By on July 19, 2017

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black front quarter

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti AWD

2.0-liter turbocharged inline four, SOHC (280 horsepower @ 5,200 rpm; 306 lb-ft @ 2000 rpm)

Eight-speed automatic, all-wheel drive

23 city / 31 highway / 26 combined (EPA Rating, MPG)

10.5 city / 7.7 highway / 9.2 combined (NRCan Rating, L/100km)

22.8 mpg [10.3 L/100km] (Observed)

Base Price: $42,990 (U.S.) / $54,890 (Canada)

As Tested: $51,490 (U.S.) / $62,540 (Canada)

Prices include $995 destination charge in the United States and $1,895 for destination and A/C tax in Canada

There’s a series of curves on my route home that can be an absolute joy when traffic is minimal. Beyond a left-hand kink over a slight rise, the road drops away at least fifty feet in a sweeping right curve and flicks back left at the bottom of the hill to cross a river. It’s not much – maybe a quarter of a mile – but for a few moments, I forget the last nine hours spent driving a desk.

While my usual vehicle for this road is my trusty minivan, a proper driver’s car makes the route much more rewarding. Beyond making me disregard the stress of a day at the office, a good drive can make me briefly ignore the various quirks and idiosyncrasies of the car beneath me.

Quirks and idiosyncrasies — in roughly equal measure with solid driving dynamics —  have been the hallmarks of virtually every Alfa Romeo since at least the Truman administration, meaning the 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti has plenty of heritage to live up to. Now that Chrysler is once again part of the Alfa Romeo parentage, will the Imported From Detroit vibe reflect in this imported sports sedan? Or will the Giulia remain, for better or worse, a proper Italian?

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black profile

Ace in the Hole

I’ll admit to being disappointed when I realized the Alfa Romeo being delivered was not the twin-turbo V6-powered Quadrifoglio, but the tame, four cylinder-equipped Giulia Ti. Tame may not be the best term, however, as the base engine’s 280 horsepower shames all other entry-level compact sports sedans.

BMW can only muster 180 horses from the 2.0-liter turbo in the 320i, and 248 hp from the similar four in the 330i. Audi’s A4 manages 190 hp in base trim, and 252 hp with the uprated four-cylinder. Mercedes-Benz offers 241 horsepower in the C300, equal to the power from Lexus’ IS 200t. Infiniti? 208 hp in the Q50. Only Cadillac approaches the Italian with the 271 hp generated by the ATS’s turbo 2.0-liter.

The character of this turbocharged four-cylinder is unlike most Alfa Romeo engines I’ve experienced. Rather than a sonorous sweep up to a redline, the torquey engine runs out of steam as the needle glides to the right, with a rev limiter cutting the fun at 6200 rpm. Again, unlike other Italians, the exhaust note is rather dull.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black front

Alfa Romeo claims a 0-60 time of 5.1 seconds for the Giulia Ti – though I haven’t concluded whether that figure is for the rear-drive model, or the all-wheel drive car I tested. My instrumented testing (using a Racelogic Driftbox GPS timing system) resulted in consistent 5.8-second 0-60 dashes – still quick, certainly, though I’d love to try the rear-drive model for comparison.

I was a bit flummoxed by the “DNA” selector dial behind the shift lever. While I’m accustomed to a drive mode selector, the D, N, and A nomenclature encouraged me to recall my 10th grade Latin classes for acronyms resembling the Italian language.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black rear

Imagine my embarrassment when I realized the modes are Dynamic, Normal, and All-weather.

Double Down

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black rear quarter

Much of my driving, of course, was spent tuned to the Dynamic mode, which holds gears until redline and allows you to bounce off the rev limiter when using the automatic transmission’s manual mode. On that note, the manual mode is one of the few I’ve seen that shifts in the “proper” pattern – that is, forward to downshift, backward to upshift. It’s a more natural motion for a sequential transmission, and shows that FCA engineers did some homework to make the Giulia appeal to enthusiasts.

Yeah, a proper manual transmission would be better, but it’s hard to justify an option that appeals only to maybe 20 enthusiasts who will actually buy a car so equipped, along with scores of journalists (like me) who beg for it but refuse to lay down their own cash.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti front seat

 

When driving in Normal mode, shifts are as soft as you’d expect from any $50k near-luxury sedan. The Giulia works nicely as a commuter, as the suspension soaks up Ohio’s road imperfections admirably. Its seats proved reasonably comfortable, with decent support and adjustability, though I’d have preferred a longer thigh bolster.

