By on August 23, 2016

2014 Ford Mustang GT500

Ford Mustangs are hot. They’re hot in America, and they’re unusually hot in Europe, too. People like driving them, and they sure as hell like talking about them. But it’s no secret that Ford thinks the Mustang isn’t hot enough, given its third-place standing in the pony car horsepower wars.

We’ve heard that Ford wants a Mustang to challenge the Dodge Challenger Hellcat and Chevrolet Camaro ZL1, but a new report claims that the next Shelby GT500 will beat them both.

HorsepowerKings, citing an unnamed source, claims that the folks at Ford Performance have a GT500 planned for 2018 that offers power “well over the 700 hp mark.”

The ZL1 makes 650 hp and the Hellcat makes 707 hp, meaning Ford could handily beat both. Right now, the top pony in the Mustang stable is the GT350, which makes 526 hp and has developed a nasty habit of generating fiery explosions on the track. As we’ve seen recently with Ford’s trucks, the automaker doesn’t like ceding the power crown to General Motors or FCA.

So, where does the power come from? Nothing’s set in stone, but the same source tells the publication that the development team is working hard on a direct injection engine — one that breathes “through a straw.”

Ford isn’t expected to upgrade the high-compression 5.2-liter V8 from the GT350. That mill would be difficult to modify. Instead, HorsepowerKings speculates that the twin-turbo 5.0-liter V8 spotted in Ford test mules will find its way under the hood of the GT500, possibly with direct injection.

Such an engine would likely take on a familiar name, giving Ford an EcoBoost lineup spanning the gamut from three to eight cylinders. The automaker’s recent developments in aluminum architecture and use of carbon fiber means the next GT500 (which disappeared from the lineup after 2014) could see significant weight savings.

[Image: Ford Motor Company]

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60 Comments on “Next Mustang Shelby GT500 Will Beat Hellcat’s Horsepower: Report...”


  • avatar
    indi500fan

    I only see one problem with the astounding capability of all these supercars.
    If you use the capability, and you wreck, it’s going to be at one helluva high speed / kinetic energy.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      Meh, you can probably get a V6, 4500lb CUV to 120mph. That is a substantial amount of energy. The difference is that most people aren’t inclined to do such a thing with a CUV. Most drivers of these cars won’t do anything but run up to 80 as fast as they can or hit onramps as hard as they can.

      Then again, youtube videos of Cars and Coffee can attest that Mustang owners aren’t “most drivers”. Relax, mustang drivers, I’m just making a joke.

    • 0 avatar
      Joe Btfsplk

      I dare say most of this blog’s readers are too young to remember the “musclecar” wars of the late 1960’s. The auto insurance industry strangled the performance car market with obscene rates ( along with pressure from the Feds on emissions).

      Light’em up while you can, Buckoo’s.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Someday soon, 700+ HP will get you laughed at when Mustangs, Camaros and such, have 2,000+ HP and even more torque!

        I had just turned 20 when my agent quoted me $5,000+ a year to insure my new V8 Mustang with an insane for the era, 230 HP! That’s with a spotless driving record. New V8 Mustangs started at just $10,000 btw.

        I think we’ve adapted quite nicely. The reality is muscle/pony cars are much heavier, with a host of traction nannies, and the power is metered to not hit all at once, saving the transmission and other parts.

        • 0 avatar
          Paragon

          I remember what you are talking about, DenverMike. Somewhere back in the mid to late 1980s, I went with a couple friends to the local Ford store to check out the Mustang. The one friend sat down with a salesman to find out what the payments would be. After we left and went home, he called his insurance agent to find out what the insurance would be. He claimed that his monthly insurance payment would be almost the same amount as the car payment! Needless to say, he passed on the idea of getting a hot, new Mustang GT.

        • 0 avatar
          05lgt

          Back then pony cars didn’t have supercar prices. Anyone want to guess at the first year average price including ADM will be? High insurance costs won’t deter the buyers. They won’t be working class young adults this time.

