By on July 11, 2018

China and Germany signed a collection of commercial accords valued at $23.5 billion this week. Meanwhile, the nations’ leaders publicly affirmed their commitment to a multilateral global trade order, while the United States adopts a more protectionist policy.

“We both want to sustain the system of World Trade Organization rules,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said during a press conference. Chinese Premier Li Keqiang, also present, agreed and stated protectionism must be prevented for the good of the global economy.

Chinese President Xi Jinping has already pleaded for governments to maintain an open trading policy. “We reject selfish, shortsighted, closed, narrow policies, [we] uphold World Trade Organisation rules, support a multi-lateral trade system, and building an open world economy,” Xi said in an incredibly hypocritical speech from last month. 

While China has promised to open its market a bit, the country’s trade practices remain exceptionally protectionist. All banks are state-owned and the nation has proven highly aggressive in keeping foreign investments to a minimum — unless they somehow benefit the country in the long term.

The automotive industry sees this in the form of state-mandated partnerships that require manufacturers to join with established Chinese firms. Critics claim these moves force businesses hoping to gain entry to the lucrative Asian market to lose access to their own intellectual property and hand over profits, as China gets a leg up on technologies that would have taken years to develop. The People’s Republic also imposes fairly large import tariffs on high-end goods produced outside its borders, especially cars.

The Trump administrations’ recent tariff proposals seem to exist primarily to counter these issues, dampening China’s plan to become the global leader in all advanced technologies and manufacturing by 2025. But the resulting trade war has created strange bedfellows. The United States had hoped threatening new import duties would encourage Europe to ease off on some of its own. While that approach appeared to be working, with promising rhetoric coming from Merkel, it now looks like Germany may be more interested in siding with China — a country currently retaliating viciously against new U.S tariffs.

In May, China promised to lower its tariffs on imported cars to just 15 percent as a way to appease the United States. However, things didn’t play out that way. The People’s Republic ended up raising U.S. auto import duties to a massive 40 percent.

According to Reuters, the Chinese-German commercial accords include deals with Siemens, Volkswagen, BMW, and BASF. The Chinese government had said that German companies and institutions would soon be able to issue bonds in renminbi in China — a very big deal. But it’s just a promise and the Chinese government doesn’t seem to be particularly good at keeping them.

Some German companies and politicians have complained that Germany is too accommodating toward Chinese businesses, while China has been less than willing to return the favor. There’s also been a string of high-profile takeovers by Chinese firms. While Merkel welcomed the opening of China’s financial sector, she still requested that Beijing continue opening its other markets.

Meanwhile, the United States continues to squabble with itself over Donald Trump’s tariff proposals. It’s plain to see that China is hitting below the belt (if there is such a thing in business), but the Senate voted overwhelmingly against the trade deal on Wednesday — saying the president should seek congressional approval before using national security as a reason for imposing tariffs on other countries.

The majority of its complaints focused on how a hyper-aggressive trade policy might risk alienating allied nations and risk domestic investments. Automakers have already claimed new U.S. tariffs on automobiles and parts would severely hamper their ability to do business effectively. We’re wondering how they feel about China’s new tariffs.

[Image: Volkswagen Group China]

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84 Comments on “Trade War Watch: Germany and China Now Best Friends...”


  • avatar
    dwford

    Every time I think our country is a mess, I look at Europe and realize we still have it pretty good here.

    • 0 avatar
      Whatnext

      Ever been to Europe? Rural Germany makes rural America look like a drug-ridden hillbilly ghetto.

      • 0 avatar
        TwoBelugas

        Too scared to go to the no-go zones in urban Germany eh?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          TwoBelugas,
          WTF are you stating?

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            @ Big Al, He’s saying Germany has some sketchy areas. It does.

            BTW, we had almost a week with nothing but car articles. The discourse was civil and dare I say enlightening in some respects. I also noticed when we were simply discussing cars you were nowhere to be found. Why don’t you go post in an economic forum instead of polluting this place with your nonsensical vitrol. Leave this to those of us that like and enjoy cars.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Art,
            Equal to the US? The US Trumps (pun intened) most of the EU for violence.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    Angela likes to play both ends against the middle. She’s on borrowed time anyway, her act is wearing thin at home.

