By on May 7, 2018

Any number of unpleasant things can befall a motorist after an unexpected, police-initiated roadside stop. Asset seizure being just one of the dangers. Of course, suspected drug use can also ruin your day, as well as your life.

For an Ontario woman pulled over for speeding on the I-75 in Cook County, Georgia, the item that landed her in jail was exactly what the officer asked for: a driver’s license. Sorry, wrong country, she was told.

According to CBC, the 27-year-old woman’s legal saga started in April. While driving back to Tennessee through Georgia, Emily Nield, who recently completed a master’s degree in geology in the Volunteer State, was pulled over for doing 87 mph in a 70 zone.

While this type of encounter would normally leave a motorist fuming over a pricey ticket, Nield soon found herself in handcuffs. When handed an Ontario driver’s license, the officer was in no mood to recognize Georgia law, which states that non-U.S. residents are allowed to drive with a valid license from their country of origin.

“She kept saying, ‘No, Canadian licences are not accepted,'” Nield told CBC. “I was flabbergasted. I just kept saying this can’t be right — a Canadian licence is always valid.”

Foreign motorists might find themselves asked to produce identification — like a passport — to prove that everything’s on the up and up. That’s exactly what the officer asked Nield, who claims to have had a copy of her passport, birth certificate, and Nexus card on her phone. However, the officer wanted hard copies.

“When I failed to produce it, she reached through the window of my car and she put handcuffs on me,” said Nield. “She told me that I have just been arrested for driving without a licence and that I needed to go to jail.”

And that’s exactly where she ended up. However, before having her photo and prints taken (and told that she was firmly “in the system” now), she fired off a Snapchat video to her friends, appealing for help. Maybe social media does have its uses. A friend tracked Nield down in Adel, Georgia, and contacted the Cook County Sheriff’s Office, after which Nield was allowed a phone call. She claims her requests for a call with the Canadian Consulate or her parents went unanswered.

Nield eventually put up her own bail via a debit card ($880 USD), thus avoiding the unpleasant experience of waiting in jail until her June 12th court appearance rolled around. Getting her car out of impound cost $200. Still, it’s wasn’t the financial penalties that worried Nield.

“I just kept thinking this would ruin me,” Nield told CBC. “Any job application you have to check a box. Are you a criminal? Have you ever been convicted or arrested for anything?”

Luckily for Nield, a friend’s father worked as a lawyer in Virginia. With the help of the consulate, the lawyer leaned on local authorities, and three days later the charge was off the books. However, it’s not hard to imagine a more drawn out ordeal had this been someone without useful connections and know-how.

Despite her arrest no longer being in the system, Nield remains disturbed by what happened. The Cook County probate court solicitor, Matthew Bennett, said Canadians and other non-U.S. drivers should make sure to carry their identification while plying American roadways, but that’s not what landed Nield in jail. Nield said it wouldn’t have mattered if she was carrying the original documents, as the officer wasn’t prepared to recognize any Canadian license as legal. (Bad news for the thousands of snowbirds who drive south each winter in search of heat.)

For that, she’d like to see an apology — if not a formal reprimand for the arresting officer.

[Image: Wikimedia (CC BY-SA 3.0)]

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138 Comments on “Driving Under the Influence of Canada: Possession of Strange, Foreign Driver’s License Sends Woman to Georgia Slammer...”


  • avatar
    JimC2

    87 in a 70 is just keeping up with Atlanta traffic, although Cook County is way out in the sticks a couple hours away… and speaking of way out in the sticks, Cook County’s finest are certainly doing a nice job reinforcing stereotypes of the intellectual prowess of ruralfolk… sigh…

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      Tell me about it – back in 1995 I was on a business trip to Atlanta, and headed up 75/85 on my way up to Norcross, doing 85 in the rent car (a four-cylinder Chevy Corsica), and I was barely keeping up. And this was when the double nickel was still the law of the land.

    • 0 avatar
      ect

      As I used to hear when we lived in Georgia, “it’s not the heat, it’s the stupidity”.

    • 0 avatar
      slavuta

      this is why they are being called “pigs”. Back to the farm, pigs. Back to the farm.

  • avatar
    65corvair

    Don’t these police have any training? Up north in Minnesota most police have a four year law enforcement degrees.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    We get a lot of Canadian snow birds wintering over in the Great American Southwest desert and their Canadian licenses are valid in TX, NM, AZ and SoCal.

    How do I know this? My brother-in-law is a Vancouver-based Canadian citizen. He and my sister are avid RV-ers and spent winters at such exotic RV havens as Picacho Peak, Quartzsite, Yuma, Winterhaven and Lordsburg (NM).

    Then again, they’re not exactly known for speeding 87 in a 70 either.

    People from Old Mexico are viewed less favorably because of all the forged and stolen documents used by them along with counterfeit folding money. Just about every establishment here has an electronic bill-verification device, and quite a number of bills are rejected.

    • 0 avatar
      kkop

      Your relatives are tourists. The woman mentioned in this article is not.

      Big difference.

      As I mentioned in another comment: it IS illegal to drive with your foreign license if you are a resident (as she probably was, based on the limited information, in TN). So cop was probably right about that.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Well, hell! They should lock her up and throw away the key!

        Thanks for pointing it out because I totally missed that.

