By on July 29, 2016

2016 Ford Falcon ute

There’s sad news from Down Under. No, Paul Hogan is still alive, and no, dingoes didn’t get into a local kindergarten.

The last Ford Falcon Ute rolled off the assembly line in the Melbourne suburb of Broadmeadows today, ending 55 years of continuous production, Car Advice reports. The death of the FG X Falcon Ute heralds the looming demise of Australian Ford assembly, and leaves just one (doomed) ute in the marketplace of the country that invented it.

1966 ford falcon ute (Chris Keating/Flickr)

In North America, the Ford Falcon’s life ended during the Nixon administration, replaced by the unloved Maverick. In Australia, however, the dream stayed alive. Over its lifetime, the Australian Falcon went from the compact sedan most familiar to 1960s American buyers, to a full-size, rear-wheel drive holdout.

The Falcon bites the dust in October, and with it ends all Australian Ford production. As Aussie motorists mourn the Falcon Ute, the Holden Ute is the only car-cased pickup left standing, but not for long. General Motors’ long-running ute ends production late next year.

North American buyers enjoyed a ute kinship with the Aussies from the 1960s through the 80s. They had their utes, and we had the Ford Ranchero and Chevrolet El Camino (as well as the GMC Spring/Caballero). They drove like the car they were, with a usable bed for light hauling — just like the fist-ever ute, the 1934 Ford Coupe utility.

Despite constant calls over the past three decades for GM to bring back the El Camino, it’s been one big “No dice” after another. Pickups are hot, crossovers, too, and sedans are withering. It’s doubtful the ute concept will ever be seen as more than a niche oddity (i.e., not worth building) on these shores.

[Images: Ford Motor Company of Australia; Chris Keating/Flickr]

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56 Comments on “The Greatest (Attainable) Car You Never Owned Was Just Killed in Australia...”


  • avatar
    Pch101

    “In North America, the Ford Falcon’s life ended during the Nixon administration, replaced by the unloved Maverick”

    We had the Ranchero, which was killed off during the Carter administration and was replaced by the Ranger. A bit before my time, but I don’t think that too many tears were shed.

    • 0 avatar
      skor

      The Ranchero was not always Falcon Based. It started off in the 50’s built on a full size car chassis. From 1960 to 65 it was based on the Falcon. From 66 to it’s demise it was based on the Ford intermediate car chassis. The first gen Falcon based Rancheros were the prettiest.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    I’ve mourned the El Camino and Ranchero since the ’70s (I didn’t like the last version of the El Camino.) I mourn for the fact that the Aussies have had proper Utes all the way up to now while in the US GM kept teasing us with the idea of a new one and then throwing overpriced, over-engineered junk that they “thought” would be a better product for them. I loved the SSR concept–intended to be a brother to the Camaro and in the same price range. But GM chose to take it too far and priced it up with the Corvette as a result; abandoning the market that really wanted it.

    What I hope is that somebody produces a true Ute for the American market that shows GM and Ford the error of their ways. Not everybody wants a Road Whale™ pickup truck; there are those who need a more compact, lightweight, light DUTY open bed that’s as easy to drive and as maneuverable as a car. There’s a reason the old S-10/15, Ranger, even Hardbody Nissans and older Tacomas are being kept in the best condition they can; their owners simply don’t want anything larger. A car-based Ute at a reasonable price or a true compact pickup at least based on one of the smaller CUVs has a whole market segment waiting for it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      FWD, light-duty utes are very common in parts of Central and South America. Volkswagen, for example, sells something called the Saveiro there.

      http://bright-cars.com/uploads/volkswagen/volkswagen-saveiro/volkswagen-saveiro-03.jpg

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        We can only hope they eventually show up here, Kyree. I’ve been asking for the approximate equivalent for over 20 years!

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Vulpine,
          I thought you wanted one of those tiny Brazilian sort of pickup/ute things?

