By on February 24, 2017

Mercedes-Benz Concept X-CLASS

Colorado. Canyon. Tacoma. Frontier. Ridgeline. X-Class?

That could be the lineup Mercedes-Benz has in mind for the competitive — and growing — U.S. midsize pickup segment. Ever since the automaker unveiled its questionable-looking X-Class midsize pickup last fall and declared America off limits for now, there’s been no end to the speculation that we’d eventually end up with a German offering on these shores.

The midsize pickup segment has now grown to 17 percent of all U.S. truck sales, and Mercedes apparently likes what it sees.

Mercedes’ X-Class, which goes on sale in South America and Europe later this year, borrows the Nissan Navara’s ladder-type frame and adds a heavy dose of luxury. However, with the market so hot in America right now, the automaker is wondering if that country’s worksites could use some panache.

“In the past year the mid-sized truck market has come back a bit,” Volker Mornhinweg, head of Mercedes-Benz Vans, told Reuters today. “General Motors is launching a mid-sized truck. We are watching developments very closely, and we will take a decision at the appropriate time.”

Apparently, Mornhinweg didn’t get the message that GM has sold the Colorado and Canyon since the 2015 model year. It’s more likely that he misspoke, and was actually referring to Ford’s upcoming Ranger, due out in 2019.

Bringing the X-Class stateside would give Mercedes the only luxury offering in the segment. While success isn’t a guarantee, the automaker has aggressively countered the notion that the X-Class is merely a tarted-up Navara with no working man bona fides. During last year’s concept unveiling, CEO Dieter Zetsche claimed he once consulted with a “tough old ranger” to find out what Americans can stomach when it comes to pickup truck luxury.

As such, the X-Class is built to haul. The automaker claims a 1.1-ton payload — topping the GM twins — and a towing capacity of up to 3.5 tons.

Now, where will the pickup come from should Mercedes give the go signal?

It would have to come from within its own borders, said Mornhinweg. Mercedes-Benz’s Argentina assembly plant wouldn’t be able to handle the extra volume, and there’s that dreaded “chicken tax,” meaning a new plant would probably have to be built in the U.S.

Now, let’s hope Mercedes’ new pickup doesn’t snap in half.

[Image: Daimler AG]

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

124 Comments on “Hmm, Maybe We Should Give America a Pickup, Mercedes-Benz Ponders...”


  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    hell Mercedes sells what are essentially lifted station wagons with big wheels, excluding G-wagon, so why not?

  • avatar
    threeer

    But for that schnoz…yikes!

  • avatar
    carguy

    If anyone can make a fully loaded diesel Colorado seem like a bargain, Mercedes can (with a little help from Nissan and some automotive lipstick).

  • avatar
    Corey Lewis

    Well if it requires a new plant, not sure it’s worth it. But previous Mercedes image cares seem to have gone away with the ever-lower pandering to cheaper models. I don’t see where a truck would be out of line here these days.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Why a new plant? It’d be to the Frontier, as the Sierra is to the Silverado.

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        “It would have to come from within its own borders, said Mornhinweg. Mercedes-Benz’s Argentina assembly plant wouldn’t be able to handle the extra volume, and there’s that dreaded “chicken tax,” meaning a new plant would probably have to be built in the U.S.”

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Mornhinweg seems ill informed. If the Frontier plant couldn’t handle the extra volume, there’s also Complete Knockdown kits. The point is, the Frontier is already federalized and a “badge-job” plus some unique sheet-metal would be the most equitable route.

          Of course we’re talking the “next gen” Frontiers, same as current Navaras.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Corey,
          From what I’ve read there are significant differences between the Navara and the X Class.

          I also read the next Frontier is based on the narrow body Navara.

          • 0 avatar
            Corey Lewis

            Yeah, if there are that many differences, I can see why a new plant could be in the cards.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            US volume wouldn’t allow for a dedicated plant, no matter the “differences”.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Corey Lewis
            Probably why you will have the old Frontier for quite a while

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DumverMike,
            Why do you require a dedicated plant for the US X Class?

            Why not just import them from another plant that has excess capacity?

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’d be a (next generation) Frontier “re-badge”, already federalized and built at the Frontier plant, assembly line.

            There’s zero need to complicate it by importing it from another market, or build it at a dedicated X-class plant in the US.

            The comments from the Mercedes rep must have been “off the top of his head” (or out of his A$$).