  • avatar
    Maxb49

    Merkel is a filthy scum and it’s time for her to get off the world stage. She is the poster boy for executive term limits.

  • avatar
    TW5

    They’ve been friends for a long time, and one of their favorite pastimes is tag-teaming the American middle class. Being publicly friendly with China is meaningless, if everyone already knows you’re pals. This is nothing more than Merkel attempting to mess with the psyche of clueless Americans who don’t understand how the trade deficit works or the nature of our “alliances” within the EU.

    To make matters worse, China was able to raise its tariff on US automobiles because Canada and Mexico are still working to keep loopholes and quotas open so foreign content can be brought into the NAFTA zone duty-free at America’s expense. Until we defeat our “allies”, we don’t have much leverage over China or anyone else. Sadly, our own Congress is too stupid to get it, either.

    As EU bureaucrats delight in telling us, America doesn’t have many allies. That’s correct, actually. Many of our allies have been threatening to unfriend unless we render dollar diplomacy (tribute). The EU needs to be dismantled, and then we need to have trials in Nuremberg to deal with the people in charge.

    • 0 avatar
      thornmark

      Exactly.

      “There are no permanent alliances, only permanent interests.”

      Germany is a freeloader and Trump called her bluff.

      btw, Canada and Mexico can only lose if they are recalcitrant. Some people don’t get it, Trump isn’t doing this so he can be praised by the NYTimes, he doesn’t care what they say and that’s why they hate him so much.

      • 0 avatar
        TW5

        Yeah, it’s a bad situation. Both of our NAFTA trading partners would be better off, if they allied themselves with the US. Unfortunately, both governments (including the newly elected Mexican government) seem convinced that the US will not survive this economic conflict. They think the rot within will destroy us long before the EU or China blink.

        I’m not sure what the future holds for the US, but, sadly, Canada and Mexico know there will be no consequences for their disloyalty. If we prevail, we will simply readopt them as our trade partners because our citizens are too dumb to know what’s going on.

        Oh well, it’s not going to get fixed in a day or even by one administration. This will require decades of sustained pressure.

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          Canada has been losing jobs this year while US job growth is soaring.

          Trudeau is deeply unpopular in Canada and a total goofball. Meanwhile the new Mexican prez is saying he will control the borders or something like it.

          Trump told the Saudis to produce more oil and MSM said they wouldn’t – they did. etc, etc, etc

          • 0 avatar
            TW5

            We’ll see what happens. I harbor no ill will against the people of either nation. They have been solid neighbors in the grand scheme, and some of the corruption within their governments is bought and paid for by plutocrats in the US. Hopefully, they will be able to get it sorted.

            I’m cautiously optimistic about Mexico. A strong landslide to the left suggests the CIA may have abstained from election rigging. Maybe AmLo will be a better neighbor than we expect.

          • 0 avatar
            Whatnext

            Canada has not been losing jobs this year. Thanks for playing, mini-Trump. From Alberta by any chance?
            “For Canada, 2018 brings an ‘unbelievable’, ‘ridiculously strong’ job market”
            https://www.macleans.ca/economy/for-canada-2018-brings-an-unbelievable-ridiculously-strong-job-market/

          • 0 avatar
            Peter Gazis

            Thornmark

            Saudi Arabia doesn’t listen to Trump when it comes to oil.

          • 0 avatar
            Hydromatic

            If Trump was a smarter man, he would have told the Saudis they could shoot for the moon as far as gas prices were concerned. That would have been the perfect opportunity to open the taps on U.S. oil production and it would have brought a lot of well-needed jobs back.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          TW5,
          Why should Canada and Mexico want what Trump is offering?

          You whine and snivel how the world in your eyes are screwing the US (quite misguided) and yet all should support Trump screwing up the world.

          • 0 avatar
            TW5

            @ BAfO

            Because the money and economic activity they are inheriting to betray the cause of NAFTA is essentially coming from the US. They would be much better off to cut out the middle man, and make deals with the US.

            But Nieto and Trudeau do not appear to be serving the best interest of their people. Their allegiances lie elsewhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            TW5,
            Your comment is just flowery words, again you play on emotions as you have no real support for your position.

            Your writing is like that if the Baruth family. Not substantial and full of subjectiveness.

