By on January 6, 2016

2016 Jeep® 75th Anniversary edition complete model lineup

If you didn’t know it was Jeep’s 75th anniversary this year, it’s your fault for not paying attention. Pretty much all of the automaker’s SUVs are rolling billboards for its “Since 1941” branding, and now Jeep is officially doing something to celebrate.

Jeep launched its 75th Anniversary lineup Wednesday, which includes special editions for all its models. All of the Jeeps are candied in some sort of “macho” green — Jungle Green, Sarge Green or Recon Green — with bronze wheels, some sort of opening roof, and available cloth.

Oh, and there are a bucket-full of badges everywhere so you can feel special edition too.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, the Wrangler and Wrangler Unlimited receive the heaviest special edition backhand. Based on Sahara trims, the 75th Anniversary packages add steel bumpers, a body-colored grille and rock rails. The Wrangler starts at $35,570 and Wrangler Unlimited starts at $39,370. (A comparable Sahara costs roughly $2,500 less.)

Jeep also dressed up the Grand Cherokee with a unique front fascia, 20-inch wheels and cloth seating inserts for $37,770 to start.

There are also special-edition garbs for the Cherokee and the Renegade, which run $30,870 and $26,370.

For the Compass and Patriot — which may or may not make the Jeep 100th anniversary highlight reel in 2031, that’s not my call — there are special editions, too. Those unloved, but phenomenally inexpensive Jeeps right now, get bronze wheels and Recon Green paint and I kind of want one now. Is that weird?

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94 Comments on “Jeep Rolls Out 75th Anniversary Editions; Yes, Patriot, Compass Too...”


  • avatar
    Mullholland

    Yea, that is weird. Seems that I also think the Patriot is the most attractive of this geriatric Jeep family.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      FCA is dying here in Australia. Used to see a lot of Commeners etc on the roads( Not Wranglers), but now they are a fairly rare site.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Jeep sold more than double their yearly volume in Australia last month in the US. Jeep cannot make enough vehicles for global demand right now. I don’t think they are that worried about Australia since they moved 900K!!!! units in the US in 2015.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          Outside NA , they have major trouble, FCA is having major trouble. Looks like they will be leaving here.
          As I suspected NA, is there major market.
          “2015 Jeep global sales total surpasses 2014’s previous record of 1,017,019 units
          U.S. sales increase 25 percent to a record 865,028 units”

    • 0 avatar
      seanx37

      But it is awful. In every way I can think of. If it wasn’t for the Compass, and the Dodge Journey, it is the worse car sold in North America.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Nah its not weird. I’d get a good laugh if I saw a 75th Anniversary Jeep Patriot/Compass at a car show in 20 years.

    Plus getting the cheapest most humble version of something like a “75th Anniversary” edition is sort of a sly way of sticking your tongue out at the guys in special edition Wranglers who think their crap don’t stink.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      If I had a Compass, I’d seriously consider getting a custom-made “Trail Rated” decal big enough to cover most of the back window to remind high-end Jeep drivers what the brand is capable of producing on the low end. Especially if it was a FWD CVT.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        I was just looking online in the dealer inventory at a 2016 4×4 Patriot that was “trail rated”. Strangely the trail rated badge was only on the driver’s side fender not the passenger side.

        What did that save them? 50 cents per vehicle?

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          That’s unacceptable! Badges on sides of cars need to match one another, in pairs.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Badge fail.

          • 0 avatar
            Firestorm 500

            On my ’05 Liberty, the radio antenna is mounted of the right fender where a companion badge would have gone.

            As far as I know, the Trail Rated badge is only on the left fender of everything that deserves to get it.

        • 0 avatar
          FreedMike

          The second badge was stolen. Those things go for BIG BIG BIG money after all. Nothing says “cool” like a “Trail Rated” badge on a 2002 Hyundai.

          • 0 avatar
            IAhawkeye

            On my ’10 Wrangler the radio antenna sits in the exact spot where a companion Trail-rated logo would go.. I guess I don’t mind too much I never notice it. It’s been debadged of everything else since I got it. I just didn’t have the heart to tear it off too..