The kids were happy spending time in the rear seat, with no complaints – the high center tunnel helped keep the overly clingy eight-year-old on her side, away from her brooding older sister.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti rear seat

Bust

I dislike the start/stop system. My week with the Alfa Romeo was a particularly warm one, hovering near triple digits, though not as warm (118 degrees!) as the car’s dash readout would have you believe.

The Giulia’s restart process is unlike any I’ve experienced in a car with a fuel-saving start/stop system. Upon restart, the HVAC blower shuts off for a few precious seconds, which is quite unpleasant when trying to combat a scorching sun and radiant heat from a jet black sedan.

The parking assist is equally annoying. There are times when I’ll sit in the car with the engine running for a few moments after parking – gathering my wits before subjecting myself to another day at work, or negotiating a truce between warring tweens in the backseat before heading inside. When activated, the Giulia’s system emits a warning any time something comes near the front bumper – no matter if the transmission is in Park or not. Thus, the Giulia chimes away annoyingly until I turn off the ignition or deactivate the system.

Which means I deactivated both the park assist and the start/stop every time I started the car. It’s a shame both systems are so intrusive they can’t be used.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti infotainment

The infotainment system, likewise, is not good. It’s not quite as bad as the universally hated first generation BMW iDrive, but it’s close. The big knob requires pushes, clicks, and turns to control navigation and audio, but navigating the multiple layers of menus takes your eyes off the road for entirely too much time. Thumb controls on the steering wheel help, but too many functions require the control knob.

Sound quality, on the other hand, is quite good with the optional Harmon Kardon audio system, though I found myself suffering through songs I’d rather not listen to simply because setting radio presets or SiriusXM stations was such a chore.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti center stack

With Fiat Chrysler’s excellent Uconnect infotainment systems available from the corporate parts bin, I’m baffled why this system exists. Heck, even the old, low-resolution uConnect screen in my 2012 Town & Country performs more intuitively.

And, yeah, there are panel gap issues. See this hasty cell phone pic of the gap between the fender, hood, and fascia.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti panel gap

Hold ‘em, or Fold ‘em?

I’ve always been one to read a great deal about a great number of subjects. I’m told that at the age of three, I’d often head out to the curb on Sunday mornings to get the newspaper before my parents were awake. I’d hide books under my pillow so I could read after I was supposed to be asleep. And I quickly graduated from Dr. Seuss to Road & Track, thus my appearance at this fine publication rather than some place like Feline Headwear Weekly.

I’d often seek out back issues of my favorite magazines, either by writing letters or stalking my local library. Most fascinating were new car reviews published in the ‘60s and ‘70s, which I assumed were an unvarnished assessment of vehicles from the good old days. I was amazed at the positive reviews that casually mentioned, in passing, the need to replace ignition points during testing, or “only” getting stranded once by some magnificent exotic.

As I marveled at the relative reliability exhibited by then-modern cars in the mid-1980s, I often wondered about the issues road test editors experienced that didn’t make it into print. I knew those problems first hand, as my dad usually had an MGB on jackstands in the garage, but I somehow knew that future automotive writers wouldn’t have such character-building experiences while driving new cars.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti instruments

In 1984, though, I didn’t know Alfa Romeo would eventually leave the US market, only to return decades later with the Giulia. Today’s writers get to experience the uncertainty their elder colleagues lived with on the daily, as witnessed the other day at Jalopnik. Beyond the uneven panel gaps, and the start/stop funkiness, I didn’t experience any serious issues.

Maybe I was lucky, but no car thoroughly redeems its many quirks like the 2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia does. Ten minutes on any two-lane had me grinning like an idiot. Four hours on the epic backroads of southeastern Ohio had me considering rolling the dice on becoming a one-car household. I didn’t want to give the Giulia back.

The Alfa Romeo Giulia is not a rational choice. It’s the car that speaks to the five-year-old gearhead within who somehow needs to choose respectable transportation. It’s for the driver who needs a little excitement every morning – whether from the drive itself, or from the uncertainty of whether you’ll get out of the garage.

