By on June 11, 2016

Roush Mustang Blue

You remember Lebanon Ford — the suburban Cincinnati Roush Performance dealer that suddenly began offering the country’s greatest performance bargain early last month?

Well, its 727-horsepower supercharged Mustang GTs are now flying off the lot (at the insanely low price of $39,995), and the once-sleepy Ohio dealer has become a nationwide performance mecca, Automotive News writes.

Credit to the idea goes to Charlie Watson, Lebanon Ford’s Roush Performance manager. Watson came up with the idea of a low-priced supercar as he lay in bad one night after watching Smokey and the Bandit.

“Back in the day, it was just a man and his car,” Watson told the publication. “It had a big engine, it had tons of power and it was all fun. It wasn’t about the fancy body kits, the heated seats and the touch screens and all this other craziness. It was just a lot of power and a lot of fun.”

Inspired by the movie’s mustachioed hero, Watson started working out the possibilities of creating such a car. He realized that by fitting a Roush Phase 2 supercharger to a base 5.0-liter Mustang GT, he could offer a 727 hp vehicle to buyers for under $40,000 — 25 grand less than a 707 hp Dodge Challenger Hellcat.

The future doesn’t belong to the fainthearted, Ronald Reagan once said, and that applies to both Watson and the buyers of his supercharged creation. Store owner Lisa Cryder went all in on the idea, and the result was instant promotion and sales.

A month after Lebanon Ford began offering the modded Mustangs (in both 727 hp and 670 hp Phase 1 versions), the dealer easily fields 1,000 calls a day to its newly created internal and external call centers. Three to five 727-horsepower Mustangs leave the lot daily, with the majority of buyers going for the hotter Phase 2 version.

The moral of the story? As another famous film once said, “Build it, and they will come.”

[Image:  © 2016 Lebanon Ford]

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79 Comments on “Lebanon Ford is Flinging Out Cheap Roush-Supercharged Mustangs Like You Wouldn’t Believe...”


  • avatar
    zip89105

    I couldn’t agree more with the basis for this, as I too purchased a vehicle with the biggest engine and the least amount of options. Fun, fun, fun!!!

  • avatar
    Syke

    I suppose it’s too much to ask if there was any upgrades on the brakes, suspension, etc. to go along with the horsepower boost?

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      For the $39,995, it’s just the engine upgrade. You pay extra for the suspension mods.

      • 0 avatar
        TonyJZX

        I kind of wonder what suspension brake mods people have in mind.

        I think these $39,995 700hp Mustangs are what we used to call “weekend d*ckhead cars”… they are just for weekend laugh and maybe some fun at the dragstrip.

        Sure I understand it has a chinese gearbox but I wouldnt think you’re going to wind up dead if you’re the least bit sensible but hey, maybe I’m overestimating the avg. American.

        If the car corners flat and it has decent brembo brakes then what do you expect?

      • 0 avatar
        Fred

        Which I guess is okay for the stoplight-0-60-burn-rubber kids, but as soon as you get serious or stupid, you’re going to be in trouble.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Gotta see how they were configured. If Rough starts with a GT/PP car then there is the GT500 brakes baked in from the get go. If the 727 hp is crank horsepower and these are GT/PP Mustangs to begin with then you have a chassis that is at least as capable as the preceding GT500.

      • 0 avatar
        dwford

        This dealer is taking a base $32k Mustang GT with no packages and simply adding the Roush kit to the motor. That’s how it’s only $39,995. Customers can have them bolt that kit onto any new Mustang GT, so I’m sure some people are paying more to get a more complete car.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        These are not Roush cars they are cars the dealer installs a Roush supercharger kit on. For $39,995 I’m pretty sure you get a base Mustang and the supercharger. I’m certain that if you wanted and were willing to pay the money they will strap a Roush supercharger on any 5.0 Stang on their lot, or order you the one you want.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      Hopefully they’re using a Performance pack model as the base. The suspension and brakes on those are capable enough for everything an owner would need in this case.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Kinda better if hidden then you can take luxo brand owners by surprise…

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    It’s cool that a certified-Roush Ford Dealership is offering this deal.