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Oh! A 75th Anniversary edition of the Compass. Be still my beating heart.

    —-Swoon—-

    Wait, they still sell the Compass?

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Yes, I parked next to one yesterday, new or nearly new. It has the Grand Cherokee face instead of the “Wrangler’s developmentaly-disabled little sister” face it came out with, so thats why they arent as easy to spot in passing. If the owner had been there, I wouldve asked them if the newer model like theirs actually HAD a compass, because they didnt when the Compass was introduced.

      As I was sitting there waiting for someone (and looking at the Jeep so I wasnt looking at the interracial couple arguing loudly in their beater Grand Marquis parked in front of me), I thought about peeling the COMP letters off the door badges. Whats left is a more apropriate description of the car. Being this far south, Im quite sure it was even 2wd, and the handsome Grand Cherokee mug doesnt make up for that. And, it was “rental standard silver”. Uhhgg.

      Id take a last-gen Dodge Avenger over a 2wd Patriot/Compass. Probably a Trail Rated version too, though I might ask for time to decide lol.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “which may or may not make the Jeep 100th anniversary highlight reel in 2031”

    2041

  • avatar
    Car Ramrod

    I don’t see why anniversary editions are interesting to anybody. I saw a Daimler/Cerberus era JGC on the road last week with “Jeep65” badges all over it and wondered why anybody would buy it, new or used, as it only proved this was an older Jeep from that unremarkable generation. Anyone care to take the opposite position?

    • 0 avatar
      tylanner

      IMO Anniversary Editions are reserved for cars which have strong enthusiast community/culture/clubs and are catering directly to those members. Corvette is the prime example but I think Jeep has a fairly sound following.

      They won’t really make sense or appeal to your average consumer.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I agree. Fans scoop them up. In my area Silverado comes out with the “Texas Edition” for Texas fans and the “Zia Edition” for New Mexico fans.

        Both packages add a lot of gear and options to the standard features.

    • 0 avatar
      Firestorm 500

      My daughter had a 2006 Grand Cherokee 65th Anniversary Edition. It was very nice. The special equipment put it between a Laredo and a Limited in features.

      The heated cloth seats and the sunroof were the best features in her opinion.

      You call these an “unremarkable generation”. As a long-time Jeep owner, I can assure you that these are very nice vehicles that are a pleasure to drive in any weather.

      You will see a lot of these on the road for many years to come. It’s no wonder Jeep sells so many of them.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    Welcome to Orvis. I approve of these.

  • avatar
    tylanner

    Just came to say hi to that handsome Grand Cherokee. That design just works.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Yup. The Grand Cherokee a winner! And they seem to hold up after 4 years of use. Must be the Daimler engineering.

      • 0 avatar
        White Shadow

        Mines junk. It’s a 2015 and I love it, but there’s no way I’m keeping beyond the warranty period because it’s a piece of crap and has plenty of issues. The transmission issues alone scare me enough to dump it after 3 years.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          White Shadow, my wife’s three sisters each had a 2014 JFC that was initially junk but after three or four reflashings things got better and they still drive them today.

          Maybe a knowledgeable Jeep dealer, or Jeep.com, can help you correct the issues. I recommend Perking in Colo Sprgs, CO and Avondale in Phx, AZ. They live all things Jeep.

          • 0 avatar
            White Shadow

            I had 5 flash updates so far and none of them did anything to correct the various transmission issues. The transmission slips on the first to second gear upshift when cold. It also shifts hard to the point it goes “bang!” on the first to second gear upshift when no throttle is applied (think parking lot speeds). It also has rough downshifts from 8 to 7 and from 7 to 6. And finally, at times it refuses to go into 8th gear at all on the highway. This can go on for more than 30 minutes and then all of a sudden it will drop into 8th. So strange…

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            White Shadow, those are the exact same gremlins faced by my wife’s sisters. I wrote about that extensively on Kicking Tires, ttac and putc after March 2013.

            IIRC there are at least three different flashes out that are tailored to locations, like Denver, Phoenix, sea-level, but there may be more now.

            Present your issues on Jeep.com and you will hear from a factory guy (or gal) at Jeep in a reply.

