By on June 12, 2018

Considering how the popularity of crossover vehicles resulted in the industry-wide genocide of passenger cars, it is both strange and exciting to discuss a new sedan. While we haven’t reached the point where one could describe the situation as a blending of Children of Men and Disney’s Cars franchise, new models with a low center of gravity are becoming increasingly difficult to come by.

That’s why we’re glad Hyundai’s luxury Genesis division built the G70 and saw fit to allow the ability to option it with a manual transmission. You read that correctly; there is an automaker that builds a competitively priced luxury sedan that can be had with a manual transmission. However, buyers need to actually purchase these vehicles for the brand to rationalize that decision in the years to come. 

The idea already looks to be on rather thin ice. Despite sharing a platform with the G70, Kia’s Stinger lacks the manual option for reasons unknown to us. But we can guess it has something to with the company lacking faith that they’ll move many models in a manual configuration.

There’s a little of that going on over at Genesis, too. While the company is happy to offer the sticked version with the base engine, the brawnier twin-turbo V6 is a different story. Fortunately, mating the six-speed manual to the smaller 2.0-liter turbo results in a fewer ponies getting lost along the way. Unlike the base car (equipped with an eight-speed automatic), the manual variant boasts 255 hp and 260 lb-ft of torque.

It’s not exactly an engineering miracle, but selecting your own gears also nets you rear-wheel drive, unique sport exhaust, Brembo brakes with enhanced performance pads, and “additional weight reduction measures.” You can also option a limited-slip differential.

That LSD lands in the AWD-equipped cars as well and, if all you care about is performance specs, you’ll probably want to get one of those with torque vectoring. The 3.3-liter V6 may not come with a manual but it does boast a 0-to-60 mph time of 4.5 seconds, thanks to its 365 horsepower and 376 foot-pounds of torque.

Additional options include adaptive sport suspension, 19-inch wheels with Michelin Pilot Sport 4 summer tires, and Active Sound Design — which pumps in faux exhaust noises paired to the car’s five available drive modes (Sport, Comfort, Smart, Eco and Custom).

The G70 was officially unveiled in September and had its U.S. debut at the 2018 New York International Auto Show. Meanwhile, Hyundai has been trying to figure out a way to get the Genesis brand its own dealer network, or at least ensure existing Hyundai/Kia shops give the luxury models their own area.

You might think separating the G70 and the Kia Stinger would be essential, as they’re basically the same car and eagle-eyed shopper could see through the luxury veneer. But they aren’t the same. While they share a common architecture, the Genesis is noticeably smaller, isn’t a hatchback, and weighs about 100 pounds less in every configuration.

It’s also a more dialed-in package than the Stinger, which wears its development as a grand tourer on its sleeve. That’s not a dig against the Kia, it’s simply a reminder that these two cars are less similar than you might assume. The G70 launches in the United States this summer. While pricing has yet to be announced, we suggest taking a look at similarly quipped Stingers and tacking on a couple grand.

[Images: Genesis Motors]

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51 Comments on “2019 Genesis G70: Korea’s Answer to Germany Comes to America With Available LSD and Sport Package...”


  • avatar
    Sub-600

    LSD package? Hey, man. Turn on, tune in, drop out.

    • 0 avatar
      Blackcloud_9

      Exactly.
      I’m glad they explained the LSD acronym in the article. My first was also, “Wow, G70 now available with mind-altering drug as an option.”

  • avatar
    R Henry

    Looks like an Infiniti Q50 with a Bangle butt.

  • avatar
    asphaltcowboy

    Probably a good deal, if bought used.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    which is exactly why next gen won’t get a manual.

  • avatar
    smartascii

    Neat. Another self-fulfilling prophesy, wherein the manufacturer limits the manual to the lowest-spec version, as though the hoardes of value shoppers out there are longing for an entry-level luxury sedan, but it’s the cost of that dang automatic that keeps them from pulling the trigger. So then, the people like me, who would want the bigger engine and all the options with the stick go elsewhere, and Genesis can throw up its hands and say, “See, nobody wants sticks. I guess we don’t need to build any more.” And one more nail gets driven into the coffin.

  • avatar
    nels0300

    Geez, with Ford ditching cars and Lexus likely ditching the IS and GS (no manuals offered anywhere in the Lexus lineup BTW)….can’t we just be grateful that Hyundai even offers this instead of complaining about everything? Some of you people are just too much.