        Come to think of it, I had something similar happen to me in Nebraska where I drove a CA licensed car with a NM drivers license while stationed in Nebraska, and on my way to MS.

        The cop had pulled me over to inform me that my static-chain was illegal in Nebraska and it had to be tied up to keep from dragging on the road deck.

  • avatar
    Mojohand2

    She’s a white woman and she emerged from the ordeal alive,which is nice. Given that the facts presented suggest the arresting officer is a authority-intoxicated clown, had the offender been a black male, the odds of they being shot dead over this are significantly greater than zero.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m going to suggest we stay on topic, and avoid such off-topic incendiary commentary in future.

      • 0 avatar
        Advance_92

        My first question as I read this was how non-white is she to be treated like this?

      • 0 avatar
        Lynchenstein

        Unfortunately (for you I guess), the comment is germane to the discussion: Law enforcement employees being ignorant of said laws, and if not, then willfully disregarding them for whatever reasons they choose. Black, white, brown – we’re all subject to the whims of the idiots with badges, but it’s those darker than white who’s encounters are far more likely to be fatal instead of merely inconvenient.

        • 0 avatar
          jalop1991

          @Lynchenstein:

          “the comment is germane to the discussion”

          THE GO****N GERMANS GOT NUTHIN’ TO DO WITH IT!

          what’d he say, daddy?

          SHUT UP! ONE SH1T AT TIME!

          yes, I came to this article specifically to make a Buford T. Justice comment.

          Thank you for being the perfect straight man.

          Oh–and while we’re here:

          “Hey boy. Where’s Sheriff Branford?”

          “I AM Sheriff Branford.”

          “Oh. hehehehe For some reason or ‘nuther, you sounded a little…taller on radio.”

      • 0 avatar
        probert

        Huh – did you check the comment before this that finishes with a racist screed? Truth is whenever I read a headline featuring cop misconduct, I wonder if it’s a black person and think of the dire consequences.

        Sandra Bland ring a bell: https://www.cnn.com/2015/07/21/us/texas-sandra-bland-jail-death-explain/index.html

      • 0 avatar
        Hydromatic

        Yet no response to the “Affirmative Action hire” comment? A bit of re-prioritization may be in order.

      • 0 avatar
        John R

        Tell that to iama (https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2018/05/driving-influence-canada-possession-strange-foreign-drivers-license-sends-woman-georgia-slammer/#comment-9528936)

        • 0 avatar
          iama

          Funny that my post was deleted. It’s well documented that ex-Officer Noor was hired through a diversity program. His scores were too low for a regular hire. Not only was he hired anyway, he was fast tracked through the training program. In his short time on the force Noor compounded several complaints of inappropriate behavior.

          I’ve no problem with diversity. I have no problem with Noor’s race or religion. I do have a problem with choosing to ignore qualifications, fast tracking and ignoring a pattern of problems. Someone died as a result of excessive political correctness.

          We can have articles that are designed to create cop hate. If someone makes a post about a process, it gets deleted.

          Nice knee jerk reaction by a TTAC moderator.

      • 0 avatar
        Malforus

        For the record is the problem here that race was raised?

        The officer improperly charged the woman with an inappropriate charge that doesn’t reflect current documentation guidelines.

        They also caused a minor diplomatic incident by not providing phone call services. I shudder to think what would have happened considering that area’s incredibly poor history of racial police profiling.

        So help me, per forum guidelines which part was out of line.

  • avatar
    IBx1

    Sue the department penniless and shred the deed to the officer’s home.

  • avatar
    Stanley Steamer

    For Canadians used to dealing with the professionalism of the RCMP,run in’s with America’s finest must be quite a shock to the system.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Much of the time it is a shock to fellow Americans!

      But that is the world we live in now.

      American cops are under siege and it is their survival mechanism that takes over and makes them treat every encounter as a potentially dangerous, existential, situation.

      In many states these days, when in doubt they shoot first and ask questions later.

      If you doubt that, try watching the nightly news some time.

      And I don’t blame the cops! They’ve become conditioned this way because of the previous cop-hating administration.

      Hopefully things will change with the current administration that respects and honors cops and first responders.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        “Hopefully things will change with the current administration that respects and honors cops and first responders.”

        Way tooo funny…Only as long as cops are investigating or arresting anyone other than their wealthy cronies.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          They’re not going to be ” investigating or arresting their wealthy cronies.”

          There are protected classes in America. Wealthy cronies are one class. Naturally blonde white women are another.

      • 0 avatar
        ttacgreg

        So sounds like you are implying that this is all Obama’s fault? I have heard that line before once or twice.

        Might you admit that there are lots of police departments, and maybe, just maybe a few are corrupt to varying degrees, or maybe have lax standards and training, or may be in their own little bubble subcultures, and or happen to be staffed by men who are bullies and thugs at heart, and have found policing to be a socially acceptable, if not honored niche in society?
        Or, all cops everywhere honorable, noble, and of impeccable integrity and judgement or are out to press forward economic or political agendas of the jurisdiction they work for?

        I could name a nearby town police department that strictly enforces an under posted speed limit (that the town lobbied the state to set said stupidly slow limit) that pretty much amounts to highway robbery. Am I supposed to “respect and honor” them?

        What say you High Desert?

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Sounds like you cop-haters all sing from the same hymnal.