            Finding a Jeep Tech in the real world who knows what he or she is doing, that may be another challenge altogether.

            FWIW, the engine air filter plays a crucial part in providing mass-airflow sensor input to the CPU that manages the different systems.

            Another variable was the quality of the gasoline which dictates gas-pedal position.

            The JGC in Denver, CO responded positively to Amoco mid-grade (89 octane) and an K&N air Filter in conjunction with a third reflash for high-altitude.

            The firmware for our 2012 JGC V6 was much simpler by comparison and it only had the older automatic transmission, not the 8-speed. It only took one reflash (high altitude) to get everything to work right on our JGC.

    • 0 avatar
      White Shadow

      It looks no different to me than my Overland. I’m not sure what they changed for the front end of this anniversary edition. The wheels are different though.

  • avatar
    Thatkat09

    Say what you want about the Patriot, but it just had its best-selling year yet. Think about it, it just entered its 10th year of production yet it’s selling better than ever. The Compass/Patriot twins are the modern day Omni/Horizon.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I just want to see what FCA does with these twins, the Renegade is apparently less than stellar, yet costs more… So is it or is it not going to replace them?
      Letting them go would definately slow down their streak of success.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        It’s going to replace them with a Renegade XL.

      • 0 avatar
        Thatkat09

        I dont even think FCA knows what its going to do. Sergio probably didnt expect for the Dart to be selling as poorly as it is and if the twins get discontinued, Belvidere essentially looses more than half of its production. It doesnt hurt that the Patriot/Compass are probably nothing but profit at this point since they’ve been in production for so long. Allpar says the next generation Dart is moving to Mexico so I guess when the time comes around to retool the twins will be taken out back.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The Renegade is already One Big Badge. I didn’t know more were possible.

  • avatar
    -Nate

    I don’t get it ~

    Doesn’t anyone want a regular old Jeep anymore ? .

    I have *very* fond memories of back woods bashing in our 1952 M38A1 in New Hampshire .

    Not long ago I was looking at a used base model ‘ Sahara ‘ (?) in Desert Tan with four cylinder engine , it looked fine but I realized I’d have no use for the 4X4 anymore .

    -Nate

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Pretty much no. The people who do want to bomb around in the woods buy used.

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      Mission shift, on the Jeep line. They’re not for bombing around the woods anymore. They’re for posing around the Starbucks.

      Part of it is Federal safety standards. It’s not legally POSSIBLE to bring out a CJ2 II. AMC did broach the concempt with the 1977 Jeep II prototype; but probably our keepers in Washington looked askance.

      So, instead, they’ve aimed for the SUV Luxo-Barge market – and they’ve pretty much hit the pinnacle.

      Today, if you want to bomb around the woods…you either get a four-wheeler; or you get an old pickup truck. There aren’t that many rough-and-ready old CJs left.

      • 0 avatar
        -Nate

        I see ~

        _$tarbuck$_ ~ in a _JEEP .

        ?!WTF?! .

        FWIW , I was looking on Flea-Bay a while ago and there were still plenty of battered old Flat Fender Jeeps out there , ours (not a Flat Fender) was cherry but I well remember working on battered old Farm Jeeps that soldiers on in amazingly bad shape , year after year…

        -Nate

  • avatar
    Zackman

    For me, the only Jeep I’d buy is a base Wrangler; half-doors, soft top all the way, preferably with A/C. I’ll do my own sound system, thank you.

    However, if I really wanted to spend serious money, I’d have to opt for an auto tranny, hard top w/full doors in addition to the above. The hard top with doors & roll-down windows would be better for serious travel and winter driving.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I don’t know if you can get them any more, but in 2010 I went halfsies on a Wrangler Soft Top stick shift for my grandson, for $22K out the door. He bought a detachable Hard Top separately for $1600, plus tax.

      I haven’t seen any like it since, and none below $25K MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        JustPassinThru

        This will floor you. I bought a NEW 1998 Wrangler for $9999. It was a stripper with no carpeting and a four-cylinder – but that’s what I paid for it.