2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti black

[Images: © 2017 Chris Tonn]

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76 Comments on “2017 Alfa Romeo Giulia Ti AWD Review – Rolling the Dice on Your Commute...”


  • avatar
    ajla

    “the torquey engine runs out of steam as the needle glides to the right”

    “the exhaust note is rather dull.”

    Thats disappointing. At least it helps ensure I won’t want one.

    Although I will say the aesthetics of that natural wood interior is what I wish the Jaguar XE offered.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus

      Well, you know the Quadrifoglio has a heart-stopping glorious note from its twin turbo V-6. The videos of it can give you chill bumps.

      I would like a middle model, with a naturally aspirated version of the V-6. Might as well make it a stick shift while I’m dreaming.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      Agreed, this car has a REALLY nice interior vibe. And I love the materials on the center console.

      I want to love this car, but…no way I’d buy one unless it was a “fun/weekend” car, and no one buys a conservative sedan for that. Besides, I can think of far more reliable (and fast) “fun” car options out there at a $50,000 price point. A lightly used CTS-V, maybe.

    • 0 avatar
      watchit999

      Petty much everything you read in the revue above is crap. I’ve owned a Ti for 4 months with 6,000 miles on it now and none of the “problems” stated above have I experienced. This is my one and only car and I drive kids to and from school some days in nothing but stop and go traffic in heat and wind and rain 30 miles one way and this car has been perfect. The “gaps” in the fender do not appear on my car and many others I’ve seen. The info, Hvac, and nav system work perfectly and are very easy to use (this guy literally must not be able to walk and chew gum at the same time). The nav is not as pretty as some but that’s it. The only thing he is correct about is the sun visor (it should and inch wider and longer).
      The start/stop works perfectly and starts up instantaneously and I have never had problem with the parking sensors if someone comes close, they have to come very close and then it works exactly as it should.
      I am not a shill for Alfa just a true owner who actually drives his car in all conditions and the 0-60 times he mentioned are crap. I live in Colorado and I can consistently get times from 5.2-5.3sec.,learn to drive fellas. This car drives handles and steers far above its sticker price. Don’t believe me and please don’t believe these dipsticks, drive one yourself and you will see. Also any very early production electrical faults have all been corrected and are now non-issues.

    • 0 avatar
      watchit999

      Believe my by the time the engine runs out of steam you are well into triple digit speeds. I know I’ve done it.
      The exhaust note is easily upgraded by buying the Corsa Exhaust System from Centerline International. Less weight, larger diameter throughout, more hp and torque, and a glorious deep throaty sound as it should have been.

  • avatar
    kcflyer

    I don’t get the rave reviews from most sources about the looks of this car. It’s ok, not unattractive, but nothing special.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    Panel gap? if that’s even a millimeter of difference I’d be surprised.

    meanwhile, one of the muckety-mucks here has an unrestored ’61 Continental in the garage. Beautiful car, but you can stick your finger through some of the gaps, and no two panels meet squarely.

    • 0 avatar
      golden2husky

      I’d like to think that 56 years of progress might be a thought here….that said, the fit issue pictured is that not bad…

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      When a 1985 Firebird features better build quality then a 2017 luxury sedan costing 50K bucks, one may question the merits of said sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        You’re saying a stock 1985 Firebird off the assembly line has better panel fit that that picture? I have a hard time believing that. The F-body from the mid 1970s onward always look like it had been crashed and put back together. The hood, fenders, bumpers etc look disjointed and ill fitting. Gaps you can see from a distance, not something you have would have to be close to notice like that picture.

        I get that the Giulia isn’t Lexus perfection, in this area or others, but I doubt the IS drives like this does. It sure isn’t the looker this is. Having perfect panel gaps does nothing for how it drives and how it stirs your soul. That’s what Italian cars are all about.

        If that was the worst example of panel fitment issues he could find, I’d say its just fine.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I think the IS350 is a fun car. The 6400RPM V6 on the Toyota vs the diesely, dumpy-sounding turbo-4 on the Alfa would be a huge plus as well.