          Cops are a necessity because people are the worst creatures on the planet.

          And that’s where the justice system, courts and judges come in; to determine if the cops are corrupt or if the defendants are guilty as hell.

          Not surprising that liberals and ‘crats see cops in a different light. They would prefer to have NO cops at all.

          I’m an Independent but I recognize that cops are necessary in any society, especially in American society, rife with cop haters, law breakers, and leftists who condone murder and mayhem.

          Re Chicago…

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Right, b/c there was never such a thing as corrupt, incompetent or power-hungry cops.

        And while there have been case of wide-spread corruption in the police depts. of major cities, will often find a more deeply rooted corruption/favoritism in small town/rural Sheriff depts. often intertwined w/ the local courts.

        And then there’s the recent case of the Sheriff in Alabama who (legally) pocketed $750k that was budgeted to feed inmates and used those proceeds to purchase a beach house; not to mention police depts. having gotten used to seizing the cars and even homes of people who are (falsely) suspected of engaging in the illegal drug trade.

        Sure, it’s who Obama “hates” law enforcement b/c he had the gumption to say that the police need to do a better job when it comes to using firearms against unarmed citizens and not the current resident of 1600 Penn Ave. who has repeatedly been slamming both law enforcement (the Justice Dept. and FBI) and the intelligence services.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          The last guy in office was a f’n disaster. Even ‘crats have said so.

          But hopefully that will be changing during the duration of the current occupant.

          Law abiding citizens, rejoice in the world according to Trump!

          And if this Canadian gal had not been speeding, this would not have been a topic.

          Give credit where credit is due.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “The last guy in office was a f’n disaster.”

            this is why LAPD has 50 year history of abuse. OK. Got it.

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            Funny but the current President has engaged in a war of words against most of the justice system, including judges, the FBI and the DOJ.

            And how many people have said the previous President was a disaster? His approval ratings are much higher than those of the current President.

      • 0 avatar
        Noble713

        “And I don’t blame the cops! They’ve become conditioned this way because of the previous cop-hating administration.”

        I’d argue their conditioning comes from dozens of years of US law enforcement being trained by Israelis….people who have had a siege mentality since their country was created. Israeli counter-insurgency tactics are really not want I want to experience in Middle America.

        US law enforcement is the #1 reason I’m a permanent expat.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I didn’t know the Israeli’s trained our cops.

          I have three former cops in my extended family and none of them had Israeli instructors.

          They left LE because there is better money to be made elsewhere AND in a safer work environment.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            There are many Israelis that train our cops, military, etc. Like this
            https://www.critraining.com/
            krav maga is some serious stuff. In my town we have some dudes from Israel running at least 2 schools like that. And In other schools krav maga thought by dudes who trained over there.

      • 0 avatar
        Malforus

        Umm first of all “Cops under siege” is complete and total BS outside Chicago.

        Officers Dying on duty has fallen along with the national average: https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/2017/12/28/number-officers-killed-2017-hits-nearly-50-year-low/984477001/

        The reason they feel “at war” and under siege is because of this Windbag: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_Grossman_(author)

        Grossman’s mentality that officers are “at war” with civilians has been incredibly lucrative, and has also spread the fiction that a willingness to kill makes them better at their jobs.

        Personally I don’t blame you for believing that noxious F.U.D. but its not based in facts.

        Police are being targeted for egregious over-reach and in many cases criminal behavior that they are dodging repercussions. If anything, people are realizing that the police have not been good stewards of their budget or trust.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          It’s not BS, we had a cop killed by a MS-13 gang member recently.

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            “It’s not BS, we had a cop killed by a MS-13 gang member recently.”

            So what? there was some dude in PA who wasn’t MS13 and killed 2 cops. timothy mcveigh blew entire federal building and he was american soldier!

            For the MS13, I would say, sell licenses to hunt them at walmart. you will see how quickly they will disappear.

      • 0 avatar
        Arthur Dailey

        Come on!!!!!!! How does Obama get blamed for this????? There are a couple of issues involved, none related to the previous administration. 1) The proliferation of handguns in the USA. American law enforcement officers have to go into nearly every situation anticipating that there are firearms present. Compare this to the situation in Toronto, where the police officer correctly assumed that the perpetrator was not armed. Hence American officers are more prone to resorting to their firearms. 2) The number of ex-military now working in law enforcement. The police are not and should not be a para-military force. Too many have taken this mindset into law enforcement careers. 3) The racial divide in the USA, which creates a mindset in some communities of the police being an ‘occupying force’ or at the very least ‘against them’. Not really applicable in this instance but still an issue. 4) Law enforcement officer earnings. In Toronto the vast majority of the members of the police services earn over $100k per year. Plus generous benefits and pensions. Therefore they can pick and choose who they hire and most new hires have not only degrees but considerable experience in the workplace. And with those earnings, there is much less incentive to look the other way.

        Saying that liberals or Democrats are all anti-police are like saying that all Conservatives or Republicans are all in favour of launching the bomb against China.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          ” How does Obama get blamed for this?”

          During that administration, LE in America was severely diminished and handicapped. The courts’ hands were tied and criminals rights took precedence over the rights of law-abiding citizens.

          But change has already started with the promise of prosecution of all who illegally enter the US and get caught.

