By on September 23, 2016

2017 Cadillac XT5, Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars

If dealership owners spring for a recent offer by the president of Cadillac, expect to see a vastly reduced brand presence in towns and cities across the U.S.

Johan de Nysschen is offering 400 low-volume Cadillac dealers cash to close up shop and walk away, Automotive News reports.

It’s nothing personal, the brand’s performance-focused leader claims — just business.

In an interview with AN, de Nysschen claims the brand has too many dealerships as it is, at least when compared to its luxury rivals. Paring down the herd, even significantly (the 400 dealers are 43 percent of the brand’s U.S. dealer presence), would make it easier for the brand’s dealers to fold into the executive’s controversial “Project Pinnacle.”

That program, due to kick off on January 1, would see dealers slotted into five tiers based on sales volume, each offering a certain level of customer perks. Compensation from the automaker would be tied to sales performance.

Because dealers would need to invest in their facilities to upgrade their services, the buyout offer gives smaller dealers a chance to avoid the hassle, de Nysschen says. The offers starts at $100,000 and rises to $180,000, depending on the operation. The 400 targeted dealers each sold less than 50 Cadillacs last year.

Ideally, de Nysschen would like every Cadillac dealer in the country to be on board with Project Pinnacle. “Our target is zero,” de Nysschen said. “Our target is to have 100 percent of the Cadillac dealers engaged with the Cadillac business.”

Backlash against the program has grown since de Nysschen introduced it. A California dealer group recently wrote to General Motors CEO Mary Barra in a bid to delay the rollout. The group claimed Project Pinnacle violated state franchise laws, heaped unfair costs onto dealerships, and discriminated against smaller dealers.

It’s hard to see this buyout offer as anything other than a make-the-problem-go-away effort.

[Image: © 2016 Matthew Guy/The Truth About Cars]

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69 Comments on “Cadillac President Will Pay Dealers to Disappear...”


  • avatar
    Click REPLY to reload page

    How to sell more cars and increase your market share:

    1) Close 400 locations where your customers can buy your product.

    / Fantastic idea, GM. I wonder why McDonald’s, Chevron, Subway, Taco Bell, Walmart and Home Depot haven’t thought of this?! /

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      If McDonald’s was selling 50 Big Macks (or combo meals) a year at one location, you can bet it would be shut down, and it would help the company to do it.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        The profit margin on a Big Mac or combo meal is considerably smaller than on any model Cadillac. Besides, McDonalds doesn’t sell Jack-In-The-Box, In-And-Out or Burger King menu items, but those small Cadillac dealers probably sell other makes, used cars, and repair services. A local Cadillac dealer also sells new Buicks and GMC, as well as a large inventory of used cars. The Cadillac business is probably the loss leader for the dealership.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Lorenzo,
          Maybe Caddy doesn’t want other brands near their vehicles when selling. They might deem it as unnecessary competition.

          This could be a part of the new Caddy experience, along with a Caddy Cafe Latte.

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I can understand Cadillac wanting to have standalone stores, but like I said in another comment, the Cadillac dealership here in OKC is in a complex with several other luxury brands; it’d be hard to mandate that it be on separate grounds from those other brands. The best way to stand out…is to build desirable products, and to price them reasonably.

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          Here in Oklahoma City, Bob Moore Cadillac is a standalone store, but it’s in an autocomplex with various other brands also sold by Bob Moore, including Porsche, Audi, Maserati, Land Rover, Mazda and Subaru. They also had Hummer, Saturn and Saab before those brands were shuttered. Anyway, the Cadillac dealership appears to do brisk business and shows no signs of being shuttered.

          Bob Moore has a second Cadillac dealership which truly is all by itself just inside of Norman (where the University of Oklahoma is located), about 30 miles away. I’m not sure how that store is doing.

    • 0 avatar
      MoDo

      Sounds like a move to drive buyers to larger / fancier / newer showrooms. If your last cars were BMW, Benz etc You aren’t going to like dealing with a “Chevy store”. I am sure this is just half truth as well, when they closed all the GM dealerships back in 08 it was because they were so close together. The guy would get a quote, then run across the street to the other GM dealer and ask them to beat the price. Blowing profits for both stores. Getting rid of stores gets rid of competition.