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Please no NIssan DNA is any Merc. That surely would mark the beginning of the end.

    Merc should never do that. Ever.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @thornmark
      Only a starting point for a company that has not built Pickups before. Applies equally to Renault and their Alaskan, it also uses the Navara dimensions and some of the suspension.

    • 0 avatar
      Click REPLY to reload page

      The “end” started years ago.
      I agree with you 100%. A relabled Nissan is not a Mercedes. They used to be the world standard of quality and superior engineering. Those days are long gone.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      DeMk
      What’s Federalized? This term I yet encountered? Explain ALL involved in Feferalizing.

      Explain why the US can’t import an X Class from Germany. Explain what barriers are in place.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        USA (Federal/federalized) safety and emissions standards are only “barriers” when other markets decide to differ to their own, specific, usually weaker standards.

        That’s mostly to protect their local/home automakers, along with high tariffs, like Europe’s 10% duty on all import autos, vs the US’ 2.5%.

        The US has pioneered and crusaded for the toughest auto standards the world has even known. Most markets are in the Dark Ages or slowly catching up.

        Europe never required catalytic converted before 1992. They still don’t require (passive) safety airbags.

        On rare occasions, other markets have exceeded US standards (never on emissions), but mostly regarding pedestrian safety and amber turn signals/lighting.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “Please no NIssan DNA is any Merc…”

      Yeah god forbid they ever become reliable.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    Is it me, or does that truck look like an angry character from a Cars movie?

  • avatar
    brawnychicken333

    Isn’t the US the largest pick up truck market in the world? Assuming that is correct, it seems insane that MB wouldn’t sell it here.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      The Chicken Tax reduces the US market to a few pickup offerings.

      Sad protectionist socialism.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – Cheer up! The “few pickup offerings” we have, still makes the US the greatest place on the planet for choices in pickup classes, engines, brands, etc.

        We really don’t need much more.

        You do have impressive choices in “midsize pickups” in OZ, but there’s many pickup (Ute) “choices” no one really wants.

        So we’re really only “protected” from the most dangerous, gross polluting, throwaway pickups the world has to offer, and may like to dump here.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Um, DumbverMike, I do believe I can buy any US piickup ever made in Australia. You are aware of this, so why the blatant trolling.

          Face it, the US is a closed market offering only pickups made in NAFTA.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            OK BAFO, what are we REALLY *missing*, that isn’t redundant to what’s already here, or Chinese or Indian gross polluting, death traps?

            The US market isn’t *perfect*, but name a meaningful market, with a more complete set of pickup truck “choices”..

            OZ isn’t meaningful (except to Ozzies), except you’ll pay at least $140,000 for a mid-trim US fullsize 1/2 ton (4X4 crew) pickup, costing a mere $30,000 average, in the US, after rebates.

            Sorry but that’s not what anyone would call “complete”, even if you’re a “Cashed-up Bogan”.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Al while you can buy them, the cost of conversion to RHD makes them really expensive or imported in really low numbers via grey market with no manufacturer support. The small size of your market relative to the LHD world means it isn’t economically advantageous to reengineer our full sized trucks since they are already profitable. If you would adopt the standards that the vast majority of the world has, you’d get the trucks at competitive prices. As it is the juice isn’t worth the squeeze and you guys get the leftovers.

            Again, the US Auto industry alone is 1/3 the entire output of your country’s economy. Your market just isn’t relevant enough to reengineer these vehicles for.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Little troll, you can experience the pleasures, of the new breed of European HDT and MDT trucks if a certain tax is dropped, by the way we used to build the F150, F250, F350

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            Yeah Robert Ryan, you used to build a lot of vehicles there. Now, not so much. And I am exposed to those trucks regularly in my work travels. Compared to any of our fulssizers they are relatively agricultural.

            if your market was globally significant you’d get the trucks. Period. We don’t need your little $#!tboxes here.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Little Troll, US Automotive scene , very important to NA but is not that Globally important, that is why Mercedes did not bother to produce or sell them there.
            They stopped buildingF150, F250, F350 here as demand dived.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            @ RobertRyan, the US automotive market isn’t globally significant? Wow, ok. I got nothing.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Li’l Al,
            I realise conversion costs.

            So, how many 2017 Hiluxes, BT50s, Izuzu Dmaxes, Tritons, 79 Series can you import into tje US to drive on US roads?