          Note the difference between illegal entry and asylum and/or LEGAL/documented entry.

          People seeking asylum, if accepted, automatically become documented LEGAL entrants.

          And with the dispatch of Feds to Chicago, we’ll be seeing the heavy hand of LE there, and no doubt, all over the US as well, as LE has gained in stature with the backing of the President, DOJ and the courts.

          Lock her up!

          • 0 avatar
            slavuta

            highdesertcat,

            read some books from 1960. Nothing changed. when you read, it sounds like they describe current events. Obama-shmabama. america always was and is the same when it comes to violence, racial [email protected], etc. Remember when cops killed some dude who was selling illegal cigarettes? they didn’t have to do it. He wasn’t doing things dangerous to public. He had no license to sell cigarettes. Give him citation to come to court hearings, confiscate the product and let him be. if he doesn’t come to court, then issue arrest warrant. This is how it supposed to work in democratic society. Killing people for cigarettes – what country is this?

          • 0 avatar
            Arthur Dailey

            How in the heck does immigration get included in this???

            According to statistics, less than 6% of crime in the USA is committed by non-citizens, that includes those in the country legally.

            http://www.politifact.com/texas/statements/2017/dec/21/lupe-valdez/lupe-valdez-says-unauthorized-immigrants-account-1/

            https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/fact-checker/wp/2018/01/18/trumps-claim-that-immigrants-bring-tremendous-crime-is-still-wrong/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.5b334c644ffe

            And the current President has launched a war of words against the DOJ, FBI and independent judges. Meanwhile a number of his campaign team have pled guilty to crimes. Hardly a pro law enforcement administration.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Hey, it’s all included because it is under the heading “Justice”.

            And before you get the idea that I voted for Trump, I didn’t. But I sure am glad he got elected!

            Made me want to vote for him if he runs again.

            Based on what Trump has done in such a short period of time, I love the guy! And that includes backing LE, unlike the last guy.

            I love how you free thinkers think that you can stand in judgement of cops and the justice system when you believe that it is such an ideal world out there.

            No, I don’t agree with your line of thinking, at all.

            Cops are a necessity. But because the past administration has so negatively impacted LE, we find that more and more Americans find it necessary to carry concealed.

            And THAT is a shame. But necessary.

            Because if the lefty libbies had their way, guns would be outlawed in these here United States.

            May you find yourself in a situation where you have to rely on LE. And may crime furnish you an attitude adjustment.

          • 0 avatar
            dantes_inferno

            >read some books from 1960. Nothing changed.

            highdesertcat apparently doesn’t heed the following law:

            “The first law of holes, or the law of holes, is an adage which states that “if you find yourself in a hole, stop digging”. Digging a hole makes it deeper and therefore harder to get back out, which is used as a metaphor that when in an untenable position, it is best to stop carrying on and exacerbating the situation.”

            “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Law_of_holes”

      • 0 avatar
        johnny ro

        the militarization of US police came under George Bush not Obama. We see more cop murdering victim ideos now then under Obama.

        Trump respects nobody. He uses people, especially fools and people worse than fools.

        Can we go back to cars now.

    • 0 avatar
      Advance_92

      I remember a news article the last time I was in Ontario about an intoxicated driver that was pulled over, threw a cup of hot tea from Tim Horton’s at the officer then fled. The officer drover over to her house and took her into custody.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @Stanley Steamer – I find that the RCMP are generally polite and easy to deal with. The only time I ever got a big hassle was on my sport bike but that member was well known for being an azzhole.

        I was pulled over once by RCMP where it was a “guns drawn” scenario. My truck fit the description of one seen leaving the scene of a violent assault. I saw that they parked their cars in a defensive posture so I made sure my hands were visible to them at all times. Once they ID’ed me they both were apologetic and explained the situation.

        • 0 avatar
          Tele Vision

          I had a similar experience two weeks ago. A woman cut me off after roaring up a disappearing lane and nearly hitting me. I slowed to let her in, then gave her the finger. She apparently called the cops on me, claiming I was a drunk driver. Ten minutes later, as I came out of the beer store ( true story ) and was getting into my truck, three cop cars surrounded me. I got back out of my vehicle and went through the rigamarole for a few minutes. It ended with me and a cop shaking hands, after he told me that they’d had a few similar calls from the same woman. Interestingly, they couldn’t get back in touch with her, even after repeated phone calls. They have to act on every call, obviously, but I asked if this falls under ‘Filing A False Report’. He said it does not, while shaking his head ruefully.

  • avatar
    FreedMike

    I guess the officer in question hadn’t read up on the traffic laws in her state.

    • 0 avatar
      Malforus

      I am 100% certain they will chalk this up to “to an honest mistake in training”.

      In no way was the officer pulling the “you aren’t a local so I can flex my biceps”.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Certainly reinforces all the stereotypes about red neck rural officers. Going through customs is similar – I’m a white guy with 2 young daughters, but often feel like the u.s. border agent suspects I’m some sort of cocaine smuggler. Going back into Canada, the Canadian agent gives you the impression he’s just happy to talk to someone.

    • 0 avatar
      turbo_awd

      Honestly, having crossed the border many times, I would say that in general, the Canadian customs agents (when coming “back” to visit) are gruffer than the US agents.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        When I went to Vancouver last year, they didn’t even stop us. Just waved us through.

