By on February 15, 2022

With the Ambassador Bridge having been cleared by police over the weekend, those protesting government mandates have literally been relegated to the sidelines. Canadian officers from a variety of departments, including Ontario Provincial Police, are now situated at relevant intersections and Windsor, Ontario, has declared a state of emergency in case demonstrators return.

But don’t think the story is over. The trucker blockade certainly caused trouble for the automotive sector and it suddenly seems interested in rolling the event into the industry’s ever-expanding list of excuses. Now that the rigs have all been removed, spokespeople have been chiming in and they’re being presented as rather single-minded on the matter. They want more assistance from the government to quash any protests that might impact their bottom line and are happy to have something else to blame for why the broader industry remains in such a pitiful state. 

Flavio Volpe, head of the Automotive Parts Manufacturers’ Association (APMA), took to social media to complain that an insufficient number of protestors had been arrested. He also said that those who were taken in should have been charged with more serious offenses, suggesting the same should be applied to those still demonstrating in Ottawa.

“This is unacceptable. Decisions have consequences,” he said. “This is still a developing story from where I sit.”

Brian Kingston, President and CEO of the Canadian Vehicle Manufacturers’ Association (CVMA), made similar assertions this week. Despite the Canadian government declaring emergency powers that give police and financial institutions unprecedented levels of authority, he likewise suggested not enough was being done. But he’s also setting the stage for the automotive sector to use protesting as another convenient excuse for production shortfalls and ludicrously high vehicle pricing.

“Ongoing border blockades are disrupting trade and now hurting thousands of workers in the auto sector on both sides of the border,” Kingston said on Monday. “The time has come for our governments at all levels to enforce their laws, end the blockades and restore cross-border trade.”

Automakers, who spent the duration of the Detroit-Windsor blockade silent, have started to express their thoughts and feelings. Even as the Ambassador Bridge closure seemed to be having a direct impact on Michigan-based factories, automakers attributed production stalls to the semiconductor shortage that’s lasted for two years or unspecified bottlenecks. But, now that Ambassador Bridge has been cleared and the Canadian government has stepped up threats against demonstrators, companies are being less careful.

“This interruption on the Detroit/Windsor bridge hurts customers, auto workers, suppliers, communities and companies on both sides of the border that are already two years into parts shortages resulting from the global semiconductor issue, COVID and more,” stated Rose Pao, Communications Manager at Ford of Canada. “We hope this situation is resolved quickly because it could have widespread impact on all automakers in the U.S. and Canada. We are running our plants today in Oakville and Windsor at reduced capacity.”

Prior to Valentine’s Day, you couldn’t get industry spokespeople to formally weigh in on the potential ramifications of the Ambassador Bridge blockade even if you bribed them. Now that the crisis has passed, however, practically every major manufacturer with a facility in Michigan or Ontario has attributed future production problems to the trucking protests. PLANT, which covers Canadian manufacturing, has a full rundown of the public comments made by automakers on February 14th, here.

Fair enough. Even though I support the ongoing Freedom Convoy protests, millions in goods are said to come across the Ambassador Bridge on a daily basis and a significant portion of that can be attributed to auto parts. Civil disobedience is designed to inconvenience the state in the hope it brings attention to the cause and the blockades have undoubtedly been a sizable obstacle. But the situation has also provided business entities with another excuse for why they can’t seem to get their own acts together.

On Tuesday, Automotive News published a piece speculating as to the long-term ramifications of the bridge traffic being disrupted. Citing a report from the Anderson Economic Group (a company designed to make other companies look good), it estimated that direct industry losses amounted to $300 million, including a $155 million loss for automakers and $145 million in wages stemming from plant shutdowns. Though no automaker, near as TTAC can tell, had attributed any plant shutdowns or production stalls to the blockades until after police had removed demonstrators from the Ambassador Bridge.

“Within hours of the trade disruption at the Ambassador and Blue Water bridges, we observed shortages and then slowdowns at assembly plants,” Patrick Anderson, CEO of Anderson Economic Group, said in a news release. “Only some of that lost production can be made up given the tightness of the auto industry’s supply chain right now, so these are real losses to the men and women working in this industry.”

It also needs to be said that the global semiconductor shortage is estimated to have cost the automotive sector $210 billion in revenue just for 2021. That makes the blockade seem infinitesimal by comparison. However, it gives the industry another scapegoat for why it’s been incapable of constructing vehicles at anywhere near the normal pace. Deliveries in the United States were sitting pretty at 17 million deliveries in 2019. In 2020, that number was driven down to just 14,697,837 by our collective response to the pandemic. The following year was slightly better, but the U.S. still failed to crest 15 million units.

From AN:

Contract disputes between automakers and suppliers have become common since the COVID-19 pandemic and resulting microchip shortage have hampered production over the past couple of years.

In the case of the Ambassador Bridge closure, which blocked truck traffic, some suppliers resorted to flying parts back and forth. Air freight can cost 10 times more than moving parts on trucks, Rustmann said. While keeping assembly lines running amid crisis is the priority, OEMs and suppliers will eventually have to decide how the bill gets handled.

One benefit of dealing with so many recent supply chain kinks is that companies have a better idea how to handle the unexpected, said Michael Brady, co-chair of the automotive industry group at Warner Norcross + Judd.

The outlet questioned who would be paying for these additional expenses, casually implying costs will be transferred to the consumer as usual. But car buyers seem to have had all they can take of elevated vehicle pricing and lacking selections on dealer lots. Even valid excuses cannot be used forever and there’s mounting evidence that people living in North America are getting increasingly willing to hold onto whatever vehicles they have today than bother with the current market.

Thanks largely to inflation and corporate involvement in politics, consumer confidence is at an 11-year low, with the last several months representing the sharpest declines. Meanwhile, the U.S. Labor Department reported that the consumer price index rose 7.5 in January from a year ago. Ironically, the statistic became a common theme among Freedom Convoy demonstrators who faulted government restrictions and corporate greed as having been the presiding reasons for the ongoing economic strife. In the future, they’ll probably be lumped into reports speculating as to why industrial finances are in the toilet.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau believes he can solve the swirling disharmony by enacting the Emergencies Act (formerly the War Measures Act) and giving police and financial institutions unprecedented levels of authority to stop public dissent. Despite having received numerous requests to sit down and debate with truckers, Trudeau and the Canadian Parliament narrowly elected (185-151) instead to give itself total authority to decide where citizens and businesses are allowed to be, how their money is managed, and what conditions constitute an offense worthy of arrest.