      • 0 avatar
        "scarey"

        As for Me-hi-co, leftist governments never work.
        Oh, but this time it’s different. I know. It always is. LOL

    • 0 avatar
      SSJeep

      Two countries whose economies rely on a massive trade surplus with one country are going to be friends? I expect that this “friendship” will be short lived. Its a knee jerk reaction to try and pi$$ off the US. It wont last.

    • 0 avatar
      retrocrank

      I think China is taking advantage of the EU’s disdain for the USA, to our disadvantage.

      https://thediplomat.com/2018/06/what-does-chinas-belt-and-road-initiative-mean-for-us-grand-strategy/

  • avatar
    BoogerROTN

    Germany will import more crap.

    China will import more German manufacturing tech and reverse engineer it, as is SOP.

    “Win win.”

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      BoogerROTN,
      You’re correct.

      How effective will Trump be if everyone else continues on as we have? The country that will lose the most will be the US.

      If the Chinese and the EU take on the mantra of the global free trader leaders and the US has isolated itself with more expensive imports and exports are more expensive (less will be bought) the US will decline.

      The US needed the EU most importantly to assist in tackling the Chinese.

      Trump and his goons are not going to fare well with their ill concieved plan.

      All Trump has done is make production in the US more expensive, imports more expensive and forced countries to increase taxation on US made goods. Dumber than dogsh!t Trump is.

      • 0 avatar
        Art Vandelay

        Umm, he is saying Germany gets there IP stolen in exchange for crap…think the win part is sarc. But never miss a chance to bash the US.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Art,
          I don’t bash the US. I bash the current junta running the comedy.

          Your comment suggests 2 things to me. First you are a Trump man and secondly you don’t understand much going on outside of your State.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scarey,
            I sit centre right economically and centre socially.

          • 0 avatar
            Art Vandelay

            First off, I am a me man. My vote goes to whomever is going to benefit me the most. As I write a disproportionately large check on the 15th of April, Trump’s message of tax cuts resonated more to me than anything his opponent was saying. That could change in 2020 as, like I said, I am a Me man and another candidate could benefit me more. In short, the more of the fruits of my own labor I get to keep, the more likely I am to vote for someone. That is my number one issue currently. That may not be everyone, but I don’t cast their vote.

            As to what is going on outside of my state, I do travel quite a bit both in the US and to Europe and the Pacific. I don’t really care that much about outside of my state…heck I barely care about outside of my community. I live in one place. I chose to live here as I had multiple offers from probably 10 different states both red and blue in nature. The only thing that really concerned me about the state as a whole was the tax rate for the most part because again, I don’t live in the whole state.

            So it is less that I don’t understand, it really is more that I just don’t care anymore. Local politics frankly have far more impact on my life than national and I chose my locale with that in mind. And yes, my attitude is callous, but frankly I am sick of subsidizing people who refused to make the same sacrifices I did to ensure my family was taken care of.

      • 0 avatar
        threeer

        I always find it ironic that China loudly professes to be a champion of “free trade.” They advocate anything but, unless you take it to mean “we want to trade freely in YOUR country without restriction, but not in ours.”

        I’m no fan of Trump and maybe the tariff war isn’t the way to go, but we’ve collectively allowed folks like China (and yes, even my second home, Germany) to take advantage of us. I think there are better ways of evening the odds and not continuing to stick our heads in the sand under the mantra of “cheaper goods are better.” That our position now is driving allies straight into the waiting arms of Chairman Xi is troubling…

      • 0 avatar
        "scarey"

        -I’m a rude person.-

  • avatar
    ajla

    President Xi declared this “an agreement of equals” so I think Germany is going to be juuuuuuust fine.

  • avatar

    Last time when Germany was “friends” with totalitarian Asian power it did not end well for both “friends”. Germans have to be careful with whom they keep company. Being enemy of America for any reason does not bode well.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    This is a loud message to Trump in first-grade words, but he’s too consumed with narcissism to hear or understand it.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      “he’s too consumed with narcissism to hear or understand it.”

      which also describes every other foreign policy expert who has posted in these comments already.

      isn’t it funny? people like TW5, Sub-600, thornmark, and dwford are so good at their jobs they have an immense amount of free time to comment on blogs.

      one might wonder why they’re not legislators or executive cabinet members, what with their breadth of experience.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      Intelligent people are aware that China and Germany are friends and have been working together for some time. Merkel’s statements were meant to spook the American livestock. Congratulations.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    Maybe China should pay to defend Germany then.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      ” “Since the announcement of the tariffs: we’ve lost 20 percent of our income in soybeans, that’s nationally,” said Bret Davis, an Ohio farmer who also serves as a director of the American Soybean Association.