    • 0 avatar

      Cadillac’s problems began when they sought to increase market share. FIFTY years ago.

      EXCLUSIVITY is a selling point at that level. Increase market share too much and the cars become common to their intended audience, no matter how good they are.

      Cadillac customers should enjoy a premium experience when in the dealership.

      Profit per transaction should be the goal. Secondary goal is the halo effect the brand should have over the rest of GM.

      • 0 avatar
        Lorenzo

        Cadillac is the most exclusive already! They sold 175,000 cars/SUVs in 2015 in the US market, 277,000 worldwide.

        Mercedes’ total US sales were 380,000, BMW sold 346,000, Lexus US sales were 344,000, and Audi topped 200k for the first time by a hair, with 202,000 US sales.

        You can’t get much more exclusive than Cadillac!

      • 0 avatar
        Featherston

        @ Budda-Boom – Agreed. And this should serve as a cautionary tale to any luxury maker (especially, I’d say, to Lexus vis-a-vis differentiating its FWD-based models from Toyota’s and to BMW vis-a-vis making its vehicles so widely available via leases). Clearly some strategies can work over the medium-long term. Caddy had a great, half-century-plus run, and Lexus and BMW have been doing great for three decades now.

        When I finish my time machine, there are several rounds of comparison shopping I’d like to do:
        – Cadillac vs Packard vs Pierce-Arrow vs Peerless for a given year
        – Cadillac vs Lincoln vs Packard or Imperial for a given year
        – Cadillac vs Buick vs Olds C platform cars for a given year (no, not the late ’80s ones)

    • 0 avatar
      Luke42

      “How to sell more cars and increase your market share”

      That’s the volume car game, not the luxury car game.

      For luxury cars to work, you need everyone to know it’s something special, but make it scarce enough that only “special” people get it.

      The main way to make it scarce is the price — but only making it available in “special” places could also be a part of that, too.

      Some luxury cars even get into the Veblen Hoods category — products that become more valuable as they become more expensive, just because they’re expensive. Is a $10,000 purse better than a $500 purse in practical terms? Probably not. Does anyone who buys the $10,000 purse care? Probably not, because being able to brag that they’re rich enough to afford it is a big part of the value they receive. These are the people Cadillac wants to sell to.

      Would I ever play this game? HELZ NO! Because you never really win a check-writing contest, and because I’d rather be a smart guy who builds and finds value than a guy who writes checks with more zeroes than necessary. But, do I see why Cadillac is trying to get into this game? Absolutely.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    I would bet a lot of these dealers are in fairly rural locations, which means they basically own the luxury segment of SmallTown, USA. Shutter them and the biz will just go to Buick/GMC Denali or Lincoln.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      I’m legitimately surprised the local Buick/Cadillac/GMC dealer isn’t just Cadillac/GMC. They have hardly any Buicks.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      “The 400 targeted dealers each sold less than 50 Cadillacs last year.”

      So Cadillac looses 50 sales in one year from the shuttered dealer, half to Buick-GMC and the other to Lincoln or other compeditor.

      I fail to see why that’s a problem.

      Lexus doesn’t need those 50 sales a year either and they are far more profitable for it. If you can’t beat ’em, join ’em.

      • 0 avatar
        ToddAtlasF1

        400*40=16,000 sales a year. That’s almost 10% of Cadillac’s sales. Figure an average new Cadillac buyer in a small town buying one every four years, and that’s telling over 60K Cadillac customers that they’re unwanted. People that don’t understand math are destined to turn 51% market share into 15%.

        • 0 avatar
          Xeranar

          Meh, those 60K caddy buyers are old duffs that will be kicking it soon anyways. that’s the core problem for Cadillac and Lincoln. Getting rid of the old folks to get younger hipsters and cash rich execs in. Replace the steer horns with San Fran Tech.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Over the past three decades Cadillac at one time or another has touted the tech du jour approach, in fact I can remember the jingle being “the fusion of design and technology” as recently as fifteen years ago. Ultimately one of two things happens regardless of spin:

            1. The brand expands to offer a large lineup from high to low in terms of cost as have zee Germans in recent years.

            or

            2. The brand shrinks and focuses on three or four models which should be creme de la creme in terms of materials, assembly, and features with price being variable at best.

