By on March 25, 2016

Genesis New York concept at NYIAS

It was the end of the first day at the New York International Auto Show, a time when most “journalists” would normally have stopped doing anything that resembled work. Yet there we all were, assembled out in the hallway of Javits Convention Center, of all places, holding our glass bottles of Voss water and waiting to see what was hiding underneath the long blanket on the right side of the stage.

It’s at this point that most of the articles you’ve already read about the Genesis New York Concept start giving you the entire historical background of Hyundai, and the Genesis models, blah blah blah. I give you more credit than that. I know that you already know that the Hyundai Genesis sedan was a legitimate contender in its segment (especially you, BTSR).

The difference now is that everybody else seems to know that not only does the Genesis brand seem to be able to survive, they’re prepared to hit some towering home runs.

Forget that the concept car has a low power output number. Don’t worry that it’s a hybrid. Who cares about the fancy screen inside?

What matters is that Genesis has proven, beyond the shadow of a doubt, that they can design a beautiful, compelling, dazzling car that people genuinely desire. But in order to understand why that’s important, one has to look back at the histories of other Asian luxury brands.

It’s hard to remember this now, but there was a point in this nation’s history, and it wasn’t even that long ago, that it was a somewhat bold choice to pick a Lexus LS400 or an ES250 over the safer choices from Germany and Detroit. Infiniti and Acura were players at that time, too, but they never truly got the traction that Lexus did, did they? Why is that?

The answer is simple: Women love Lexus.

Poor Infiniti. They never had a chance. Remember the original J30 and Q45s? They were strangely beautiful, completely different than anything we’d seen on these shores. The automotive press fawned all over the G35 coupe when it come out, praising its sporting capabilities and its bold styling. It was the closest thing we had to a Skyline at that time.

Suburban women looked at the Infiniti lineup, shook their damn heads, and went and got a Lexus.

Acura tried to be bold, too, with the Legend, the Integra, hell, even the Vigor. It wasn’t until they got smart and started making an MDX that was pretty much purpose-built for the fairer sex they got any traction in the marketplace whatsoever.

Don’t forget — women make most of the car purchasing decisions in America. Even if they aren’t the primary drivers, they’re influencers. They’re the ones taking kids to dance and soccer practice. They’re the ones putting the majority of miles on road nowadays.

So I started polling my female friends. I sent pictures of not only the New York Concept, but also the G80 and G90. Many of them are Lexus and Mercedes loyalists. I asked them one simple question: “Would you drive this car?”

Every single one said yes.

If Genesis can bring these cars to market — they claim that the New York isn’t a “concept,” but rather a “picture of where we are in the development process” — as well as an upscale CUV, then I think they’ll leave the Hyundai stigma in the rear view quite quickly. We might know that the G80 and G90 are just rebranded Hyundais, but it’s entirely likely that the primary target audience won’t.

For now, it looks like Hyundai plans to just have the Genesis brand off in the corner of existing Hyundai stores. While it might be a safe, smart, easy way to get the brand going, they’re going to have to spin them off into their own showrooms if they truly want to establish Genesis as a luxury brand. Nobody wants to be reminded that the Accent exists when they’re looking at a G90.

Let’s hope, for their sake, that Genesis learns from their Japanese friends’ mistakes, and becomes more Lexus than Infiniti.

[Image: Bozi Tatarevic/The Truth About Cars]

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98 Comments on “NYIAS: Genesis is the Real Deal...”


  • avatar
    bunkie

    “Don’t forget — women make most of the car purchasing decisions in America. ”

    My wife and I are headed to the show to look at all the vehicles we are considering to replace our CTS wagon whose warranty expires this year.

    I do 99% of the driving (she has night vision issues), but no car gets purchased without her approval which is only fair considering that we both share the cost.

    My Tacoma lease was purely my decision as I pay all of its costs.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Why are you getting rid of the Cadillac CTS right before the warranty expires?

      Yea of little GM faith?