          • 0 avatar
            skor

            Correct. Back in the day ‘muscle’ cars…big block Mustangs, Camaros, Chargers and the like….were maybe 50% as much as the two-barrel small block versions of the same cars. A twenty-something with his first real job could afford to buy such a thing. Today the ‘muscle’ versions of pony cars have engines made of unobtainium. 99 44/100% of the population can’t afford such a thing. The current speedy ponies are purchased by wealthy, middle-aged men. Most of these cars will spend more time under a car cover, inside an immaculately clean garage then they will spend street fighting.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Guys in their early 20’s don’t want the jobs that can get them the GT500, Hellcat, ZL1, etc. That would involve starting at the bottom of an industry and working up to a union welder, plumber, electrician, lineman, etc. And breaking a sweat, coming home filthy and exhausted sometimes.

            They’d rather cry about the *man* keeping them down.

          • 0 avatar
            bumpy ii

            The guys who do have those jobs spend their paychecks on crew-cab 4×4 turbodiesel trucks with another $15,000 in lift kits and knobby tires. Not muscle cars.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            It’s a matter of choice, but even in the late ’80s (in my early 20s), I had a fleet of newer sporty cars and pickups, so those that didn’t know any better assumed I was dealing drugs from my apt. Lots of parties and random visitors at all hours.

            I didn’t consider it a put-down, and cute chicks around the neighbourhood were actually asking ME out! Something about “bad boys” or something.

            Damn good times though.

        • 0 avatar
          pb35

          Yeah Mike, I had a new GT when I was 20. It cost me $3500/yr. on Long Island. My monthly insurance payment was more than the car note.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      Disagree.

      I would speculate that most wrecks from a RWD 700+ HP sled is going to come during launches gone terribly wrong.

      Hold my beer and watch me light ’em up. Youtube is full of videos that show, “hold my beer and watch me do a burn out,” that turns into a wagging rear end until the oversteer is too much and it slams into the nearest curb, pole, ditch, guard rail, crowd of onlooking cars and coffee photographers…

  • avatar
    NoID

    Bring it on.

  • avatar
    mikey

    Not the vehicle for me, but it’s comfort to know, they’re still making them. I do fear , such vehicles ,will not be around much longer.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Today’s muscle cars have the bragging rights shelf life of a cell phone.

    And none of them can beat a Tesla at the track, which is the only place such horsepower makes any sense.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      What track and which Tesla?

      The 60 or 75 run pretty close to a Camaro V6 or Charger R/T and the P90D and P100D are over $100K.

      Plus, even with the acceleration advantage, would a P90D beat a GT305R or Z/28 at a road course?

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I’m guessin’ you’re speaking of a drag strip. More specifically, a quarter mile strip.

      On a 1/2 mile or longer strip or at a road course the Tesla doesn’t stand a chance.

      Why must Tesla fanbois continually bring up its 1/4 mile time as if it’s the be all and end all? It’s a fast car in a straight line. Everyone knows this.

      • 0 avatar
        SCE to AUX

        Typical straw man argument. The GT500’s 700+ HP isn’t going to be good for much in practice, regardless of which type of track it’s run on.

        The whole point of bragging about horsepower is 1/4 mile times. Nobody takes a Hellcat to a road course.

        And yes, Teslas don’t do well on longer runs. But the 1/4 mile is the benchmark test for horsepower wars.

  • avatar
    LBJs Love Child

    “Right now, the top pony in the Mustang stable is the GT350, which makes 526 hp and has developed a nasty habit of generating fiery explosions on the track.”

    Habit? More than once?

  • avatar

    I had a strange dream the other night that the Probe, which had actually supplanted the Mustang successfully, was now being sold in a Cobra variant.

    Cold sweat doesn’t begin to cover it.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I don’t think the twin turbo 700hp+ engine could rightly be called Eco anything.