          The Falcon and Commodore utes are actually wider than a midsize pickup, ie, wider than the US Colorado. with a back they are just as long.

          They are “midsize” between our one tonners and US full size 1/2 ton pickups and the V8s can suck fuel if driven unwisely.

          But, can they do burnouts! I saw a guy at work several years ago at a work function drive at around 30-40mph and tramp the accelerator and the assend just lit up. It was an older XD Falcon with a 351 and little bit of work.

          So, these are bigger than a midsize pickup.

          I found the pickup to suit you, Vulpine!!! I hope it’s the small enough. Check out the link;

          http://resources2.news.com.au/images/2013/02/15/1226579/142534-toy-ute.jpg

          Here are what Redneck Aussie kids drive, I really laugh every time I see a B&S ute.

          https://i.ytimg.com/vi/kNst7mec534/hqdefault.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            My demand for something along the lines of the Fiat Strada is the simple fact that a Ute like the Falcon and Commodore are simply not going to be available. I got excited when, somwhere around ’07, there were hints that we might see the Commodore Ute come to the US as the new El Camino and then later when the idea became a Pontiac version. Chevy got the SSR instead which was engineered and priced way out of its originally-intended market and Pontiac got shut down, these two events fully killing any concept of a return of the car-based pickup in the US by a major player. Even as they are now, the Commodore Ute (and the Falcon Ute) are smaller than the latest round of so-called mid-sized trucks by GM just as the US Colorado/Canyon is larger than the global version. All you have to do is park an ’05 Colorado next to a ’15 model to see the difference.

            As for the Kei trucks. I appreciate the satire but we already have their equivalent and they’re not exactly legal for use on state and Federal highways.

      • 0 avatar

        My Rampage never quite made a sales impact. I think it’s a really smart little car myself. I sometimes toy with the idea of buying a Fiesta Sedan and making it a Ute.

    • 0 avatar
      MerlinV12

      I absolutely believe that a US car based pickup would be a license to print money. Not saying it would be a perfectly logical choice for a lot of buyers, but buyers do not make purchasing decisions on pure logic. A base LS model Camaro with a pickup bed would steal a lot of F-150 sales. That cowboy swag factor would be an intoxicating brew for a lot of buyers.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The Honda Ridgeline hasn’t exactly been a runaway success story.

        The VW Rabbit pickup truck is long dead, along with the Ranchero and El Camino.

        The Subaru BRAT is ancient history.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al From 'Murica

          Agree on the Ridgeline, but I think the current model will see more success. No, it won’t sell in big numbers in comparison to the big trucks out there, but I think there is room for some profit where Honda has positioned the current Ridgeline. The knocks on the old one were it was ugly and it drank gas. They have at least fixed the ugly bit…not sure what sort of mileage they get.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The Ridgeline makes some sense because it squeezes more value out of the factory and platform for the Pilot and Odyssey, and because the full-size truck market is already too crowded for Honda to enter. (In any case, a large V8 RWD pickup would go against everything in Honda’s DNA.)

            Would it make sense for Ford, GM or Chrysler to make their own version? Probably not.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            We see a shrinking market in compact and mid sized cars but somehow feel that pickups in that size would be successful?

            Currently I have a choice between some decent mid sized trucks and full sized trucks. If you have a growing family a small truck is a tough sell. An even smaller one won’t register on my horizon. I suspect that most buyers would agree.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “We see a shrinking market in compact and mid sized cars but somehow feel that pickups in that size would be successful?”

            Compact and mid-sized SUV/CUVs are going very, very, strong. A similarly-sized pickup would have a real chance.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Vulpine,
            I do think there is a far larger mid size pickup market in the US if they were priced more competitively against the full size and more imported choice were available.

            The US has little choice when it comes to 4x4s, SUVs and pickups. CUVs and cars do have a decent selection.

            This is where the US needs imported midsizers. There are at a minimum 8-9 brands to choose from that would be acceptable in the US market.

            I do think the US market is flooded with a protected and limited choice in it’s pickup segment.

