  • avatar
    bmoredlj

    Platform whoring notwithstanding (they should’ve started with the G8′s Zeta Platform and expanded for a proper line-topping flagship) this is a gorgeous car, even in photos, which aren’t always kind to Caddys. I appreciate the restraint in this as opposed to the more rambunctious, extroverted CTS family. More and more I think of the CTS as Caddy’s de facto flagship, in the same way the Lancer Evolution is Mitsubishi’s.

  • avatar
    Ernie

    Lot of irrational love and hate in this room ;)
     
    My (half off, today only!) 2 cents worth:
    Nice looking car, but it’s called a ‘concept’ which worries me.  With GM, that typically means that the subtle and almost pleasant parts of styling will disappear in implementation and/or lower trims won’t look nearly as nice.  “let’s put more chrome on it!”
     
    In this price range (assuming current DTS price and it’s NOT going down), it’s hardly a value.  I know, I know, Caddys aren’t about value, but it’s not an S-class or 7-series, as others mentioned, if you’re undercutting price, it’s gotta be at a value.  It’s just not enough to drag in new blood or steal customers elsewhere.
     
    It’s a GM . . . who has done NOTHING (even for their better cars) with regard to protecting resale value.  This means that the guys who they’re going to ding on the value drop are the same saps they’ve been costing money over the years.  I know, I used to be one of them.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Maybe one should look at the resale of the S-Class cars.  7-Series cars aren’t great for resale either.  It really isn’t a detractor at this level.  There simply isn’t much of a market for a used land yacht that costs this much.
       
      I am not sure how well it will compete against the S-Class and 7-Series buyer, but it will hold its own the DTS and STS buyers that are out there.

  • avatar
    mjz

    The concept of a stretched Epsilon II platform might have worked as a Buick flagship, but as a Cadillac, it’s not gonna cut the mustard.

  • avatar
    cole carrera

    RIP Camaro platform
    What idiots. Unless bailed again GM WILL stop dying and die.

  • avatar
    mjz

    This will suffer from the curse of the “X” names, all cars that I can think of with an “X” in the name have been doomed to failure. Jaguar X-Type, Cadillac XLR, GM X-cars (Citation, etc). Beware the curse of the “X”!

  • avatar
    jkross22

    AWESOME, AWESOME design.  I hate GM for all the right reasons, but this car has presence that no Cadillac in my 38 year old memory can recall.  Seems to mix A8 and S-class design ideas and translates it to Cadillac.
     
    Modify the G8 GXP suspension, make it adjustable, take out the Buck Rogers feel of the dash and make it simple and elegant and price it $10k less than an LS, and people will at least look.
     
    But man, it better drive awesome or it will be yet another epic FAIL from GM.

  • avatar
    rpol35

    What do yo get when you put a potato in the oven at 450 degrees for only a half  hour?  An XTS….or half-baked.

    While I’d admit the XTS is impressive in appearance, a new Impala will probably come along on the same Epsilon platform and we’ll have a holy troika and further dilution, what’s the point? Not to mention the fact that the Buick LaCrosse and XTS will be so close,  product and marketing-wise, that they’ll get blurred. As an aside, I also  question suede seats, suede seats?! They’ll look great in about a year….

    I agree that the STS & DTS need to go away but I was expecting some real high-end (RWD) Cadillac momentum as a serious replacement worthy of the target competition, not this pit stop. Perhaps it’s an interim move?

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Platform sharing is here to stay.  I don’t see why everyone is so upset about it.  I also don’t know why you would assume that the LaCrosse and XTS will be so close in product and marketing.  The XTS will be a nicer vehicle, bigger vehicle, and far more expensive.  I don’t think they will get blurred at all.  And suede seats… it is a concept after all.
       
      I agree that this might be an interm move till a large RWD vehicle on a newer version of Zeta will be coming.  I believe the current Zeta doesn’t have too much more of a shelf life.

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      Platform sharing is here to stay.  I don’t see why everyone is so upset about it.
       
      Because GM already has a very good platform—hell, a whole car—in the form of the current STS.  All the STS is lacking is interior space (excising the Lutzian greenhouse would help) and the interior from it’s little brother, the CTS.  So, instead of improving the STS, which is mostly there, we get a re-do that results in another mostly-there car that fixes some of the current STS’ issues, but adds a whole new, and much more troubling, set of compromises.
       