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        I have a policy of not paying for repairs. It’s that simple. In point of fact the CTS is in excellent shape and considering it’s relative rarity and condition, I expect to get a good price for it.

        Frankly, if I didn’t have this policy, I would rather have my CTS than almost any of the other “superior” cars that everyone loves. And, a few of the vehicles in the running are Cadillacs. It’s not faith when you have years of positive experience to draw upon.

        By the way, you still haven’t answered *my* question from a few threads back.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          You’ve been conditioned to get rid of your Cadillacs (General Motors garbage) before the warranty expires for good & sound & rational reasons. If I had a GM POS, I’d do the same.

          Let’s face it, outside of maybe 3 vehicles, GM produces throwaway, unreliable crap.

          I have no idea what question you’re talking about, as I don’t follow you around with piqued interest.

          • 0 avatar
            bunkie

            Ithe question I asked is one that, for someone like you who makes a lot of noise, is entireley relevent: have you actually driven the cars you trash?

            I can’t decide whether your fixation is pathological or just bad, repetitious schtick.

          • 0 avatar
            bd2

            With regard to reliability, GM has been hit and miss recently, but they are improving despite adding the latest tech to their powertrains – unlike say, Toyota/Lexus which has been using the same old powertrains.

            Honda/Acura have seen a hit in the latest reliability rankings due to new powertrains.

            The Volt has been a lot more reliable than the Models S or the Leaf.

        • 0 avatar
          TurboX

          This “policy” does not make much sense. To save a little on repairs but to take the big hit on the depreciation of buying a new car every 3 years seems like to miss the forest for the trees.

      • 0 avatar

        So someone like me can swoop in, pick up a well maintained and probably not abused car for the price of a Sentra. People pay way too much for warranty……

    • 0 avatar
      Austin Greene

      It’s not well known, but GM will sell you a two year, 24,000 mile extension on your existing warranty. You just need to know the right people to ask.

      I just completed a total of eight years bumper-to-bumper factory coverage on my 2008 DTS. I bought it for peace of mind reasons (a Northstar don’t ya know) and incurred maybe $500 worth of repairs in that eight years. GM won big time on that gamble.

      Either way, GM will put a warranty on your CTS wagon when they sell it to its next owner. You will already be subsidizing that through whatever trade in value they give you. So you may as well keep the car for another two years and buy the warranty extension if you do truly want to keep the vehicle.

  • avatar
    SC5door

    With the direction they’re heading, they needed to drop the flying “H” and create a sub-brand for it. The roots are embedded as an industrial company, I don’t associate a Hyundai as “luxury”—especially when you’re sharing the same logo as what’s on the mudflaps of many trailers running around (Hyundai Translead).

    Now time to either retire the G8BE or figure out how to get better economy.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “women make most of the car purchasing decisions in America.”

    Women participate in about 80% of car purchases. That does not mean that they are the sole decision makers. In many cases, it probably plays the role of veto power.

  • avatar
    twotone

    Having been a BMW and Mercedes guy in my 40 years of driving, I now prefer the Genesis. It offers something the Germans now longer do — a 420 HP normally aspirated V8. And, it comes just the way I want — RWD, panorama roof and all the requisite toys.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    In my house it is slightly different, I do 99.9 % of the driving in my car and get a auto allowance so I pick what I want that works for me, with my wifes car it comes down to what she wants/needs at the time and I only can veto over safety concerns, back in the day a car with no air bags lost out to a car that had them ( a Audi 90) she is due for a new car pretty soon but really has no idea what she wants so the 05 Pilot continues its faithful service. My guess is she will end up in a Volvo or Audi sedan but it is her choice.

  • avatar
    houstonbob

    My wife has driven GM Holdens, Aussie Fords, Volvos, Jaguars, Mercedes, MGB, Chrysler, etc.. She now drives a 2012 Hyundai Sonata Limited. It is her all time favorite car. Good luck to Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      My wife states her current car is her all time favorite also. Just like she said about the previous car and I suspect what she will say about the next one.