            If a country like Australia can have around 15 brands of pickups to choose from with a tiny population of 24 million and still have them at or cheaper than a US equivalent, then the US can absorb what we have.

            Full size will dominate in the US without the chicken tax due to cheaper fuel prices. So, this comment in no way is stating the demise of the full size 1/2 ton.

            I also agree with you that if midsize cars, CUVs and SUVs sell so would a decent range of midsize pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Lou_BC,
            Um …….. ??? WFT ???

            Why is it that midsize CUVs and cars are selling ……. hmmmm …….. ????

            So, what supports your argument??

            I see it this way. The price difference between a full size 1/2 ton pickup which 75% are just daily drivers with ONE person and a midsize pickup as the reason.

            Have some more competitively priced pickups (imported) and you will see full size pickup prices drop and more families make due with a “tiny” midsize pickup. Hmmm ….. ?????

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            @Big Al from Oz – I am referring to the SMALL trucks that Vulpine dreams about. LITTLE trucks.
            Our current mid sized trucks sell very well and are considerably bigger than a compact or mid sized car and are also bigger than a mid-sized SUV. The Tacoma crewcab is longer than a 4Runner or a Highlander.
            Regular cab midsized trucks are DEAD.
            Anyone making a midsized regular cab pickup???????
            Any attempt at a small truck was a disaster. Subaru Baja comes to mind.
            As you keep saying over and over and over again, pickups for the most part compete against similar sized SUV’s/CUv’s and most are used as personal use vehicles.
            THAT MEANS they need to be versatile and have room for 4-5 people. You can’t make them smaller and keep that versatility.

            Look at regular cab pickup sales. Who buys them?
            Fleets and single young guys or old guys who don’t need to haul kids.
            Who buys midsized crewcab pickups?
            I don’t see families with teenagers buying them.

            I’m all for competitive pricing BUT one has to live within the confines of the marketplace one is in.
            That means most people will opt for a full sized pickup since price is close, mpg is basically the same but there is more luxury, comfort and capacity in the full sizer.

            I’ve owned every size class of truck. Let that fact sink in.

            I don’t buy based on fantacy. I buy based on what works the best for my needs and most buyers tend to agree with me. Sales numbers confirm what I’m saying.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “THAT MEANS they need to be versatile and have room for 4-5 people. You can’t make them smaller and keep that versatility.”

            Never say something can’t be done; somebody will invariably prove you wrong eventually. The base model Fiat 500 proves you can easily have a 4-seater car in less than eight feet of overall cab area and with the size and performance of modern 4- and 6-cylinder engines you simply don’t need four feet of added nose. That means you could effectively plant a 4.5-5.5-foot bed behind it and have a perfectly functional sub-compact pickup truck in about 12-13 feet of overall length. I believe the Chevy Tornado and Fiat Strada both come in “crew cab” versions near that size.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Subaru Baja as well.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I love the Baja. A 5 speed Turbo always appealed to me.

            Excluding the trailer, a Baja would be perfect for camping, off road camping in the crownland, with friends. Clearance, symmetrical AWD, room for 4 and room for 4’s camping gear with a topper.

            In case people aren’t sure, crown land is public land in Canada that can be used if respected. “Most Crown land and conservation reserves are available year-round for personal, temporary use, at no cost. Some restrictions apply to certain activities and areas.”

            Funny story. Every female I’ve ever discussed the Baja with was repulsed by it. Probably the most polarizing in that regard, in my experience.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            Vulpine – “The base model Fiat 500 proves you can easily have a 4-seater car in less than eight feet of overall cab area”

            From June of 2015 to June of 2016 Fiat 500 saw a -48.5% decline in sales.