            Zero, to be precise. And don’t give your usual trolling response no one wants one. Because I bet there are those who would of paid USD $70 000 for a supercharged 6.2 Commodore ute.

            So irrespective of costs, the US blocks vehicles from entering the country. Not because they are inferior as the Mustang’s massive fail has shown.

            Then add the chicken tax and I do believe the US consumer has less freedom than we do. Or the Europeans.

            It’s not about the quantity sold but the fact the US has a closed vehicle market.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – Yes we can’t get the Mitsubishi Triton. Oh the humanity.

            Not only is the Triton redundant to the midsize pickups we have here, its rear axle is so far under the rear seats, it looks funny. And it’s dangerous to put any kind of load in the bed that way.

            I wouldn’t call it a real “choice”, but what else ya got?

            The badge-engineered Mazda BT50 (Ford Ranger) probably wouldn’t happen anyway. Nor necessary, what with the Ranger is coming next year. But is Ford/Mazda still a “thing”?

            An Isuzu pickup would be a (US spec) badge-engineered Colorado/Canyon, but wouldn’t that be too many *brands* for just one chassis? Isuzu has left the US (screaming Bloody Murder!) anyway.

            The 70-series is a 1983 debut/design, better left for Africa, Australia and the 3rd world. No. But thanks.

            Then there’s Chinese and Indian pickups… Yeah right.

            What else you got? A *supercharged V8* dream “El Camino” update? Where were they in 1985?? The most ours got was a wheezy 305 CID V8 boat anchor.

            Or are you talking “Grey Market” imports? You should realize we once had a thriving grey market. It was 99% high end, luxury/sports cars from Europe and Japan (that didn’t/couldn’t meet US safety/emissions).

            Whatever compact, global pickups we were “missing” at the time, no one bothered (grey) importing them.

            Why would it be different now??

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @brawnychicken333
      No, the Global Pickup market will be roughly 2.8 million in 2020 according to Daimler Benz. Hyundai is in the process
      Of producing a ” Hillux” killer in the next two years.
      Boutique Mini Pickup proposed by a US Hyundai executive is not going ahead

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        LMAO
        Hyundai is teasing a fwd unibody crossover truck and suddenly its a “HiLux killer”. This is as good as saying VW is in a bed of roses because they’re still selling, never mind executives going to jail and more lies revealed everyday. Its all blue sky’s and lollipops.

        (BTW, it kinda helps to quote the whole phrase, as in “HiLux Killer”, not just half of it. But I guess you and your alter ego are used to [email protected]$$ crap, like the figures you pull out of your “down unda” crack to prove your unprovable points.)

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Sadly it’s too late for the X-Men First Class tie in, a la the Rogue One Rogue. But it’s not too late for a Predator tie-in!

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Why MB just why, you are tossing your well deserved classy image away one poor CLA at a time, once it is tarnished it is very hard to get back ask Caddy about that.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @seth1065
      Little idea that Mercedes Benz is the largest Truckmaker in the world. Luxury Cars are a subset of the whole organisation.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        To the US market, Mercedes is strictly a prestige “luxury” brand, with some obscure commercial trucks wearing the emblem. In Europe and other places, Mercedes Benz is known for many things, including taxis, police cars, and cheap econ cars.

      • 0 avatar

        That was clear after the Chryco-Benz merger. The very next year, the German Soccer Team was no longer “mercedes benz”, and certainly wasn’t “Damiler Chrysler”, instead all the uniforms read “mercedes Benz Trucks (in small letters, trucks).

        That was when I knew the Germans weren’t serious.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @speedlaw
          Correct. Mercedes was taking over Chysler, not a hilarious ” merger”.
          VW , or more correctly Scania/MAN are ” increasing their involvement ” with Navistar.
          On VW’s website,they are already listing Navistar as one of their brands.
          Must be a German thing.

          • 0 avatar
            Click REPLY to reload page

            So International Harvester is now even more international.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            Awesome. Naviatar’s highly praised products like the 6.0L and 6.4L TurboDiesel V-8s can go hand in hand with Mercedes that is built to last, last and LAST…until the lease is up.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            Little Troll,
            Glad you think they are going to use Navistar diesels ,they. do not

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            “On VW’s website,they are already listing Navistar as one of their brands.”