        Two years later, weary of the cramped seating and unable to modify the seats…airbags, dontcha know…I sold it. For what I paid for it. Thirty thousand miles later.

        That’s how fast those prices went up. Even into the TJ era, the base Wrangler could lay claim to its role as a utility truck. That’s now long-gone; and only someone deluded or misinformed is going to expect the maker of not-very-durable Italian cars to engineer a durable, tougher-than-dirt TRUCK.

        They can’t; they aren’t; and the current Jeep market buyers don’t care. These are cars to be seen in.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Wranglers, and now the WK2 Grand Cherokees, keep insanely high retail value when the owner decides to sell them or trade them in on a new car or truck.

          And you’re right – ” These are cars to be seen in.”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You know when you say “resale, resale, resale” into a mirror at midnight 28-Cars-Later comes out of it and contradicts you.

            Nah seriously though JGC is very similar with Lex GX in terms of resale percentage of msrp. Both are in the 50-60% arena depending on features/condition/miles.

            MY11 Jeep GC Laredo V6 4×4 (msrp $30,215, leather group + 4K, nav + 1K, + 1K moonroof)

            01/05/16 OHIO Regular $16,750 54,386 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes
            12/07/15 NY Regular $17,400 59,126 Avg GRAY 6CY A Yes
            12/10/15 DETROIT Regular $17,400 59,798 Avg BLUE 6G A Yes
            12/16/15 KC Regular $18,300 60,235 Above BLACK 6G A Yes
            12/16/15 PITTSBGH Regular $17,900 62,890 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes
            01/05/16 ATLANTA Regular $15,500 63,195 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
            12/08/15 GEORGIA Regular $16,100 64,918 Avg RED 6G A Yes
            12/09/15 MINNEAP Regular $17,600 65,081 Avg WHITE 6G A Yes
            01/04/16 PA Lease $17,800 66,910 Avg RED 6G A Yes
            12/22/15 OHIO Lease $15,800 74,535 Avg BLACK 6G A Yes

            MY11 Lex GX460 4×4 base (53K, nav + 4K)

            12/30/15 NJ Regular $28,000 38,304 Avg WHITE 8G A Yes
            12/18/15 PA Regular $28,900 43,601 Avg WHT/WHT 8G A Yes
            12/14/15 ORLANDO Lease $32,600 50,827 Above SILVER 8G A Yes
            12/10/15 ATLANTA Regular $27,800 59,283 Avg BLACK 8G A Yes
            12/17/15 LOUISVLL Regular $25,950 65,868 Avg GREY 8G A Yes
            12/29/15 ATLANTA Regular $27,200 66,878 Avg GREY 8G A Yes
            12/18/15 PA Regular $27,500 68,490 Avg GREY 8G P Yes
            12/14/15 PA Lease $26,900 69,557 Avg GREY 8G P Yes
            12/17/15 PA Regular $29,750 79,316 Above BLACK 8G P Yes

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            For an FCA product, 50% depreciation is still pretty impressive, especially considering that these JGC Laredos have 60-65K miles on them.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I agree, I expected the Lex GX to do better percentage wise but the data speaks for itself.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            For whatever reason, GX Lexus trucks have worse resale than their 4runner platform mates. A rift in the Lexus resale continuum as it were. 03-09 era GX470s and 4runners are basically at price parity, some guys have started to buy soccer mom driven Lexi and replacing the rocker trim with rock sliders, installing Prado lifts, and taking these things wheeling. Very capable and sturdy rigs once you rip off the color matched plastic mudguards and other gingerbread.

          • 0 avatar
            VoGo

            Maybe its hard to reconcile the tough Forerunner image with Lexus coddling?

            Who is going to dress up in flannel and go into the woods for a week with his bros, but only if they have heated leather seats and multi zone climate control?

          • 0 avatar
            White Shadow

            Really? WK2? Not from what I’ve seen. I’ll be happy if I get back 40% on my 2015 WK2. Then again, I paid cash for it and got it at a bit more than $9K off MSRP, so I guess the resale value seems better if you base it off MSRP, but nobody pays anywhere near that.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Now I really want a Lexus GX.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            28-Cars-Later, you are right and you are one of the few who knows his stuff.