            Thanks for proving my point.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            I would say, “Only you”, Lou, but I would be wrong. You choose to ignore the point by trying to deflect on a different one. The Fiat 500 is not a truck. The point I was making is that it is very possible to make a usable crew-cab version of a compact truck as demonstrated by the physical size of cars like the Fiat 500, Nissan Fit, Toyota Yaris and others all capable of carrying four passengers effectively. A truck, as a truck, is not meant to be “comfortable” in the sense modern full-sized trucks have become.

            And it is VERY obvious that a true compact truck along the size of the Tornado, Strada, RAM 700, etc could take a decent market simply because compact crossovers are among the biggest-selling non-open-bed trucks on the market right now. (I don’t call them trucks and it seems even Canada is migrating away from calling them “trucks” since pickups have finally been split out in Canada’s “best truck” competition after so many years of calling jacked-up station wagons, ‘trucks’.)

            I do own a Fiat 500 and to be quite honest I’ve never had a more fun, more economical CAR in my life! A small truck would bring the FUN back into owning a truck.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al From 'Murica

        I don’t think such a vehicle as you describe would sell any more copies than the old SSR pickup. If we are going to see car based pickups make a comeback in the US I think Honda has a potential winning formula with the current Ridgeline and there may be room at the bottom for something akin to a Transit Connect style vehicle with a bed.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          I also love the SSR! 6.0L, 6MT. Put the top down, fill the bog ol box trunk with coolers and bags, and cruise into the mountains listening to that V8 noise.

      • 0 avatar
        thattruthguy

        Retail buyers overwhelmingly prefer huge four door trucks. I can’t fathom them pivoting to much smaller two seat trucks.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Who said anything about “two-seat trucks”? Don’t you think a smaller truck can have four seats? The point is that not everybody needs or wants a bloomin’ Road Whale™.

          • 0 avatar
            thattruthguy

            Private buyers of new trucks want road whales. For smaller vehicles, they already mostly prefer SUVs. A smaller four door truck combines the worst features of a smaller vehicle and an open cargo space.

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            “The point is that not everybody needs or wants a bloomin’ Road Whale™.”

            Sales would indicate that the MAJORITY want ROAD WHALES.

            ”? Don’t you think a smaller truck can have four seats?”

            Four seats in a small truck means you can’t keep it small unless you want to drive around in a Yaris with a flower pot sided pickup box.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Vulpine,
      They morphed here into the Corvette like the Holden Maloo and the Ford Falcon ” truck” that was used as a base vehicle for reasonably heavy Truck Campers, Upfitters and many other uses.
      Barra turbo six cylinder with it 415hp and 420( 450lbs ft of torque on boost) was the forerunner to the Eco Boost
      Still saw a brand new Ford Falcon Ute, two days ago, with a truck bed. If it was viable to still produce the Falcon( Ford here was looking at producing it n Indonesia), it still would be selling in considerable numbers as the Ranger, does not do what it does.

    • 0 avatar
      IAhawkeye

      There’s a lot of reasons for companies to do the exact opposite. Namely, the amount they’d sell would make a Ute a money loser from the very first meeting where they approved the designing of one. Since you were a fan of the Ranchero and El Camino I’m guessing you’d want your Ute to be a two seater like the Falcon(not sure how a bench would do safety wise nowadays). AKA exactly what the market doesn’t want, no matter how affordable you try and make it, it still has way too limited utility with an open bed and two seats. The Ridgeline is probably the closest we’ll ever get around here, but Honda can use the platform for other vehicles to make it so it makes sense money wise.

      I know your quite a vocal opponent of trucks and wish everyone would drive nothing bigger then a Ranger at most, but the market’s spoken and manufacturers are going to continue to give the majority what they want. Those old Ranger’s, Tacoma’s, S-10’s, etc. aren’t going anywhere anytime soon. Being so simple, with cheap common parts they won’t go anywhere until rust finally takes them their grave. They still make Tacoma’s and Frontiers, which in lower trims will more then satisfy the people looking for a small pickup like that, when their old ones bite the dust. They all buy used anyway.

