Jaguar Land Rover Trademarks a Bunch of Potential Car Names, Including One From Ford

Matt Posky
by Matt Posky

Jaguar Land Rover unleashed a volley of trademarks over past month, offering a glimpse of some of the names it might use on upcoming models. However, JLR took something of shock-and-awe approach while filing, so it would be unlikely to see all of these affixed to the side of a new model.

One of the more standout monikers is XJS, Jaguar’s former luxury grand tourer. Absent for two decades, Jag could commit sacrilege and bring it back as something other than a large two-door without much blowback from the general public. Those who remember the original would no doubt be appalled. The company also trademarked Westminster, which likely denotes a particular blue paint Jaguar was fond of during nineties and not a specific model. JLR also slipped in a filing for Freestyle —sharing a title with a crossover utility vehicle that sold incredibly well before Ford changed its name.

Perhaps trademarking the Freestyle moniker is payback on behalf of Jaguar’s current design head, Ian Callum, for Ford usurping his Aston Martin styling cues for the Fusion. Although, if he really wanted to stick it to the Blue Oval, JLR would have also filed for Taurus X name, too.

Other noteworthy trademarks, initially spotted by AutoGuide, include Landy, Range Rover Classic, P-Type, T-Type, C-XE, iXE, diXE, XEdi, XEi, CXF, CXJ, Sawtooth, Stormer and Landmark. Say “Land Rover Landy” and “Land Rover Landmark” aloud if you are absolutely sure no one else will hear you. Those names don’t exactly roll off the tongue and you sound daft pushing the words clumsily out of your mouth. Landy is the name for an obnoxious company mascot, not a car.

The remaining names are a jumble of letters, hinting at multiple variants of current production models or entirely new ones — some of which would definitely be electric. The only exception is the Range Rover Classic, which harkens back to the British Leyland days (the company had to come up with some way to distinguishing the original 4×4 from its successor).

Matt Posky
Matt Posky

A staunch consumer advocate tracking industry trends and regulation. Before joining TTAC, Matt spent a decade working for marketing and research firms based in NYC. Clients included several of the world’s largest automakers, global tire brands, and aftermarket part suppliers. Dissatisfied with the corporate world and resentful of having to wear suits everyday, he pivoted to writing about cars. Since then, that man has become an ardent supporter of the right-to-repair movement, been interviewed on the auto industry by national radio broadcasts, driven more rental cars than anyone ever should, participated in amateur rallying events, and received the requisite minimum training as sanctioned by the SCCA. Handy with a wrench, Matt grew up surrounded by Detroit auto workers and managed to get a pizza delivery job before he was legally eligible. He later found himself driving box trucks through Manhattan, guaranteeing future sympathy for actual truckers. He continues to conduct research pertaining to the automotive sector as an independent contractor and has since moved back to his native Michigan, closer to where the cars are born. A contrarian, Matt claims to prefer understeer — stating that front and all-wheel drive vehicles cater best to his driving style.

More by Matt Posky

Comments
Join the conversation
5 of 15 comments
  • Jagboi Jagboi on Mar 21, 2017

    Landy is a very common nickname for Land Rover in the UK. Typically applied to a Defender or the older Land Rovers (109 etc).

  • Tstag Tstag on Mar 21, 2017

    Landie may Ben used on a baby Defender as it's often an affectionate nickname for smaller Defenders. The XJS may be an alternative to CXJ. The Westminster could just be a variant for an existing model.

  • Bd2 Probably Toyota, Hyundai is killing them these days.
  • Wolfwagen If Isuzu could update this truck and keep the cost between $25K - $30K they would sell like ice pops on dollar day in a heat wave.
  • 3SpeedAutomatic I'm at that the inflection point of do I continue to putting money in a 12 yr old SUV entering a heavy maintenance cycle or start shopping.I have noticed comparable new SUVs with $2.5k knocked off the sticker price, but still with the shenanigans of $300 for nitrogen in the tires. However, I have noticed the same 2 yr old SUV which are only $4.5K less than the original sticker price. Usually the used cars price should be 35% to 40% less. This tells me there's a stronger market for used as opposed to new. Part of this is to handle the monthly note. Considering installments of 72 months, you'll never pay the beast off. Just wait till the end of the model year which is just two months away, and I think the comparable new SUV will come with larger markdowns. May not be the color you want, but there are deals to be made. 🚗🚗🚗
  • Lou_BC Ironic, the Honda Ridgeline, a truck that every truck guy loves to hate is in 6th place.
  • 28-Cars-Later I keep forgetting I own it, but the space look on the ext cab reminds me of my 'Yota pickup of the same model year. I'm pretty sure there is some vintage of Hilux which features the same looking ext cab window (maybe '88?) its a shame these things are mostly gone and when available are $1,000,000,000 [INSERT CURRENT CURRENCY].
Next