            I suspect Baghdad Johann is going with option one despite losing excess dealers, which the second option is predicated on IMO. One would think more dealers available to sell lesser brand product (think 25K-30K range MSRP), but perhaps he will surprise us?

    • 0 avatar
      Carlson Fan

      In rural arras people buy because of the dealer not the brand. So the business will just go to whatever the dealer also sells which is probably another GM product.

  • avatar
    VTECV6NYC

    Sounds reasonable to me, although I’m assuming those dealers that were able to get by with selling fewer than 50 cars per year also sell other marques?

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Take the money, don’t ask questions, and you never saw me. Capire?

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    That dude is wack.

    The only advantage Cadillac has over the competition now IS its distribution footprint. It’s got dealers in places that most folks only get gas in when driving somewhere else.

    He needs to fix the weak product in the division, or pretty soon the **entire** dealer network will be shuttered for lack of profits.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Its chicken and egg. Which came first the weak product because there are 933 US dealers (three times as many as most competitors) or the 933 dealers because of the weak product?

      • 0 avatar
        thattruthguy

        The smalltown dealers were established when wealth was broadly distributed throughout rural America and big cities were relatively distant and inconvenient. For example, there’s still a Cadillac dealer in Terre Haute, Indiana. All of the businesses that drove Terre Haute are gone except the college, so those are senior managers and locally based owners who aren’t trading for new de Villes every three years.

    • 0 avatar
      AoLetsGo

      +11
      It’s the product stupid, not the dealers. Sure some dealers are weak – raise the standards and drive out the weakest. Spend your money on long term product improvements and rebates short term to keep market share. Ford tried this back in the 90’s and it was a miserable failure, does no one learn from history?

      • 0 avatar
        Paragon

        Want to chime in to agree that for sure, Mr. Cadillac Honcho, that it’s the product, stupid! I can only hope that he or some of his peeps actually read these boards. Paying dealers to disappear doesn’t seem too bright, in my estimation. He is will to lose the sales generated by low-volume dealerships. Not too bright. I’ll suggest that part of the reason things aren’t any better, sales-wise, has to do with the economy.

  • avatar
    Roberto Esponja

    In my opinion, Cadillac died in 1980. Exploding diesel engines, downsizing to the lousy HT4100, 2nd generation Seville that looked like a dog scraping its itchy butt on the carpet, then the Cimarron, the 1985 FWD models, the Allante, the Catera, and on and on and on…

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      No true Cadillacs since the last 368 engine block was cast. Even with the V8-6-4 version you could cure that by clipping a wire or even connecting it to a switch so you could turn it on and off.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      Becuase I owned one (over 20 years after it was built), I will briefly defend the Allante.

      It wasn’t a *terrible* thing like the Catera or the 4.1L, and it wasn’t a brand nuke like the Cimarron. It was an adequate enough late 80s luxury convertible that was for some reason priced deep into WTF! territory.

      I think it belongs in the more minor ELR and XLR class of Cadillac screw ups.

      • 0 avatar
        never_follow

        While the Catera was a terrible *Cadillac*, it was actually a pretty decent handling car, and had some of the best seats I’ve ever experienced.

        Really, it should have been a Pontiac, but I imagine it would have cost GM too much/they would have had to sell it at a higher price point than Pontiac customers were attuned to.

    • 0 avatar
      Johnster

      1980 was really the last good year for Cadillac. The down-sized 368 cubic inch V-8 was disappointing, but reasonably reliable. 1981 saw the introduction of the V-8-6-4 and was the beginning of its decline, followed by the horribly under-powered 4.1 V-8.

      Cadillac revived a bit with the arrival of the Northstar V-8 but it pretty much died when the DTS and Northstar V-8 went out of production in 2011. (The XTS is a very pretty Buick LaCrosse.) I kind of hope that when they get the new V-8 engine in production in the CT6, it might return to some of its former glory.