      Davis fears the repercussions of a long-term trade impasse. “We spent 35 years now working on this, trying to get trade with China to this point … It’s going to take years now to get this back.” ”

      Gee, Trump’s trade war is going very well, isn’t it?

      • 0 avatar
        Sub-600

        Don’t be mental. The “trade war”, as you call it, is a couple of weeks old. If you’re already panicking you may want to want to head to your safe space now. There will be pain associated with this, the trade deficit has to be addressed and it won’t happen overnight. Germany has been running a trade surplus with the U.S. for sixty-seven years. Time to pony up. The same for the Chi-coms. Oh, and another thing, this “we have no problem with the American people, we have a problem with your president” platitude is a total crock. They have a “problem” with being asked to participate in fair trade.

      • 0 avatar
        redapple

        ETC

        RE Farm end of the world due to evil Trump.

        FAKE NEWS !!!!!

        China tariffs on US ag products will have little effect on prices.

        AG products ARE nearly COMPLETELY FUNGIBLE. FUNGIBLE- LOOK IT UP.

        • 0 avatar
          ect

          Precisely, which means that Chinese importers can easily respond to tariffs on US soybeans by buying from Argentina, Brazil and other producers.

          US soybean prices are already down 13% so far this year, which is exactly what worries Mr. Davis and his confreres.

  • avatar
    MoDo

    Canada and the US would already have a fair ‘win win” trade deal(s) in place had Harper only been re-elected. I’ll tell you one thing though, Trudope will NOT be getting re-elected next year, that’s a fact. Doug Ford has already done more for Ontario in 2 weeks than the provincial liberals did in the past 5 years, and the Country is watching.

    • 0 avatar
      Sub-600

      Is he related to Rob Ford? That guy was a laugh riot. The U.S. could have worked with him.

      • 0 avatar
        MoDo

        Yes, he’s Robs older brother. He’s a literal gift from god to have become our new Premier (same as Governor). He’s already said he’ll be taking Trudeau to court if he tries to impose a carbon tax on us, has repealed a very far left sex-ed program that taught kids about trannies and gender fluid BS, repealed cap and trade with California and Quebec (carbon credit program) which lowered gas prices by 10 cents per liter, fired the hydro CEO that was making 6 million per year (why we have the highest hydro rates in North America) – all that and he was sworn in less than 2 weeks ago.

        He’s cutting taxes, red tape, regulation etc.

        • 0 avatar
          Sub-600

          The Warmists in California would have North America back in the Stone Age if they could.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          While I’m not about to deny that Doug is accomplishing he promised, was a $6 million salary (roughly split among 13 million people) really the reason our rates were so high? You know, as opposed to the costs of maintaining aged infrastructure. And I’ll be curious to see if it ever comes out as to what the true cost of getting Schmidt to step down was, because nothing but $400k in severance without due cause doesn’t really add up.

          • 0 avatar
            MoDo

            Maymar – the rates will drop when the green energy act gets whacked which is already in motion.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            Right, so while the 6 million dollar man was not the reason for our high rates, but at least we got a pyrrhic victory right out of the gates.

        • 0 avatar
          mikey

          @MoDo….Agreed ! If we could get Premier Ford, and President Trump at the table we could cut a deal.

          President Trump has expressed his willingness for a Canada U.S deal. Rejected by our wannabe “world leader” that feels the need to include Mexico.

          Unfortunately our former snowboard instructor/ drama teacher, and now Prime Minister has a very weak opposition. I can see him winning again.

        • 0 avatar
          "scarey"

          Does Doug Ford have enough to eat at home ? Maybe he could go eat at his late brother’s house. His brother always had enough to eat. LOL

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Well I again will ask Matt Polsky some questions. He appears to be one of the Trump Unfortunates.

    So Mattie, if we include trade in services (finance, travel, etc) what is the US position?

    You seem to put forward your Trumponomics with little knowledge other than what you apparently watch (and believe) on Fox.

