By on February 26, 2018

2018 Alfa Romeo Stelvio Ti Sport - Image: FCA

The popular thing among automakers last year, besides the incessant preaching of “mobility,” was the pledging of allegiance to an electrified future. This year, it seems diesel fuel is the bogeyman all automakers must reject. We’ve already told you about Porsche’s abandonment of the blacklisted power source. Now, it’s Fiat Chrysler’s turn.

Though unconfirmed at this time, the Financial Times (subscription required) reports that FCA’s mid-term plan, due out this June, will announce the dropping of diesel across its lineup by 2022. If you’re currently wondering how you’ll tow a horse trailer using a battery, don’t get too upset just yet.

The report specifies FCA’s passenger car lineup, which — in Europe, at least — is a heavy user of compression ignition engines. Europeans, of course, are increasingly looking elsewhere for propulsion sources. Diesel registrations fell 8 percent last year, and governments across the land now spend their free time thinking of ways to rid the world of the fuel they once promoted and incentivized.

Keeping up with the latest European emissions standard isn’t cheap, and it seems FCA would rather not bother. Some 40.6 percent of FCA vehicles sold in that market last year contained a diesel engine. The phase-out reportedly covers the Fiat, Maserati, Jeep, and Alfa Romeo brands, sources claim, but fear not, American consumer.

FT claims commercial vehicles are expected to be exempt from the plan, along with U.S. products like Ram trucks, where the legendary Cummins turbodiesel inline-six is needed to do battle with General Motors and Ford. America’s emissions standards aren’t as volatile as Europe’s, and FCA isn’t about to kiss off a huge market in the interest of environmental stewardship.

As well, the light-duty 3.0-liter diesel V6, which briefly disappeared from the market after last year’s emissions brouhaha, is scheduled to appear in the Jeep Wrangler in 2019. That engine — now compliant with EPA regulations once again — also resides in the Ram 1500 and Jeep Grand Cherokee.

A free fix for older Ram and Jeep EcoDiesel models should arrive this year.

[Image: Fiat Chrysler Automobiles]

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33 Comments on “Fiat Chrysler to Stomp Out Diesel Across Its Lineup, Report Claims...”


  • avatar
    DenverMike

    The whole caper made no sense. If it did somehow, the horrendous ill health effects of diesel exhaust, especially in dense cities had to be widely known by bureaucrats early on, and the much bigger concern.

    So of course they pressed on.

    • 0 avatar
      stingray65

      The EU bureaucrats were only looking at how to reduce CO2 emissions to save the world from global warming, and diesels burn less fuel so less CO2. The fact that all the major Euro car manufacturers (except Ford and GM Europe) were big proponents of diesel engines probably also was considered as a non-trade-barrier way to keep out imports from Japan and Korea (who weren’t big on diesels).

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Shouldn’t EU citizens be hella p!ssed? Setting aside the health related, man-made disaster, they’ve been systematically shielded from way more reliable cars, for less money.

        • 0 avatar
          Carrera

          DenverMike, the European diesels didn’t have the complicated urea systems that we’ve had here for a while. I’ve seen many, many European diesels with over 200,000 miles one them without any issues. And yes, VW, Peugeot, Opel, Renault. What makes them less reliable is the addition of extra anti-pollution hardware. Often times, they were the same price as their gas counterparts or just slightly more ( not like in USA). People recouped their investment after a year or so. Well, diesel was a bit cheaper but even at parity, still a better deal.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Diesel is/was very popular in Europe. Many of my relatives in Germany, Holland and England own diesel-motivated cars.

            Besides, diesel fuel contains more energy than gasoline, but gasoline IMO remains the fuel of choice for me, and millions of others on this planet.

            Fiatsler should keep diesel an option for those who want it.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @Carrera – I was referring to the over all reliability of Euro cars, gas engines included, but anything from powertrain to power windows, vs virtually banned USA/Japanese imports.

            Yes pre-emissions diesels are far less complicated, and obviously more reliable, but that brings us to the environmental fallout and health issues of EU citizens.

            Differing regulations (or lack of) is another form of trade barriers. There’s that “little” 10% tariff (or chicken tax) on all import cars sold in the EU. Keep in mind “catalytic converters” weren’t forced on EU cars until 1992.

            The high price of fuel in the EU was bureaucrat’s answer to CAFE. That intensified the advantages of diesel mpg, over and above all other diesel “perks”, don’t kid yourself.

        • 0 avatar
          ThomasSchiffer

          Denver Mike,

          The Japanese and Korean competition offer diesel cars and they are quite good. What people buy is up to them but most Japanese cars that I have driven were so lackluster and simply boring that I got turned off pretty quickly by them. This is especially true for Toyota, Nissan and Daihatsu (I have no experience with Suzuki or Mitsubishi). A notable exception are Mazda and Honda, which I enjoyed. The current Mazda lineup is very nice. Perhaps in the future I may consider one. But for now my ‘unreliable’ European cars (high mileage by the way), work flawlessly and are fun to drive.