            Where?

            http://www.volkswagenag.com/en/brands-and-models.html

            I only see VW, VW commercial, Audi, SEAT, Skoda, Bentley, Bugatti, Lamborghini, Porsche, Ducati, Scania, and MAN. AFAIK the only current “involvement” is one engine Navistar offers (the N13) which is largely a MAN design. everything below that is a descendent of the DT466 or bought from Cummins.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    You know BMW and Mercedes don’t think image matters anymore when you have 320is, CLA250s, and GLA250s running all over the major cities as carshare vehicles (ReachNow for BMW, Car2Go for Mercedes).

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @dal20402
      Typical NA view that Mercedes only makes luxury cars, in the US Mercedes owns Freightliner and Western Star heavy duty trucks. So a luxury or not so luxury Pickup is nothing.
      Outside NA they also make luxury Vans

      • 0 avatar
        Corey Lewis

        “in the US Mercedes owns Freightliner and Western Star heavy duty trucks.”

        And Darden Restaruants owns Capital Grille and Olive Garden. They’re different brands, not the same one.

      • 0 avatar
        Ermel

        On home turf, Mercedes-Benz offers a full lineup of plain commercial vehicles, from a tiny Renault-based microvan all the way up to full-sized commercial long-distance trucks and tractors. A pick-up would fit in quite well, and not endanger their image at all.

        You Americans are not as used to seeing the three-pointed star on commercial vehicles, but you did get the Sprinter van with Mercedes branding in the past, did you not? Also, you do know the Unimog I take it.

        Mercedes-Benz is not a luxury make. At least, not exclusively. And it never was.

        • 0 avatar

          Well, yes. To look at the mirror the other direction, imagine if GM had cachet in Europe. There, they sell the Cadillac line (don’t snort your single malt out your nose, DW-its a waste of good scotch). They sell a few top line Buicks, the Corvette and that’s it. Euros line up and toss stupid money at them for this. They don’t get the Cavalier…never see a GM cop car…or work truck. Having ridden in enough e class taxis, and having spent enough time in other markets, I always love the marketing.

          Snob appeal is why we don’t get the five door 1 class, even though I’d sign up tomorrow if it appeared.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @speedlaw,
            Cadillac sales can be counted on one hand in Europe. Cadillac is less successful in Europe than even in the US,hard to imagine.
            ” Euros lining up and toss stupid money” Must be an awfully short queue,
            ” Euros” do line up for every overpriced Supercar, that some boutique outfit has produced.

          • 0 avatar

            @Robt Ryan…this was a hypothetical. Imagine if…
            on my last trip over there….between parking, driving and overall expectation as to what car fits in what tiny parking space, my CTS would be a parade float. I couldn’t have put it into the spaces, passed other vehicles stacked up on a roadway, or made the turns into and out of my hotels….

            I know Caddy is a no-sale over there for a lot of reasons…but

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Ermel
          If they did see the real MB, they would have a very different impression.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          The Mercedes branding for the Sprinter is relatively new for the US. If started as a Freightshaker then they added it to the Dodge and then Ram brand before moving them to the Mercedes store when they were finally able to unload Chrysler.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Scoutdude
            I guess they did not know how to push it, a Commercial Vehicle or now a basis for a Class C Motorhome, now it is a Mercedes Sprinter

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “US Mercedes owns Freightliner and Western Star heavy duty trucks.” we know, because they almost got run into the ground same as Chrysler.

  • avatar
    orenwolf

    Holy hell.

    • 0 avatar
      Corey Lewis

      You know, if you approached Mercedes in 1994, when they were making this as a utility vehicle:

      http://i.ebayimg.com/images/g/Ee4AAOSw2XFUgxns/s-l640.jpg

      And said “Hey, you know that Eddie Bauer F-150? How about you do something like that?”

      They’d have laughed you out of the room.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Corey Lewis
        They actually thought of doing a US F150 vehicle, but decided.not to do it, Local loyalty and the very profitable and growing Global ” 1 tonne” market killed the idea.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    In Australia it is reported many are already putting deposits on the X Class.

    The interest is that great MB has an X Class in Australia.

    It apparently only uses the Navara chassis. It has MB suspension, longer control arms and a wider wheelbase.

    Best of all the 3 litre V6 will have 261hp and 460ftlb of torque and an 8spd auto. I would like to see what the AMG version will have.

  • avatar

    Anyone laughing at this idea has no concept of how many Mercedes X-Classes would be sold.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Flybrain,
      About the number of F150’s in Germany…Zero. This meets non NA market preferences

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @RobertRyan – You must be nuts. Germany is the F-150s biggest market, outside of the Americas.