          The biggest problem I have with the IS is ugliness.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          “I get that the Giulia isn’t Lexus perfection, in this area or others, but I doubt the IS drives like this does. It sure isn’t the looker this is. Having perfect panel gaps does nothing for how it drives and how it stirs your soul. That’s what Italian cars are all about.”

          then why haven’t you bought one yet? It’s real easy to sit there on your @$$ and demand that everyone else buy what you tell them to, but everybody who lives in the real world has to balance their wants and needs. And “wants” play second fiddle to “needs.” I suppose it’s OK for anyone who is well off enough to spend $45-80k on a “weekend car,” but that is a vanishingly small number of people. the vast majority of car owners have a car so they can get to work, get the kids to school, and so on. they need something they can reasonably *rely* on, not some finicky piece of s#it some Internet Guy thinks they should have.

          and it’s not about Alfas not being up to Lexus standards of reliability, it’s that they can’t even measure up to an Audi Allroad 2.7t, and that’s just plain sad.

        • 0 avatar
          burgersandbeer

          I thought reviews of the IS regarding driving dynamics are almost universally positive.

          I find the IS attractive, and would take the NA V6 over a turbo 4 with a lame exhaust in a heartbeat.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            It’s JohnTaurus. Toyota/Lexus will always be held up as the negative example.

            He chose poorly on this one, though, as the IS handles well, has a high-quality interior, a strong linear V6 at this price, some truly excellent seats (Chris is far from the first to note the overly short bottom cushions on the Giulia), and looks more distinctive than the Alfa, whose only distinctive aspect is the front fascia…which is either delightfully unique or the face of a giant insect, depending on taste.

  • avatar
    phila_DLJ

    I’ve brought this up in an earlier Alfa article, but you COMMUTE in Giulia at your own risk. She KNOWS you’re not driving to your girlfriend’s house unbeknownst to your wife. She KNOWS you’re doing something square and conformist. So she reserves the right to break down when you’re on the way to the office. Giulia is allergic to offices.

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      One could say the Giulia says *vaffunculo* to offices.

      That’s amusing, but Giulias aren’t exotic cars. They’re sold to the same folks who’d be buying a Lexus IS, and they expect reliable daily transportation.

      Alfa better get its’ act together, and fast.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        “One could say the Giulia says *vaffunculo* to offices.”

        then says “che cazzo fai?” as it conks out on you halfway to yours.

      • 0 avatar
        JohnTaurus

        Lol, you refuse to get it. Its not that you’re stupid. I know better. Alfa isn’t trying to be Lexus. Just like a Wrangler isn’t trying to be a Highlander.

        “Ten minutes on any two-lane had me grinning like an idiot. Four hours on the epic backroads of southeastern Ohio had me considering rolling the dice on becoming a one-car household. I didn’t want to give the Giulia back.”

        Alfa has its act together just fine.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          John, Alfas were fun to drive back in the 70s and ’80s as well. They got drummed out of the market anyway. Why? Reliability issues. Go figure, right?

          Alfa could get away with this if it were an “exotic” brand. But it’s not. The Giulia is a $50,000 sport sedan for middle managers and yuppies, who will use it as daily transportation. Those folks aren’t going to put up with a shop queen, no matter how fun it is to drive.

          Sorry, you’re off base. Alfa needs to fix this problem pronto if it expects to survive in this country.

        • 0 avatar
          watchit999

          Right on John, if Alfa was trying to be Lexus I wouldn’t have bought an Alfa, which is a much superior driving machine.

    • 0 avatar
      watchit999

      Read my above post Phila. Driven it everyday for 6,000 perfect miles.

  • avatar
    True_Blue

    “The fact is, Alfa Romeo’s comeback car has been plagued with problems, and these are increasingly well-documented by the journalists who have been testing them.

    “Consumer Reports’ Alfa has been to the dealer service bay three times since they bought it. The UK’s Sunday Times had three Giulias crap out on them. Forums abound with reliability issues. Pistonheads had an Alfa Giulia break down in the middle of a test against a Mercedes and a BMW. Motor Trend’s Alfa was completely defeated by a normal driveway. Car and Driver said that their Giulia suffered “foibles.”

    “And perhaps most damning of all, Road & Track’s Sam Smith said sister mag Car and Driver actually has “an in-house code reader all but earmarked for Alfas, and every test Giulia they’ve seen has had problems.” And then Sam just this morning posted about a Giulia that had broken down on him.”