        Both ways.

        • 0 avatar
          ernest

          Same here. Offered documents, but they just waved us through. Didn’t even ask for the dog’s papers. (And his head was sticking out of the window on that side- not like they didn’t see him).

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @turbo_awd – that has been my experience too. Contraband fruit or vegetables must be soooo dangerous to Canada ;)

        We had gone to DisneyLand and as we approached Customs my then 10 year old son blurts out, ” My dad is going to set off your metal detector”. That did raise eyebrows but they thought it was funny when I pointed out that I had hip replacements.
        I had gone through security at the Calgary airport for a flight home and I thought I was going to get the “elbow length rubber glove” treatment.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Why didn’t your doctor give you a certificate about your metal hip replacement?

          Every time I have a radioactive scan I get a certificate, show it at the BP station, and all’s well.

          Ditto with people who have had metal-joint replacements.

          And we’ve got THREE BP stations in my area, so we’re bound to cross one if we go anywhere.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @highdesertcat – I had checked with Canadian and USA Border Departments and was told that it wasn’t necessary. The USA side had a special scanner that was “smart” to implants.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Lou-BC, my son in the BP tells me that they (and Customs {CBP}) don’t have scanners that are “smart” to implants.

            Without going into detail I can say that their scanners will pick up any metal and any type of radiation, and then flag it for review.

            Usually the behavior of individuals is what drives further, in-depth inspection.

            And then there is always the pooch to do the sniff thing.

            That usually triggers nervousness in people who have something to smuggle or hide.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            “Usually the behavior of individuals is what drives further, in-depth inspection.”

            True, except when you’re entering Canada and then it’s usually the behaviour.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            JimC2, in case you missed it…

            I’m born and raised American, and damn proud of it!

            The screwed up American language notwithstanding.

          • 0 avatar
            JimC2

            Heh heh, just keeping the conversation light with some witty banter!

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Oh yeah! And doing a great job!

      • 0 avatar
        Lynchenstein

        Seconded. They can be downright impolite at times.

      • 0 avatar
        Tele Vision

        Agreed. The Americans have always been happy to welcome us into their amazing country – every single time. My Canadian brethren, however, are much harsher upon nearly every return. I remember getting grilled about the skis on the roof of my auld Suburban. To wit: “Got receipts for those? Did you buy them in the States? Can you prove that you didn’t buy them in the States? We can take your entire truck apart…” She didn’t give a crap about the Marlboro Red Apple packs littering the truck, or the booze that we declared, just the ratty rock skis on the outside of the ski rack ( the nice planks ride inboard, out of view ).

        • 0 avatar
          bd2

          Even worse are the Brits; despite getting bad rap, the custom agents in France have always been nicer ime.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            bd2,
            I’ll agree with you about France. CDG is very easy to go through. Merignac is easy as well.

            The US isn’t that bad. The worst is doing customs in Sydney. Slow as sh!t. You’d think after flying hours to Australia from anywhere our government would produce a very fluid operation.

            The US is almost as bad as Australia, especially the West Coast.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      I’ve had plenty of roadside interaction with various law enforcement throughout the south (er, the South)- police, sheriff, staties, even a state game warden. To a man and woman they have always been professional with me. This includes getting a ticket with an expensive fine and getting let off with a warning.

      Probably hundreds of foreigners get pulled over every year in practically identical circumstances and we never hear about it because it gets handled professionally and competently. Ms. Nield just had the luck of the draw to end up with a dummy.

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I ALWAYS have my passport on me when in a foreign country – leave the copies in the safe at the hotel and online. Not to say the officer wasn’t being more than a tad over-zealous here, but this girl really should have known better. Of course her freak out video in the back of the cop car was kind of adorable…

    Technically, I should have had a ride in the back of a police car when I got my last speeding ticket. Was in Montana, in the middle of nowhere, in 2005. $40 fine, pay on the spot, but I only had $20 on me. Lady officer told me she was supposed to take me in to see the judge if I couldn’t pay, but I “looked like a nice fella” and she trusted that I would mail it in. Which I did. Probably helped that the judge was a good 120 miles away… I am not exactly white either, though I am VERY polite to officers, and as soon as I saw her brake lights come on I pulled over and waited for her. 88 in a 70.

  • avatar
    bluegoose

    They soaked her for over a $1000. I think that was their primary objective. A lot of these rural police districts are underfunded and they have taken to literally robbing citizens to add money to coffers. The Search and Seizure practices have resulted in outright theft in many instances.

    There is no excuse for this. If I hear one more rationalization for this kind of behavior I am going to vomit.

    • 0 avatar
      Erikstrawn

      Here is the root of the problem. It’s the training of police officers to pull people over and ticket them for any expensive issue they can because tax revenue is down. She’s lucky she only had to pay $200 for them to tow her car illegally. Apparently the adage that “ignorance of the law is no excuse” doesn’t apply if you’re on the prosecutor’s side.

  • avatar
    tomLU86

    That’s terrible.

    After he retired, my uncle and his wife became snowbirds for about 10 years. He was an immigrant to Canada, and “Atlanta” was his stopover from Toronto en route to Florida.

    One thing Canadians could consider is cancelling their reservation in Georgia hotels, and/or NOT shopping in Georgia, on their drive to Florida, until the Governor or State Police Chief formally apologizes, and the overeager cop is punished.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      Over reaction, cry boycott for any issue now?