        If this pickup takes off for Mercedes (within reason), look for an Infiniti re-badge of the Frontier.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I’m pretty sure China will be the biggest F150 market outside of NA this year. They are shipping a ton of Raptors there.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            China! Raptors!!

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Adam Tonge,
            Minuscule number for Chinese Middle Class, they are Raptors, not F150’s. Sold some after a few car shows in China.
            Much more interesting and profitable for Automakers to actually sell Pickups in China. Market dominated by Chinese brands, established Japanese brands find it hard.
            Europe for US Pickups is a lost cause. In fact for Pickups generally.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al From 'Murica

            You know you think it is a joke, but I saw no less than 4 Raptors and a couple of other F150s of the current model that were not owned by US service members. Several Mustangs too. It wasn’t many, but it was more than I expected to see for sure. That was Around Stuttgart. 2 of the Raptors were wrapped in advertising.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          DumberMike,
          You have made ridiculous trolling comments in the past, ie, you’ve been to Spain over 36 times and their is huge fullsize pickup market potential within the EU.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            @BAFO – There’s an impressive number of grey market, US fullsize pickups running around Europe, although you hate to admit it. But think about all the red-tape, shipping, fees, delays, code/lighting modifications, and other big expenses owners were put through, not counting Right Hand Drive conversions (for UK, Ireland).

            So what does that tell you? Obviously there’s respectable “pent up” demand. Excitement perhaps!

            Yes US fullsize pickups, Tahoe/Expedition SUVs, could never come close to US sales figures, and never mind “mainstream” acceptance. But as healthy *niche* vehicle sales, if imported legitimately (with OEM/Dealer support, warranty, financing, etc)? Totally within the realm of possibilities.

            Hell, whodda thought the Mustang would be such a damn hit in Europe/Australia? (NOT YOU!!!) It also has had a healthy “grey market” in Europe, since there’s been Mustangs.

            At least Mustangs and F-150s aren’t redundant to what’s already for sale in Europe. That’s also key here.

            When the US allowed “grey market” autos, think about how many global pickups were imported here… Yeah why would anyone bother, right? Or go to all the trouble??

            Keep in mind Europe has its own “technical barriers” against all import vehicles. Besides a 10% tariff on all import autos, of course Europe has a 22.5% “Chicken Tax” on all import trucks. Why do you think that is??

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Big Al from Oz
            Spot on, there. On another matter we can wait for Hyundai and what they are going to come up with. Pretty interesting times, with Mercedes, Hyundai,, Isuzu/ Mazda, and Renault coming out

      • 0 avatar

        I’m willing to bet actual money that these will fly off the lots here in the US even with ADM bump stickers for the first six months.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Actually, if it was this truck, I’d laugh twice as hard…damn, that’s ugly.

  • avatar
    BuzzBNY

    Will there be Mercedes branded truck nuts? Even better maybe just the circle around the truck nuts?

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I do believe there is a market in the US for a 4×4 crew cab MB with 261hp and 460ftlb of torque that can easily tow 7 800lbs and carry 2 420lbs in the bed.

    An AMG version should be good for 300+hp and 500+ftlb of torque.

    That would be more than necessary for a want. Especially with longer control arms and rear wheel travel. A Raptor would definitely be out classed.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Big Al from Oz
      I am with Mercedes at this point and say no. I will say there say there is definitely a market for many of the current HDT Scania’s , Volvo’s ,MAN’s etc NA adversion to Cabovers is the big sticking point. Australian’s are gradually warming to the new European models

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        Robert Ryan,

        I see Kenworth, Isuzu and Fuso cabovers all the time. There is no aversion to cabovers, they just occupy a smaller niche between larger pickup and van-based trucks and larger conventional trucks.

        Their big advantage in maneuverability isn’t all that critical in the US, so the trade-off in operator comfort and NVH makes them less attractive.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @heavy handle
          You get the lightweight , no heavy duty Japanese Trucks, and no European Trucks
          Cab overs outside NA are on highway and Logging trucks, not just inner city delivery trucks.
          Mitsubishi Fuso, is a brand not a Truck in Japan. Everything from the Canter(, what you get light Truck to Class 8’s

        • 0 avatar
          idm3

          @ heavy handle:

          the KWs, Isuzus and Fusos you see here are from the Class 5-7 range. These are not the 8-Class OTR trucks you may be thinking of.