      Where I live (in flyover country) the local Cadillac dealer went out of business in 2010 when they stopped making Pontiacs. The local Ford-Lincoln dealer is cleaning up selling Navigators, MKXs, MKSs and MKZs. The Buick/GMC and Chrysler/Jeep dealers seem to be doing well and so is the Toyota dealer (seems to sell lots of Avalons and Land-Cruisers).

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    For many of these dealers, they’re being faced with the decision to take $100,000 or spend $500,000 or more for upgrades and more direction from the main office on how to treat customers. It looks like a slam dunk for a lot of dealers, who can probably pick up a franchise from other carmakers.

    De Nysschen apparently believes those customers will go elsewhere for their Cadillacs, and up to 19,000 sales won’t be lost. If he’s wrong, US Cadillac sales will drop by up to 11%, and wipe out last year’s global 7.5% increase in sales. You can cite China all you want, but the US market produces 63% of global sales.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    The second to last paragraph covers the issues I was wondering about. How can this plan not be a violation of the franchise agreement? Unless there were different priced franchise fees then there shouldn’t be varying levels of privileges. As politically connected as auto dealers have proven themselves to be in their fight with Tesla, does GM really need another legal distraction?

    It was discussed during the bankruptcy that the savings to GM by eliminating a dealership were minimal. Caddy sales stink; to me this is GM pacifying the bigger dealers by guaranteeing them a bigger slice of a shrinking pie. Better to drop the low performers than to lose a high seller.

    • 0 avatar
      thattruthguy

      It depends on state franchise laws, but Cadillac’s probably fine as long as each dealer is offered the same terms.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Offering them all the same terms is what will cause the problems, making the offer based on their volume is that they will have to do.

        • 0 avatar
          thattruthguy

          Sorry, I was referring to the Pinnacle program for active dealers.

          For a voluntary termination, any offer that Cadillac makes and the dealer accepts is okay for both Cadillac and the dealer. I don’t think Cadillac would have any duty to make comparable termination offers to individual dealers, or to offer termination to any individual dealer. This isn’t a case like Oldsmobile, where GM is unilaterally terminating every dealer, yet the corporation is remaining in business.

          It’s only if Cadillac unilaterally cancels the franchise, or obviously tries to force the dealer out of business, or makes demands that exceed the franchise terms or state franchise law, that it’s actionable. I don’t think Cadillac is openly threatening to cancel franchises that don’t accept its offer.

  • avatar
    mleclerc19xx

    Our markets being somewhat similar, I did a little research for sales versus dealer network in Canada. In 2015, Lexus sold 22,025 vehicules in 37 dealerships. Could not find how many Cadillac there are in Canada – there are 37 in Montreal & Toronto (same as the whole country for Lexus). Canadian sales totaled 12,249 vehicules. Do the math! Build cars people want and they’ll travel to get them. Simple as that.

  • avatar
    InsideMan

    When working for a non related OEM, I would often question the value of having franchises in really small towns that were within 2 hours of much larger cities. The examples I’ll give is having dealers dotted along the eastern NM border when much larger Amarillo, Lubbock and Odessa could easily serve many of those customers. I’d often hear the dealers complain that the customers all went to the nearby “big city” and never even gave them a shot at their sale or non warranty work. It was almost like they were telling us to close them but in reality we couldn’t do much besides find a buyer.

    When asking why we had these super small dealers (with sales volumes similar to those mentioned in the article), often shared folk lore included: an executive’s kid had a breakdown there, an executive had family that lived in the town and was sick of them complaining about driving to the dealer that was out of town or they put in a dealer because of the hatred of the other nearby dealer that wasn’t “factory friendly”. All of these stories were typically from a bygone era when manufacturers had the upper hand prior to franchise law neutering them and removing their power to change the dealer network with the stroke of a pen.

    In modern times the agonizing over data and demographics of open points is frustratingly slow and takes years. All too often, whether opening, closing or selling dealers, the fate is decided by state dealer boards or in the courtroom. Cadillac knows in taking this position, that the ensuing fight will last for years.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      For most of my father’s 30 plus years selling John Deere tractors he worked for a franchise of ONE which was owned by his uncle. He was a productive salesman but there were 2 John Deere franchises in the county, both family owned and in similarly small towns.