            That said, in areas where Jeep Wranglers and Grand Cherokees are in much demand, such as the Rocky Mountain States, and others, they keep a retained value better than in places where they are not as popular.

            For grins, visit the sites of Perkins in Colo Sprgs, Mark’s Casa in Albuquerque, and Avondale in Phoenix. There’s one in Idaho too, but I forgot their name.

            Where a person trades and what they trade for has a lot to do with how much they get for their trade. KBB is just a guide.

            Sometimes these trades are gone/sold the same day they’re taken in, as was the case with my grandson’s 2010 Wrangler in San Diego.

            The places you listed just don’t seem like too many people would buy them.

            It would be interesting to learn in which states the Wrangler and Grand Cherokee sell the most new.

            Regrets, but I no longer have access to that current info.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @white shadow

            I tossed in a few of the options listed on cars.com. People may get money on the hood but then they want nav or moonroofs and give some of it back in trim profit.

            @CJ

            Now I do too, and I had dreams of an LS.

            @hdc

            There were more JGCs listed I just picked the ones with middle of the pack miles to compare against the smaller amount LGXs so as we could see an even comparison. There were cleaner JGCs which did more and rougher ones that did less.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “They can’t; they aren’t; and the current Jeep market buyers don’t care. These are cars to be seen in.”

          If you had limited plant capacity and a ton of demand for $35K+ loaded 4 door models, would you choose to crank out basic $23k 2 door models?

          • 0 avatar
            JustPassinThru

            It all depends on which market they are trying to serve. Obviously the Cadillac market was a little different than the Kaiser-Jeep Wagoneer market in the 1960s.

            So, the current owners of the Jeep brand have chosen to monetize the image and heritage and sell to the image-conscious, at inflated prices. Will that market be there forever? Today’s Jeeps recall the memories of military vehicles and gas-station CJs and hunting trips and bulletproof ruggedness. In twenty years, with the FCA Itali-Jeeps all long scrapped from failures and corrosion…will customers THEN see the Jeep line as anything other than a brand passed from company to company, shoddier every time?

            Cadillac tried to forever sell the image of an aspirational car. How did that work, when the engines became corporate and the bodies became badge-engineered C-bodies?

            How did the reputation of Mercedes engineering stand up to the present reality of the cars as expensive to buy and more expensive to maintain, with repairs eventually more than the rapidly-depreciating market-value? Volkswagen, likewise. Their present has long ago overtaken their past; and Dieselgate is showing they are not striving to learn from their decline.

            So…no…I think FCA, which obviously is focused on the present, future be damned…is just cashing in the status value of the marque when they can. I suspect Sergio knows his game has an end date.

  • avatar
    JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

    Nothing new. My aunt had a 65th aniv. Commander my uncle bought her new. V-8 2wd, not Hemi. They hated it, and so did I (I was helping them out a lot at the time and frequently drove her vehicle to do so). Terrible vehicle, utter garbage. Traded in at 65k for a new F-150 she still has with 100k+.

    So Jeep is proud of even its awful products, just goes to show how full of themselves they are I guess. Im sure there was a special edition Liberty at some time.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      I can relate to the bad Jeep experience. Had a Grand Wagoneer that I bought used from an Air Force Sergeant going overseas.

      I was constantly having to tool and wrench on it. If it wasn’t one thing, it was another that broke.

      But we were very, very lucky with the 2012 Grand Cherokee we had for four years, in spite of all the recall notices we received during ownership.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I think the Liberty gets some undeserved flack. Sure, it wasn’t terribly reliable (but the good Jeeps — Grand Cherokee, for example — can’t make that claim either), but it was pretty solid off road. My friend’s wife had one when they were dating and it climbed some surprisingly steep snow covered hills after a weekend of caving.

      While the Compass and Patriot aren’t my cup of tea, they serve the purpose as cheap little CUVs.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        The liberty is hated for displacing the beloved XJ Cherokee, if it merely was sold alongside a modernized XJ (which doesn’t make sense I know) the Liberty wouldn’t be as much of a whipping boy.