    1) However, this install kills the factory Ford new car powertain warranty, which is probably going to be a huge pain in the a$$ for a huge % of buyers of these when they grenade a major component within a year of ownership;

    2) Without some serious upgrades to the suspension, brakes, tires, and most likely, rear end and gearbox, much of this power will be not only “lost in translation,” but invariably hazardous to drivers of these, as well as fellow travelers and crowds of pedestrians at Cars & Coffee.

    3) ALSO, it’s probably not a stretch to be able to snag a new 2016 Mustang GT MT for around 27k, at least in the metro Detroit area, and get something closer to a USEABLE 550 horsepower (which is still way too much to not be dangerous in most hands on public streets), along with brake, suspension, tire/wheel upgrades, and be under $34,000 all in, WHILE PRESERVING THE FORD FACTORY POWERTRAIN WARRANTY – and in reality, such a car will be faster and more capable on the track and in any other condition than this Roush-Supercharger bolt on only special.

    4) Heatsoak is going to be brutal with this car. If people think the new Stingray Z06 suffers from it, without massively upgrading the coolant system and oil coolers on a Mustang GT after adding over 100 horsepower, let alone 200 to 300 horsepower, you ain’t seen heatsoak like this kind of heatsoak, so be forewarned.

    5) Old Man Voice (but factually true): “More than 400ish horsepower in a street car, especially driven by inexperienced drivers of fast vehicles, on public roads = recipe for many, many disasters to life, limb, trees, lamp posts, buildings, pedestrians, animals and other objects.”

    • 0 avatar
      Nick_515

      It’s like someone got exposed to BTSR and acted before learning to tune it out.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      All you said notwithstanding, given that the Mustang has been a blank canvas for doing your own thing in a way other cars have ceased to be, it certainly is an interesting starting canvas.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      DeadWeight,
      I do believe there is a point when responsibility and accountablity must be made by and individual or business selling this type of product.

      I do love horsepower, as most do. But I do believe this is dangerous to society overall. It isn’t the fact that some dumb sh!t will drive this vehicle as 11/10ths and kill himself, it’s the innocent that could be affected.

      People will spruik up “freedom”, but when one exercises freedom they must be aware of their impact on others. This is called maturity. In my mind the dealer has shown enough maturity and responsibility he has to the public. His decision is based on greed as the expense of lives.

      I do believe this vehicle is over the top and dangerous. I don’t mind an over 700hp car, but it must be designed to manage this power as safe as possible.

      How much would a Mustang cost if it was designed to manage 700 horsepower. Lots more than this deathtrap.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @BARFO – with freedom does come responsibility and accountability.

        Who then is responsible to shoulder this burden and who has to be held accountable?

        You are missing the fact that this Roush kit can be purchased legally by anyone and put on any Mustang Coyote that it will fit upon.

        You point of view is rather paternalistic.

        In relation to personal risk:
        In health care we have a term called, “AMA”. That means “Against Medical Advice”. A patient/client who is under active care can chose at any time to leave and/or refuse treatment at any time. They sign an “AMA” form. That form spells out that they were informed of the potential problems associated with that choice and the fact that health care providers do not agree with their refusal.

        As pointed out elsewhere, the dealer will have buyers sign release forms acknowledging the fact that the warranties are void and the dealer is released from any implied or expressed warranties.

        In relation to public risk:
        There are multiple laws governing personal conduct on public streets. Closed course competitive venues also have rules and regulations in place.

        Next point:
        Do we stop selling Vipers, Hellcats, GT350’s, Yamaha R1’s,MX bikes, Rubicons, Raptors et al because there is an alleged increased risk of harm?

        Who decides?

        If it is a 3rd party then I’m no longer free.

        If I chose to operate this vehicle in an irresponsible and unsafe manner in the public domain then there are all sorts of civil and criminal laws that cover such an action.

        All listen to Papa Al and all will be fine, just and right in the world.

    • 0 avatar
      Noble713

      “ALSO, it’s probably not a stretch to be able to snag a new 2016 Mustang GT MT for around 27k, at least in the metro Detroit area, ”

      DW, you have an arbitrage opportunity. Even Ecoboost Mustangs are ~$45k in Japan. V8’s are $60k, and the sole GT350 listed on Goo-Net is $98k.

      You need to ship some cars over here (trans-Pacific shipping is maybe $3k, Japanese bureaucracy/registration headaches maybe another $3k)…probably still room for ~$10k profit per vehicle.