      This car makes me fear for the next CTS and the upcomign ATS.  If GM can’t spare a proper platform for it’s top-of-the-line car, what’s going to happen to the next CTS?  Will the ATS be a Cruze with a nicer interior?

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

                      Steven02
       
                      There ought  to be some sort of balance between the cost of the car and the sophistication of the platform it is built on. Putting a $70,000 Caddy on the same platform used to profitably produce perhaps a $25,000 Chevy, simply will not flatter the former when compared to competitors built on platforms not required to be so darned cheap.
       
                      Acura is having similar problems, trying to justify a $43,000 TL on a platform optimized for profitability in $20,000 Accords. Toyota does a heck of a job with the ES350 on a Camry platform, but could you imagine them trying to build the LS on the same? I’m probably about as big an Avalon fan as you’ll find anywhere, but still, the LS is really in a different league.
       
                      Viewed more as a Euro / World market A6/E/5/S80/9-5/Genesis competitor than as an S, this thing may well make more sense, in the recognizably American tradition of A6 size for A4 price. As far as fashionably greenhouse challenged contemporary cars go, I like the look.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      @ psarhjinian
      GM didn’t have any money to develop with when this car was being developed.  They had to reuse this platform.  I also don’t think that this is a bad idea.  While I don’t think that every platform should or would need to be reused from Chevy to Caddy, I think there is too much focus on how this car is terrible because it reused the platform.  If the platform is good, what is the issue?  The car must have a luxury interior, luxury ride, and luxury technology.  If it has that, it will work.  Remember, not everyone wants a corner carving car that sucks gas and rides like hell.  While this doesn’t fit the model for all, most people won’t be able to afford a car like this.

      As far the STS goes, I am not sure enough could be made of the current platform to fix all of the STS problems.  I am not sure how flexible the sigma architecture is.  But, I do know that the SRX is not being made on it anymore, the STS is going away, which means that the plan maybe to get rid of this platform.  My understanding is that GM is going to have limited RWD platforms.  Sigma was to expensive for anything else but Caddy, which is probably why it is going away.

  • avatar
    Juniper

    The folks that have actually seen this car at the show with their own eyes are quite positive. So I will wait and see. First impression is I like it.

  • avatar
    MMH

    I like the exterior lines.  A lot.  Too bad it’s not big enough to play in a segment where size does matter.  Alo, we’re admitting that we designed the interior to look like a flower that looks like a vagina?  Really?

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Which part of the size isn’t big enough?  Longer than an S-Class and wider too.  The wheel base is shorter than most in the class, but I have been inside the LaCrosse, and there is plenty of room.
       
       

  • avatar
    mjz

    rpol35:

    Yeah, not just suede seats, but how about that suede armrest as well. That’s gonna look like crap about a week after delivery. And why do the steering wheel in the light cream color, when the contrasting brown would have been much more attractive as well as practical.

  • avatar
    cwallace

    No bench seat?  My grandfather is going to be disappointed when/if this thing gets built.  He buys a new DTS each spring.

    • 0 avatar
      Maxb49

      I am disappointed and I will not purchase a car without a bench seat. A console is too confining. When I park my Lincoln in the city I can slide over and exit the vehicle on the curbside. Doing this I dont have to step into traffic. This is important especially ona  busy street.

  • avatar
    tedward

    The problem with this car isn’t it’s platform sharing with GM midsizers or it’s styling, but that it dosen’t try hard enough at it’s task. They could have aggresively pursued a difference with a RWD biased AWD, fruits of the 9-5 development if I recall correctly (if it’s fitted already, market that!), or with a different take entirely on upscale leather treatment on the interior…anything really to grab attention and make it non-mediocre. I don’t see anything here but a trim upgrade from the Buick, and I don’t even hate the exterior.

    On the other hand, they never were going to make money selling this flagship (executed properly at least, they might with this), and the 3 series competitor is absolutely more important to the brand. So this was probably never meant to do more than retain DTS/STS customers, and maybe with luck, reliability results and good styling (looking at the ES here) poach some Lexus owners on the side.  

  • avatar
    late_apex

    I think the vehicle looks nice.  I’m not in this market space, so perhaps it will appeal to those who are.

    • 0 avatar
      Sammy Hagar

      You might not be in the market now, but two years after this thing comes out,  depreciation will have shamed it’s value by $15-20K;  then it might be a good deal.