    What does Eco stand for? Economy??? Doubt it. Less emissions?? Doubt it.

    It’s nice to see Ford (really Shelby) doing something.

    This 5 litre V8, will it be based on the UK designed/devloped Miami V8 we use in Australia in some Falcon sedans and utes. It’s a stronger engine and weighs the same as a Coyote with a supercharger fitted.

    • 0 avatar
      LBJs Love Child

      “It’s nice to see Ford (really Shelby) doing something.”

      You do realize the ‘S H E L B Y’ is only a vinyl sticker on the GT-350 and GT-500, right?

      Shelby American has no involvement with these cars.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        This! Shelby gets a big fat royalty check for the use of “Shelby” and “GT350” and “GT500”

        SAI today is a tuner and merchandising company with little in the way of engineering chops – they are more akin to Hennessey in that they open up a big catalog and pick a bunch of off the shelf stuff and work out the bugs as best they can but are still saddled with whatever limitations the standard Mustang GT comes with (check out stories on the S550 Super Snake to see what I’m talking about)

        The current Ford based GT350 (as opposed to the previous SAI post title efforts) is a thorough reengineering of the Mustang with several changes that are specific to the GT350.

        The body work forward of the A-pillar is different as are the control arms (different lengths and in case of the rears are made to accommodate counter wound springs (the springs are specific to each corner of the car). Bushings are specific to the car and as of 2017 the dampers on all GT350s are magnetorheological units.

        The brakes are different in that they are two-piece composite rotors with an aluminum hat and cast iron rings located by steel pins using fixed 6 piston monoblock calipers fore (which may or maynot be the same as the GT – I need to check) and fixed 4 piston rears (as opposed to the GT and lesser Mustang’s floating single piston rears).

        The transmission is a Tremec unit (same as the Cadi ATS-V and not the standard Getrag M82 in the GT) and I’ll have to check on the 8.8 but under the GT350 at least the carrier is cast iron and the Torsen diff is tuned specifically for the GT350.

        The engine pretty much shares external dimensions with the Coyote but is very different internally from the big bore block to the 5.2 specific cylinder heads designed to take advantage of the big bore. There is the flat plane crank and cams specific to that. The intake is also GT350 specific but works on the Coyote.

        The traction control system and the track apps have been reworked for the GT350 as well.

        Wheels and tires are substantially upgraded. The GT gets cast 19 x 9 and 19 x 9.5 shod with Pirellis that are 255/40R19 x 275/35R19 compared to the GT350’s 295/35R19 x 305/35R19 Michelin Pilot Super Sports using forged 19 x 10.5 and 19 x 11 wheels respectively.

        The R model gets even wider carbon fiber wheels shod with wider tires (305 fronts and 315 rears) and are Michelin Sport Cups, the R also gets additional changes over the regular GT350 in a few areas.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      It hasn’t been that long ago that a 700 HP motor would not have been streetable and would have swilled race fuel at a rate comparable to an Abrams Tank. And you are aware that Carroll Shelby is dead and the Mustangs that bear his name are 100 percent Ford, right?

      And for crying out loud, the Miami V8 IS A COYOTE V8. It is tuned and supercharged in a similar manner that SVT would do to a motor here, but it is still a darn Coyote.

      http://www.themustangnews.com/content/2010/09/australian-supercharged-5-0-miami-v8-details/#.V7zftZMrLKI

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        From wherever,
        The Miami is an evolution of the Coyote. The block has been lightened with larger buttresses.

        What you are stating is the Coyote is a Modular V8. The Coyote is an evolved Modular, just like the Miami is an evolved Coyote.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          The Coyote is a modular motor in the same sense that an LS2 is a Small Block. They share some dimensions like deck height, bore spacing, and connecting rod length but almost no parts interchange as is the case with the old 4.6 based motors.