    • 0 avatar
      Ophelia

      I’m more for putting Cook County on the map of places not to pass through when travelling through the United States.

      Seriously. When I have a road trip south across the border in the future, I want to have a good time. I likely won’t have the connections to bail me out. I’ll keep an eye on a GPS unit with traffic and speed limit displays.

      Last thing I want to do is to be locked up in jail being unable to post bail.

  • avatar
    Jaeger

    That cop is a complete dirtbag and should be fired. No WAY that motorist should have faced anything more than a speeding ticket.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      No, it just sounds like the cop, and probably others in the sheriff’s office, need more training. Hopefully Ms. Nield will be a little more careful about her speed in the future. A ticket for 17 over can be pretty expensive.

      • 0 avatar
        Mike G

        I guess it’s too much to expect they have sufficient training before being let loose with guns and authority to screw up people’s lives and cost them gobs of money.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    Pfft, wait till she gets the Super Speeder ticket in the mail 3 months later…the state gets their piece of the pie after the county gets theirs. One of my offspring got pulled going to Spring Break last year, 86 in a 70. She was shocked when the multiple fines started showing up.

  • avatar
    Zipster

    I suggest that our friends to the north boycott all Cook County, Georgia businesses. The most effective tool is the economic one.

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Zipster, I don’t think they’d notice. You should check out the economic activity of Cook County. Unfortunately for the good people down there, it falls on the list of 100 poorest counties in the United States.

    • 0 avatar
      dukeisduke

      There’s only 17,000 people in the whole county, and not much there besides a state park, so not much to boycott, unless you want to penalize the local beer store:

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cook_County,_Georgia

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I live in the Washington DC area and dozens of stories abound where people can’t get a drink in the hinterlands or other cities because “District of Columbia” drivers licenses are thought to be foreign. Even though the cardholders address still says “Washington, DC”. The city is actually changing back to a different design that says “Washington DC” more prominently. I know many people who are DC residents who always carry their passports when traveling domestically. TSA used to get this wrong a lot also.

    • 0 avatar
      Mike G

      Sweet Fancy Moses there are some ignorant people out there, it’s the national capital for pete’s sake.

      I used to hear stories about people from New Mexico being taken for foreigners and thought they must be exaggerated.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        Like those 2 native American prospective students who got the police called on them by a parent for acting “suspicious” (b/c they were shy/quiet) and were from (New) Mexico.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Sigh, the rural south is not generally know for its enclaves of higher thought.

    What a stupid cop, one would hope the department in question has made the necessary changes once it was known the IQ of said cop was as low as it likely appears to be.

  • avatar

    It would be better if that police department hired officers with an IQ higher than room temperature.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    I remember some Georgians having a fit back in the 70’s when some highway signs had the speed limit in the English and the Metric system KM(this was an emerging issue then)
    Many thought it was the “world government” and the UN taking over and proceeded to shoot up the signs.
    You figure a region with a International presence with multinational companies and an international air hub would be a bit more attuned to and welcoming of Canadian visitors.

  • avatar
    pdog_phatpat

    LOL @ all the defensive people over a woman breaking the LAW. Maybe if she had been following the speed limit she wouldnt have been stopped. Hey, maybe if she was texting and killed someone we could blame it on the phone, and stage protests to ban phones(please, do it) and make her an effing hero? Also lmao at the people making this political or about race. So many crybabies crying. Hahahaha great laughs though.

    • 0 avatar
      87 Morgan

      I don’t believe anyone has made mention of the fact that she was speeding, and most likely received a ticket. She was speeding, got pulled over. I am willing to wager this event has occurred to 99% of the readers of this site. The issue is the whole, handcuffs, car impound and over the top stupidity of the cop. But, perhaps this is your home town and the cop is one of your relatives so you feel the need to defend blatant stupidity.

  • avatar
    haroldingpatrick

    Geez, while we are jumping to conclusions without all the facts and stereotyping, I’ll play devil’s advocate. What obviously happened here is a superior Canadian white suburban princess got all huffy when her gold lined and odor free vagina didn’t get her out of trouble as usual when some dumb butt rural Georgia Barney Fife working class prole inconvenienced her while driving down the road. Said prole had the nerve to arrest her odor free and gold lined vagina!

    The truth, I suspect is a combination of things commenters have said. I’m not too distressed that a rural Georgia LEO sniffed out a major traffic law violating and improperly documented foreign visitor and perhaps when pressed, chose not to give some crazy carpet a tune up on the spot with something hard.

    • 0 avatar
      jimble

      I hope the good folks who run this site have the decency to delete this borderline violent, misogynistic spew.

      • 0 avatar
        JimC2

        I hope the good folks who read and comment on this site have the critical thinking ability to tell the difference between spew and ironic contrarianism. @haroldingpatrick’s comment, while using a lot of AA movie words (Adult Accompaniment is what they call PG-13 north of the border) and perhaps disagreeable with some of our opinions, is the latter.

        • 0 avatar
          jimble

          I guess I’m not as familiar with AA movie words as you are.