    I think as a journalist stick to what you hAve some insight with. You are looking sillier with every pro-Trump Ultra Nationalist article here on TTAC.

    • 0 avatar
      Art Vandelay

      If you consider funding the bulk of things like the UN and NATO as services, our position is fairly strong. In retrospect it may be cheap insurance though (NATO) as history over the last 100 years has well taught us what letting the Germans build a strong Military means for the world.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Art,
        Let’s look at NATO logically and break it down. First I will admit the US spends more funding defence, but what percentage is NATO?

        1. NATO was designed to counter the USSR. If you don’t know the USSR no longer exists.

        2. So, why should NATO members contribute to the Pacific or Indian Ocean US presence? What I’m stating here is focus on what is needed.

        3. Nowadays (pre Trump), other than some small battlefield skirmishes relative to a full scale war. Military is projecting power to protect trade routes. Which nation/s have the greatest trade. The US. Trade in and out/around China will be protected by the Chinese, hence their expansion into the South China Sea, not much different in design to the Suez Canal, controlled by the Brits or the Panama Canal controlled by the US.

        So, as you can see the US itself has stretched itself, mainly protecting its interest and past US interests including the EU. The US had a lot to lose, more than any other nation like Great Britan did, when it was the greatest military power.

        It seems many focus on just pure goods trade neglecting the saturation of US business globally, discounting non goods trade like services and finance by the US.

        I really think many need to look objectively at the current situation holistically.

        The US isn’t really losing out. Its many like you are insecure at a less dominant and influencial US.

        • 0 avatar
          Sub-600

          It’s estimated that out of approximately 180 fighter aircraft, Germany may have SEVEN that are combat ready. They couldn’t defend against an Air National Guard fighter wing let alone multiple MiG formations, lol. They need to step it up a bit. Just a tad.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Seven?!?!?!?!?

            LOL. The National Guard Wing by my house more A-10s combat ready than that.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          I don’t think you know me that well, Al…I am fairly isolationist in nature. Fighting in a bunch of stupid wars tends to have that effect on you.

          With respect to NATO, I agree 100 percent that the organization was founded to confront a threat that has changed radically or no longer exists (The Warsaw Pact). But if your take is correct, then why do the European nations care what we do with respect to NATO? I ask you this, who is the Second Largest Military in NATO? Not Germany, nor the UK or Australia. Nope…try Turkey. Turkish politics are pretty different from the traditional NATO powers and they have been more pro Russia of late so take them and the US out and what are you left with? A little more than a speedbump to any Russian agression, thats what. I’m fine with that. I don’t live in Europe and I have 2 Oceans and by far the most powerful bluewater Navy in the world between my community and pretty much any threat. As such, I would be perfectly fine scaling back and sort of saying “OK, do what you are going to do rest of the world, just don’t come across this ocean” and trading with whoever is standing when the dust settles so long as it isn’t a Hitler or Stalin type.

          But I am also fine with staying in an alliance like NATO so long as everyone is contributing at a level consummate with their economy. In fact, that is what I’d prefer. 2% of GDP by 2024 was the stated goal. Why should the country that by far spends the most not demand accountability here? I think the President is simply prodding them to this as they have had no real enticement to get there. I am fine with NATO, so long as we get to that 2% across the board. Anything less than that frankly amounts to the US Subsidizing the defense budgets of other nations. In that case I’d be fine entering into some sort of pact with those nations that are serious about defense.

          I’m also fine going it alone. We may not be as powerful globally at the end of the day, but we are a vast and diversified nation that would still survive in relative safety on its own. We are far richer in resources than the UK so the old British empire isn’t a great example. Still, the UK manages 2.1 percent of GDP on defense so I’m not sure why we can’t prod the Germans to do the same.

        • 0 avatar
          Art Vandelay

          And with respect to who needs who, If the US cut our defense to 2 percent of GDP, left NATO, and pulled back to our own borders, I don’t think for a second my country would be open to invasion or I would be less safe. Less powerful and prosporous on a global scale, probably but again, we are a large, diverse economy so at the end of it, I’m still speaking English. Are the Germans still speaking German after the dust settles?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Al, where in this article is anything that would indicate that Matt is a “pro-Trump Ultra Nationalist”?