          At least one company is trying to reintroduce the 8-Class COE to the US. Alkane, a startup from Charleston, South Carolina, plans to roll out a COE *-Class next year. That truck is interesting besides the fact that it’s a format that hasn’t been seen on US roads in nearly 10 years (aside from the few ancient ones pulling logs) in that (1) it’s LPG powered and (2) the gliders are built by Foton in China and shipped over to the US for final engine fitting and US federalization.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @speedlaw – BAFO just said something funnier than @28 cars.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      It isn’t going to be able tow 7800 lbs in the US. Mercedes has already said that the X-Class will be able to tow up to 7000 lbs and have a maximum payload of 2200 lbs. Who knows what the US tow and payload ratings will be. Still, those numbers are more than adequate for most people.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Adam Tonge
        Correction, tow 3.5 Tonne( 7,700lb). Payload if this came as a New Frontier more like 1500lb, not 2,400lb.
        Mercedes is not going to make a single cab low height Type vehicle, with a 2,700lb payload. Just a Dual Cab( Crewcab) version.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Its payload/towing will be very close to Frontier specs. Don’t expect much more than 1,500 lbs payload. This isn’t Africa, Australia, SE Asia or some other market where they leave it entirely up the manufacturer’s sense of humour.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I think the article I read elsewhere must have gotten their ton and tonne mixed up. Still, I can’t see it having such a high tow rating here. Identical vehicles have much higher tow ratings outside of the US.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Adam Tonge
            The Colorado Diesel is rated at 7,700lbs
            http://www.tfltruck.com/2015/07/2016-chevy-colorado-duramax-diesel-to-tow-7700-pounds-preview/

            “Rated 181 hp and 369 lb.-ft. of torque, the all-new 2.8L Duramax lifts Colorado’s maximum trailering capacity to 7,700 lb. on 2WD models and 7,200 lb. in 4x4s, handily out-towing full-size Chevy Silverados powered by the 4.3L EcoTec3 V6.”

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Given the number one vehicle purchase for those with incomes over $250K is the F-150, and for those with an income over $500K is…the F-150 — this seems like a no brainer. Especially if it has any capacity for the Home Depot runs, and to tow the toys.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      @APaGttH – I suspect that you’d have a hard time selling this to a wealthy F150 buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Lou_BC
        And Vica Versa. Going by pre sales here, they are lining up for it’s release.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Lou_BC
          Just by chance , I saw this trio lined up on the street .
          Current Model Toyota Hilux, Ford Ranger and a F150 Harley Davidson
          http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zps8dr8yayz.jpeg
          http://i11.photobucket.com/albums/a186/RobRyan7/image_zps9c7b1mmw.jpeg

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          You can’t gauge US interest in this product by pre-sale numbers in another market. That being said, I think the X-Class would do fine here. It won’t have the volume of some other trucks, but that isn’t the point.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @Adam Tonge
            You are not going to pack in 70,000 to watch a Cricket game in the US, but no problems in Australia.
            US is a different market, with. different tastes. Whether Mercedes thinks it is worthwhile, my feeling in the long run is no and they wil stick to it
            We know what Mercedes are trying to do, but a lot of confusion, bias and too much home team love to make it work.in the US. plus the fact they would have to expand or build a new factory.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            They could add this product to the new Sprinter plant.

  • avatar
    MeaMaximaCulpa

    The US built Mercedes SUVs has the worst interior in the Mercedes range, will this thing top the horrific cheapness that can be found in a $ 100 000 SUV? I’m not sure but my hopes are high.

  • avatar
    OldManPants

    This could be a Ridgeline for venal dummies. Neither has anything to do with WURK.

  • avatar
    Spartan

    If this makes Cadillac give us an EXT again, I’m all for it. I miss the EXT :(

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Spartan
    Go ask Mary Barra, she has the answers

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Robotdawn: As they have discontinued my Cruze and there are too many downsides to low sitting vehicles nowadays,...
  • jack4x: @Jon, I suppose you’ll need to be more specific about what you don’t want if you expect an...
  • slavuta: If I bought Toyota this year, they must be doing something right! Or, at least – better than others!
  • slavuta: “This is our new reality” This is not yet a total reality. Camry is still in the old reality, on...
  • Heino: Toyota is also being very aggressive. My dealer keeps reminding me that I can trade my 2017 RAV4 for a 2019...

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States