      That said, quick depreciation is one of the problems hurting Cadillac’s image as a “luxury” brand.  When a large, non-luxury car like a boring Avalon has half the depreciation rate of your “flagship,” you have a serious problem…

  • avatar
    guyincognito

    Platform sharing is good, as in using a Focus platform to create a Focus, a Transit Connect, and an Escape. These are substantially different vehicles that appeal to different markets.

    Platform sharing to create 3 vehicles within one brand which have barely distinguishable features, content, price, or capabilities and are marginally different in appearance and another in a separate brand with different looks and much higher price but no other appreciable way to distinguish it from its lesser bretheren is not better than badge engineering. 

    • 0 avatar
      Disaster

      Like all Lincolns…perhaps?!?!

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      One might care do wait on the judgement of the platform sharing of the vehicles till they are actually out, notice only the LaCrosse is currently available on EPII.
       
      Also, I don’t recall any one brand having 3 copies in the same form.  I do know that Buick will have the Regal and LaCrosse, Caddy the XTS, and Chevy will get an Impala and Malibu.  But, the pricing is going to be very different, so will the content, features, and appearance.  I don’t think this looks a bit like the Regal or LaCrosse.

  • avatar
    educatordan

    Cadillac, here’s a better flagship, cobbled together from existing parts and in the spirit of the factory limos you guys used to create.
     
    Take the CTS sedan and coupe.  Cut the coupe right at the B-pillar cut the sedan at the C-pillar.  Fuse the coupes back half onto the front 2/3 of the sedan (all four doors and forward) and bingo!  Instant Fleetwood 75!  With a V8 cause we know one will fit!

  • avatar
    vwet9394

    The rear seats are too tight to be a flagship. I guess the XTS is not going after the limo market.

  • avatar
    Runfromcheney

    No rear seat armrest? FOR SHAME!
    Seriously. This is supposed to be the flagship of the whole General Motors range, yet they are too cheap to put in a rear armrest.
    They just don’t get it.

  • avatar
    Disaster

    If it has the same backseat headroom as the Lacrosse it is a big FAIL.  The Lacrosse was off my list when I sat in the back seat and my head pressed against the ceiling (I’m 6 foot tall.)  No way would my 6’2″ son fit back there.  That and looking out the back window, was like looking through a periscope.  The back up camera should be mandatory.

    • 0 avatar
      Steven02

      Rear seat headroom stats…

      37.2 LaCrosse
      37.8 Camry
      37.3 Mazda 6
      36.8 Accord
      38.2 Sonota
       
      I am not sure what you mean by big fail.

    • 0 avatar
      Disaster

      I’m not sure how Buick fudged those numbers, maybe by measuring forward of where a passenger’s head would really rest but I can assure you that it is horribly claustrophobic in the back of the Lacrosse.  My head was pressed against the ceiling and my eyeline was about equal to the top of the windowsill.

  • avatar
    phargophil

    I like the front end and the interior design (except as noted below.) The rest, meh. In my mind a top of the line luxury car should allow comfortable movement for all in the car, including the driver–did anyone notice how the front wheel wells intrude on the driver’s feet? Half of the equivalent seat width in the foot well is consumed by the wheel well. I like to move my left foot around a little when I drive just to keep the circulation going–no can do with this.

  • avatar
    Gardiner Westbound

    I am a candidate for a luxury trim level car, but it has to deliver the goods. A deluxe Buick LaCrosse, which is what the Cadillac XTS appears to be, doesn’t float my boat.

    I want a RWD, roomy, well trimmed car. A V8 would be nice but a good V6 is not a deal breaker. Top drawer customer care, a track record for quality, reliability, and durability, and reasonable resale value are prerequisites.

    Lexus and Infiniti get it. Mercedes and BMW not so much. Cadillac must not have received the memo.

  • avatar
    NoChryslers

    Cadillac seems reluctant to give up the 60+ audience of conservative North Americans who like lots of chrome and column shift trannies.  Don’t they know that they are buying Avalons and Azeras now?

  • avatar
    Len_A

    I’m reading all these negative comments, and I’m puzzled that no one has hit on GM’s problem in coming up with a replacement for the DTS. The new CAFE regs killed a RWD replacement for the current STS and DTS. Originally GM had planned to use the Holden developed platform being used for the Camaro, but when the new CAFE regs passed in the summer of 2008, I distinctly remember Lutz crabbing that it was going to kill future RWD sedan development, and that’s exactly what this looks like.
     