  • avatar
    rudiger

    Nice little throwback to the musclecar dealer tuner days of places like Mr Norm’s Grand Spaulding Dodge, Tasca Ford, Royal Pontiac, Nickey and Yenko Chevrolet. There have always been dealer tuner cars, but the Lebanon specials are actually affordable.

    Better enjoy it while it lasts. Some 16 year old kid with wealthy parents will get one, wrap it around a pole the first day, the grieving parents will sue, and that will be that.

    • 0 avatar
      kvndoom

      Affluenza is real, yo!

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      When I was in high school I lived across the street from such a kid. Parents got him something expensive and powerful, forgot the exact car and he and his buddy went racing one night then ran into each other and both cars ended up getting totaled, sadly they lived and only had minor injuries. What made it worse was that he got zero punishment for what he did and they got him another car. Naturally that did not sit well with a lot of us so one night we called every pizza place and tow company in town and they all showed up at his house around the same time. His dad lost it when one tow guy went to the door asking about the car that was totaled and cursed out the guy, so the tow truck driver got pissed and drove over his lawn. It was beautiful, good times.

    • 0 avatar
      mikeg216

      Do people Sue fork makers when they get fat? If the car is driven on the street. It has insurance. It is the job of the insurance company to properly assess the risk and charge appropriately for it through the insurance premiums paid on said Mustang

      • 0 avatar
        SunnyvaleCA

        >>> It has insurance. <<<

        Not really. States require very low minimum liability insurance. Is your life only worth $50k to you?

        Maybe people should be required to carry $1 million liability policies. I have such a policy (with umbrella) and it's not very expensive. Then again, I'm a so-called 'low risk' driver. I’d assume a teenage driver with this Mustang would be pay $10k/year instead of only $1k/year for minimum liability.

        If $1 million policies were required I wonder how high the premiums on cars like this particular Mustang as well as the huge number of enormous "light" trucks would rise.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          Liability insurance is cheap. My $1 million umbrella policy wouldn’t change if I had a teenage driver in my house. My auto insurance with 250/500 liability limits would go up.

  • avatar
    LS1Fan

    I helped a pal turbocharge his 3.4L Grand Am back in the day, and received payment in Bud Light . Goes without saying I wasn’t that smart back then.

    I learned a metric ton about why performance cars cost what they do from the factory. Anyone can bolt a turbo / supercharger to a motor and call it done. Tuning the motor so you don’t lose power and/or break parts, finding out your stock axles are failing under strain, blowing trans seals because power, and making the car handle without being a rolling death trap on a curve are where the money’s spent.

    This venture will work out until the dealer get sued when someone puts their 727HP dealer special through someone’s front yard. Personal responsibility is just another feature lost to the 1970s.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      The kits are Roush tuned so it’s an OE quality tune plus they come equipped with air/water heat exchangers on top of an engine that is fairly stout in terms of the rotating assembly. The rods are the strongest Ford makes ( taken directly from the Boss ).

      These cars will be fairly reliable untransportation you get that one guy trying to run into the 9’s on his stock Lebanon Roush with the exception of a super aftermarket aggressive tune and super sticky tires then it’s game over. Also the guys thinking these cars will be road course material will learn quickly as well.

      • 0 avatar
        LS1Fan

        I’m more worried about the axles, wheel bearings, transmission and other auxiliary parts.

        No point owning a 751 HP car if it eats $1000 every month in failed components.

        • 0 avatar
          raph

          The axles maybe? But the Diff is the Super 8.8 and the MT82 has been pretty reliable (early issues aside) Since that is the same trans that backs the older Boss cars (although I’ll admit I’m a Tremec man and wouldn’t shed a tear if they sent that Getrag packing) and a few of those guys have blown well past the 700 rwhp mark on that trans (and I believe this 727 HP kit is at the crank so its less than 650 at the wheels if the car is in the 11-12% range on power absorption).

          In any event it all comes down to traction and how aggressively they drive the car which for most people it wont be a problem. Its the guys out there looking to put a notch in there belt and ring every last 10th out of the car who are gonna bolt on some super sticky tires and leave the line banging off the rev limiter and snatching on the shifter like its weighted with a 300 pound dumbbell on the opposite end.