While Justin did say he intended to give police additional tools to combat protestors, adding that “everything is on the table,” he also indicated that he probably wouldn’t need to deploy the military on Canadian citizens. But he’s still taking fierce criticism for his actions.

The Canadian Civil Liberties Association said the truckers’ protests did not come anywhere near meeting the standards for Trudeau to have invoked the Emergencies Act, which exists for “the ability of the Government of Canada to preserve the sovereignty, security and territorial integrity of Canada” and exclusively for actions that “cannot be effectively dealt with under any other law of Canada.” While it’s technically never been used before, its predecessor (the War Measures Act) was reserved for World War I, World War II, and the October Crisis. The group expressed grave concerns surrounding the normalization of instituting high levels of centralized control and warned of the precarious situation it has placed the nation into.

The BBC similarly released an article suggesting that the conditions needed to utilize the Emergencies Act had not been met. Reuters also published a piece citing a report from Lori Williams, a politics professor at Mount Royal University, Calgary, warning that the government’s decision could ultimately bring on more hardship.

“There’s the danger this could create more problems, that’s why this has to be done with the cooperation of premiers and if they don’t want help, then the federal government needs to hang back. It has to be very targeted, very strategic and very restrained, because these are enormous powers that are being implemented,” she said.

As of the time of this writing, truckers and their allies are still sitting outside of the Canadian Parliament in hopes that someone will eventually sit down at a table to meet with them and discuss the issues. Ottawa Police Chief Peter Sloly has resigned, though it’s assumed he was pressured to leave so that the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and Ontario Provincial Police could assume command under the Emergencies Act. It’s assumed that aggressive policing will commence sometime this week and demonstrators will be forcibly removed. However, truckers have said they are not leaving and Canada’s towing companies have been broadly supportive of the movement thus far.

[Image: JL IMAGES/Shutterstock]

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127 Comments on “Industry Begins Blaming the Bridge, Truckers in Ottawa...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    Can we get back to talking about cars, versus this half-a**ed political hackery?

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      So when Toyota is closed again next they can use the bridge as their tsunami excuse?

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Can we get back to talking about cars, versus this half-a**ed political hackery?”

      Perhaps you should just not click on the article? I know…crazy idea. And even if you do click on it, you don’t have to comment. Again, crazy stuff.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        Or maybe garbage articles like this can go to 4chan, and you can go with them, and the rest of us can talk cars, which is what this site was founded to do.

        • 0 avatar
          WalterRohrl

          Mike, there are six presumably paid and six more presumably paid by the piece names on the masthead and between those twelve people there are a total of four posts today and this is one of them. Nothing on weekends and every extended holiday. It’s getting pretty clear which posts pay the bills via clicks or what the preferred editorial direction of the site is and the car stuff ain’t it, which , let’s be honest, has for the last few years been very much just repackaged/rewritten stuff from elsewhere with the odd short “review” or longer “history” piece lobbed in occasionally. Maybe everyone is more of a part-timer these days, it’s not like this piece and most of the others could possibly take all day to “research” and write. It’s much less of a car site and much more Mr. Posky’s personal blog these days with the same lame arguments among the few remaining readers (which is fine if that’s the desire), but maybe it should just be renamed. After all, you can technically find a car angle to anything – for example if the price of Spam goes up it’s because it gets delivered via truck, boom, there’s your transportation angle etc…which is exactly what’s happening to a large degree.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @walter:

            As someone who’s contributed actual automotive content – i.e., writing about actual cars – for well over a decade, it’s frustrating to see what you’re talking about happening.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “Or maybe garbage articles like this can go to 4chan…”

          So the entire site needs to cater to YOU.

          Tell us you’re a liberal without telling us you’re a liberal.

          Ever think you should just leave if you don’t like it?

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            No, this site needs to cater to stories about automobiles. And if it wants to delve into politics, fine, find someone who can actually write about it, versus seventh-rate claptrap political rants from a guy who first whines about how high car prices are and then cheers on the yahoos who are doing their part to keep those prices high.

            “Maybe you should leave.”
            I dunno, I’ve actually written articles about those silly car thingies for this site any number of times…for free, natch. What have you done lately besides act like a fiftieth-rate Tucker Carlson impersonator?

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Throwing tantrums in the form of comments is not writing articles.

            Regardless of what you’ve done in the past, the point is that nobody is forcing you to click on articles you don’t want to read. Just move on and keep scrolling. It’s that easy.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            “Throwing tantrums in the form of comments is not writing articles.”

            Physician, heal thyself.

      • 0 avatar
        Greg Hamilton

        EB,
        Seems apparent to me that he is being paid to make disruptive comments on this site. He is always commenting, unless he has nothing better to do he must be getting paid. Why else would he be on here all the time making snide comments about the authors or other commenters?

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @Greg:

          And how many snide posts a day does EB make? Maybe he just needs a raise.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “EB,
          Seems apparent to me that he is being paid to make disruptive comments on this site. He is always commenting, unless he has nothing better to do he must be getting paid.”

          Could very well be. Never adds anything of value, just wants to attack commenters and a specific author for having the audacity to think for themselves and disagree with him.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            Maybe if I was making fun of liberals – i.e., attacking commenters for having the audacity of thinking for themselves – you’d like me better.

    • 0 avatar
      zerofoo

      Absolutely yes. When car companies start building cars again.

      I’m looking for a new car for my daughter. It’s depressing how empty new car lots are.

      The used car market is in even worse shape.

    • 0 avatar
      alexVA

      half-a**ed political hackery

      That’s being generous.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The only place I feel the “Emergencies Act” would be of benefit is when it comes time to towing vehicles involved in the protests. Heavy towing and light towing companies have refused to get involved for several reasons, namely fear of reprisals or solidarity with protesters. The “Act” can order companies to remove vehicles. Court orders have already blocked finances and have placed further restrictions upon protesters.

    It is sketchy to claim that these protests rise to the level requiring the implementation of the “Emergencies Act”. Some provinces feel it is necessary i.e. Ontario where most of the problems have occurred.

    There have been incidents that rise to the level of prosecution under the criminal code:

    In Coutts Alberta the RCMP served warrants on a raid involving three trailers at that protest. A cash of military grade “long guns”, handguns, and body armour were seized. 13 men were arrested. Within hours of this action the rest of the protesters left.
    In Surry BC, protesters used a military surplus 8×8 to broach a barricade and proceed on the wrong side of the boulevard. They failed to get to the border due to a second barrier but at the time of the incident escaped arrest.