        • 0 avatar
          Firestorm 500

          The Liberty is actually badged as a Cherokee everywhere in the world other than North America.

          So, the Liberty is actually a modernized XJ.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            I guess what I meant to say was specifically a modernized version of that same old XJ platform, but with looming emissions tightening and safety standards, that wonderful design just didn’t have a future. Lightweight, roomy (for the footprint) body with solid axles front and rear, with a simple and torquey engine. A potent combination, I definitely see one in my future at some point, ideally a 5spd. At the same time, I do see the appeal of Liberties as well, in the context of the current used SUV market. They’ve depreciated enough, common, and not particularly desired by the offroad crowd. I wouldn’t say no to a 6spd manual V6 4wd model, or even a 4cyl 5spd 4wd variant. They’re similar to my brother’s Suzuki Grand Vitara XL7: not rock crawlers by any means but way more capable and durable than the typical crossover.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Why exactly do you guys dislike these vehicles because of age? Possibly because they make vehicles like the HRV and encore look like awful deals? Soldiering on a platform is one of the best ways to say it works, I would much rather have an old platform that is a sure deal than something new that cost $8k more.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      I haven’t liked anything on the Mitsubishi GS, so I am fine with the Compatriot going away. I will, however, not hate on these two vehicles because they are affordable AWD/4WD options that part of the market enjoys.

      • 0 avatar
        VoGo

        Every review of the ComPatriots I read when they were introduced was negative. Time has not improved them relative to the market.

        • 0 avatar
          Hummer

          Oh I don’t for a second think they are good vehicles, I’m just questioning why people apparently into cars are going to deride a company for keeping around an old vehicle when the sales more than justify its existence.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Patriot is best Jeep.

    First off, its the best looking Jeep currently on sale. (Handsome, Honest)
    Second, the 2.4L/5MT combo wont set the world on fire, but it also wont set itself on fire.
    Third, the selectable AWD system us more than enough for my, and I am guessing most peoples needs.
    Four, the lack of all but the most common electronic gizmos should keep the gremlins away.
    Five, they are inexpensi.. er, lets just say cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I don’t think you’ll find many Liberty owners who don’t wish they could have afforded a Wrangler or Grand Cherokee.

      And isn’t the Liberty a Dodge Nitro in drag? Who outside of trailer parks aspires to own a Dodge Nitro?

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Second, the 2.4L/5MT combo wont set the world on fire, but it also wont set itself on fire.
      Third, the selectable AWD system us more than enough for my, and I am guessing most peoples needs.”

      I had one with this combo for a time and took successfully WAY beyond most people’s needs.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Dave, you and I are like the Patriot Internet Defense League :)

      I was a doubter myself, I can’t stand when manufacturers parade their “soft roaders” around outdoorsy settings like shallow streams and simple dirt roads, and very carefully manicured courses for the press.

      Then I saw this:

      linkhttp://www.expeditionswest.com/equipment/reviews/patriot/

      Their test on the Crown King Back Road near the bottom is the most interesting bit.

      I’d love to see Expeditions West take a Renegade down the same trail. I’ve been a real downer about the Renegade (I think it’s the $33k they charge for the Trailhawk that gets me), but if it can work similar magic on a real world test like that then I will gladly change my tune.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        I would be personally unsurprised if the Renegade, even in more basic AWD guise, is pretty decent off road. Jeep seems to have figured out how to get the most out of their transverse AWD system.

        That said, I’d still take a Patriot. Looks for starters, the Renegade doesnt do it for me, and the 2.4L/5MT would be my pick over the 1.4T/9AT weirdness in the Renegade. Add in the pricing on these things (especially north of the 49th, where they tip 40k) and for me, I’m a Patriot patriot.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          Error in your statement, davefromcalgary. The 1.4T in the Renegade is a 6MT exclusively while the 2.4 is the 9AT exclusively.

          Not faulting the Patriot, but I never liked its looks. That said, my next-door neighbor is now driving a fleet Pat and likes it better than the Hyundai SUV he’d been driving for three years with his company.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Thanks for the specs clarification Vulpine.