      I love her, but she quickly forgets the good and bad about previous cars.

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    What with Genesis, the new E-Class, and the new gen Volvos, it’s a damn good time to be upper middle class. And with the Fusion and Sonata and Optima it’s not a bad time to be regular middle class either. It’s a damn good time to like cars!

  • avatar

    Tangential topic…styling and design:
    “Remember the original J30 and Q45s? They were strangely beautiful, completely different than anything we’d seen on these shores…”

    …As was the late 1990s Audi A6 sedan. I thought it was stunning (especially the 4.2s with moderately flared fenders) and was taken aback when someone declared it looked like “a turtle taking a dump.” When the shock of that statement wore off, I considered that position and concluded that if I accepted that pundit’s premise, then the original Infinity J30 must be the resulting turtle turd.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Anyone who would answer “yes” to the question of “[w]ould you drive this car?” without test driving it, at the very least, is a moron, male or female.

    • 0 avatar
      Toad

      I think almost anybody interested in cars would “drive this car.” Based on how that drive went they may or may not entertain buying it.

      Being open minded to a vehicle (or person, or house, the list goes on) based on it’s looks/attractiveness is completely rational; that does not guarantee that the relationship will be consummated but it is a good start.

      Good for Hyundai.

    • 0 avatar
      energetik9

      I’d drive it, but I am very suspect to own it, which I think is what you meant. I’ve never owned a Hyundai because I am just not interested in the cars, the history and what they have to offer. I have yet to be compelled.

      “they claim that the New York isn’t a “concept,” but rather a “picture of where we are in the development process”. This still screams concept to me.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Yes, I inferred that Bark’s question was really “[w]ould you buy/own this car?,” and I try not to stereotype, but some stereotypes just ring true, and women tend to be far less discerning in terms of how a vehicle drives, on average, and more concerned with how a vehicle appears, on average, than men.

      So, for all the generally accepted notions of women being more substantive and rational than men (a stereotype propagated in the modern era), my experience with women’s vehicle acumen has not seems to reflect such “substantive & rational” thinking when it comes to vehicle purchases/pleasing.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        “…and women tend to be far less discerning in terms of how a vehicle drives”

        Strangely enough, both my wife and my ex-wife are *very* particular about how a car drives. How about that?

      • 0 avatar
        energetik9

        “women tend to be far less discerning in terms of how a vehicle drives, on average, and more concerned with how a vehicle appears, on average, than men”

        I can’t really disassemble this argument. My wife would kill me if I said this, but to her, it’s a similar argument. Is it cute, does it drive “nice”, is it fun. They are encompassing arguments, not specifics in the way I would dissect how a car drives. They care, but only in the sense that it’s nice. As long as it hits those and she doesn’t have to worry about it, that’s 99% of her criteria.

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        DW, the existence of the “Bro Truck,” which is the mirror image of the cute “chick car” refutes your argument. Guys can be just as shallow and foolish when buying a vehicle, and usually spend a lot more money doing so.

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          Toad
          Great point and one I hadn’t connected the dots on myself yet. The Bro truck and chick car are indeed same concept, but with a different execution.

          A suspension lift pickup is about a utilitarian as a new beetle in the majority of users hands. I guess that makes truck nuts roughly equivalent to the flower vase on the dash.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          Yeah, I forgot about the brotruck – which is a significant % of make whips in particular areas of the country.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      So in other words…

      the typical Lexus buyer?

  • avatar
    lawmonkey

    At Hyundai in south Austin, went in to test drive a Genesis sedan. Afterward, sales team turned up the pressure to buy big time, pulling out all the stops – hand off to another person, four square finance sheet, detailed questions on what payment I was willing to make. This is not what happened at the Lexus or BMW dealership after a mere test drive, and a shining example of why Genesis needs to get the heck out of a Hyundai showroom.

    Also, current gen Genesis was a nice car, but steering was very, very strange. Most floaty modern RWD car I’ve driven yet.

    • 0 avatar
      eggsalad

      This. Very much this.