    I’m mentioning these incidents to show that the potential for serious harm is there.

    If one looks at the car companies whining after the “Emergencies Act” has been implemented, talk about a bunch of babies. They are expecting to belly up to the government trough for some slop.

    I’m on record stating that Trudeau has mismanaged this all to score political points by playing identity politics. He’s had his “deplorables” moment and he’ll most likely pay for it politically.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    I have to add that most Canadians would like the mandate protesters to go home and Trudeau to leave office!

  • avatar
    ItsBob

    I find a lot of your articles weird, but this one is really strange.
    You never really say what you are trying to “say” that I can detect.
    It’s like you are implying that the manufacturers are looking for excuses to “not” build all the vehicles they can?
    It’s like a friggin book with a few pages, including the last couple missing.
    But hey, I very infrequently post and you got me to log in and do so, so maybe that’s a win?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “It’s like you are implying that the manufacturers are looking for excuses to “not” build all the vehicles they can?”

      Yep. And – weirder still – this guy whines all the time that low production is driving up car prices, then fanboys for the truckers, who are doing their absolute damnedest to keep production low. But are the truckers to blame? No, sir.

      Thanks for coming to my TED talk!

      • 0 avatar
        zerofoo

        First it was “chip shortages” – now its a blocked bridge.

        You know what appliance companies did when they realized that chips were going to be in short supply for the foreseeable future?

        The went back to basics and started making mechanically controlled appliances.

        Yes cars are much more complex things that have to meet all kids of regulatory compliance – but the trend is clear – the world will be tight on chips for a very long time.

        I’m looking forward to simpler, more mechanical cars – if only the automakers would pull their collective heads out of their rears.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Appliances are a bit simpler than cars, though…

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          “I’m looking forward to simpler, more mechanical cars – if only the automakers would pull their collective heads out of their rears.”

          Electromechanical machines are much simpler than purely mechanical ones.

          A microcontroller can easily replace thousands of mechanical parts.

          What you’re really asking for is the return of non-optimized car designs. You can still buy those, with all of their faults, as a classic car — but it’ll have all of the faults, inefficiencies, and unreliabilities that have been engineered out of modern vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “It’s like you are implying that the manufacturers are looking for excuses to “not” build all the vehicles they can?”

      I mean that’s obvious. First it was the covid cold, then it was the supply chain, now its chips, and protesters, and more chips, etc etc etc.

      These manufacturers *LOVE* the position they are in of heavy demand and low supply. Instead of moving trucks at $10k below MSRP (and still making tons of money on them), they are selling vehicles ta MSRP and making even more money on less inventory. And Ford just raised prices on the F-150 even higher. They also said they are cracking down on dealer markups simply so they can charge more.

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    The private owners of this bridge need to shut it down.

    The canadian dictatorship is clearly not following the science and instead are relying on fear and misinformation to drive policy. Luckily the people of canada are far smarter than lady bird Trudeau who can’t even answer when his draconian, non science based restrictions will end. He still thinks masks and vaccines work to stop the spread when it’s demonstrable that they actually do nothing close to that.

    This is about control. Nothing else. People of Canada, rise up against this. Stand up for your freedom and rights.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Less about Canadian Freedom and more about a Fox News story and trying to overthrow a Government. Granted Trudeau should go but this is more about causing chaos and a revolution via a group of American extremists. Let the Canadian people decide to oust Trudeau. Don’t need to destroy the Canadian auto industry in the process.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I don’t live in Canada, so Trudeau’s not my problem. But people in different countries who are purposely f*cking with my country’s economy ARE my problem. And these yahoos are doing precisely that.

      And they’re screwing with their country’s economy as well. Forget the whole supply chain issue – Canada has a taxpayer funded health care system, so when these crash test dummies get sick with COVID, they’ll stop shouting “neener-neener” at the government and start shouting “cure me with taxpayer money!” And the taxpayers – you know, the overwhelming majority of folks who are actually playing by the rules – get to foot their hospital bills. It’s a no-lose proposition – they get their “jAcKBoOt GuBmINt tHuGS” freak on, and then the same “jAcKBoOt GuBmINt tHuGS” save their a**es when things go sideways. Win-win!

      And for what…to make a “brave stand for freedom”? I buy that when all these yahoos opt out of their taxpayer-paid healthcare. ‘Till then, they’re just yahoos who are bent on shooting their own country in the foot.

      • 0 avatar
        EBFlex

        “But people in different countries who are purposely f*cking with my country’s economy ARE my problem.”

        Yet you completely ignore lockdowns.

        Hypocrite.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Yes, the lockdowns hurt the economy. That’s why they ended almost two years ago and haven’t come back.

          I’d suggest you find some new material.

          • 0 avatar
            EBFlex

            Lockdowns have been happening all over the world on and off since. Try and keep up.

            You’re problem is you are tired of the hearing the truth about all of these failed mitigation efforts. You blindly follow whatever the government tells you and when that is refuted with facts you have a tantrum.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            I don’t care about “all over the world.” I care about here. The lockdowns here stopped almost two years ago. And considering that even at the “strictest” point of the lockdowns, that I could leave my home whenever I wanted, go pretty much anywhere, order take-out, and do the shopping I needed, I’d say the “lockdown” term was more than a bit oversold.

            Like I said…you need new material.

      • 0 avatar
        Jeff S

        Agree these yahoos are messing with our country some are just naive and some actually want to destroy the economy and actually bring down the governments of Canada and the USA which are usually the ones that organize but don’t participate. Those in the background who actually want to destroy getting others to do the work for them.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          @Jeff:

          What you’re talking about is “political nihilism.”

          https://iep.utm.edu/nihilism/

          Explains much of what’s happening today.

          • 0 avatar
            Jeff S

            @FreedMike–That is exactly what I am talking about and it is dangerous to society. We as a species will never be perfect and we will always have different viewpoints some positive and some negative but we need to respect each other and get along. There are those who exploit others. There are those just who just want to destroy everything. I am not saying these protesters are trying to bring down the Government and destroy everything but some of those who plan and organize these protests have an ulterior motive to do just that. I might not like a certain politician or disagree with a certain political party but I don’t want to destroy them and in the process destroy everything just because I disagree and don’t like them or the way things are. Doing such has a high cost to our freedom.