          The Miami on the other hand is much closer to the Coyote. It is basically a Coyote with a bunch of Australian go fast parts thrown at it but the architecture is the same similar to what SVT would do here. Block changes are pretty minor if at all from what I have found and one could throw all of those Miami bits at a stock Coyote pulled from any Mustang or F150 and most of it would bolt up. The same can not be said for throwing Coyote bits at the 4.6 powering your granddads Town Car or even your cool granddads twin cam 4.6 powered Mark VIII.

          A so called “evolved” coyote would be the voodoo motor that powers the GT350. Some things will fit your standard Coyote (The Intake I have heard, but most is unique.

          So the Miami, IMHO is a warmed over Coyote just like a twin turbo 5.0 would be.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            Heads and Intake will fit the Coyote but the heads were optimized for the big bore on the Voodoo engine so they lose a little bit going on a coyote.

            Right now Ford has intake packages based on the GT350’s CAI, Throttle body, and Intake Manifold in varying degrees as well as a tune complementing each setup which includes “no-lift” shifting in order to maximize acceleration by not having to back off the throttle as the driver shifts.

            On a side note I sorta wish the GT350 had rev matching but I guess its time to take my heel-toe game seriously.

  • avatar
    Phillin_Phresh

    What, no comment from BTSR?

  • avatar
    Bazza

    Here’s the thing…even if the GT500 came in at a “measly” 650hp, the twin-turbo setup should give one the capability of adding another 100-150hp without breaking a sweat. Ford, of course, wants a stock motor that’ll reliably dyno higher than a stock Hellcat. The bonus for owners will be the relative ease of bumping power up even further.

    It’ll be interesting to see how much headroom there is to turn up the wick before having to make serious mods.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      i figure we should know within a month or two of it hitting the street.Speaking of hitting thing i figure that it should only take 2 weeks or less before we see the first picture of a wrecked one.

  • avatar
    Drew8MR

    It doesn’t matter what the claimed hp numbers are if you’re traction limited. I guess you could win a dyno contest or something.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      Big slicks and a built rear end. These cars will be built to go fast 1/4 mile at a time.

      • 0 avatar
        Drew8MR

        Who is going to build these out though? Too much chassis work kills the value, you can build 700 hp aftermarket all day every day on a way cheaper chassis. The drive it/race it guys will be there, but they will be leaving so much on the table.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Smokey burnouts are strictly amateur hour.

      So you take off at 75% throttle and roll into it, WOT by 35 mph or which ever works best. Some wheel spin is OK, whatever the nannies can allow, along with some sideways action before 60 mph. In a straight line, or exiting a turn, the fun starts at 40 mph anyway.

  • avatar
    MrIcky

    I still can’t figure out how we got from ‘the v8 is dead’ to 700+ hp in 6 years.

    Let the SC vs TC debate rage.

    • 0 avatar
      NoGoYo

      That supercharged Audi V6 has always seemed like a great powerplant in theory, but I’ve never experienced it.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      >>shrugs<< Not much to debate superchargers have great throttle response and bring a tidy package to the table but lose out on efficiency since it takes power to drive it. Turbos are more efficient but take up more overall real estate plus they will never quite match a supercharger for throttle response (well until hybrid units driven by electric motors show up)

      The real problem with turbos these days are that they haven taken the same sort of mythical attributes that small journal 327 small block chevys and 426 hemis have.

      Your average twit hears the word turbo and they think they are an adjustable wastegate away from four digit horsepower numbers on pump gas with zero lag coupled with a near zero understanding of aerodynamics in conjunction with weight and gearing.

      The biggest offenders I think are the EcoBoost truck guys who somehow think an EB Truck is the absolute fastest thing Ford produces (Christ almighty wait till the boosted bent six Raptor shows up! Those guys are probably going to go Ford GT hunting.)