      I’m not saying that he is or isn’t, but nothing in the content of this piece indicates any political position whatsoever. I allow pretty much all political comments around here, but at least have something legitimate to attack.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Adam,
        All his articles are biased. As I’ve stated, I pull him up and will continue.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          They are not. Continuing to say it does not make it so.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Adam,
            Most every article by Matt are factual. But through omission of relevant information makes them unbalanced.

            He has failed to articulate what is occurring completely. And if he included what he has omitted maybe the discussion would be of better quality.

            Why didn’t he state 2 weeks ago Merkel stated she would be more comfortable (and be supportive) with Trump’s demands if it dovetailed with WTO regulations? Not that Germany was interested in Trump’s demands, which was a part truth. It was widely reported Merkel’s position.

            Its simple with all that is going on report ALL the facts.

          • 0 avatar
            Sub-600

            “..omission of relevant information makes them unbalanced.” This coming from a man who reads Ziggy with a highlighter.

    • 0 avatar
      "scarey"

      -I am a rude person.-

  • avatar
    Art Vandelay

    Yep, just went back through all of the weeks car articles and not a single post from the usual gasbags that jump on posts like this. Why don’t you clowns go post in the Economist or something and spare us all your BS.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    This is Trump’s style of negotiation. Trump wants to force all the parties to the negotiating table. The only problem with this is that he is not negotiating with businesses but with governments. Driving Germany and the EUs into stronger ties with China will not work for the US. The US has already done this for years with Central and South America which have formed stronger trade alliances with China.

    • 0 avatar
      TW5

      The EU already has strong ties to China. Therefore, none of their threats influence Trump, and Trump can delight in bashing them publicly at an EU summit.

      Of course, prior presidents knew this as well, but they did nothing because they were afraid the fake news media could easily prey upon the minds of the ignorant American populace to make them feel as though we were losing friends and influence. Trump does not pander to the fake news media.

      Is it all starting to make sense yet? That which you perceive to be a consequence of Trump’s boorish behavior is actually the antecedent.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        TW5,
        What alliances are they?

        • 0 avatar
          TW5

          @ BAfO

          I’ve written about them extensively in previous posts. The most basic of ties between Germany and China are related to trade. Some of the “trade deficit with China” is actually trade deficit with the EU because the EU is sending components that are used to manufacture final goods for export to the US market.

          Besides numerous articles and scholarly works explaining the mechanics, proof of this arrangement can also be seen by looking at capital flows between the US and Europe.

          Of course, the strategic alliance isn’t limited to Germany and China. It’s actually BRIC and the EU. The relevant question is: considering the scale of the collaboration between EU and BRIC nations, how are you still completely unaware?

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            TW5,
            Not your distorted untruths.

            How about some links show how the EU is more aligned to China than the US. Oh, not from some radical right or left wing source.

            You’re full of it.

          • 0 avatar
            TW5

            @BAfO

            This will be less difficult to understand, if you will just learn a few basic rules of international trade economics, particularly regarding balance of payments.

            Furthermore, you never really posit any basic hypotheticals. You’re stuck perpetually in some sort of political mind jail in which everything is interpreted according to narrative.

            Mexico is right next to the USA. It’s resource rich. It has 100M working age people. Why is our trade deficit with China and not Mexico?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      I agree Jeff.

      I also believe for the US to be sucessful with the Chinese the EU and all the OECD needed to be on board.

      The end result would of placed the US and EU influencing our world.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Big Al–I don’t have a problem with renegotiation the tariff agreements but I don’t believe in the long run that Trump’s approach will work. I am not going to criticize Trump or call him names but I think his approach is more scorched earth. There are other things in place besides tariffs like keeping our allies. I agree that EU countries need to pay more into NATO. The US needs to be tougher with China especially about the issue of stealing technology. I do hope that the US is able to work out trade agreements with our allies–all will lose in a prolonged trade war.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Big Al, Maybe so but I want to stay hopeful that trade agreements can be worked out.

  • avatar
    conundrum

    This kind of bullshit article by Posky, that well-known expert, and the rampart alt-right idiotic commentary is why I need to get the fuck out of this whingeing dead end of a “car” website.

    Delete my account forthwith or I’ll be on to Torstar to see why you pack of sad jokers cannot accomplish even that


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