      • 0 avatar
        285exp

        Mike, I bet you were furious back in 2020 when violent rioters were looting, burning, and occupying parts of major US cities, causing hundreds of millions in damages and disrupting our economy, not to mention how large groups of people who weren’t even required to show vaccination passports were a danger of spreading covid. I bet you were calling for Trump to impose emergency restrictions and freezing the assets of the rioters and even calling out the National Guard to stop all that economic damage and pestilence spreading. Yep, we can’t have the petty grievances of some yahoos costing us money and endangering public health.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          In fact, I hope that every single person who was doing the burning, looting, etc., does a nice, long stretch in jail. And I would not have supported Trump calling out the national guard because that’s not the president’s job – it’s up to the governors in the affected states to do that, and as I recall, that’s exactly what happened in the states that were experiencing violence.

          Is that answer sufficient?

  • avatar
    Imagefont

    Eleven comments? You people must be tired.

    • 0 avatar

      It is the end of the world. First millions of us were supposed to die because of Nuclear War. But we survived. Then came Global Warming we were supposed to be dead by now. But we survived. Then came the Climate Change. But we survived. Then Mr. President Trump. But we survived. Then Global Pandemic and Dr.Fauci who sold his soul to Devil. But we survived. Then 2020 Riots, Unrest and Looting. But we survived. Then 2020 election. But we survived. Then Global Reset. But we survived. Now this and Joe Bidon. Will we survive 2022 election?

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    First of all, I was assured (at length) in the TTAC comments that this whole thing is no big deal and only involved two trucks and one truck driver [but plenty of American terrorists].

    Second of all, if ‘American’ automakers are so American, what do they care about obtaining parts from other countries? Build your car (I mean CUV) in the U.S.A. and get on with it. [Oh wait, were you lying to me?]

    In case you haven’t been paying attention, here is the deal in 2022:
    • The transnational corporations tugging at your heartstrings last Sunday night run the show
    • Your favorite national government is subservient to those guys
    • You the citizens of your favorite national government are at the bottom of the pyramid
    Your favorite big corporation has no issue calling up governments A through C and having them stand on your neck to keep them rolling along. Your government has no problem with complying.

    Get it?

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Pretty much. Federal and provincial politicians did not give a sh!t about Ottawa being shut down but mess with big business profits and states of emergency get declared.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        All true, but the bottom line is that these evil multinationals are the engines of the economy of both countries. If you want to talk about ways to check their power, then let’s have that conversation (reforming campaign contribution law so they can’t literally buy elected officials would be an excellent first step), but in the end, we need them.

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Exactly we do need the elect leaders and we need the multinationals and there are ways to check their power. Campaign contribution reform is long overdue. Having years ago kept track of a Pac Fund a company contributes for various reasons and in the case of the company I worked for it was to protect their interests. Political campaigns are financed from contributions and large contributors get the most attention.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “First of all, I was assured (at length) in the TTAC comments that this whole thing is no big deal and only involved two trucks and one truck driver [but plenty of American terrorists].”

      Crickets on that point. But those same people are used to being wrong.

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      @Toolguy: I did not realize prior to reading this post that you are a dedicated Marxist.

    • 0 avatar
      Greg Hamilton

      ToolGuy,
      I think you have summarized Ned Beatty’s speech from the movie “Network:”

      https://youtu.be/yuBe93FMiJc?t=29

  • avatar
    gemcitytm

    The protestors are a bunch of morons. Arrest them wherever. Confiscate their trucks and sell them to benefit the Canadian government. The protestors are breaking the law. They must be prosecuted. And the U.S. government should prosecute the U.S. citizens who are sending them money. There is no excuse for these morons to commandeer the Canadian capital. They’re just a bunch of ne’er do wells who want to cause trouble. If they want to catch Covid, by all means, they should.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      Just so long as the pass it to each other and then they will be candidates for the Darwin award.

      • 0 avatar
        slavuta

        See Jeff what kind people are here. And you say Putin is not allowing protests. hahahaha

        • 0 avatar
          Jeff S

          Well Comrade if you want to protest in Russia I sure Putin will allow you to protest all you want about the US and Canada and their leadership. I doubt you could protest too long about Putin and his policies before you are arrested but if you agree with Putin then I am sure he would welcome you home with open arms.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      Wow. You must be a blast at your masked and socially distant parties.

      And where are you getting this about wanting to catch the covid cold? You realize that NOTHING has been shown to stop or slow the spread right? The “vaccines” do not stop transmission at all and masks are equally ineffective.

      Do you even know what they are protesting?

      Lastly it’s not a crime to give someone money. You and lady bird trudeau seem to want North Korea type governmental control. Those that are reasonable do not.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      But most funds donated are from the U.S. at GiveSendGo. With a couple of dozen of those from .gov emails!

  • avatar
    slavuta

    According to the US department of transportation Americans must drive less. So, what is the problem?

  • avatar
    mooray

    “…millions in goods are said to come across the Ambassador Bridge on a daily basis…”

    Do you doubt this is true? Take a moment to think about that one.

    “Even valid excuses cannot be used forever…”

    I would call them reasons. And why can’t a valid reason be used to explain something forever? A discontented audience doesn’t change the truth of the matter.

    I only recently began to frequent this site, and if the quality of this article is an indication of the site at large, I don’t think I’ll stick around much longer.

  • avatar
    Jimf

    Just because they removed the protestors…that does mean the protestors will hurry up and deliver goods…

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      The protesters are a tiny fraction of the truck driving profession.

      They fired the vaccine-resistant nurses. It was less than 1% of the workforce, and the anti-vaxxers tell us that a less than 1% fatality rate isn’t a big deal — so firing 1% of the nurses isn’t a big deal, either.

      The truck drivers are pretty much in the same boat.

      To those truck drivers who won’t fulfill their civic obligation to avoid spreading nasty diseases around, good riddance. The other 99% of their profession kept going to work through this whole thing, and their hard work is appreciated.

  • avatar
    Detroit-X

    If the truckers were protesting for better wages or work company/government, rules/requirements, I’d be on their side. But they are not, and this is not about that. These truckers are just acting as a bully with a weapon, like many of the other irrational and selfish political extremists. The truckers have lowered their collective image by doing this action for too many days, and they have reinforced their historic, intellectual-stereotype.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      I’d be on their side as well for better wages and working conditions. This protest is not supported by the majority of the truckers and it gives a black eye to those hard working truckers trying to make a living. It is important to separate the majority of the truckers from these protesters.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      ” like many of the other irrational and selfish political extremists.”