      Hyundai salespeople are trained to deal with typical Hyundai customers – people with poor credit who are upside-down in their current ride.

      Maybe Hyundai doesn’t need dedicated showrooms for Genesis, but they sure need dedicated salespeople.

      • 0 avatar
        SC5door

        Do you have stats on “typical” Hyundai customers? Or we just pulling from the book of everyone else?

      • 0 avatar
        JCraig

        This has not been the typical Hyundai customer in a very long time. If anything Nissan and Honda have fully embraced the marginal credit buyer.

      • 0 avatar
        Xeranar

        Gotta love TTAC’s credit analysts…

        Every mainstream maker has their share of poor and middle-class buyers, it’s the nature of the beast. Regionally and even city-to-city it changes based on dealerships.

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        Anecdotal, I suppose. I only visited 2 Hyundai dealers when I was shopping. At one of them, the “sales manager” got angry with me for having a better credit score than he did.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      IMO, what you’re experiencing is that South Austin is the worst area of town to buy a car. The Acura dealer in S. Austin pretty much behaved the same way.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    The problem with Hyundai’s high-end cars is that they still look like the automotive equivalent to a knock-off purse up close. They need to step-up if they are going to play in the big leagues.

    Why would you choose a Hyundai over a Lexus, Audi, Mercedes, BMW? They all lease around the same price, and nobody really cares about an extra few horses, they are all sufficiently fast. The difference is that Audi’s fit and finish is perfect in every way, and BMW, Mercedes and Lexus aren’t far behind. The Hyundai feels like a Sonata with more leather (just like a CTS feels like a tarted-up Malibu).

    • 0 avatar
      Davekaybsc

      “The difference is that Audi’s fit and finish is perfect in every way, and BMW, Mercedes and Lexus aren’t far behind.”

      Maybe at one time Audi’s fit and finish were perfect, but that time is over. Have you been in the B8 A4/A5? That interior feels INCREDIBLY cheap inside, with tacky hard plastic all over the place, cheesy feeling buttons, and rock hard, terrible seats. The A6 and A7 are not all that much better. Especially the A7 considering how expensive it can get in S7 and RS7 guise.

      The Q3 looks like what the Tiguan *should* look like on the inside, and I’ve never been remotely impressed by the cave of black plastic that is the A3 interior. The BMW 2 series may not be all that fantastic inside, but at least they tried.

      The new interior design leader is Mercedes by a mile. The CLA and GLA suck, sure, but those are cynical products targeted at people who will eat ramen every day so they can stretch just enough to have that M-B logo sitting in the parking lot of their apartment complex. Everything from the C-class on up knocks Audi into the weeds.

      The new A4 and Q7 are at least less blatantly cheap looking than most of Audi’s existing products, but theirs something weirdly overwrought and inelegant about them. Mercedes doesn’t have that problem whatsoever. The new E is gorgeous.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        I was just in all of them (and the Hyundai) last weekend at the local auto show. Went with a buddy who is shopping this market, so we spent most of our time looking at these 5, Jaguar, and Volvo.

        I can see why you might prefer Mercedes over Audi, or BMW over Lexus. They each have their own brand personality. We both came away from the Hyundai/Genesis stand with the feeling that they were cheap cars tarted-up. It’s hard to pin-down why, but every little detail seems off-brand: the door hardware, the way carpets fit, the way surfaces flow into each other.

        • 0 avatar
          JCraig

          Amazing how different impressions can be. My experience was the opposite when car shopping. I was surprised at how cheaply made the Mercedes E class felt and the BMW felt like a car that should cost $25k whereas the new Genesis was a solid vault by comparison. My only complaint is the steering wheel in the Genesis, which is disappointing for a $50k car.

        • 0 avatar
          Davekaybsc

          I don’t think Hyundai interior design is by any means perfect yet, but they are learning very quickly. The first generation Genesis STUNK on the inside, and the Equus wasn’t all that much better.

