Report: Max Verstappen Will Stay In Red Bull Seat for the 2025 F1 Season

Chris Teague
by Chris Teague

The action off the track in Formula 1 is often more dramatic than anything that happens on race day, but the 2024 season has taken things to a new level. F1 superstar Lewis Hamilton will move to Ferrari at the end of the year, and other drivers are moving between teams at a furious pace. Reigning World Champion Max Verstappen was rumored to be leaving his longtime home at Red Bull for greener pastures at Mercedes, but the Dutch driver recently put those whispers to bed.


At a press conference before the Austrian Grand Prix, Verstappen responded to questions about his next move, saying, “I mean, we’re already also working on next year’s car. I think when you’re very focused on that, that means that you’re also driving for the team.”

Speculation and rumors started swirling when news broke that Red Bull’s Chief Technical Officer, Adrian Newey, was departing. Mercedes-AMG team boss Toto Wolff has said that he’d love to have Verstappen in one of his seats, but it was never clear that another team would provide Max with the support and authority that Red Bull has allowed.


Though other teams have improved as the 2024 season has progressed, Red Bull and Verstappen remain the dominant forces on the F1 grid. The Dutchman has won seven of the last ten races and leads the driver’s championship by almost 70 points over the next closest driver, Lando Norris, from McLaren.

[Images: Jay Hirano Photography via Shutterstock]


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Chris Teague
Chris Teague

Chris grew up in, under, and around cars, but took the long way around to becoming an automotive writer. After a career in technology consulting and a trip through business school, Chris began writing about the automotive industry as a way to reconnect with his passion and get behind the wheel of a new car every week. He focuses on taking complex industry stories and making them digestible by any reader. Just don’t expect him to stay away from high-mileage Porsches.

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  • ToolGuy ToolGuy on Jun 27, 2024

    Easy on the burnouts, or this whole thing could get expensive.

  • Scott Scott on Jun 28, 2024

    F1 is still a thing? (they should hold a race on dirt sometime...)


    (snark?)(ME??)

  • Theflyersfan Well, if you're on a Samsung phone, (noticing all of the shipping boxes are half Vietnamese), you're using a Vietnam-built phone. Apple? Most of ours in the warehouse say China, but they are trying to spread out to other countries because putting all eggs in the Chinese basket right now is not wise. I'm asking Apple users here (the point of above) - if you're OK using an expensive iPhone, where is your Made in China line in the sand? Can't stress this enough - not being confrontational. I am curious, that's all. Is it because Apple is California-based that manufacturing location doesn't matter, vs a company in a Beijing skyscraper? We have all weekend to hopefully have a civil discussion about how much is too much when it comes to supporting companies being HQ-ed in adversarial countries. I, for one, can't pull the trigger on a Chinese car. All kinds of reasons - political, human rights, war mongering and land grabbing - my morality is ruling my decisions with them.
  • Jbltg Ford AND VAG. What could possibly go wrong?
  • Leonard Ostrander We own a 2017 Buick Envision built in China. It has been very reliable and meets our needs perfectly. Of course Henry Ford was a fervent anti-semite and staunch nazi sympathizer so that rules out Ford products.
  • Ravenuer I would not.
  • V8fairy Absolutely no, for the same reasons I would not have bought a German car in the late 1930's, and I am glad to see a number of other posters here share my moral scruples. Like EBFlex I try to avoid Chinese made goods as much as possible. The quality may also be iffy, but that is not my primary concern
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