          Most everybody else will just end up as YouTube Mustang crash video fodder when they get out of line before they break components.

    • 0 avatar
      chuckrs

      Wonder if anyone at Lebanon Ford has read the following:

      http://iowahawk.typepad.com/iowahawk/2006/04/the_real_acme.html

      about Turbonique Company, purveyors of fine rocket-driven accessories to automotive enthusiasts. Rocket driven superchargers, rocket driven rear differentials and rocket driven rockets that strap on like JATO boosters, all available for a short time before it went all pear-shaped. Worth a read if you haven’t seen it before.

  • avatar
    fvfvsix

    So – does anyone in the B&B want to admit that BTSR is right? Sure, this car won’t be able to out-track a GT350. To more people than exist as fans of this website, the arguments made above are just about completely irrelevant.

  • avatar
    chuckrs

    I’m old and relatively sedate, but still have an older Cayman S with just under 300hp and 250lbft torque. I live in suburbia and when I drive the car, I usually have to forget gears 4 through 6 exist. That is, unless I want to enjoy getting tickets and paying more for insurance. FWIW, a drive usually includes 70mph in 3rd, not close to redline. I can’t imagine having 2X+ the HP and probably 3X the torque, even if the car is 1/3rd heavier.

  • avatar
    bricoler1946

    Are these cars within the Ford warranty, what will happpen regarding the warranty if a motor blows up because of the engine modification?

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Ford will tell them too bad, but we can fix it for $$$$.

    • 0 avatar
      SirRaoulDuke

      I did some reading on their packages. The 727 HP version has a 3 year/36k mile PARTS ONLY warranty. Ouch. The 670 HP version actually comes with Roush’s 3 year/36k mile full warranty, which is much more reassuring and not surprising since that is the HP level of Roush’s Stage 3 Mustang. I wonder what else they are doing to get to that 727 HP.

      Edit: never mind the last part, I found their details on the 727 HP. Just the usual stuff, but I think it is obvious they know they are pushing that platform to the edge.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    That $39,999 now includes our “Loved Ones” package FOR FREE! That package includes:

    – a funeral
    – a nice suit
    – a coffin & burial plot
    – life insurance policy to cover the balance of your loan

    YOLO! Might as well do it with Hellcat beating performance* and go out LIKE A BOSS! Come on down to Lebanon Ford! Our service manager Grimm Riiper will take care of you!

    *on a single dyno run. Engine not guaranteed to function afterwards.

  • avatar
    George B

    A stock Mustang GT has more than enough power available for its weight and it makes all the right V8 engine noises. I’d be tempted to focus on just swapping the standard 3.31 gearing for the optional 3.73.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      This is an incredibly astute and incredibly overlooked/too-infrequently stated point.

      For whatever reason, the difference in gearing in the Mustang 5.0 MT makes a HUGE DIFFERENCE in launch and overall acceleration (as well as torque band).

      The 3.73 makes such a huge improvement in overall power being put down to the pavement and a$$ feel that most people would swear that the 3.73 has a more powerful motor compared to standard equipped rear end.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        Yes it’s notably faster with 3.73s. It revs faster and you’ll hear the increased velocity of air pulled through. You’ll swear you just disconnected a sandbag trailer, or the car feels at least 1,000 lbs lighter.

      • 0 avatar
        Scoutdude

        The reason it makes since a big difference is it increases the torque multiplication by ~12% so off the line it will seem like the engine got a 15% boost in torque. The engine also gets to the fat portion of the power band quicker.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      Better off with the 3.31 gearing. The MT82 is geared really short in 1st and 2nd gear. Its nice I suppose if your using your Mustang to pull aircraft carriers up into drydock but pretty much useless everywhere else. In fact at the strip the 3.31 cars tend to be faster since the 3.73 cars force the driver into an unneeded shift before the line.

      Now outside of empirical results and my own experience (I much prefer the longer gearing in my GT500 since it has substantially more torque at its disposal) The 3.73’s might be more satisfying but when my ’15 was around I didn’t care for it much as I would launch and was right on the rev limiter for the 1-2 and 2-3 shift more quickly than I would like.

      I’ve never road raced either car so maybe its different on a really tight road course?