  • avatar
    jhefner

    Even though Ford invented the ute with the Ranchero, it never seemed to do as well as the Chevy El Camino; I have seen several El Caminos over the years (including just recently), but very few Rancheros.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The Aussies actually had it first.

      There is a legend about the ute being inspired by a farmer wife’s letter to Ford Australia, which may be partly true — she had supposedly requested that Ford build something that could both get them to church and be used for work.

      But ultimately, the ute was a byproduct of tight lending policies during the Depression. Farmers in Australia could not get loans for cars, but they could get them for work vehicles, hence the motivation to combine them into one vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Pch101,
        It’s amazing how simple controls alter the very fabric of an industry.

        What controls does the US have to support the makeup of it’s market? ….. ;)

        I do believe your comment is more accurate than the Ford line.

        The ute was also the reason for changes in the US pickup to improve the comfort and ride of the vehicles.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Utes or Coupe Utilities were made on a vast range of vehicles prior too World War 2. Same thing continued after with Toyota, British Leyland, Chrysler producing them.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The ute is certainly not dead worldwide. Yes, they’re all unibodies now, but an American only need look as far as Mexico to see an interesting list of car-based pickups that are available.

    Chevrolet Montana
    FCA RAM 700
    Volkswagen Nuevo Saveiro

    I want them all.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      Thumbs up, eggy

    • 0 avatar
      threeer

      Egg, you’d be one of maybe a dozen who would actually buy one (new). Sadly, the market spoke long ago when it comes to what size Americans want their trucks to be. I’d love a good, used early gen Ranger/Frontier/Tacoma to park in the yard for weekend debris hauling, but that’s a $5000 occasional-use vehicle that doesn’t need to be new, versus a $20,000 purchase (if not more). But again, all one has to do is look at the sales figures of the F-150 to see where the market resides for truck purchases.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @threeer
        Utes here were never small. Falcon Utes have 8ft + beds. So the tiny South American Unitbody Car/Trucks would be a total failure here.
        Utes actually replaced earlier F100/F150’s that were produced in Australia
        http://www.justauto.com.au/just4x4s/cars/ford/f100

  • avatar
    readallover

    Well , you can get some here: http://www.lefthandutes.com

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    The Falcon sedan, wagon and ute are gone which leaves room for other Ford vehicles.

    The Ranger is now Fords biggest selling vehicle in Australia, from what I’ve read around 40% of all Ford product is the Ranger ……. whilst the Falcon ute was moving off the lots at around 1 600 per year.

    I do believe the off shoring of process work has also benefited Australia. Ford will leave behind a large engineering and design centre for global vehicles. Most all of these jobs are high paying.

    In another 55 years the vehicle market will be completely different again, who knows we might see the demise of the Mustang.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Big Al from OZ
      Pretty well disagree with you there. Too much choice made manufacture by Ford first non viable, they were struggling anyway, as the Taurus like AU Falcon was a disaster for them. When they said were leaving ,that started the process off for the whole ndustry. Supply base could not support Ford leaving
      Other factors like Australians having smaller families and a great upsurge in the purchase of SUV’s helped put the nail into the coffin of the traditional large sedan.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Robert,
        Read my link below.

        I do think more people who would of bought a Falcon ute would buy a Ranger, rather than a CUV.

        In the end the majority of Aussie utes were V8s in a light vehicle, fantastically high performing vehicles that can only be matched by a Mustang or Camaro. Even then there are Falcon and Commodore utes that will have Camaros and Mustangs for breakfast.

        There are some Falcon work utes, but the majority are daily drivers like the US pickup.

        Also, the utility of a dual cab Ranger was more appealing to the middle class family. The Falcon can only carry two.

        The CUV has taken over the large family sedan, not ute because it offers more versatility and space in a smaller package. A CUV can be used as a family sedan never could.

        Sedans and wagons around the world are dying.

        As for the demise of car manufacturing in Australia, Australia has realised it was costing far more to subsidise than the value the industry gave back to the country. It had to be done and I’m grateful for that.