          • 0 avatar
            jimble

            My apologies to haroldingpatrick if I misread the intent. The degree of civility on this site is all over the map and these days with toxic incel and 4chan garbage everywhere it’s hard to know what’s ironic and what’s deadly serious.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Hahahahaha. Do you even know the etymology of the words you spew?

        “Misogny, by contrast, Christine E. Hutchins explains, came into the English language in the early 17th century:

        The tract that precipitated the introduction of “misogyny” to the language was Joseph Swetnam’s 1615 attack on women, colorfully titled The Arraignment of Lewde, idle, froward, and unconstant women: Or, the vanitie of them, choose you whether.

        Swetnam minces no words in his tirade against women. Chapter 1, “Moses describeth a woman thus: ‘At the first beginning,’ saith he, ‘a woman was made to be a helper unto man.’ And so they are indeed, for she helpeth to spend and consume that which man painfully getteth. He also saith that they were made of the rib of a man, and that their froward [difficult] nature showeth; for a rib is a crooked thing good for nothing else, and women are crooked by nature, for small occasion will cause them to be angry.”

        Swetnam forges on with book-length alliterating abuse and jest, all at the expense of women. “[S]he was no sooner made but straightaway her mind was set upon mischief.”

        The Oxford English dictionary cites 1656 as the first use of “misogyny” in English, an error then repeated by William Safire in his New York Times column. In fact, the first use in English was during the Swetnam controversy four decades earlier when opponents nicknamed Swetnam and his followers “Misogynos.””

        thefword.org.uk/2009/09/where_does_the/

        …and here is the fourteen whole pages of scandal:

        mysite.dmacc.edu/personal/sdphillips2/instructor
        /lit190/Course%20Materials/
        Joseph%20Swetnam%20The%20Arraignment%20of%20Lewd.pdf

        So apparently, any who agreed with Swetnam in the Seventeenth Century just had to be labeled and fools such as yourself have to continue labeling others. Good job!

        “Labels create expectations that are based on previous experiences, or hearsay that either are high or low. We fail to look at the whole picture which in return causes harm to individuals attached to specific labels. This creates mental health stress as people feel the pressure of having to live up to something, feeling trapped or not good enough. It is very common for people to begin to internalize their labels as well. Words hold power, and we seem to forget that time and time again.

        Not only does labelling say things about the people being labelled, but a lot about the person doing the labelling too. Our words and tone of voice all come together as an indication of how we perceive others and see the world as well. People’s self image is strongly tied to the words and labels they use.

        https://www.hercampus.com/school/uwindsor/dangers-labelling-people

        • 0 avatar
          jimble

          I don’t feel too bad about causing “mental health stress” when I call people out for using language that degrades a whole gender.

          The point of the Jess McCabe article you quote is not that the etymology of the word misogyny invalidates the label. Quite the opposite. Language acquires new words when they are called for to push back against unjust cultural presumptions, in this particular case thanks to “the active awareness and engagement of men and women who both recognize and criticize the subordination of women.”

          But thanks for the interesting history lesson.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Jimble, grow a thicker skin and don’t get so triggered.

          • 0 avatar
            haroldingpatrick

            There’s no need to apologize friend. My comment was offensive even though I prefaced it by saying I was playing the Devil’s advocate.

            What have we learned from this? Humans are imperfect, emotional, and reactive – all of us. What happened on the side of the road in Georgia and in the comments to this article are not bad examples of this. Peace brother.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          You’re quite welcome as one thing we may have in common is an enjoyment of history.

          However your label of him is no better than his label of “women” no matter how you frame things.

          “Language acquires new words when they are called for to push back against unjust cultural presumptions”

          Unjust? rofl.

          Here’s how this works. There is no “fair”, there is no “just”, there is no “equality”, there is dominance and submission in language and deed. Your “pushing back” is an attempt at dominance. Own it if you’re going to push for it.

          Funny there are no common English words for when females attempt to dominate, only words for when men attempt to call them on their nonsense. This is why those words are bullsh!t. Just look at the history of a word made up to label a specific group of followers came to refer to an entire gender.

          I invite everyone to give the Seventeenth Century piece a read, it is difficult to interpret although he makes a few points which can be discerned. Like most things, there is some truth to be found but I don’t think I would agree with all of it. Funny how any criticism results in an instant label even three hundred and more years later. The only label I’m going to wear is #IamF**kingAwesome.

          Have a good evening everyone.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      Is no one going to point out that the Barney Fife in this situation was also a woman?

    • 0 avatar
      Arthur Dailey

      No jumping to conclusions, as noted in the article: “the officer was in no mood to recognize Georgia law, which states that non-U.S. residents are allowed to drive with a valid license from their country of origin”.

      So the police officer charged the suspect with a crime that had not been committed. Illegally seized her vehicle, illegally jailed her and allegedly illegally refused her a phone call or access to an attorney.

      The suspect was in the USA legally, was driving legally and provided all the documentation that she was legally required to carry. (Correction based on post that I read below, that if correct would have required her based on the length of residency to acquire a Tenn license, however the Police Officer would not have known that Tennessee rule or the length of residency of the suspect.)

      Someone charged with going 17 miles over the limit, is not to my knowledge jailed or subjected to having their vehicle impounded.

      The police officer demonstrated incompetence and acted as if Cook County and the State of Georgia were totalitarian jurisdictions where the rule of law did not apply and where there were no civil liberties.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Someone pointed out to me that this gal was a legal resident of TN, driving on a foreign license.