    I dunno, I guess. I just don’t understand the love for this thing. It’s gotta work first. Your love affair with it will take a severe testing the first time you gotta get it flatbedded off the 405.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      the “love” for this thing comes from people who:

      1) endlessly beg and wheedle automakers to make cars like this
      2) won’t buy one because reasons but expect everyone else to
      3) endlessly complain and whine when they’re cancelled due to low sales
      4) blame said cancellation on everyone except people like them who didn’t buy what they said they wanted

      • 0 avatar
        ElAntonius

        5) go on to claim that Americans have terrible taste in cars

        I saw some commenter on Jalopnik equating NOT buying an Alfa to being in a sexless marriage and a dreary office life (or to buying a Camry, which, incidentally, is a stupid, stupid link to draw).

        When the car market has a ton of practical and semi-practical options that are both fun to drive and get you where you’re going reliably, I see no reason that this thing will succeed.

        • 0 avatar
          True_Blue

          I’d equate not buying an Alfa to always wishing you’d banged that liberal-arts major in college, only to find her on Facebook 20 years later with seven kids from six dads, a severe drinking problem, and constantly posting images of her Caesarean-section bikini bod.

          A bullet dodged

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus

            Except that night or week you spent banging her would be the joy you felt when driving this Alfa. Just because you gave her some petercilin 20 years ago doesn’t mean you’re stuck in her life forever. Unless you were too stupid to use a condom lol.

            A bullet dodged, or a missed opportunity of one of the best sex/driving experiences you’ll have?

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          yeah, that comment thread was ALL THE STUPID. It’s part of the reason I don’t comment there any more (the other part is because I can’t.)

          just a bunch of young twits talking about the driving dynamics of a car they’ve never even seen in person.

      • 0 avatar
        True_Blue

        JimZ, pretty much my thinking on it, too.

        I really would like for this to work. I really would.
        But if this is Alfa’s comeback tour, the bus *needs* to start to get the band to the gigs.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    The conventional wisdom for European sports sedans is that you safely lease them instead of purchase to avoid out-of-warranty headaches. Alfa’s given us a car for which even that strategy is too risky.

    Those leasing these to have a status symbol will stop seeing much status in said symbol if reliability issues mar their experience. And I would imagine the few enthusiasts who would splurge for one also have limited patience.

    Still, it seems like a far more interesting choice than a 330i or C300 or IS200t.

  • avatar
    Add Lightness

    Looking forward to picking one up one up in 6 years for $3,000 because the owner was dismayed due to a $10,000 repair estimate.

  • avatar
    Arthur Dailey

    To steal from JB’s idiom, this is like the beautiful but obviously ‘crazy’ young lady that you have longed to date/have a relationship with. One part of you keeps saying yes, the other part says no.

    And as @Ajla wrote, it’s too bad that the designers (interior and exterior) of this car did not instead work for Jaguar.

  • avatar
    moff90

    “With Fiat Chrysler’s excellent Uconnect infotainment systems available from the corporate parts bin, I’m baffled why this system exists.”

    Because then people would be bitching that it has the same unit found in a Chrysler minivan.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Didn’t stop them from doing so in more expensive Maseratis.

      • 0 avatar
        ajla

        And every publication has given them major grief over using uConnect on the Maseratis.

        • 0 avatar
          TMA1

          UConnect is probably the only reliable part of Maserati ownership, so those people think it ruins the ownership experience.

        • 0 avatar
          MLS

          I can see criticizing the use of Chrysler switchgear in the $100K Quattroporte. (Not that there’s anything wrong with the Chrysler switchgear, per se, but the perceived “exclusivity” isn’t there.) But the near-universal acclaim for Uconnect should preclude any criticism for its inclusion in that car, especially now that the Giulia’s unique system apparently stinks.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          so what? it’s well known that the people who write for publications don’t buy cars, so why should they give a rat’s patoot what publications say?

  • avatar
    spookiness

    I live in an east coast metro area with tons of people around with disposable income. I don’t hang with that crowd, but still surprised ive never seen one on the road.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Well that settles it. I’m gonna get an intake and exhaust for my G37. I have to extract every ounce of enjoyment of natural aspiration from it while I have it. Even the turbo 6 engines sound like school buses. And it looks inevitable that its replacement will have snails… unless FCA has the sense to make the next Charger from this platform.

    • 0 avatar
      Maymar

      I would absolutely drive a school bus that sounded like a Q50 3.0T. They finally made an engine that sounds tolerable at daily driver ranges (I find the VQ awful unless you rev the hell out of it).