  • avatar
    nickoo

    The mustang GT with PP is already capable enough when it comes to handling and braking. I wouldn’t be too worried about those aspects of this “”package””, but what does concern me is the drive-line. We all know ford specs the bare minimum in the ‘stang with Chinese transmissions and pot metal gears…This thing is going to be eating transmissions, drive shaft u-joints and rear ends all day long. I bet you can’t even get one run down the strip on Mickey Thompsons without grenading.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      The rear end should be fine, lots of people have put major power down on the strip through them w/o issue and unless they have changed their supplier the U-joints should do OK too. The trans is another story.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      nickoo,
      With this kind of power change to the vehicle it will be a completely different beast. What appears adequate for a “standard” Coyote powered Mustang would most likely be totally inadequate for this.

      Selling a vehicles like this to a young people is playing “Russian Roulette” with their lives.

      • 0 avatar

        How many young people can afford a $40,000 car?

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          They may not be able to but their daddy might be able to and likely will.

          Considering the time of the year I’m really really surprised I haven’t heard about someone who just graduated from HS and proceeded to wrap his brand new car that cost way more than $40k around a pole or tree killing himself and his passengers in the process and occasionally the person that just happened to be driving, or walking down the street in the same area at the wrong time.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Ronnie,
          Many, millions of the young in the US will have the capacity to own one of these.

          When I state young, I’m talking the sub 25s.

          Even where I work there are basically 4 types of vehicle owners.

          1. V8 hoons, they generally drive HSVs, SS Commodore and Falcon sedans/utes. You hear the guys describing some of the macho adventures, like we did as youngsters. This group represent the 2nd largest group and as a manager it appears they are the most immature with the Asian “hot” guys the second most immature.

          2. The Japanese set, Skylines, WRX’s, 86 guys, even an EVO guy, etc.

          3. The bored married man with the CUV or eco box, Mazda 3 or Camry types. A few drive Lexus, MBs and BMWs as well.

          4. My set, 4×4 guys, ie, pickups, SUVs, not forgetting a SUV has 4 hi an lo, as opposed to a CUV which is generally AWD or FWD. This group represents the largest segment.

          5. The VW/some Euro (not all) diehards. They don’t appear to fit into any group and tend to be less biased towards the V8, off road, Asian bretheren.

          We have two Prius and that Honda thing in the Hybrib/EV department.

          Vans have lost out to CUVs.

          The average age where I work must be around 30 years of age as well.

          Ronnie, why doesn’t TTAC do an article on “What is Vehicle is Driven and by Whom Where You Work” or something along that line.

          You’d get a lot of comments, all objective;)

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Ronnie, I added the hybrid/EV types and I completely forgot about the “hot” VW/Euro types. But these are insignificant in the big scheme of things as they might represent a few percent of vehicle ownership.

            I can understand the lack of interest in EVs/Hybrids.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I really do think the Coyote is beyond it’s limit with the supercharger. The Miami, which is a supercharge 5 litre Ford V8 based on the Coyote, but strengthened and lightened would of been a better choice.

    This engine is going far beyond what FPV and Ford engineers have envisaged for the Coyote. There are article that state around 350kw is the most you can obtain from the Coyote reliably.

    You would be foolish to buy one of these, but unfortunately their will be some in our society who will, with little knowledge of vehicles etc …… unless they spend lots modifying the brakes, suspension, drivetrain, etc to manage the additional power.

    I do have a vehicle with the Ford Getrag MT82 ….. made in China. It’s not horsepower that destroys transmissions and diffs, it’s torque. A diesel powered vehicle to be effective uses lots of torque at low rpm for acceleration and normal driving. This is what killed my gearbox, not hp. A supercharged Mustang will have the same issues with the MT82, but worse. I’m only putting 350ftlb through the gearbox very often, what will this Mustang be doing?

    Dig around the net and google “FPV GT 351-F Falcon” and read up on what Ford and their engineers think the Coyote is capable of.

    Here is a link describing the engine in a Falcon will give 404Kw for 15-20 seconds due to stress on the engine. The engine will also only boost under certain environmental and vehicle conditions. This IS from Ford.