          The current Genesis is a HUGE improvement over that first car, same with the G90 over the Equus. I wouldn’t expect them to be as good as BMW 7 or MB S, those guys have been at this for decades.

          The current A8 though is largely a re-tread of the 2004-2010 car, just with a few more creases and sharper lines in place of the older more rounded look, and at least from appearances, the G90 doesn’t seem all that far off. I haven’t been inside and actually felt the materials to see how they stack up, but just going by looks, the G90 is a good 90-95% there, which in my mind shows more of what a bland update the 2011 A8 was than necessarily how fantastic the G90 is.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        The B8 interior is a design from 2009.

        Look at the B9 A4 interior for an idea of where Audi’s current interior detail and material levels are now.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Audis from 1990s and early 2000s lagged behind Mercedes with regard to interior appointment – sharing too many parts with VW.

      Shared parts savings, nonetheless, enabled Audi to upgrade their interiors (often the best in class), but lately, Mercedes has retaken the crown and are charging for it.

      If you think the CTS drives like a “tarted up Malibu” or the Genesis like a Sonata – you have zero credibility (the CTS, esp. in CTS V-Sport or CTS-V form bests what Audi, much less BMW, have to offer in terms of handling/driving dynamics).

      Anyhow, the Genesis sedan well outsells the A6 – so there are clearly buyers.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    You’re done Acura. Done. You may be able to continue to peddle a CR-V Limited and a Pilot Limited to those either scared to death of German reliability, or who have been burned too many times by it, but when it comes to actual cars, you’re done. The ILX, TLX, and RLX are *already* some of the worst, least competitive cars in their segments, and they’re mostly fighting against old Buicks and Volvos, and losing to THOSE cars.

    Once the Genesis line has a chance to spread out, and each car is better than the equivalent Acura in every way, Acura will retreat into nothing more than a “premium” SUV brand, even more than they already are.

    And Infiniti you’d better well get your sh_t together, and figure out just what the hell kind of brand you are, or Genesis will kill you too.

    • 0 avatar
      TMA1

      So true. I was crossing the street today when a new TLX passed me. I had to check the badge on the trunk to make sure, because it looked that bad. It’s already one of the cheapest cars in its segment, and it looks even worse because Acura sticks black plastic inserts into the bumper instead of foglights, and because there’s no visible exhaust. The paint was pretty awful too, and the wheels were ugly. Terrible, terrible car.

      Oh, and just a minute before I crossed paths with that Acura, I walked past a new 5.0 Genesis in all black. That car was gorgeous, even with the slanted “H” on the trunk.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      Sorry, the Japanese guys won’t be finished until Hyundai figures out how to make a car that is enjoyable to drive. The first gen Genesis absolutely sucked to drive. I suspect that the next one will be/is better, but I’ll take a friggin’ Acura every day and twice on Sunday before I go in for a current Genesis. I’m fully expecting the next 8-12 years will be great for the Koreans, but not now. Sorry.

      • 0 avatar
        bd2

        The 2G Genesis is significantly better than the 1G, but it’s a large sedan for the midsize segment and Hyundai was going more for the “comfort”/luxo-cruiser end of the market (Kia’s entry will be on the sportier side).

        However, the G70 will be a sports sedan and Albert Biermann is having a hand in the development (as well as heading Hyundai’s N-division).

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    I didn’t know that women liked cars with severe overbite. What women want to see that aweful trendy aggression on the front fender? And the rear fender flare? That’s masculine, that’s Bangle.

    I’d like to know if the women/men ratio changed once Lexus released the new RX350 and NX200. My dealer has them all lined up along the road and it’s a real scary sight seeing all these fronts next to each other. Women like it?

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    …women make most of the car purchasing decisions in America…

    aka, “Happy wife, happy life.”

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I always shake my head when I hear this as it negates the currently promoted concept of an equal share in marriage. Essentially you men are going to kowtow to a woman which is no different than if the evil patriarchy forced womyn to be subservient to you. You’ve become the “women” of old, I mean WTF guys.