    On top of that, before all the comparisons to BMW and M-B are made, those two companies received an exemption from the idiots in Washington, to meet the higher CAFE standards, on the grounds that at the level they sell at in the USA, they’re more niche manufacturers (which is completely idiotic reasoning). The only way Toyota plans to keep the rear drive LS and GS around is to also offer heavily subsidized hybrid versions, but with Toyota’s decent into red ink hell, one wonders if they can stay that course for a long time.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I stopped believing anything Lutz says long ago.  GM might have reasons for not going RWD, but fuel economy concerns shouldn’t have been on the list.
      _______
      The RWD Cadillac STS with the 3.6L V6 makes 302hp, weighs 3970lbs, and get an EPA 18/27/21.
       
      The RWD Cadillac CTS wagon with the 3.6L V6 makes 304 hp, weighs 4100lbs, and gets an EPA 18/26/21.
       
      The FWD, EpsilonII-platform Buick Lacrose CXS with the 3.6L V6 makes 280hp, weighs 4085lbs, and gets an EPA 17/27/21.  (Keep in mind that the smaller 3.0L gets worse mileage.)
       
      The FWD Epsilon-platform Chevy Malibu, with the 3.6L V6 and a 6-spd auto, makes 252hp, weighs 3700lbs and gets an EPA 17/26/20.
       
      The RWD Zeta-platform Pontiac G8 with the 3.6L V6 and a 5-spd auto, made 256hp, weighed 3880lbs, and got an EPA 17/25/20.

  • avatar
    MadHungarian

    This has “more” rear overhang?  Than what, an AMC Gremlin?  Gimme a break.  Let’s dissect the press release:

    The XTS Platinum Concept design artfully conveys its focus on functionality through technology.

    Uhh, how about functionality through functionality.  Like an interior you can see out of.  Like a dash and console that aren’t closing in on your knees from 3 sides.

    It is the antithesis of the conventional three-box sedan,

    Uhh, actually I like three box sedans.  BTW, Cadillac basically pioneered the three box sedan with the 1938 Sixty Special, still one of their best and most elegant designs ever.

    suggesting the active evolution of Cadillac’s design language.

    Can someone translate that into English for me?

    Think I’ll keep my Town Car too.

  • avatar
    85eldorado

    What will it be like to sit behind the wheel of this thing? IMO the short, stubby front deck screams declasse in this market segment. Short hoods are for Civics and Jettas, not a Cadillac flagship. Same with the powertrain (V6??!! Shame on Cadillac putting “V” cues everywhere on this car like on the backs of the front seats, etc. with that puny powertrain. I don’t care how many horses it makes, it’s not a V8)
    Why can the competitors field the LS, 7-series, S-Class, while GM seems beholden to CAFE?

    • 0 avatar
      Len_A

      Because Toyota, like every hybrid manufacturer, is subsidizing their hybrids to get them out the door (just about no one’s hybrids actually make money — the closest anyone got was the previous generation Prius, last year, and then gas prices fell, sales went with the gas prices, and Toyota lost their volume). On top of that, BMW and Mercedes received an exemption from meeting as strict a CAFE requirement as GM, because their sales volume is lower.That’s why GM IS beholden to CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      Len_A

      Because Toyota, like every hybrid manufacturer, is subsidizing their hybrids to get them out the door (just about no one’s hybrids actually make money — the closest anyone got was the previous generation Prius, last year, and then gas prices fell, sales went with the gas prices, and Toyota lost their volume). On top of that, BMW and Mercedes received an exemption from meeting as strict a CAFE requirement as GM, because their sales volume is lower. That’s why GM IS beholden to CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      Len_A

      Because Toyota, like every hybrid manufacturer, is subsidizing their hybrids to get them out the door (just about no one’s hybrids actually make money — the closest anyone got was the previous generation Prius, last year, and then gas prices fell, sales went with the gas prices, and Toyota lost their volume). On top of that, BMW and Mercedes received an exemption from meeting as strict a CAFE requirement as GM, because their sales volume is lower. That’s why GM IS beholden to CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      Len_A

      Because Toyota, like every hybrid manufacturer, is subsidizing their hybrids to get them out the door (just about no one’s hybrids actually make money — the closest anyone got was the previous generation Prius, last year, and then gas prices fell, sales went with the gas prices, and Toyota lost their volume). On top of that, BMW and Mercedes received an exemption from meeting as strict a CAFE requirement as GM, because their sales volume is lower. That’s why GM IS beholden to CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      Len_A

      sorry about the multiple posts – darn slow posting – someone @ TTAC please delete the duplicates!


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