    Here’s a cut and paste and link;

    “There has been quite a bit of discussion around the overboost function and some people assumed this was only available for the GT-F, which is not the case. The 15 per cent temporary power boost (as well as a torque boost) is a feature on all Miami V8s from 2010 onwards and operates for bursts of 15 to 20 seconds. It doesn’t work in first gear or below 4000rpm in others and will shut off if the ambient temperature hits 40 degrees or so.

    This is great, and means the GT-F can make 404kW, but don’t forget the next XR8 will be able to make around 380-odd kW thanks to the same overboost function and it should be priced in the $40,000s.

    Some people argued the final GT should have made even more power and Premcar, which did the calibration for the GT-F 351, had proposed a far more powerful intercooled version with help from Ford tuning legend Rob Herrod, but it got knocked on the head early.”

    http://www.caradvice.com.au/290486/fpv-gt-f-review/

    This is not the link I’ve read a year or so ago regarding the potential of the Coyote. Have a look on the net if you are interested.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      You have to keep in mind that factory power train engineers have constraints other than maximum HP. They have to design a power train combo that will last 150k miles, in the case of Ford, with late or way late oil changes done at a monkey lube joint with the cheapest oil they can buy and likely filled 1/2 gt shy of full so they can make an extra buck. They also have to assume that at least a certain number of yahoos will extract every ounce of torque out of the engine every single chance they get. So yeah you’ll see that they design a fairly large cushion between the max power an engine ships with and what it takes to break the weakest link in the power train.

      I do believe that yes many of those customers will have a need for a new engine or transmission well before the vehicle has traveled 150k miles. However if the Ford dealer didn’t do it there are lots of companies that are willing to strap a supercharger or big turbos on anything you bring them and they don’t care if that means that the engine will strip all the teeth off of first gear the first time the owner dumps the clutch. Just means that the person will be back for a new upgraded transmission soon.

      Do a search on youtube for “engine blown dyno” and you’ll see all sorts of engines that gave up when someone attempted to see just how much power could be achieved.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Scoutdude,
        After speaking to Mazda regarding my self destructing MT82 I found out they expected most MT82s to be changed out between 30k to 40k in the BT50s and Rangers!

        They stated that the gearbox is more tolerable in a Coyote than having the 3.2 diesel due to the torque loads placed on it. I brought this up with them after I Googled as much information as I could regarding the MT82. The other problem is the slow shift on it. But in a ute/pickup I don’t really care if it takes an additional 1/2 a second for a gear change.

        The MT82 has problems managing 350ftlb frequently, how will it ever manage this supercharged V8? Another issue I have is Ford has been aware of the deficiencies regarding the MT82 and had done little to rectify the problems. Ford has finally made the shift easier and quicker this year! 9 years on.

        I do believe you be looking at sub 10 000 mile engine, transmissions, etc.

        I do support your comment that the Ford 8.8″ assend will be the strongest point.

        I do remember in the early 80s when we were drag racing we were building diffs on a monthly basis, granted it was a Salisbury and not a 9″ as we were running a GM. We looked at moving to a 9″, but then we were worried about the Muncie self destructing and decided to rebuild diffs prior to every race, rather than a gearbox every few months.

        Maybe a sh!ttier diff would be cheaper and better in the longer run in this vehicle.

        Another point I would like to highlight is the MT82 is made in the UK. The UK manufactured MT82 has exhibited identical issues as the Chinese made version. The UK MT82s were fitted to Transits and Land Rover 130s, etc fitted with the 3.2 diesel.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          I’ll go you 1 further and bet that at least a few will need some new power train component before they hit 1000 miles.

          If the dealer is at all smart one of the dozens of pieces of paper they push at the buyer in the F&I office will be a piece that holds them harmless for any stupidity that the buyer does in the car, that the factory Ford power train warranty is void and that they aren’t going to warranty it either.

        • 0 avatar
          TonyJZX

          Dont the higher powered Mustangs use the Tremec T56 Magnum/TR6060 whatever the hell they are?

          I agree with everyone here… I have no issue with the stock car brakes and powertrain EXCEPT the Chinese Cheese strength quasi German gearbox.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            TonyJZX,
            The MT82 is/was(?) manufactured in the UK and has the same issues as the Chinese gearbox.

            I’d look at Ford for the problems with the gearbox and not country of origin.

            Even look at Getrag for a design flaw.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        For the “turn-key” money, you get a kit that’s specifically designed for the Coyote and its high compression ratio. Ideally, you’d start off with lower compression for supercharging, but you also start with less power.