        If that’s the case, she’s guilty as all hell because ignorance of the law is no excuse.

        This license thing happens a lot with people owning more that one residence while claiming only one state as their domiciliary.

        I guess I better be real careful because I claim NM as my residence but spent time at our residences in TX, CO, NV, AZ and CA where our names are on the deeds.

        • 0 avatar
          dantes_inferno

          >I guess I better be real careful because I claim NM as my residence but spent time at our residences in TX, CO, NV, AZ and CA where our names are on the deeds.

          It’s time for you to practice assuming the position – just in case…

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            My BFF was pulled over near Indio, CA, where the CHiPs were mining Eastbound I-10, so as to collect from those exiting CA into AZ.

            I’ve known this guy since June 1965, went through AF Basic Training with him. He drives as slow as a snail. Cruise Control is his claim to maintaining steady speed.

            Cop said he clocked him doing 88 in a 70 (no fvcking way!!!) but the cop said he’d let him off easy and writing him for doing only 80 in a 70.

            Easy money, right? Who wants to come back to the expensive, degenrate Hell that is CA today to go to court?

            $336 for a staged citation.

            Those bright yellow NM license plates just scream “Easy Money – Come And Get It You Cops!”

            Yeah, we, my wife and I, keep it right at the speed limit, but we do get the look-over every time we have to go there in one of our vehicles.

  • avatar
    Booick

    Welcome to the American Police State. Largest prison population in the world where private corporations profit off misery and are guaranteed a certain number of beds filled while charging as much as $10 per minute for a phone call, where sheriffs get to cut food budgets for their prisoners and pocket the money, where the police force refers to normal people as civilians, wears tactical gear, drives military surplus, and carry assault rifles, where innocents beg for their lives while being given impossible instructions only to be gunned down in cold blood for non compliance.

    Seriously, you got off this time with a valuable lesson: The lesson, go back to Canada and thank your God you don’t live in this hell hole of so-called freedom.

  • avatar
    kkop

    “While driving back to Tennessee through Georgia, Emily Nield, who recently completed a master’s degree in geology in the Volunteer State…”

    Apparently she had been a resident of Tennessee for some time and still lived there as she was returning there. In which case it IS illegal to use your country’s license, as you should have applied for a state driver’s license within 30 days (https://www.dmv.org/tn-tennessee/apply-license.php).

    Doing 87 in a 70, and then not having a valid license would get anyone in trouble.

    • 0 avatar
      Booick

      Wrong. Students are exempted.

      • 0 avatar
        kkop

        Students who are residents can only drive on their country’s license for 30 days. After that they will need to get a TN license. The only difference for international students is that their license is a temporary one that expires soon after their visa expires, and that they will need to pass the tests.

        https://www.vanderbilt.edu/gss/TNdriverslicense.php

        I went through this process myself after I became a resident in GA, which has similar laws.

  • avatar

    No speeding, no stop, no pain, no fine, no issue.

  • avatar
    road_pizza

    Isn’t it funny that “ignorance of the law” isn’t an excuse for us civilians but it’s just hunky-dory for the police…

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Gotta feel sorry for Rick Scott (Gov. Florida), who must be super po’ed about this.

    First his tourism $ from Canada dwindles because of Trumpety. So much so, Scott comes up to Toronto and gives a speech promoting tourism, giving 20% discounts.

    Now Georgia dumbness is sure to rub off on some of the tens of thousands of Canadians driving down that same highway to and from Florida. They will say forget going there, I don’t need the potential aggravation.

  • avatar
    Jagboi

    They seem to be trying to do some damage control now: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/u-s-county-tries-to-reassure-canadian-visitors-after-story-of-ontario-woman-s-arrest-makes-headlines-1.4654432

    • 0 avatar
      JimC2

      Hehehe, looks like this one single incident set their reputation back at least twenty years or so to about 1950.

      Well, there are at least two sides to every story. I wonder what actually happened. Boys and girls, this is why you take all that free money from Homeland Security grants, get some decent dash cams and body cams- and actually remember to use them!

      womp womp womp wommmmp (sad trombone sound)

    • 0 avatar
      snoproblem

      Classic case of ‘Too little, MUCH too late’.

      Those will the last Canadian plates they’ll see in that county for a long, long time.

  • avatar
    Beef Malone

    This entire article is a joke. Reads more like something I’d find on Jalopnik. First of all, she was going nearly 90mph. I know everyone is hauling ass, but not that much. Second and most important, she didn’t have her actual passport as required by law. If she’d had that, there wouldn’t have been an issue. The author tries to make it sound like it was simply her DL that was not accepted which is a blatant lie. Just another BS article lamely attempting to bash “duh south.”

  • avatar
    mmreeses

    I drove through Georgia on I-75 last week during the day and thought of this article.

    As in the past, traffic moved pretty quickly. But travel at 87 and you WILL stick out. And there law enforcement visibly was watching traffic from the median and/or busy with a traffic stop.

    Even assuming that Canadian woman was a US citizen (and not even addressing the whole, did she have to apply to a TN license), speeding at 87mph (which also might mean she hit 90+ here and there) was not prudent.

    I love to drive quickly but I have my limits. In georgia it was 75mph in the right or center lane.

    Just saying.

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