      • 0 avatar
        bunkie

        You make the mistake of jumping to the conclusion that there is no corollary.

        My wife knows that it’s important for *me* to be happy in order for us *both* to be happy. Just as *I* want her to be happy.

        And there’s no need to “kowtow” to make my wife happy. We often get things to go my way, as we often go her way. It’s called the art of compromise.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I am happy to hear that in your case. In life when I have heard such a saying, there isn’t such a corollary.

          • 0 avatar
            onyxtape

            It’s true – most women nod when they hear “happy wife, happy life” without a single shred of irony.

            Although in reality, it’s mostly just men who “compromise” on things they don’t really care all that much about to begin with. They’ve already decided it wasn’t a hill worth dying on.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    “Nobody wants to be reminded that the Accent exists when they’re looking at a G90.”

    “Nobody wants to be reminded that the Spark exists when they’re looking at a Corvette.”

    So true.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Or the SMART car when it comes to S Class Maybach owners.

      Or better yet, the lower-priced Sprinter that’s geared to tradesmen (plumbers, electricians, etc.).

  • avatar
    VoGo

    While I mostly agree with Bark, I still say Genesis is missing the boat by focusing on cars, rather than CUVs, which would also appeal to women more.

  • avatar
    philadlj

    The thing is, we’re all going to find out in a few years that to develop Genesis, Hyundai, in its hubris, employed the liberal use of protomatter, which anyone can tell you is highly unstable and its effects unpredictable.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if that’s the reason for all the strange and extreme weather we’ve been getting.

    Basically, I’d recommend anyone thinking of buying a Genesis in the near future to learn how to say “Beam me up!” in Klingon.

  • avatar
    derekson

    Hyundai did the right thing by grabbing designers from Audi and Bentley to make cars in European style rather than trying to make their Asian designers imitate it like Infiniti did.

    Lexus succeeded by going their own way and doing conservative designs that didn’t really try to look Euro but looked elegant in their own way. They’ve now completely abandoned that strategy and I think it will hurt them in the long run.

  • avatar
    anomaly149

    The new Genesis branded cars are really nice, got to sit in them at NAIAS. I hope they help pivot people away from the trash the Germans are making these days.

    Really nice attributes too – sounds, efforts, and feels were all quite premium. It’s easy to forget what a solid feeling door handle will do to a car.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The Germans are hardly making “trash” these days.

      Aside from some misses like the CLA – the Germans have been bringing it (which is why higher-end, RWD Japanese luxury sales have been declining).

  • avatar
    Joss

    2 Koreas one brings us Genesis the other threats. One man one woman.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    Being that South Korea has a pretty high percentage of evangelicals, I was waiting to see if they’ll do something stupid like name their cars after the books of the Bible after the Genesis.

  • avatar
    dal20402

    I’m still waiting for Hyundai to prove that they can do either of two things, both of which would be necessary for me to consider replacing my LS460 with a Hyundai:

    1) Get high-end interior design and materials really right
    2) Get ride/handling balance really right

    The current Genesis sedan/G80 would be promising on #2, except that since its release Hyundai has released other cars with the usual mediocre to bad suspension tuning (I’m looking at you, Sonata and Santa Fe Sport). Until they start getting it consistently right I continue to be skeptical.

    They’ve never released any car with an interior remotely close to the standards that prevail in midsize to large luxury cars. Of course, the established luxury makers are also ignoring the standards they themselves set with their smaller products, so Hyundai has nothing to worry about there.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Why would anyone in their right mind wish to replace an LS460 with something inferior?

      The LS460 is THE standard of the automotive world in that price/class/size/category with only BMW and Mercedes offering a different alternative, each with a character all its own.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      Thank You! IDGAF if Hyundai/Kia/Genesis vehicles are the most beautiful vehicles known to man. Most of them are still completely uninspiring to drive. Why spend $50K on a car if you absolutely don’t care how well sorted its powertrain & suspension are?