          Modern diesels are not unreliable if you use them properly. The problem is that some buyers are attracted to the excellent fuel economy of diesel cars and will even buy one despite their commute being relatively short. Short trips are the death for any engine, especially a diesel; and especially a modern diesel with DPF filters. DPF filters work flawlessly if the vehicle is driven over long distances and also at high speed, which allows the DPF to burn off the toxins. Short trips and low speed (city commutes for example) can lead to the DPF becoming clogged and failing, and this failure may wreck havoc on the Diesel engine and possibly some of its other anti-pollution components.

          If your commute is long and involves some highway, your diesel car should be fine. My brother runs a taxi business and his Mercedes E-Klasse diesels work without issues. These cars essentially drive all day, long distances and even if they should be used for short trips the rotating driver cycles and destinations ensure that the DPF does not become clogged and fail.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Yeah thank god for Europiean cars keeping us from getting bored to death by reliable cars. Either way, quite shocking anything referred to as “oil burners” find it a foreign concept turning spent diesel exhaust into something remotely breathable. If I’m not mistaken it becomes exponentially harder for diesels to scrub their dirty exhaust completely, the smaller they are. Notice modern semis have the least problems fully complying, even if far from perfect in regards to emissions related problems and breakdowns.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      Funny, but American cities in the early 1950s had filthy air, because most heating was with coal. There are pictures of Philadelphia’s City Hall, with the top half of the tower and the statue of William Penn covered in coal soot above chimney level. The air was cleaned up with conversion to diesel’s cousin, home heating oil.

  • avatar
    BoogerROTN

    “FT claims commercial vehicles are expected to be exempt from the plan, along with U.S. products like Ram trucks, where the legendary Cummins turbodiesel inline-six…”

    It might be “legendary,” but my local RAM dealer still has a hard time moving them. There are still a dozen 2017 1500 EcoDiesels on the lot…most of them with ridiculous cash incentives on the hood (and no, not “farmer’s daughter combat veteran conquest rebate” B.S. either). For instance, they’re offering multiple 1500 Big Horn Diesel Crew Cab 4×4’s at $37K if you finance through Chrysler; I’m almost tempted to go for a test drive.

    • 0 avatar
      scott25

      The EcoDiesel is the (Italian designed) 3.0 V6 mentioned at the end of the article. The Cummins is only available on the 2500+. They have much different reputations.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The novelty wore off that sucker right quick.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Scott,
        More like GM or to be precise Cadillac. VM was 50% owned by GM at the time.

        Its actually a damn good engine.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        The Cummins in the HD Rams are based on an Italian diesel as well.

        Using brand names as a basis is not good practice.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          This is news to me since I owned a 1996 RAM Cummins.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “The Cummins in the HD Rams are based on an Italian diesel as well.”

          No. Why post if you don’t really know?

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Its never stopped him before.

          • 0 avatar

            That’s how fake news are made. He might be the product of Russian troll factory and not actual person. And I remember there was the identical “Ryan” twin and then it got shut down to save money probably.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            It is pretty common knowledge that the Cummins B-Series is based on engineering from Moto Guzzi.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            The European Engine Alliance (EEA) was established in 1996 as a joint venture between Cummins and two Fiat Group companies, Iveco N.V. and New Holland, which is now CNH Global N.V., to develop a new generation of 4-, 5- and 6-liter engines. EEA includes manufacturing assets in Turin, Italy. Cummins will sell its one-third interest in the EEA to Fiat Powertrain Technologies.
            “We have enjoyed a long and successful relationship with our partners. This change will essentially be transparent to the CDC employees and to our customers,” said Jim Kelly, president of Cummins Engine Business. “On July 1, we celebrated the 25th year of CDC’s successful production of engines and components with our employees there, and we look forward to continuing this success together well into the future. Our customers can continue to depend on Cummins and CDC for the quality products and support they have always received.”

            http://www.industryweek.com/companies-amp-executives/cummins-conclude-joint-ventures-cnh-and-iveco

            The European Engine Alliance was established in 1996 as a joint venture between Cummins and Fiat units Iveco NV – Fiat’s buses and commercial vehicles segment – and New Holland (now CNH Global) to develop new 4, 5 and 6-litre diesel engines.

            https://www.drive.com.au/motor-news/fiat-and-cummins-end-joint-venture-20080719-144ua

            Cummins Announces Conclusion of Joint Ventures with CNH Global N.V. and Iveco N.V.
            Cummins Purchases CNH Equity Stake in Consolidated Diesel Company
            European Engine Alliance Sold to Fiat Powertrain Technologies