      What exactly is extreme about wanting to control ones medical care?

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-X

        This illegal action, that severely infringed on others, was just another case of stupid human, mob-mentality. Hooray for free society, that does not make laws based on the loudest-strongest-largest bully.

        There is no vaccine against stupidity, but if there were, the stupid wouldn’t take it–and probably protest it.

  • avatar
    Margarets Dad

    Wow, what a great car blog this is … [rolls eyes].

    Mouth-breathing truckers paralyze the auto industry because of free-dumbz or some such nonsense, at a time when car prices are already through the roof and Americans are begging for production to return to normal, and this blog … wait for it … takes the truckers’ side.

    Meanwhile, over on Jalopnik, people are actually talking and reading about cars. Hell, the TTAC staff is, too (reading at least)–that’s where most of their pieces are cribbed from that aren’t Matt’s nihilistic rantings.

    Hey, when are we going to get to read the big report Matt was researching proving that vaccines don’t work? As long as his smartphone is charged, the toilet is open, and Facebook is active, he’s a researching machine. Remember the good old days of March thru December of 2020, when the vaccines hadn’t come along yet, how great everything was? Meanwhile, here we are in 2022, I’m double-vaxxed and boosted, and my girlfriend and I are traveling, eating out, visiting museums, friends, and family, and having a fine old time. And it’s all thanks to the vaccine, which has given us back 90% of the life we had before. Thank you, vaccine!

    Sometimes I wonder how stupid people can be. Then I open up TTAC and read Matt’s feeble-minded rantings about free-dumbz and medicine, and masks, or whatever, and thank God I had parents who made sure I’d grow up intelligent enough to take my advice from doctors, scientists, and public health experts rather than boobs and mountebanks like Joe Rogan and Tucker Carlson.

    “Grandpa Matt, what did you do to help end the pandemic?” “End it, hell, I helped keep it going–clicks are clicks, and screw the consequences!”

    Peace out.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      Wait, so clicks can spread Covid now?

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      “As long as his smartphone is charged, the toilet is open, and Facebook is active, he’s a researching machine.”

      Not much of a fan of this commenter, but I spit my coffee up reading that line.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “As long as his smartphone is charged, the toilet is open, and Facebook is active, he’s a researching machine.”

        Damn…

        Sums up a large chunk of society….as I type this on my phone while sitting on the sh!tter at work ;)

    • 0 avatar
      ravenuer

      Margarets Dad: Thanks for one of the more intelligent posts on this “article”. TTAC should be ashamed.

    • 0 avatar
      EBFlex

      “Mouth-breathing truckers paralyze the auto industry”

      Thats some CNN level hyperbole right there.

      How is the entire auto industry paralyzed? You do realize that not all vehicles are made in Canada right? You realize that there are exactly 7 vehicle factories in Canada and very few had to halt production due to the ONE bridge being blocked by peaceful patriots.

      But you continue to be a government test subject. Glad you got your three vaccines and yet still think it’s reasonable to test all the time and wear masks. Doesn’t say much about the rushed and experimental vaccine. You’d think if the vaccine worked, you would see all restrictions lifted and you wouldn’t see HUGE spikes in cases (last fall).

      • 0 avatar
        Margarets Dad

        EBFlex,

        Where I live (NYC) the restrictions are being lifted and hospitalizations and deaths are way down from the peak before the vaccines, in 2020. This is because people here have overwhelmingly been doing the right thing and getting vaccinated, for the benefit of themselves, their loved ones, and their community.

        “Cases,” of course, is a total red herring. I tested positive after being double vaxxed and boosted. So did a lot of my friends. For us, Covid amounted to nothing more than a day or two of cold-like symptoms. So yes, I caught Omicron but my body shrugged it off because of the vaccine. 10 seconds of googling would tell you that although both the vaxxed and unvaxxed caught Omicron, the unvaxxed were something like 12 times more likely to end up in the ICU or die from it. But of course, none of this matters to you because you’ve proven time and time again through the grammar-school level of your comments here that facts and common sense just don’t exist in whatever strange world it is you inhabit.

        Anyway, it’s as pointless discussing this with you as it is discussing politics with my cat. Good night.

        • 0 avatar
          EBFlex

          “Cases,” of course, is a total red herring.”

          Of course it is…now. You have to move the goalposts to keep the lies and control in place.

          But please ignore the fact that these vaccines were only sold as miracle drugs that completely stop the spread. They never said that it minimizes symptoms until it was proven that vast numbers of vaccinated people were getting the covid cold. Then the narrative had to change to “you have to get vaccinated because it will make the sniffles less”.

          But the fact is the vaccine didn’t stop the spread, masks didn’t stop the spread, as evidenced by YOU, one of the sheep, getting the omicron sniffles.

          And please spare me the grammar talk. You are really going to be that hypocritical?

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Are we going to blame these truckers for the past 2 years of supply chain BS too?

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    So much misunderstanding in these posts. Matt makes multiple errors in his column. Parliament did not ‘elect’ the Statute. The powers that it provides the government are still limited. And it differs in its powers/scope from the War Measures Act.

    Initially some protesters wanted the federal government to revoke the vaccines mandates for truckers crossing back and forth into the USA. However even if the Canadian government did that, the American government also requires it for non-Americans.

    Other protesters have made some ludicrous demands for Governor-General, etc to take over the government. They obviously have zero understanding of the Canadian political system.

    Healthcare falls under provincial jurisdiction. So rules regarding masking, vaccine ‘passports’ etc are invoked by each province. Ottawa and the PM have nothing to do with them. Which many do not seem to understand.

    Policing falls under municipal jurisdiction. So it is the City not the province or federal government who were responsible. Until the Emergency Measures Act was invoked.

    Peter Sloly the Ottawa Police Chief, until yesterday, was a ‘progressive’. He advocated for negotiation, de-escalation and against the use of force. He did not get the job in Toronto because the rank and file, represented by the Police Association opposed him.

    On the Monday and Tuesday of the first week the number of protesters was less than 500. Each weekend that number increases. As of today it is probably around double that number although some claim that it is more like 600.

    Far more than that came out in counter-protests last weekend. They stopped the ‘convoy’ from moving through their streets.

    Some police are/were worried about possible firearms among the protesters. At Coutts the police found an arms ‘cache’. Some of the weapons are illegal in Canada and were ‘smuggled’ into Canada from the USA. There is a concern that in Ottawa there are a number of Americans who may also be armed.