      He would complain about people who bought their product at other dealers (sometimes playing the two small dealers against each other) but then bring their warranty work to whichever dealer was closer to home.

      When it came time for his uncle to retire, John Deere stepped forward and volunteered to help find a buyer for the franchise. John Deere was able to engineer a large franchisee (now totaling 16 plus locations) to come in a buy BOTH small dealers in the county. They closed both of them and opened up a new franchise centrally located within the local market.

      The upside for Dad is that he got higher showroom traffic and a $3 per hour raise practically overnight.

      Small franchises generally make little sense for any manufacturer.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    My initial thought was wow something sensible from Baghdad Johann, he must be reading TTAC.

    However:

    “The offers starts at $100,000 and rises to $180,000, depending on the operation.”

    I hope this is a typo as an automobile franchise fees are not $100K, let alone the value of one which might be fifty years old.

    ““Our target is zero,” de Nysschen said. “Our target is to have 100 percent of the Cadillac dealers engaged with the Cadillac business.””

    Whoa, this is dangerous as it implies the grand strategy may be to replicate something similar to the Chevrolet/Buick distribution chain as Cadillac. Historically, Cadillac has offered many products similar or based on the lesser marques, but moving forward I personally don’t think that’s wise. One of the reasons to do so now is the fact you have a legacy dealer network about 90% the size of Honda’s. If you cull 43% of it, you’re in a better position to offer and *sell* more elusive product through the remaining dealers who are actually able to do so.

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      The $100,000 to $180,000 is a “go away and don’t sue us” fee. There’s a guy with a website who advertises, “For one million dollars I will leave the internet forever”. He’s overpriced his presence on the internet. For a dealer to voluntarily drop his franchise and agree not to invoke state franchise laws in a lawsuit, $100k-$180k is cheap.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        The minimum “see ya later” fee should be equivalent to whatever GM is charging for a new Cadillac franchise in 2016. Affected dealers should pool their money and hire an excellent firm to sue GM in a class-action suit to get a proper settlement.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Who gets the cool old signs?

    s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/236x/09/25/55/0925556ff704559de973187b234787e8.jpg

    • 0 avatar
      Lorenzo

      I think those neon signs are long gone. The few examples remaining are probably in museums. Cities have claimed airspace over their sidewalks and no longer allow overhanging signs. That’s why downtowns look so sterile today. With the “urban forest” people planting trees at the curbs, you can’t even see signs on the buildings.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        Not all cities have done that. Yes you need a permit and approval to allow your new sign or awning to hang over the sidewalk but around here very few cities are forcing them to come down.

  • avatar
    stuki

    The best way to be a successful at selling cars, is obviously to pay your dealers to sell overpriced coffee instead. And handbags.

  • avatar

    I’m not sure what my take away is. 43% of dealers sell less than 20k vehicles, or the value of a standard of the world auto dealer is valued less than two vehicles from the same store if they accept $100k. That’s a bit mind boggling.

    • 0 avatar
      thattruthguy

      It’s probably a family owned business being offered a big fistful of hard cash to drop a small, and shrinking, part of its business. Either they just take the money out of the business, or they get more operating capital without borrowing or taking a partner from outside the family. Maybe there’s a family member who’ll take the cash and leave. They aren’t going to bite on the first offer, but they’re listening.

  • avatar
    Varezhka

    Wow, $100~180K/dealer? That’s pretty insulting even by GM standards.

    If GM doesn’t consider keeping these low volume dealerships around is worth their effort, I’m curious why they didn’t just cut them loose during the big bankruptcy cull of 2009. I can’t imagine these dealerships sold many more vehicles back then, and probably would’ve been a lot easier for GM. The cries of 400 Cadillac dealerships would’ve been lost among 2100 other GM franchisees.

    • 0 avatar
      Paragon

      I think we can say Johan doesn’t think like a stereotypical GM exec.