    Hyundai is throwing us a bone and people still $hit on them.

    • 0 avatar
      jkross22

      Gratitude is in short supply these days. That being said, it’s a curious choice Hyundai made mating the stick to the small engine. I get what they’re thinking, but aren’t the days of poverty spec cars over?

      I think the new Nissan Kicks/Jukes thing is 19k, and it comes with a crazy amount of standard equipment… stuff that some cars costing double offer as options.

      Makes me wonder how many 340i manuals bmw is moving.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Did you read the article? Specifically where the equipment that goes with the manual was listed? It may be only mated to the smaller engine, but I think its quite a stretch to call it “poverty spec”. C’mon.

        • 0 avatar
          thegamper

          Doubt any trim on the g70 could be considered poverty spec, but sure would be nice to get a few cars where every available option could be had with a manual. I just learned that the 2018 Mazda 6 is now only offered with a 6mt in Sport trim. Et tu Mazda :(

          The thing that kills me is that sticks in high trim levels exist in other markets. They just never bring them here.

          • 0 avatar
            smartascii

            This has been covered elsewhere (i.e., not on this site), but there are five trim levels, each available with the 4- or 6-cylinder engine, and each with rear- or all-wheel-drive. The stick is only available on the lowest trim with the small engine and RWD. Selecting it also eliminates some of the driver-assist features that are otherwise standard, even on the most basic automatic.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      ^^^^110% agreed^^^^

    • 0 avatar
      tallguy130

      I feel the same way. You would think this news would be better received among people who like cars given where the market is going.

      Say what you will, the people at Hyundai are doing more for the enthusiast buyer then most automakers now.

      • 0 avatar
        nels0300

        People should be excited instead of focusing on it only being available with a 2.0L turbo.

        Do people even realize this will be priced in the same ballpark of Accord 2.0Ts and loaded GTIs? This is your RWD choice if you want a manual.

        If you don’t like this car, go buy a Ford Ecosport.

  • avatar
    ThomasSchiffer

    It is surprising that a vehicle in this niche is even offered with a manual transmission. The take rate must be incredibly small and what is the point? The next-generation model will probably not have a manual transmission, so the few consumers whom they attracted with this feature will be forced to shop elsewhere or skip over to another, lower, niche to get what they want.

    Does BMW even offer a manual transmission in their 5er for the North American market? I believe you cannot even get one in Europe on a base model 5er, or at least nobody is buying them. Mercedes used to offer manuals on the base model E-Klassen, but again, nobody, or hardly anyone, bothered with them and ordered the automatic transmission.

  • avatar
    jeanbaptiste

    Why not offer the stinger with the manual transmission and the 2.0t?

    • 0 avatar
      Truckducken

      For the same reason you can’t get a Charger with a MT, which is (shrugs).

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      my guess is two-fold. manual transmissions in the US are well underway to being redefined as the enthusiast choice (as opposed to the fuel-efficient, reliable, cheap choice which they used to be). relatedly, enthusiasts typically drive smaller cars. it helps that in the US context European cars were smaller than the land barges. The Kia Stinger is not exactly an enthusiast car, nor is it exactly small. So my guess is the company decided it was not suited to manual duty.

  • avatar
    jeanbaptiste

    Why not offer the stinger with the manual transmission and the 2.0t?

  • avatar
    turbo_awd

    AWD model comes with LSD? That’s another difference over the Stinger. Wonder if it will just drop right in? Some of us want/need the larger rear seats.. If so, that would be amazing..

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Good for Hyundai. One more species of sedan to engage in a Darwinian battle with the infestation of crossovers. Even if it’s short-lived, it’s noble.

    There’s some wonkiness in the grille and a bit of derivative exterior styling, but overall this car looks quite nice. With a 6MT available, even the 2.0 is appealing.

    And you don’t have to say you own a “stinger”. With those looks and that name, the Kia comes off as a Transformers character.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There are too many lines going in different directions up front and the rear is a bit plain.

      That, however, will get addressed when the G70 gets its refresh (should get a pretty extensive sheetmetal rework in line with the new Essentia design language).

      Unfortunately, won’t be able to address the biggest shortcoming of the G70 which is rear passenger space (Genesis should have kept another 2-3 inches to the wheelbase).

      Here’s a really good look at the G70 as a driver’s car (Throttle House).

  • avatar
    Acd

    The G70 may help Genesis pass Alfa Romeo in the U.S. sales race.

