By on August 6, 2019

Who’s talking about the C7 Corvette these days? Precious few, that’s who, as the recent appearance of the mid-engined C8 has sucked all the attention away from the current-generation Chevrolet two-seater.

This situation, paired with the need to clear existing inventory, could be advantageous for buyers of the departing model, assuming you’re ready to shell out nearly six figures for the hottest C7s around.

As reported by Cars Direct, General Motors is upping incentives on the outgoing C7 between now and Labor Day, offering up to $9,404 in savings to buyers who like sitting behind their engine. Naturally, buyers of entry-level models stand no chance of seeing this upper amount.

The offer carries the enthusiasm-sparking billing of “Supplier Pricing for Everyone.” Available on any Corvette model, the deal ties itself to the vehicle’s configuration, meaning less savings for Stingray buyers and more for Z06 customers. Maximum savings come to those who already own a Vette, as there’s a $3,000 loyalty offer in play.

Should this be your first Corvette purchase, the maximum savings to be had (no lease offers, sorry) totals $6,404, and that’s if you’re prepared to fork over just north of $95k on a ZO6. But wait, you ask — doesn’t the Z06 start at around $85k? Indeed it does, meaning you’ll likely have to add some options in order to pare down the final selling price. Yes, this is one of those instances where being a return customer really sweetens the pot.

Any money on the hood of a car is appreciated, however, and customers eager to get into a new Vette — but who didn’t get their name on a reservation list early — could find themselves waiting for a 2021 C8, not a 2020 model. The next-generation model’s first-year popularity boost might lead them to the C7 instead.

[Image: General Motors]

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39 Comments on “Lovers of Front-engined Corvettes Stand to Save Big, but Only if They Spend Big...”


  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    Or you could go on cars.ocm and buy a new C7 for $45K. They seem to have list prices around $58K, meaning $13K off before you negotiate.

    • 0 avatar
      MiataReallyIsTheAnswer

      Chances are $13k off a base model has some fine print, IE: several incentives you won’t qualify for.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        The price is down to $43,597 today. $3,000 of it is contingent of Chevrolet loyalty, which I don’t have. I guess I never will now. There are a number of dealers at that price. One of them with a grey 7-speed manual for that price right up the road from me.

  • avatar
    ToolGuy

    GM’s incentive structure is a key driver of their success. (Read that however you like.)

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    “The offer carries the enthusiasm-sparking billing of ‘Supplier Pricing for Everyone.\'”

    What are they paying for all those Chinese parts, anyway?

  • avatar
    JMII

    Lots of garage queen C7s will be traded in as well so the used market is going to be saturated. Given the massive incentives on the 2019 models all C7 prices are going to drop. In order to get more C8 allocations dealers stocked up on C7s. Thus to move the metal… err fiberglass, they are going to be making sweet deals on C7s.

    Given all the unknowns with this totally new mid-engine configuration I wouldn’t be rushing to get a C8. Then again I bought my C7 used so I’m not the typical Corvette buyer at about 10 younger then average and driving a manual transmission Z51.

  • avatar
    jkross22

    They’re gonna make up the lack of profit on volume. You’ll see.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Honestly this is the car to buy, manuals are available on the upper 40k range, fantastic daily driver. I wouldn’t touch the C8 for at least 3 years, GM hasn’t exactly made many good decisions under Barra’s reign, so hesitation is the best policy on the C8.

  • avatar

    In the fall of 1967, anyone who was the first “gotta have it” person on their block with a C3 Corvette wishes they’d bought a leftover ’67 model. In the spring of 1983, anyone who was the first “gotta have it” person on their block with a C4 Corvette wishes they’d bought….anything else.

    Who in their right mind believes that GM can successfully launch a mid-engine Corvette without teething problems? I have no sympathy for those suckers who so willingly pay above sticker to part with their money.

    Now is a great time to get a new C7 – hell, any well-cared-for 2015-19 C7. I’d avoid a 2014 model for the same reasons I’d avoid a 2020 C8.

    • 0 avatar
      ToddAtlasF1

      You too can be a Corvette test driver!

    • 0 avatar
      geo

      I think GM’s teething problems have historically come from severe cost-cutting and assigning their worst engineers to their small cars.

      I doubt the Corvette was cost-cut a whole lot, and their best engineers were likely the ones working on it.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        GM’s best engineers are playing shuffle board or decomposing, and even they were hamstrung by ivy league accountants. The current idiocracy selections are not poised to finally turn GM’s reputation around after almost sixty years of decline.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Ironically the 2014 is the best C7 if you want an automatic because it has the A6. The A8 that came out in 2015 has been a nightmare and subject of various lawsuits.

      My 2014 C7 3LT Z51 has been flawless so far at 27K in mileage and 4 track days. I bought the car used last year with only 18K in mileage. Fit and finish isn’t the best which is sadly just par for the course in GM land. Mechanically zero problems. The only things have “broke” have been: SiriusXM antenna (how?), reverse sensor failure and the power lumbar/side bolsters don’t stay inflated. I fixed both the antenna and reverse sensor in my driveway for under $40. My Nissan 350Z had the same sensor failure so I knew how to address it.

      While the C7 was all new car with vastly improved interior quality, mechanically it was very similar to the C6 and thus no where near the leap the C8 will be. Despite my launch year C7 being fine I too wouldn’t touch a first year C8… too many changes here including a whole new DCT transmission.

  • avatar

    Z06 seems to be so much overkill for drivers who never go to a track. The base with Z51 is really the sweet spot these days.