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    I know I’m alone here, but I wish they’d toss a 700 HP 3.5 v6 in this and the GT just to cheese off the competition.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The question there is did Ford leave that much on the table with the powerplant in the Ford GT? I’m sure that engine can make 700 plus horsepower but for how long in an emissions friendly package?

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        Yeah, you are probably right. The problem here becomes something akin to Porsche building a really good Boxster that is faster than the 911. But honestly it isn’t likely a problem as I can’t picture the GT buyer rushing to trade in on the Mustang with more HP. I doubt there is enough left on the table for the GT motor though without pushing the price up to something that nobody would pay for a Mustang.

  • avatar
    V16

    SHELBY GT700 has a nice ring to it.
    The 700 is for the horsepower rating.

  • avatar
    raph

    Clickbait Kings is still around?

    Anyways I’m more inclined to believe the mule floating around is a GT350 refresh or some other special edition Mustang.

    There might be a GT500 in the pipe???? If it is I’m also inclined to think it will be supercharged if its a V8. There are twin turbo kits on the market for the GT and now GT350 (for owners who insist on borking what is a perhaps outside of the Ford GT the best handling product they have produced to date) but I don’t see where a TT V8 factory Mustang is workable. You have two spots you can put the turbos – down low and toward the back of the engine or up in the middle or up high at the front of the engine.

    Both options push the turbo chargers out farther away from the engine allowing exhaust gasses to cool and impart less energy (not to mention requiring manifolds of increased complexity if you want to take advantage or exhaust gas pulsing in an effort to aid response).

    The problem with the former is that you expose the turbos to a lot of nasty weather and road debris and the problem with latter is that the turbos will try and scorch all the rubber and plastic bits in between the radiator and the engine requiring some NASA level heat shielding if you don’t want the rubber hoses/belts and various plastic bits to disintegrate.

    The Coyote and its Voodoo derivative take up a good amount of space so placing a brace of turbos right off the side doesn’t seem really doable from a production standpoint (The 5.4/5.8 out of the previous Shelby fits but was nixed since it wasn’t that easily installed on a production line – that engine is almost or 30 inches wide).

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al From 'Murica

      What about inside the V like that AMG Benz Motor. Shouldn’t make the engine any wider and nobody would gripe if it required a hood bulge of some sort.

      • 0 avatar
        raph

        Reverse flow heads with the turbos nestled in the valley? Y’know I would put it past Ford to be honest but that would be a significant departure from what they have to work with plus there are other considerations like the aftermarket. Part of any Mustang’s strength is that it can be personalized in some fashion (be it more horsepower, more suspension, personalized looks and so on) and easily done so.

        The standard Mustang GT V8 received several upgrades so that it could handle big upgrades in power without having to tear the engine down and replace the rotating assembly plus as a port injected car – fuel injector swaps are both cheap and easy.

    • 0 avatar
      bachewy

      ^ Horsepower kings is no authoritative source on anything. It’s more like Popular Mechanics for cars.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    Wonder if a version of this motor (with a drastically different tune) may find its way to the Super Duty line as a stand in for the outgoing 6.8.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    C’mon guys. Horsepowerkings?

  • avatar
    EBFlex

    Will the rest of the car continue to suck? Or will Ford spend a dollar or two improving the styling and injecting some quality into the interior, etc?

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    We’ve seen a power war rage with sport bikes. All of the bike companies have come up with ways to manage power delivery and keep squids alive therefore I’m not too worried about any of these muscle cars being too powerful for Johnnie Street. As pointed out earlier, most problems will occur at launch with all of the nannies switched off. I’m betting that at higher speeds the nannies will reactivate and keep things in line. The HellCat has a “track key” and that alone should help reel in some of the typical commute to work road rage.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    Make that damn ecoboost 3.5 v6 mustang already.

    Also I welcome that 750hp Mustang. It’ll most likely be the last true gasoline fired Mustang.

    But Lebanon Ford already has a $39,995 Roush 700hp Mustang….

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