        If you’re buying this Mustang for constant beatings, you’ll be upgrading broken parts, but that’s hot rodding/racing. It’s a good thing it’s a common Mustang. Replacement, stock parts to street/strip or race upgrades are available everywhere.

        Figure a turn-key Mustang conversion that’s got all the right parts, ready for nonstop beatings would run you in excess of $100,000.

        • 0 avatar
          87 Morgan

          yup, they made one of those stangs’ you reference. I forget the name, but it was race only, big bad ass motored car. They sold for 100k ish.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You mean the “Cobra Jet Mustang Drag Racer”, turn-key, and “off-road” only. It’s a straight up, drag car, available from any North America Ford dealer, and built by Ford.

            I was more referring to a Saleen type Mustang conversion, but this is still available today, a 2016, $99,990

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          There is a Mustang Genius is not well known, with a shop on Horseback in Clinton Township, Michigan, and the guy truly is a literal genius who can not only design, fabricate and install reliable parts that dramatically boost 5.0 power, but the guy can troubleshoot problems that almost no one else can that I know of.

          The guy’s last name is Iacobelli, and he can build the fastest, best handling, abuse-taking Mustang with the Coyote for around an additional 18k (whether the GT is used or new).

          He is not some snake oil promoter like some Gas Monkey outfit, and only takes on a certain number of established customers that he has worked with over the years.

          He’s the way and probably only person I’d go see to pay and do a complete power/brake/cooling system/suspension total modification to a Coyote Mustang MT if I were to buy one.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            “Horseback” above is supposed to be “Groesbeck Avenue” – stupid autocorrect.

          • 0 avatar
            raph

            Lidio Iacobelli? Only if your not a Mustang guy. Muscle Mustangs & Fast Fords (among others) has featured the guy before.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Raph, thanks – Lidio Iacobelli is the guy.

            As honest & straight up as the day is long.

            He was the guy running low 10s in the early 90s with Fox body Mustang LX 5.0s but absolutely humble and willing to help others just getting into tuning out.

            And he’s absolutely a 5.0 “Mustang guy.”

            I have met numerous people who could not get mechanical issues sorted out at any price, no matter how many times a shop/stealership attempted it, until they took it to Lidio, who literally diagnosed it correctly in minutes and repaired it properly at a fraction of the price.

            if I were to buy a new Mustang Coyote, now that Ford decided to join the new century and offer Independent Rear Suspension, and offer up a newer, better Coyote 5.0, Lidio is the 1st guy I’d go see, plan with and pay with confidence to do a proper tune if I wanted a better suspension/exhaust/brake/motor package.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Where’s bball?? A Ford related article and he’s not “here”.

    Does FoMoCo not support this “Roush Mustang”??

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      It is not a “Roush Mustang” it is a Mustang that a Ford dealer straps a supercharger on that they obtain from Roush. So no Ford does not support it and I guarantee that Ford will deny any power train related warranty when something goes boom. So whoever buys one of these is on their own when something goes wrong. The Dealer will point the finger at Roush, Roush will point the finger at the dealer and Ford will give both of them and the buyer the finger when something goes wrong because of the supercharger.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Scoutdude,
        That’s why I used inverted commas, ie, “Roush Mustang” and not Roush Mustang.

      • 0 avatar
        sgeffe

        Thought there was something on here about voiding the warranty by using the “tire warming” feature; I think it was a Baruth piece.

        Obviously this is worse, if the very presence of this package drop-kicks the Ford warranty!

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      These cars make me go, “meh”. I’d rather spend $30K-$35K on a Mustang GT with the Performance Pack. I wouldn’t even buy a GT350. As cool as I think it, and any other high powered pony car is, I would never use all the power in real life.

  • avatar
    Ion

    I’d be interested in a breakdown. I (and I’m sure plenty others) would be more than willing to settle for the 670hp model with the better warranty.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Scotty quote:

    “If we stay at warp 6 the engines will blow cap’n.”

    Can you imagine stolen Roush for a heist not realising, be in for a bit of a surprise.