    As for ‘peaceful’ Canadians, my solution would be to ‘drop’ about 1,000 hockey sweaters and sticks into the protest. Half being Leaf sweaters and half being Canadiens sweaters. Add about 50 road hockey balls and about two dozen nets. Within an hour the protesters will be split into two opposing groups and fighting with each other. The police will then only have to send in some officers wearing referee sweaters with whistles and send them all back home to ‘feel shame’ (a Slapshot reference).

    Finally am I the only one who believes that this site should just be dedicated to postings from Corey ( currently the contributor I look forward to reading) and Murilee? Perhaps the odd review/posting from Chris and Tim C. The other postings be largely clickbait or below previous TTAC standards.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Send in Ogie Ogilthorpe!

      I have to agree. Many of the protesters live in an alternative reality in relation to Canadian law and science.

      Canadians smugly assumed Drumph was the disease as opposed to a symptom of a disease. The Freedumb convoy is Canada’s manifestation of the same disease. We all bear responsibility for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Jeff S

      @Arthur–Agree I am with you there. Really enjoy Corey’s series especially the Imperial series and always look forward to Murilee’s Junkyard segments.

  • avatar
    Dave M.

    There are far more amenable ways of showing full support or lack of support for a policy than severely impacting the lives of the community around you. Narcistic toddlers do that.

    There’s a rule that’s in place for the greater good of the community. It amazes me how many grown-up toddlers we have out there. I guess the only silver lining is I’m glad the hordes of idiots aren’t limited to the US.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    It amazes me how people can cheer on the emergency act. Even if you disagree with the truckers, how can you be against having protected rights?

    The Canadian government is freezing bank accounts and treating a segment of the population as though they had committed some 9/11 style attack. The Canadian government is calling the protestors terrorists – in addition to nazis, women haters, etc with no evidence to back up the claim.

    Rather than talking with Canadian citizens whom he ostensibly represents, Justy labels them with the same label assigned to people who blow up skyscrapers and indiscriminately kills people.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      I think you’re creating a false dichotomy here – either you agree 100% with Trudeau or 100% with the protesters. That’s a very “America-politik” approach – you have to be in one tribe or another.

      It’s possible for both sides to be going about this the wrong way. Far as Trudeau’s concerned, I think what he’s doing is overreaching, but Canadian laws give their head of state powers that the U.S. president wouldn’t exercise unless there was some dire emergency unfolding. If Canadians didn’t want their head of state to have these powers at hand, then they wouldn’t be enumerated in their laws. But I’m not a Canadian citizen, so my opinion only counts for so much in the end. It’s up to Canadians to judge what he’s doing.

      The protesters, on the other hand, aren’t just screwing with their own country – they’re doing it to my country too. That makes it my problem. And as far as I’m concerned, their “FREEDOMMMM!!!!” bonafides are, to be charitable, a bit thin. They seem bent on basically flipping a big fat bird at “big gubmint” because of its’ COVID policies, but if/when they get sick from the very disease those policies are attempting to control, they’ll turn to the same “big gubmint” and demand they pick up the hospital bill. The irony is probably lost on them.

      Call me when they decide en masse to opt out of the government-run healthcare program. Until then, they’re yahoos, and they’re screwing with my country. They can all go pound sand.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        No, I’m saying that proportionality is a key element to resolving conflicts. I’m saying the opposite of what you’re attempting to ascribe to my point.

        I’m saying that escalating usually doesn’t resolve conflicts – it makes them worse. I’m saying that by Trudeau refusing to talk with people asking for/demanding redress, he and his enablers escalated this situation.

        I’m saying that by scapegoating people, you don’t convert them to an ally. You convince them they can’t trust you.

        Mike, there are more important things in life than convenience for me and you. None of the last 2 years has been convenient for any of us. Masks, lockdowns, small businesses getting crushed and of course the vaccines and the ethical dubiousness of mandates.

        Now the leader of Canada is labeling protestors as terrorists. I can confidently share with you that telling the protestors to pound sand is not only falling on deaf ears, it’s proving their point.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          Trudeau isn’t the only one scapegoating here. The protesters are scapegoating Trudeau and the people who support the mandates they so loathe as dictators…which is true if you’re completely ignorant of what real dictators do when protesters throw a wrench into the daily functioning of capital cities (they could start by googling “Tiananmen Square”).

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            I’m not sure how one would refer to a prime minister as anything other than a dictator when they take away rights from one group of citizens he leads because he disagrees with them on policy. This entire story is absurd.

            He’s not getting scapegoated by the truckers – they are assigning blame and accountability.

            An argument can be made (and Trudeau has made it) that when the truckers blocked the bridges that they became a threat. I’d buy that argument a bit if he had made an attempt to talk with the truckers while Ottawa, while the truckers were asking to meet with him. Even if it wasn’t successful, he would have gained some credibility for trying.

            It’s easy to blame Trudeau because he’s incompetent and unwilling to admit he screwed the pooch. He’s a coward, and I don’t use that word as an insult. It’s describing his actions.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @JK:

            Your idea of dictatorship is a bit off by historical standards.

            1) Whatever powers Trudeau have exercised are reserved to him by the Canadian system of government, and they are not permanent.
            2) Trudeau – and any other head of state in Canada – can be removed by a vote of no confidence – similar to the PM of the UK. This has, in fact, happened any number of times in their recent history.

            Historically, dictators usurp powers NOT granted to them by law, and dissolve popularly elected bodies that are in a position to stop them.

            If he keeps these powers indefinitely, and tells the legislature to kiss off if they tell him to stop, then you can call him a dictator.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Mike,

            It doesn’t matter if you or I agree with the truckers. It matters that we consider the consequences of a government taking away rights of a group they labeled as holding “unacceptable views”.

            This is wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            FreedMike

            @JK:

            The government of Canada isn’t cracking down on these protesters’ beliefs – they’re cracking down on their actions, which were aimed at screwing the the proper function of their government and putting a wrench in foreign trade. None of that’s acceptable, which the protesters knew. And they knew there would be a governmental response.

            They’d have you believe that it’s their views on trial, but it’s actually their activities. They’re playing victim.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @jkross22 – both sides are playing games either political or in brinkmanship.