    • 0 avatar
      A Scientist

      Agreed. Never liked the jittery ride of the Z06. Riding in the passenger seat of one actually began to make me somewhat queasy in fact. It’s better for the track, sure, but for everyday driving I’d much rather have the Z51. Way more livable.

      • 0 avatar

        I spent a day with a CTS-V. The supercharged engine is insane, but for real world use, I’d rather the normally aspirated version-although there appears to be a rule that the CTS can’t have a V8 in normal trim.

        Were I to buy a C7, I’d def skip the blown motor…it’s fun, for about 8 seconds on a very, very open highway.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      The real deal is the Grand Sport as you get all the good fast goodies as the Z06 minus the supercharger which generates massive heat and sends the car into warp speed at a rate that 90% of driving public can’t control. Downsides to the GS are the larger wheel which tend to crack due to the stiff, low profile run flats, wide tires.

      If your getting a C7 there are two MUST have options: the performance exhaust and the mag-ride suspension. The Z51s have these so its the minimum C7 I’d consider (which why I bought mine). Only downside here for those not tracking is the dry sump which your average oil change place will not understand. Heck dealerships don’t see enough of these engines and constantly screw up getting the oil level correct. The C8 will be dry sump only so they better get more people trained on the procedure.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    I still prefer the looks of a C6 so I guess the used market will be a buyers market.

    • 0 avatar
      TheDutchGun

      C6 is my favorite modern corvette, along with the Z06 run of the C5.

      Not a fan of the back end of the C7, which I see the new C8 used the same taillight design.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      The c6 makes a great sub 20k low mileage 2nd car purchase. I have been super pleased with mine, yes they have the foibles everyone mentions but for the $$ I paid, who cares?

      Easy on gas (relatively 23 mpg) cheap to insure (no bs here they really are not that bad) problem free for the most part (mine is a 05′ so for a 15 y.o car is has been great) and 400 hp.

  • avatar
    TheDutchGun

    I checked whatever new 2019s are advertised on auto trader for the province of Ontario and they’re definitely marked down to varying degrees.

    The best deal I found was an all-black base stingray with a manual for $61k, which is $12-$13k off MSRP here. That one was the outlier though. Most were not marked down to that degree.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    No need to rush in to purchasing a C7. No doubt their will be stores with C8’s and new C7’s on the ground simultaneously, though I suspect the c8’s will be spoken for.

    I am very interested, from an arm chair qb position so to speak, to see what trades come in on the C8. Thos car is a game changer for GM in a positive direction. 2021 Suburban/Tahoe hopefully attracts new buyers as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      The 2021 Tahoe and Suburban are going to bomb harder than the the trucks did. At one point the full-size SUV segment was bustling with options and sale numbers that are beyond enviable. About 15 years ago one by one manufacturers started switching to IRS and jacking up prices, and the segment slowly collapsed, leaving only the Tahoe and Suburban as the only contenders, with the only true truck platform left GM has jacked their prices to the moon. I have zero doubts that without the solid rear axle that has kept the Suburban relevant for the past 80 years it will fall into the same obscurity as the Sequoia. FCA cannot come fast enough with the solid axle full-size they promised.

      With the plethora of examples of GM incompetence I simply have no hopes that the C8 will turn out to be what consumers expect.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I suppose it depends on the lens one is viewing from. I think they are headed in the right direction, time will tell.

      • 0 avatar
        87 Morgan

        I suppose it depends on the lens one is viewing from. I think they are headed in the right direction, time will tell.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        What percentage of *new* Yukotahoburbalade buyers do you suppose know the truck has a solid rear axle, or what a solid rear axle is?

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          I’d say a good 60%, I would also say a good 100% prefer the lack of odd tire wear associated with towing with IRS, and another good majority also find the linear sleekness of the tire placement of a solid axle appealing even if they don’t understand that’s what gives it those looks.

          The Navigator rear quarter and tire placement for example looks half baked because of this.

          Internet commentators can continue to pretend IRS is superior on a truck based SUV but for those of us that actually use an SUV as the truck it’s based on we prefer the axle.

          • 0 avatar
            jack4x

            I would venture to guess that well under 50% of GM full sizers have ever had a trailer hooked to them.

            I prefer the axle as well, but we are the outliers. These are luxury vehicles now, even the base Tahoe, and the people buying them prefer the lower load height and improved on-road manners of the IRS.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I still think the best move would be to change the light-duty versions to IRS and then offer a solid axle Suburban HD off the 3/4-ton frame.

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            I think these estimates are wildly off the mark.

            You are not the typical buyer. The typical buyer is my Texas sister-in-law (not the California one I referenced in another discussion, who has a Golf). She’s owned four straight GM BOF SUVs, the latest one a 2018 Denali XL. She’s never heard of a solid axle in her life. All trailers in her household are pulled by her husband’s Silverado (which, incidentally, he hates because it’s had a lot of niggling problems; he’s planning to replace it with a Ford). She uses her Denali to tote her three kids (and her oldest’s soccer team) around her town and occasionally to Dallas. The reason she doesn’t have a CUV is purely because in her part of Texas the SUV is far more socially prestigious. The extra cargo capacity of the IRS SUVs will be pure upside for her.

          • 0 avatar
            87 Morgan

            Hummer, I believe that most people who do serious towing either now or in the future will do so with a pick up vs using a Tahoe/Suburban/Yukon/Yukon XL/Escalade an IRS. I used my Suburban to tow my pop up Coleman when we had it a solid 3x times a year. I do not believe that a IRS will decrease the number of sales, it will increase them as the increase in interior space along with the improved ride will make these far more an attractive purchase.

            Again, time will tell.


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