    • 0 avatar
      geozinger

      I don’t understand this line of thinking:”unless FCA has the sense to make the next Charger from this platform.”

      I’d assume if it were to be reskinned as a Dodge, it would use a lot of the underlying Alfa bits (no pun intended). If they’re crap as an Alfa, will they magically get better with a Dodge nameplate?

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    Not in need of a car, but if I were, I’d be tempted. Contra JimZ’s observation, I owned two Alfas. And much earlier, two Fiat 124 Sports. The Alfas were 164s, an L and an S, which purists don’t regard as a true Alfa. I also had a Saab 9000CD alongside the S. The difference was absolutely night and day between the S and the Saab. The S had niggling problems; the Saab turbo enjoyed blowing head gaskets (first time repaired, second time junked). The difference that mattered to me was how much more enjoyable the Alfa was to drive, despite both being built off the same platform.
    But I’m not in need of a car. However, if Alfa can rectify the gremlins and stay in the market long enough……

  • avatar
    jmo

    $299/month $3400 due at signing. What’s the big deal? So you uber to work 3 times a year?

    Someone the other day said they wouldn’t buy a premium car because they wanted to spend the money on home improvements. Great! If you’d rather have a beige Accord and a subway tile backsplash than an Alfa – good for you. But, why are you here? Isn’t there some HGTV blog you’d prefer?

    To that end, why do the B&B get so bent out of shape about spending a couple bucks on something fun vs. all the other ways you could piss it away?

  • avatar
    DevilsRotary86

    “Tame may not be the best term, however, as the base engine’s 280 horsepower shames all other entry-level compact sports sedans.

    BMW can only muster 180 horses from the 2.0-liter turbo in the 320i, and 248 hp from the similar four in the 330i. Audi’s A4 manages 190 hp in base trim, and 252 hp with the uprated four-cylinder. Mercedes-Benz offers 241 horsepower in the C300, equal to the power from Lexus’ IS 200t. Infiniti? 208 hp in the Q50. Only Cadillac approaches the Italian with the 271 hp generated by the ATS’s turbo 2.0-liter.”

    And my Mustang Ecoboost manages 310hp from a 2.3L turbo, topping every last one of these on the list.

  • avatar
    ZCD2.7T

    Saw a Quattroformaggio (sic) the other day – pretty sweet-looking indeed.

    Still, I wouldn’t take a chance on one – not until we see how unreliable (or reliable) they actually prove to be…

  • avatar
    NN

    Crossing my fingers that a stick-shift is made available for 2018/2019 in the RWD Ti 4-cyl. Might push me over the edge and make me buy. For now as an auto-only IMO 1/2 the reason for owning a Euro Sports sedan is gone.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      Don’t hold your breath. But they should do it to give someone a reason to buy this car(Jaguar should do it with the XE also).

      So when manual shifting it will not up shift bouncing off the rev limiter (good so far). Will it also not down shift? Not that I lug an engine but it is most annoying (having bought my first automatic two months ago after driving MTs for 35 years) when I want to mildly accelerate from 55 to 65 that the car will downshift if I press any more than slightly on the go pedal. If I’ve put it in manual mode please keep the converter locked don’t down shift, what about manual mode do OEMs not understand. If I want more acceleration I’ll down shift it myself. If I’m too stupid to fiqure it out I’d leave in auto mode.

      • 0 avatar
        burgersandbeer

        Do you miss the manual? I’m entertaining the idea of an automatic daily after 20 years of manual, but I’m concerned I will be quickly bored to death.

        • 0 avatar
          pragmatic

          Yes I do, but since I buy used I could not find what I was looking for (4 door sedan, RWD) at a reasonable price. My Lincoln rotted away (after 18 years) and replacement came down to BMW 5-Series. These were either beat or expensive or both. I went with a Jaguar XJ8.

          • 0 avatar
            burgersandbeer

            Too funny; that’s pretty much my search. Looking for RWD highway cruiser in a practical package. It’s enough of a challenge without the manual requirement, hence entertaining the automatic.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    SOHC? Really? Huh, I suppose they’re saving the second cam for the Type R.

    • 0 avatar
      TonyJZX

      you’re the only person to pick this up

      for some strange reason US market models use SOHC

      I checked our market and we get a 200hp or 280hp DOHC turbo 2.0 four… they must be some emissions issue that forces that.