            Either way, though, I’ve test driven a few 6MT/1.4T Darts… Not impressed. I’d take the old 2.4L in the Patriot (which I have also driven a bit back in the day).

            I know looks are subjective. I like the Patriot because it’s the most faithful to the classic Jeep Cherokee styling. Never liked the Compass, and the Renegade shape doesnt appeal, and the easter eggs make me think Jeep thinks they are REALLY clever.

            But man, if you get/when you get/if you have already gotten a Renegade, I hope you enjoy the hell out of it. My personal opinions are never meant to wish ill on someone who disagrees.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            What I would suggest, Dave, is that you actually test drive one, rather than relying on experience from a different and older vehicle. Even the more recent Darts are reportedly better by far than the first generation model which was intentionally crippled to achieve a Federal fuel mileage goal with too short a deadline to do proper engineering.

            I drive a ’14 Fiat 500 and I think you’d be surprised at just how well the NA 1.6 base engine performs with 101 hp while the 1.4T is rated around 135 hp ( horsepower which itself ran surprisingly well in a 3400# Saturn VUE using the old Ecotech 2.4.)

            Again, test drive it before you lock in your opinion; you might be surprised.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            I’ve had a bunch of base 500 as rentals for work. I love em as rentals, since they are small, maneuverable, and you can drive them with the right foot to the floor 99% of the time. That said, I wouldn’t own one, because I find the interior layout/ergonomics don’t work for me.

            You’re likely right that the Renegade drives different/better than early run Darts. Moot point overall, as I’m not shopping in this segment now or anytime soon. And, I don’t think even favorable driving impressions would be enough to change the fact that I just don’t like the aesthetics (and Canadian pricing!) of the vehicle.

            My small 2-box AWD vehicle of choice is the SX4 anyways.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            You drive what you like… unless what you like isn’t available new or used. Ah well.

            Right now I’m torn between two upcoming vehicles and the Renegade. I like my little Fiat so that stays; the economy, agility and so far durability makes it an excellent town car with enough comfort for longer trips (200 miles or so no issue with it.) On the other hand, its interior space is insufficient when I visit my parents who always overload me with return ‘gifts’ that even have my Wrangler overstuffed with the back seats folded. However, the Wrangler is starting to get old and while I love the little Ranger as a pickup truck, with a regular cab it can’t carry me, my wife and my dog simultaneously in the cab; I prefer an extended cab because I simply have no need for a full time second row of seats. So, I can go Renegade and keep driving three vehicles, consider the upcoming Wrangler-based pickup IF it comes with an extended cab variant or the Hyundai Santa Cruz. If I go with a pickup-based compact I get the advantage of better economy, 4×4 (or AWD) and an open bed. If I go with Wrangler-based pickup I get 4×4 and a larger bed, though worse fuel mileage but still an improvement over my current Wrangler. Everything else is, for me, too big to be worth it and even the Wrangler based truck will be pushing my size limits.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Jeep, and RAM, are the only two things FCA has going for it. Thankfully with Brent punching through $35 a barrel and WTI punching through $34 today, I don’t think they have to worry about high gasoline prices killing them in the next couple of years.

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Gotta say I like that two-tone green on the Renegade. Very tempting.

  • avatar
    IAhawkeye

    Wow, am I the only one who finds the Jeep Patriot kinda ugly? I’ve never really liked that design, especially in the lower trim levels that you seem to see around here a lot. I don’t mind the Compass all that much, or should I say I don’t mind the Compass drivers I know all that much.. they make up for some of it’s misgivings ;)

    I dig the color schemes though, the Gold wheels remind me of 90’s Grand Cherokee’s(I think) that I used to see as a child. Real question. Where’s the wood-panel versions? Now that would be something I would be interested in.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I wonder if part of the 75th Anniversary package is quality, reliability and durability for these Jeeps?

    I can’t believe how many people consider Jeeps reliable. If they were that good do you think where reliability and durability is required off road Landcruisers, some mid sizers, Patrols, and military G Wagens (many countries) would be the vehicles of choice?

    Even Land Rovers are the preferred vehicle in lieu of a Jeep.