    • 0 avatar
      thattruthguy

      GM cut a lot of similar franchises in the bankruptcy. Now they want to cut more. By the time the signs come down, it will be nearly ten years since the bankruptcy. Things change in the auto business and in local markets. In some cases, lots of other local businesses have been closed, or sold to distant owners who don’t buy their Cadillacs in that town. In an extreme case, I know of a small town where the local dealer sold many, many Cadillacs to GM employees and retirees. Now, it’s just retirees, and that volume will decrease every year til it hits zero. Meanwhile, every remaining retiree would travel 30 miles to the nearest big city dealer if necessary, or settle for a Lacrosse, Impala, or Denali from the local dealer.
      The Cadillac line isn’t super valuable in a multi line smalltown Chevy or Buick GMC store that’s otherwise staying in business. $100K in hard cash is on the low end, but it isn’t an insulting offer.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    The dealers that are offered this buyout should take the money and run. Cadillac is no longer the prestige brand that it was 40 or 50 years ago. If you can afford to buy a Cadillac or Lincoln then you can afford a Mercedes, BMW, Jaguar, Lexus, or other luxury brands that have more prestige and better reliability. Coffee bars with latte are not going to get Cadillac where it needs to be and the current product is not perceived as a good value for the money. GM would be better off to kill the Cadillac brand than to waste valuable resources on coffee bars. Ford should kill Lincoln as well.

    If Cadillac is going to offer coffee bars it should partner with Starbucks or Peet’s a known commodity. Personally I think this is a waste and money would be better spent on developing better products for Buick, GMC, and Chevrolet. At least Buick pays its way with its market share in China.

  • avatar
    CincyDavid

    I wonder how many of these “non-performing” stores will not just dump their Cadillac franchise but decide that declining Buick and GMC numbers make it worthwhile to just close the store altogether and walk away from GM.

    There is one Cadillac store in the City of Cincinnati, and I sense that the bulk of their business is pre-owned. Thomson-MacConnell has been there for 75 years or more but they’re landlocked in a none-too-stellar neighborhood and I can’t imagine that they’ll spend millions to upgrade. Where are urban hipsters supposed to buy these allegedly hip, cool luxury vehicles??? The outer ring suburbs of course, where all of the uncool soccer moms keep sucking up Escalades.

    • 0 avatar
      thattruthguy

      As a rule, smalltown GM franchises are potential moneymakers for individual or family ownership, as long as GM doesn’t make onerous demands for facilities, new vehicle inventory, etc, and there aren’t too many GM dealerships in the area. A family owned business like this isn’t likely to spontaneously shut down. Most of the GM dealers terminated in the bankruptcy were going businesses and were unhappy about it.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Most downtown dealers cannot compete with the bigger suburban dealerships. It is hard to compete with the Wyler and Joseph franchises. It would be no surprise if a Cadillac dealership decided to dump their franchise and not pick up another GM brand. It is very hard to compete with the mega dealers and the amount of capital needed to invest in a dealership makes it a non start for a smaller dealer. Many the independent Ford and GM dealers that were paid by the manufacturer to close up after the 2008 economic meltdown went to Kia and Hyundai brands or went out of business. Now there are a lot of Kia and Hyundai dealerships. Robke lost their Chevrolet and Ford franchises and were looking at getting a Mahindra franchise but Mahindra never got its act together. For a while Robke sold used vehicles and repair service but that went away. John Nolan Ford is another example and now provides repair service. Many of the brands are already controlled by the mega dealerships and it is impossible for a smaller franchise to compete with them.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    In many smaller communities the dealers disappeared because they were forced to take a specific number of vehicles and an allocation of types of vehicles that they could not sell in their communities. Many smaller dealerships have for the most part disappeared. At one time the small town near where my grandparents farm was had a Dodge, Ford, Oldsmobile-International dealerships in a county of about 2,000 population. Profitability of a small GM dealership is not that much in today’s world of mega dealerships and the internet. Most buyers are looking for the best price.

  • avatar
    Boomstick0

    I have to drive 50 miles to the nearest Cadillac dealer, and because they didn’t particularly do a very good job, I have to drive 90 miles to the next nearest alternative. Too many dealers? Give me a break. Are they trying to kill the brand?


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