        The way in which the Australian auto business evolved has given us an extremely competitive market, better than most any country. But, this has taken over 30 years to occur and more can be done to improve our market.

        I do believe Australia leads the world in the auto business. The auto manufacturers can still reign, whilst we are able to import pretty much anything we want.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from Oz,
          I have previously read that News. com link. Many I know still wish the the Ute as a light truck was still going strong. Demise of the large sedan killed it, not the fact people did not want them.
          I have seen brand spanking new Ford Falcon Cab Chassis, one two weeks ago.
          Your wrong about the Falcon being daily drivers, bulk I have seen are Cab Chassis or have bodies fitted
          High Performance Sports Ute was more the Holdens domain with the SS and Maloo
          I think a lot of people in Victoria and South Australia are not very happy about the demise of the Industry.
          ” Auto Business ” you mean choice? I would agree.
          More SUV than CUV. We tend to be moving away from CUV’s and light cars, to an alarming extent.

  • avatar
    DenverMike

    By the time we lost both the El Camino and Ranchero, Australia still had a 59% tariff on all imports. Gee I wonder why their domestic, car based Utes lived on.

    “Fleet sales” ‘make or break’ a smaller pickup. Otherwise it’s a niche vehicle, which can hardly sustain itself. They do a poor job of replacing the sedan or CUV, while having very limited payload/towing. They’re neither here nor there.

    You end up having to own two vehicles to do 2 jobs better. That’s why the prices of clean 10+ year old, midsize pickups are absolutely crazy. No one wants a 2nd car payment and full insurance on a pickup that’ll sit around gathering dust, until the weekend comes.

    • 0 avatar
      rocketrodeo

      I bought my 2000 Ranger in 2004 for $6650. It has depreciated about $3000 over the past 12 years. Pretty reasonable depreciation for 100K miles of service–astounding, really. Reliability has been exceptional.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        There’s just very strong demand, short supply for that particular used vehicle, more so than demand for new examples of the same.

        • 0 avatar
          rocketrodeo

          I’ve had frequent requests to sell it, for years now. I see no reason. It doesn’t break and doesn’t rust. Suspension components replaced with Moog parts, new bushings, Bilstein shocks and a Roush handling kit. Pretty much better than new.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    This link sums up the story.

    http://www.news.com.au/finance/business/manufacturing/last-ever-ford-falcon-ute-rolls-off-the-broadmeadows-production-line-55-years-after-the-original/news-story/1c95f54e5bae2d05cf2a54f49e4bc758

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    I would say the same thing about my 99 S-10 extended cab. I have driven it more than my other 2 vehicles and it runs like it will last forever. I could sell it and get a newer truck but it is very reliable and long paid for. I bought a new 2008 Isuzu I-370 8 years ago which I still have but I like the S-10 better.

  • avatar
    cornellier

    Car mullet.

  • avatar
    ToddAtlasF1

    I don’t know what the first ute was, but the Ford Model-T roadster pickup of 1925-1927 was a US factory offering that entered production prior to Ford of Australia completing its first car.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “Ute” stands for “coupe utility”.

      We usually think of coupes as being two doors, but coupe taken more literally is derived from the French word for “cut”, which refers to the roofline.

      Pickup trucks existed before the Ford coupe utility, but it was the roofline that made the ute different.

      http://www.motortrend.com/news/australian-ford-ute-celebrates-80th-anniversary/#1934-ford-coupe-utility

      The difference isn’t particularly radical otherwise, it’s largely just a styling effort. The idea was to sell trucks that would be attractive enough that they could double as passenger cars during an era when trucks were used strictly for work. It’s a bit of a gimmick, really.

  • avatar
    skor

    What really always impressed me about Ford Oz is how they developed Ford’s wheezy little I6 into a proper sports car engine, as good as any I6 from Europe or Japan. For years I dreamed of finding a rust-free Ranchero and importing an Ford Oz I6 to install in it. Never could find the time/money.

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