          All evidence points to the blockades, protests etc. as being well organized and coordinated. In Coutts Crossing in Alberta warrants served resulted in the arrest of 13 men with an arsenal of weapons. Within hours of that raid and arrests the remainder of protesters just up and left. 4 have been charged with conspiracy to attempt murder.
          There have been hints by government officials that similar arms caches and “activists” exist elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            The last time from memory that I can remember a politician voluntarily speaking to/in front of a hostile crowd was Robert Kennedy in Indianapolis when Martin Luther King Jr was murdered. Few politicians have demonstrated such nerve before or since.

            As for addressing the protesters. The actual grievances that they were/are protesting were mostly not in federal jurisdiction. So there was zero that the Prime Minister could do regarding them. Therefore anything that he said would have no bearing and might have only further infuriated them.

            Not that I am defending the current PM. I didn’t support him in the previous election. However the Conservative Party has certainly not presented any viable alternative after ousting their previous leader.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou,

            I agree, the efforts of the truckers is the most organized protest I think I’ve seen. It’s pretty remarkable how they did this.

            More interesting is that the truckers have been called Russian agents, racists, white supremacists, et al. by the Canadian Prime Minister with no evidence of that being true. He’s just inventing things on the fly.

            YT has A LOT of people uploading raw footage of the truckers. We all have video cameras in our pockets and purses. It’s peculiar that all that footage shot by anyone with a cell phone shows no violence, racism, nothing. It’s odd that the news reports aren’t matching this reality. What to believe – your eyes or CBC?

            Trudeau trashed his credibility early and often, his enablers/advisors haven’t stepped in to tell him, and his party is supporting his foolishness.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Arthur,

            You have no recollection of any politician hosting a town hall during presidential elections or primaries??

            C’mon. Look on YT for Chris Christie town halls. He did a bunch and regardless of what you think of him, it’s what we should demand of all these cretins.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22 – journalists aren’t there 24/7. With that being said, I’ve seen some recorded confrontations where there has been verbal harassment.
            You don’t need to physically make contact with a person for it to be deemed assault. I’ve covered that in other threads.

            “racists, white supremacists, et al”
            I’ve addressed that comment elsewhere. Many of the organizers have made comments that are racist. They’ve been careful in the context of the media. it’s a matter of public record.
            “white supremacists” – what do you call someone who belongs to a movement that believes that there should be a violent overthrow of government and turn the “mid-west” of Canada into a homeland for “Anglo-Saxon’s” to the exclusion of all other groups? Again, it’s a matter of public record.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou,

            You have mentioned this before – that you’ve seen verbal confrontations. Violence, political or not, is unacceptable and perpetrators should be prosecuted. But speech isn’t violence.

            Heated discussion will happen, people will be upset, hurt and angry. That’s how we move discussions forward. By addressing problems that are difficult to tackle.
            If only Trudeau felt that way.

            As for the list of titles below, I don’t know what to say. You’ll provide sources where you got that info, I’ll question/doubt/not believe them because my bias is to doubt most corporate news. They reliably lie through omission and now can’t be trusted. They’re doing it right now with Ukraine.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22

            “But speech isn’t violence”

            Canadian law says that it can be under certain situations.

            You refer to violence as physical contact that causes harm to others.

            265 (1) A person commits an assault when

            (a) without the consent of another person, he applies force intentionally to that other person, directly or indirectly;

            (b) he attempts or threatens, by an act or a gesture, to apply force to another person, if he has, or causes that other person to believe on reasonable grounds that he has, present ability to effect his purpose; or

            (c) while openly wearing or carrying a weapon or an imitation thereof, he accosts or impedes another person or begs.

            Time to move beyond the “Sticks and stones may break my bones but names will never hurt me” mindset.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou, the first 2 points refer to an action, not just words. The last refers to carrying a weapon and then making gestures.

            Words aren’t violence. If you call for violence “let’s go kill or beat up so and so” then, yeah, there are laws against that even here in the US.

            Sounds like you’re not a fan of free speech. We need to tread lightly making laws. Look at the abuses of existing laws right now.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “Sounds like you’re not a fan of free speech.”

            @jkross22
            Incorrect. One needs to realize countries have their own constitutional definitions of free and open speech. If they don’t line up exactly to what you define it, it doesn’t make the difference in interpretation as being completely flawed. Canada’s constitution in much newer than that of the US’s so one can argue that it fits a more accurate understanding of what words can to to others when it comes to hate, fear and oppression.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou,

            “Canada’s constitution in much newer than that of the US’s so one can argue that it fits a more accurate understanding of what words can to to others when it comes to hate, fear and oppression.”

            I think you’re saying you believe that hate speech shouldn’t be free speech. So who gets to define what hate speech is?

            According to Justy Trombone, the phrase Justy Trombone might be considered hate speech. We know how he’s referred to the truckers. No doubt he might say that their perspective is misinformation and that their speech should be outlawed.

            Slippery slope.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22
            Our criminal code defines what “hate speech” is.

            Trudeau or any politician can’t arbitrarily decide what that is. If the protesters felt his stupid comments rose to the level of slander then they could take him to court.

            Public incitement of hatred

            319 (1) Every one who, by communicating statements in any public place, incites hatred against any identifiable group where such incitement is likely to lead to a breach of the peace is guilty of

            (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or

            (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

            Wilful promotion of hatred

            (2) Every one who, by communicating statements, other than in private conversation, wilfully promotes hatred against any identifiable group is guilty of

            (a) an indictable offence and is liable to imprisonment for a term not exceeding two years; or

            (b) an offence punishable on summary conviction.

            Defences

            (3) No person shall be convicted of an offence under subsection (2)

            (a) if he establishes that the statements communicated were true;

            (b) if, in good faith, the person expressed or attempted to establish by an argument an opinion on a religious subject or an opinion based on a belief in a religious text;

            (c) if the statements were relevant to any subject of public interest, the discussion of which was for the public benefit, and if on reasonable grounds he believed them to be true; or

            (d) if, in good faith, he intended to point out, for the purpose of removal, matters producing or tending to produce feelings of hatred toward an identifiable group in Canada.

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            Lou,

            Appreciate you sharing that info. I didn’t know that Canada criminalized speech in this way. I’m sure it seems as normal to you as unfettered speech is to me.

            I’ve learned more about Canada in the last week than I have in the prior 50 years!

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22 – we don’t need to agree but it is of great benefit if we learn. That’s how one finds common ground and mutual respect.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    We were told by the best-and-brightest commenters here that the protest was a big nothing burger with only 50 or so trucks involved. Move along, nothing to see here. Now it’s a state of national emergency that must be shut down by the government.