      • 0 avatar
        JCraig

        I would tell you to go test drive a new Genesis 5.0. The ride, handling, transmission, responsiveness etc are all very good. The 3.8 doesn’t ride or handle as well but it also has to meet a price point $15k lower than the 5.0.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      The current Sonata actually has one of the better rides in the mainstream, midsize segment (the previous one had a bit of a brittle ride).

      The Santa Fe Sport is not as good in that dept.; the Sorento’s ride is a good bit better.

      The rides of the new Tucson, Sportage and Optima have gotten a lot of praise as well.

  • avatar
    balreadysaid

    South Korean engineering is some of the most reliable industrial, agricultural around right now. The small diesel engines they are building right now lead the market in mass produced tech. yanmar and takuchi are Japanese and might be the sharper knife. The south Korean work horse equipment being produced now is uncanny in reliability power and strength. If there is one company that has shown similar qualities like listed above hyundai is it. As many as I see on the road and in my shop. They aren’t bad reliability wide. No they aren’t tight like a Honda after 100k. But they still get from point a to b with more than 200k on the clock often. Being a small shop that works on new cars daily right next to old ones. We see things that most will never. Hyundai for the most part do break down and aren’t easy to fix. They rust into nothing, have electrical issues and have belt pulley issues that I have never had to deal with since serpentine belts became popular. The first one I worked on was in 1997. Biggest junk since a Daewoo.probably built on same manufacturer line. Hyundai has improved quality year after year.the Sedona minivan is the only piece of shit they produced with the santafe being close second for a few years. In 2016 Hyundai has finally positioned its self to grow into a world leader and compete with the very biggest and best.

    My mother who hasn’t driven anything but a Cadillac for 30+ years is also interested in the brand lately. Good looks and a perception of quality. Hyundai has a bright future if what I notice near me is a trend all over the country, let alone the world.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The NEW Genesis is absolutely better built, assembled, and engineered, with better materials inside and out, with better reliability and durability, than ANY current Cadillac in production (leaps and bounds better than the ATS, XTS, and better than the CTS, also).

      The kicker is that a “stripper” new Genesis is still pretty loaded, with a much more powerful, refined, reliability standard 6 cylinder the joke of a 4 cylinder now standard in the ATS and CTS, and better than the ubiquitous GM 3.6 liter, and can be had for around $34,000 without much haggling.

      And the Hyundai Genesis will have way better resale value than any Cadillac, particularly as a % of new purchase price.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Maybe I missed something.
    Does the Genesis sell?
    Last I heard it was so so at around 2700 per month…all models.
    Is that good?

    The Taurus sells as well alone. Ditto MKZ.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    It’s all Peter Schreyer, not Genesis…. VW messed up and Piech even admitted it.

    Monumental eff up.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      Not all Schreyer.

      There’s Luc Donckerwolke, Christopher Chapman and Thomas Burkle (the latter 2 were already with Hyundai before Schreyer took the reigns at Hyundai to go along with his Kia duties).

  • avatar
    bd2

    Wouldn’t exactly place the success of the Genesis brand on women as it has been for Lexus.

    Lexus’s success with suburban “soccer moms” is largely relegated to Lexus’s FWD models like the RX, ES and NX whereas the Genesis lineup, including its 2 planned crossovers, will be RWD.

    Female auto buyers place a premium on reliability, practicality/comfort (interior space) and value – so the Genesis brand should appeal to them on those fronts.

    But the Genesis brand should also appeal to male buyers who are looking for power (i.e. – can get a TTV6 for the price of a German T4 or a Japanese V6).

  • avatar

    Last time I test drove Hyundai it was Sonata. I was attracted by the new bold design at autoshow. But after driving it it was like “Meh, why I would buy car like that?”. It also felt cheaply made/assembled inside I do not think Hyundai will be ready anytime soon to compete in luxury market, hell even in midsize market. If course unless you have poor credit rating. When Toyota introduced Lexus they already were making high quality cars for many years. Lexus was just demoing how good Toyota can be in engineering and building cars.

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