    Why is this so?????

    I still don’t understand why someone would drop 20″ rims on a Grand Cherokee??? Wouldn’t it be better to supply the vehicle with a better off rod suspension???

    We have numpties here in Australia that buy midsizers, remove the 16″ or 17″ rims and drop 20″-22″ inch rims on a 4×4. I suppose it’s a free world.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      Big Al,

      I’m sure you realize that American roads, unlike Australian roads evidently, are mostly paved. Off-roading is a hobby in the US, almost nobody has a 200 mile unpaved run to the nearest trading post anymore. Those that do drive pickups.

      I’m not sure why you keep repeating the whole “Wranglers are unreliable” thing. Look at resale values, people don’t pay that much for non-runners. A buddy just retired a Wrangler with over half a million miles on it, and that wasn’t a fluke, or the result of airplane-like maintenance. He just did normal maintenance at reasonable intervals.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        heavy handle,
        Without being overly rude, I do think you should come and visit Australia.

        Believe it or not we don’t have kangaroos hopping down the middle of George St in Sydney.

        And Australia is not flat and a desert.

        • 0 avatar
          heavy handle

          Big Al,

          I was joking about that, but all the preferred vehicles you mention are optimized more for longer runs on unpaved roads. That’s not the kind of offroading that’s most popular in the US.

          Americans are more likely to drive hundreds of miles on the Interstate to get to a trail that’s a few miles long.

          I’ve driven Defenders and Land Cruisers and Patrols. They work great on unpaved roads, but they are a pain on paved roads and in snow. That’s probably why they’ve historically sold in tiny numbers in the US, they’re not adapted to what customers want.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @heavy handle
        Big Al from Oz, just stating the general problems with Jeep here. Wrangler just used as a weekender vehicle, not a go tame the outback deal

    • 0 avatar
      JustPassinThru

      Durability and reliability are two different things. The Asian manufacturers developed a reputation for reliability early on – but their thin sheetmetal and poor corrosion resistance made them fragile and susceptable to tinworm. Jeeps, as built by Willys through AMC, were simple and rugged – you could bounce over boulders and not spring a frame or snap an axle (pre-AMC 20 models) And if you did, repair was relatively easy. But long-term durability was no more, and often, as with the Kaiser OHC or Chevrolet V6, less, than other vehicles.

      That of course is no longer true. Part of it is the CAFE-driven weight purge; but Fiat has never had a reputation for either durability or reliability. They have a reputation for servicing closed and protected markets – and for selling their old models to collectivist state ministries that are unable to develop even primitive auto designs of their own.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        JustPassinThru,
        I agree with your comment, but as you stated we are now going back over 50 years.

        • 0 avatar
          JustPassinThru

          @Big Al from Oz

          Not quite fifty years. Much of the AMC legacy, which may have been partly form their inheriting the old Willys/Kaiser ironmonger engineers…much of that carried forward into the early ’00s. The XJ was a wondrous achievement – a tough unibody SUV with, once the Chevy V6 was abandoned, an equally-tough set of engines.

          I speak from experience here, having had Jeep vehicles with both the 232 six and the derived 2.5 four. Couldn’t kill either of those engines – and that’s not just my experience or opinion. The six was preferred for the power; but the four was more than adaquate for routine use.

          Towards the end those were supremely-well-engineered – but more to the point, they could take a licking and keep on ticking.

          In any event, memories follow car marques. Today’s Jeep sales are on cultural or personal memories of Jeeps as tough vehicles. Those fade…like the GMC line of rebadged Chevy trucks and CUVs. That’s stood them well, even after abandoning manufacture of real trucks…but comes a time when it’s recognized for what it is. Who thinks of GMCs these days as anything remarkable, other than a marketing effort of badge-engineered vehicles?

          Jeep in a decade will be the same.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        ” collectivist state ministries” last time I looked the USSR had fallen over. Fiat is undercapitalised and needs a lot of money to compete, that is why Marchionne , needs a partner.

  • avatar
    an innocent man

    And to properly honor this milestone, after 75 miles the vehicles will fail to start.

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