            COLUMBUS, Ind.–(BUSINESS WIRE)–July 18, 2008–Cummins Inc., (NYSE: CMI) announced today that it has concluded its joint ventures with CNH Global N.V. (CNH) and Iveco N.V., two Fiat Group companies. Under the new agreement, Cummins will purchase CNH’s equity stake in Consolidated Diesel Company (CDC) and will sell its interest in the European Engine Alliance.
            CDC, which is located in Whitakers, N.C., will become a wholly-owned entity of Cummins Inc. Cummins entered the highly successful joint venture with Case Corporation in 1980, and has produced more than 2.7 million mid-range engines. Cummins will purchase CNH’s 50 percent interest in CDC.
            The European Engine Alliance (EEA) was established in 1996 as a joint venture between Cummins and two Fiat Group companies, Iveco N.V. and New Holland, which is now CNH Global N.V., to develop a new generation of 4, 5 and 6-liter engines. EEA includes manufacturing assets in Turin, Italy. Cummins will sell its one-third interest in the EEA to Fiat Powertrain Technologies.
            “We have enjoyed a long and successful relationship with our partners. This change will essentially be transparent to the CDC employees and to our customers,” said Jim Kelly – President of Cummins Engine Business. “On July 1, we celebrated the 25th year of CDC’s successful production of engines and components with our employees there, and we look forward to continuing this success together well into the future. Our customers can continue to depend on Cummins and CDC for the quality products and support they have always received.”
            About Cummins
            Cummins Inc., a global power leader, is a corporation of complementary business units that design, manufacture, distribute and service engines and related technologies, including fuel systems, controls, air handling, filtration, emission solutions and electrical power generation systems. Headquartered in Columbus, Indiana, (USA) Cummins serves customers in approximately 190 countries and territories through a network of more than 500 company-owned and independent distributor locations and approximately 5,200 dealer locations. Cummins reported net income of $739 million on sales of $13.05 billion in 2007. Press releases can be found on the Web at http://www.cummins.com.

            http://investor.cummins.com/phoenix.zhtml?c=112916&p=irol-newsArticle&ID=1176580

        • 0 avatar
          Cirruslydakota

          “The Cummins in the HD Rams are based on an Italian diesel as well.”

          I don’t know where you’re getting your information from, but you clearly have no idea what you’re talking about.

          Source: I work for Cummins.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Cirruslydakota, Thank you.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Cirruslydakota,
            The change of the B Series in the late 90s was FIAT tech. GM even went into and pilfered VM diesel tech.

            Believe it or not FIAT was a world leader with diesel that brought us, common rail.

            I would think that the multi-valve head sitting on top of that B Series block might not be as much Cummins as you would think.

            As for the B Series as opposed to the ISB, I don’t know. It could be a “true” Cummins design or it could be from the Italians.

            But, looking at the information above and the engine sizes across the whole range of those engines I would assume that the Italians do indeed have a lot to do with the current B Series.
            I do know the injection system is Bosch.

    • 0 avatar
      Carrera

      Those 2017s came late in the game due to the emission controls fiasco/stop sale. So they were approved to go back on sale at the very end of the year. Of course they have a hard problem selling them now. It is a 2017 model. They have to discount them. It has nothing to do with the diesel engine but with the timing. Actually, that engine gets great reviews and has proven to be fairly reliable…as Chrysler Co. vehicles go. Since the V6 VM Motori diesel engine came out in 2015, they never had a problem selling them. Normally, all the lease deals and cash back NEVER applied to the diesel engine. There was always a small asterisk on the bottom of the add which said “does not apply to Eco Diesel models”. Even with the $4500 premium over the gas V6 and $1,500 over the HEMI, the V6 Ecodiesel sold as it was planned.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        The stopsale did it no favors but seriously, how many Eco Diesel buyers/owners did it, paid the high premium initially, mainly for their “dramatic” mpg or towing grunt? Another problem is the soon to be released F-150 diesel novelty act.

        • 0 avatar
          Carrera

          Denver Mike, I am not sure exactly what the percentage of vehicles had V6 diesel engines every year, but as far as I understood and read in different publications, Chrysler never had a hard time selling them. Yes, the F150 diesel will probably add a little pressure on the V6 diesel Ram, but that only works on people like me who have no allegiance to any of the trucks from big 3.
          And the mpg was fairly dramatic…from 18-19 mpg HWY for the HEMI to 30 mpg HWY for the V6 diesel. The figures do get a little more fuzzy when comparing the V6 gas for sure.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            I did read in the US the Grand Cherokee and the Ram using the VM V6 diesel had issues with supply at times.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “There are still a dozen 2017 1500 EcoDiesels on the lot”

      They would have arrived not very long ago as they were held in containment due to the certification debacle. There’s no shortage of demand for them.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Lol, you didn’t even read/comprehend the quote you posted. He didn’t say the EcoDiesel is legendary, he specifically referred to the Cummins.

      They are not even close to the same, unless you just like making up facts like BAFO.

  • avatar
    Sub-600

    There goes the Hellcat diesel.

  • avatar
    darex

    Doesn’t it sound as though the biggest cheats in all this are protesting the loudest, even while they deny, deny, deny?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The only company to be confirmed as a cheat is VW. The rest of the allegations against other companies are nothing more than bluster. Basically: Your vehicles emit more emissions than the test standard, while operating outside the test parameters. Well, duh.

  • avatar
    Sigivald

    “If you’re currently wondering how you’ll tow a horse trailer using a battery, don’t get too upset just yet.”

    Well, there are these “gas engine” things, that actually have rather a lot of power, it turns out, even if FCA *had been* referring to killing diesel truck engines.

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