      I suppose it doesnt really matter because a SOHC w/ finger rockers and enough ECU tuning makes it irrelevant but I get the OCD-ness of ‘only’ a SOHC motor.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      It’s a MultiAir engine. It has 4 valves per cylinder, but only one camshaft as the intake valves are operated by variable oil pressure.

  • avatar
    YeOldeMobile

    Does anyone else think that those wheels really do not suit the Giulia? From every angle, the body looks beautiful. But then the wheels just kind of shout “STOP!”

    They’re somewhat old-fashioned in a bad way.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    I had to re-read the article (and probably will again), but I don’t see where Chris had any real issues with the car, outside of incomprehensible entertainment interfaces, optional electronic nannies and the good sounding but non-user friendly radio.

    What’s with all of the critical comments of car few of us have actually driven?

  • avatar

    Alfa is a new Mazda -“premium” car that is fun to drive (apparently BMW and Cadillac are not premium enough and not fun enough to compare with Alfa), journos love it, but general public does not care. Since journos are fascinated by both Alfa and Mazda I can make conclusion that both are equally fun to drive. But Mazda is infinitely better built and equally infinitely more reliable. So Alfa has no chance.

  • avatar
    seanx37

    $63k for small, slow, extremely unreliable car that gets crap mileage. With no resale. That’s two Camry V-6. That’s a Genesis g70 with a V8, and a motorcycle. That’s a CT6. That’s a Hellcat Charger. Or a Mercedes-Benz AMG C 43. Or a Mustang AND an Edge.

  • avatar

    It looks like a 200 with a Alfa Romeo grill. It will flop big time.

    What a disgrace!

  • avatar
    John R

    “Infiniti? 208 hp in the Q50”

    To be fair the 2.0t G…er, Q50 is a $35k msrp. The base price for this Giulia you’ve listed is $42k. A Q50 at $41k nets you 3-liter twin-turbo that makes 300hp.

  • avatar
    slavuta

    “though not as warm (118 degrees!) as the car’s dash readout would have you believe.”

    I am sure this is just heat from the engine while car is not driven. Start moving and temperature will drop quickly

    • 0 avatar
      burgersandbeer

      I think more likely the temp sensor is located in a spot where it picks up heat reflecting off the pavement.

      The solution is the same though; start moving.

  • avatar
    cimarron typeR

    I really do hope these are just 1st year toothing issues, as I gauge my interest in actually buying a car by how many times I build a virtual car on the manufacturer website.I’ve built a base red TI/ brown, with sport LSD many times.
    After seeing a QF in real life, I’d deal with no manual option , but not frequent dealer visits.

  • avatar
    ra_pro

    I was one initially turned off by the looks inside and out but the positive driving reviews made me change my mind. Until, that it I went to the dealer who told me the the Alfa Q was just like a Ferrari and that they wouldn’t let me drive it. I was still interested and started looking at another dealer but then started to see more and more stories about the car issues. So now I am back to square one, not interested at all.

    To all those that say that there is plenty of choice for an upscale sporty car, I ask where? BMW is not even close to what it used to be 10 years; Audi, sure, better than it used to be but not there yet; MB, still more a luxury cruiser than a sporty car; IS, according to most reviews it drives like an accountant’s car, everything is kind of there but not really, besides its looks are really dated, the cabin is well below my expectations for a Lexus and those the the positives. Alfa seems genuinely head and shoulders above the rest in terms of driving dynamics. Alas, I agree you can’t expect to sell a car that has continuous serious reliability issues as reported by those who took the plunge.

    Alfa needs to drive better than anything else, looks better than most, cost less than anything else and be close in reliability to a Lexus then they have a chance. As it is it will not last long on these shores.

  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    The lack of discussion on pricing and how the tester ended up over $52k does this car a disservice. I was about to comment on how a BMW 340i stomps all over it at $50k and that the Alfa was grossly overpriced, until I went to Alfa’s site and realized you have to check almost every box to get a Ti over that price point.

    For example, with sport seats (which would have addressed the lack of thigh support Chris complained about), premium sound, and the performance package MSRP is $41k. Not to turn this review into an “Ace of Base” entry, but I find the disappointing engine character more forgivable at that level.

  • avatar
    NSX

    In italy sells quite well. This engine, for now, is not available here in Europe. In general, Giulia is a good car.

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