  • avatar
    olddavid

    I spent 30 years trying to get the dealer body to think outside the box. Their job is to build equity and sell the manufacturer’s iron – full stop. Now, could some use a little sensitivity training? Could others use some empathy? Absolutely. However, I have come to the belated conclusion most buyers are useless mooches who expect- in the American tradition – something for nothing. The fact that some on this forum question the value offered is fine, but never question some poor sap with his and the next three generations mortgaged future trying to make a buck by offering something no sane individual would purchase. You do know our risk/reward heritage, right? Have you read the San Jose expose on the CIA and crack cocaine? A 700 hp Mustang with wobbly legs is right up our collective alley. YeeHaw

  • avatar
    tedward

    I think this is awesome. Big props to the dealer for having the stones to give their performance customers what they want. Tons of performance cars out there have aftermarket support for ludicrous outputs, a 400hp fwd gti or focus for example, is possible with similar bolt ons and a new turbo. Just like with those cars, you pay to play, and you pay a lot more for a complete build, which almost never happens in one fell swoop.

    I don’t understand the outrage or shock in the comments above when all the dealer is doing is completing the first stage of a customers performance build.

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      Maybe the outrage and shock stems from the legion of “MUSTANG CRASHES @ CAR SHOW!!” videos on the Internet.

      Note- most of those now-wrecks have between 260 and 500HP.

      727HP through a mass market Mustang 5.0 is a YouTube video/ fatal accident waiting to happen.

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        *gasp* I had no idea such imbeciles and videos of them existed.

        If only they could be quarantined with their cars on an abandoned air base and we could watch Instant Darwin videos.

    • 0 avatar
      Fred

      Most of us assume these customers will not be doing the suspension mods. Which brings up the idea is someone willing to do the suspension for this price?

      • 0 avatar
        tedward

        I’m sure not. Still, that’s nothing new. Cars get modified according to the budget and priorities of their owner. Power often comes first for probably a majority of owners, it’s no different from any other mustang gt owner buying the parts themselves and having them installed. It’s going to be a one at a time process, with brakes happening never.

        It will be fun watching kids and first time performance buyers stuff these at car meets, but they would have been there in a fast car in either case. For 40k and up you can create a whole range of ludicrous outcomes, especially on cars that come turbocharged from the factory. Most of those platforms and drivetrains are far less suited to the task than the Mustang.

        • 0 avatar
          LS1Fan

          There’s a world of psychological difference between someone who drives off with a mass market turnkey 727HP vehicle after signing trade in papers for their rusted Talon turbo, and someone who buys a 400 HP car and spends their own money, blood, sweat and labor getting it to 727HP.

          Folks in the latter category tend to be way more responsible with their sleds, having had to earn every HP the hard way.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            Anyone can swipe a credit card and get the same “mods”, and it can be on a used 425 HP, 2011+ Mustang GT for a lot less “cash”.

            We’re dealing with “adults”, here mostly. Or try getting insurance, under 25 years old, for just the basic Mustang GT, automatic.

            I spent $8,111 for my new 5.0 LX, in cash, from mowing lawns, digging ditches, and washing cars, when I was 19. I drove like… well let’s just say I’m lucky no one ever got hurt, but I had speeding tickets like you wouldn’t believe and I’d waste new Goodyear Gatorbacks in weeks.

            Btw, the lowest “full coverage” insurance quote I got was $5,000 a year in ’88. Basically, I was an uninsurable risk, even with a clean driving record, early on.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      It’s an “aftermarket” upgrade, by the dealer, which is nothing new. Late ’80s Saleen Mustangs offered superchargers, sold new from the Ford dealer, but with the full factory drivetrain warranty intact. Those were the complete “package” with the right suspension and brakes upgrades.

      The SC Saleens offered a similar HP/Tq upgrade to that era Mustang GTs, and that would’ve been outrageous at the time, except they essentially doubled the price of the Mustang GT.

      But that’s the real problem people are having with these Roush blown Mustangs. They’re almost *too cheap*, for the power you get. Except I remember you could get the sub $10,000 sticker, LX 5.0 “notch” Mustang stripper, in ’87+, with *crazy power* for its day, for the price of a well equipped Corolla, or mid trim Celica.

      And yeah there were plenty kids back then (25 and under, mostly), going wheels up, and wrapping 225 HP 5.0 Mustangs around trees, killing themselves and innocents.

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