  • avatar

    May be it is a Genesis but it is still a Hyundai.

  • avatar
    CarnotCycle

    No manual for the fast motor aside, the 2.0L with the slip and the manual is pretty compelling in its niche. Would be interesting to drive one of these and compare to a base Giulia with the 8-speed – they’re close in specs, price, and targeting same customer.

    What the Hyundai gives up in horsepower and cachet it makes up first time driving by a broken-down Alfa. Car shopping dilemma.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There is a more powerful base engine on the horizon – a 2.5T with 300+ HP, as well a new transmission (either a 10 spd AT or a DCT and possibly both).

  • avatar
    TMA1

    I just got back from Seoul yesterday, and saw a few of these on the road. It’s a handsome car, and that manual already makes it the most interesting vehicle in the segment.

    I’m glad H/K is injecting some new blood into the segment. It’s a pity so many won’t give them a chance. It’s not like they’re charging establishment player prices. By all means, pay more for a sloppy 3 series, an also-ran q50, or an Alfa that will fall to pieces before the warranty ends.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    This car is a real looker. I’d consider it new. The v6 is pretty compelling. I actually may prefer the extra room and lift back of the Kia, but the G70 is better looking. There is always a compromise.

  • avatar
    Parousia

    This is on the next-car short list. The G70 is a compelling package in all forms. The only thing to whine about is the fuel economy and “recommended premium” on both engines. That being said, getting a sport-luxury sedan without having to pay for a premium badge and likely above-average long-term reliability and a unique dealer-maintenance experience might just be enough icing on the cake.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I really wanted to like these, but I’m sorry, that interior is bottom of the segment with the TLX. If you’re going to pick a fight with BMW and M-B, and interior that’s barely a notch above Buick isn’t going to cut it.

    Even the Volvo S60 is now WAY above this design.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      Barely above Buick?

      What looks like metal, IS metal in the Hyundai. The door trim looks gorgeous and far above what anything GM is putting out at the moment.

      You must have this confused with the older G80.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        I would take the G70 over any Buick or other Guangzhou Motors (GM Mark of Exerrence) pile of Chinese-sourced sh!tty a$$ parts any day of the week.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      While don’t particularly care for the design, the interior is pretty top notch when it comes to materials.

      While not to the level of the C Class, close to that of the A4 and better than the current 3 Series.

  • avatar
    MrGrieves

    I’m sure it’s a fantastic car, but it’s about 10 years too late. The Sport Sedan paradigm has shifted into Luxury CUVs. Just ask BMW.

    Also, will I have to visit my local Hyundai dealer to buy one, or will there be stand alone Genesis dealers? Just wondering… our local Hyundai dealer is inside of a building that was put up during the Carter administration and has more tacky balloons, streamers, inflatable air men, and even an inflatable gorilla on the roof. Now that’s luxury!

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      There will be stand-alone Genesis dealerships and Genesis has at least 3 CUVs in the pipeline.

    • 0 avatar
      vancouver.patrick

      I would have to say you are completely correct. When the original Genesis was unveiled in 2008, I wrote a long email to Hyundai Canada advising them they need a 3-series fighter, not a 7-series flagship, to drive volume and to take it to the Germans. They even had the bones of a small-sedan platform in the Genesis coupe which offered the 3.8L v6 and 2.0T with six-speed manual, for years.

      Two generations of Genesis later………the market has rotated away, which is a shame. Think of where Hyundai would be now, if they were working on gen-3 of this small G70 sedan now, not rolling it out in the twilight of the luxury-sport sedan, when manual transmissions are dying off, and even BMW is turning its back on the segment.

  • avatar
    Flipper35

    This would be on my short list but two things kill the deal. The poorly integrated center screen and the Active Sound Design, just like the Stinger and the reason that car is not on my list either.

    I would rather live with an ugly exterior (Avalon snout) than these interiors.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    As high as a take rate the manual SS had I’m surprised they didn’t see fit to make higher trims available with the manual. Not that I would ever buy one, leave the 4s and 6s for the economy duds, put that manual transmission behind a real V8 as God intended.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    Currently if I were interested in a sports sedan again , this would be at the top of my list. Not that I’d be interested in voiding a great powertrain warranty but there is a solid 2.0T aftermarket left over from Gen Coupe that I’m sure will be offering tuning support.I just need to get over my 996.2,997.1 infatuation first.


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