    If your world view fails to predict the future, you need to change your worldview.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      No, the protests weren’t a nothingburger. “Clownburger” would be a more apt description for people who rail and whine about “BIGGG GUBBBMMMMIIINNNNNT” but rely on the same BIGGG GUBBBMMMMIIINNNNNT to pay for their medical bills when they come down with the illness the BIGGG GUBBBMMMMIIINNNNNT is trying to prevent.

      I’m sure the irony is lost on them…and you.

      • 0 avatar
        Master Baiter

        “…BIGGG GUBBBMMMMIIINNNNNT to pay for their medical bills…”

        I’m opposed to government-run health care, but it appears the Canadians are OK with it. Like they are OK with not having the right to free speech, or the right to bear arms. I’d rather live here.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          @Master Baiter

          “I’m opposed to government-run health care, but it appears the Canadians are OK with it.”

          Every democratic country on this planet with the exception of the USA has socialized medicine. The USA COVID – 19 death rate is 3 times worse than in Canada.

          “Like they are OK with not having the right to free speech’
          Please explain.
          I’ve never once felt that I could not speak my mind so your point being?
          Don’t be so lazy and attempt to educate yourself before you say dumb sh!t. Ignorance is not bliss.

          “the right to bear arms”
          The USA is the only country where it’s residents feel that owning firearms is some sort of right granted by divinity. Care to compare the USA’s shooting deaths and injury rates to that of other countries?

          “I’d rather live here.”
          Don’t accidentally shoot yourself in the foot without health insurance.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      MB, It’s nothing new. Those of us who watch/believe corporate news don’t see (or want to see) the incentives that inform what they report/under-report/fail to report.

      We don’t want to see how the US gov’t is itching for an armed conflict in Ukraine. How they provide access to the court reporters, err, reporters that parrot unquestioningly what they’re told by ‘unnamed government sources’.

      War’s good for business. The CEOs of Raytheon and Lockheed said so.

  • avatar
    don1967

    I remember when leftists used to fight against censorship and authoritarianism. Now they demand it. The transition was so seamless that we barely noticed.

    I have walked among the truckers here in Ottawa. It’s difficult to overstate the sheer dishonesty of how they’ve been portrayed by the media and by Trudeau himself. We’re living in an information Matrix controlled by some truly horrible people, and fiercly defended by those who think it’s real.

    Now we find ourselves in a world where critical thinking has been replaced by identity politics, and lives get destroyed over simple differences of opinion. This is not about science, or even politics. It’s about ego, elitism, propaganda and control.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Getting the truth isn’t that hard. You just have to look on YT to see people amongst the truckers taking unedited video to see it.

      Asking questions is dangerous. Asking for evidence makes you a heretic. Asking for details makes you a racist or traitor.

      It’s the same pattern repeated over and over. Same tactics were used during Vietnam and Iraq and Afghanistan wars. Don’t ask questions, just believe what we tell you. Same thing with mask mandates and vaccine mandates. The moment you start asking questions, look at the reaction.

      The evidence supporting these things is rice paper thin.

    • 0 avatar
      Master Baiter

      It’s easer to train a smart dog than a dumb one.

      Most of the commenters here who go along with this crap think they’re smart, when in fact they are actually mid-wits who have been trained by the media to believe the standard narrative: Climate change is a crisis; the truckers are racists; Trump is a Russian agent, Trump said to drink bleach, vaccinate everyone down to newborns, etc.

      The truly smart among us can see through this BS, as well as some dumb folks who aren’t so easily trained by the dishonest corporate media.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        It’s amazing how all dictatorships shut down the media/free press and claim that it is ‘the enemy’.

        It is also amazing that so many do not remember the important role that the free press played in desegregation, exposing Watergate, exposing corporate greed/criminality, the trtuh of what was happening ‘on the ground’ in Vietnam, and exposing environmental hazards such as the Love Canal.

        There is no such thing as ‘the government’. There are multiple levels of different governments. Each jealously protecting its jurisdiction and interests from the others.

        And there is no such thing as ‘the media’. There are different media outlets/organizations which are in competition with each other. There is some real dislike between them. Those managing/running different media outlets change often. And some are held responsible by their shareholders.

        The illogic of those who oppose the heritage media while claiming to believe in capitalism or democracy is staggering. Another searing indictment of the failures of the educational system in North America.

        Instead they ‘believe’ anonymous postings on social media. Many sourced from ‘troll farms’ in nations opposed to democracy.

      • 0 avatar
        jkross22

        MB, propaganda is hard to cut through when you’ve bought into it. It’s hard to de-program yourself, partly because it means admitting you got duped.

        We all make mistakes and when we’re constantly getting gaslit, it’s even harder to do.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          “It’s hard to de-program yourself, partly because it means admitting you got duped.’

          That is an extremely astute observation. The problem is this, who gets to determine who’s been duped?

          • 0 avatar
            jkross22

            “The problem is this, who gets to determine who’s been duped?”

            Example:

            We’ve heard for the last few days that the Russians were going to attack Ukraine on 2/14 or 2/15. People that reported that and believed that got duped. CNN, NBC, CBS, LA Times, NY Times, Fox, ABC and on and on.

            Or another example:

            “Invoking the emergencies act is not something that we do lightly,” Trudeau said in the House of Commons Thursday, blocks from the protests. “It’s not the first option, or even the second or the third. It is a last resort.”

            Last resort? He didn’t talk to them. Trudeau supporters and his party got duped.

          • 0 avatar
            Master Baiter

            “The problem is this, who gets to determine who’s been duped?”

            Sometimes the truth comes out over time, and we find out who was duped. If you believed Trump’s campaign colluded with Russia, you were duped. I never believed it from the beginning.

            If you believed in April of 2020 that masks don’t work because U.S. officials said so, you were duped. I knew from the outset that this was a lie meant to prevent a run on masks.

            Just a couple of examples…

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @jkross22 and MasterBater – looks like both of you missed the irony in my comment “The problem is this, who gets to determine who’s been duped?”

            It’s a play on phrase, “Who gets to decide what’s hate speech?”

            Simon and Garfunkel’s Boxer is a great fit here:

            “All lies and jest, still a man hears what he wants to hear And disregards the rest”

            We are all guilty of it Mr. Bater, it’s rather shallow and reeks of hubris to assume other’s are the only one’s who’ve been duped.

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