By on January 15, 2016

2016 Chevrolet Spark

Chevrolet might be trying to sell its newest Spark in the United States for $12,660 ($13,535 with freight), but the automaker is bringing its game to other low-priced subcompacts in Canada with a starting price of $9,995 CAD ($11,595 CAD with freight/PDI).

That means the Spark costs $6,880 USD on the Canadian side of the border after adjusting for current exchange rates. Either GM Canada is taking a massive financial hit on the Spark, or Americans are getting hosed — by $5,780 USD, to be exact — for the Korean-made hatchback.

According to GM Canada, the new Spark arrives with a decent amount of kit as standard: a 7-inch touchscreen with MyLink, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto; OnStar with 4G LTE and Wi-Fi hotspot; 10 airbags; hill-start assist; and rearview camera. In the United States, the hatchback also receives single-zone climate control with air conditioning as standard.

(Last time we checked, air conditioning didn’t cost nearly six grand.)

The Spark, with a curb weight of 2,246 pounds in LS Manual guise, is powered by a 1.4-liter four-cylinder engine producing 98 horsepower and 94 pounds-feet of torque paired to either a five-speed manual or continuously variable transmission. The CVT is rated at 6.7L/100km, or 35.1 mpg, on the combined cycle, according to Natural Resources Canada. Fuel consumption increases to 6.9L/100km, or 34 mpg, with the five-speed manual.

(NRCan and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency use the same five-cycle test for calculating fuel economy.)

2015 Nissan Micra S (2 of 10)

The 2015 Nissan Micra S, which tips the scales at 2,302 pounds with a five-speed manual, offers a stouter, thirstier engine but less kit as standard for its $9,998 CAD ($11,598 CAD with freight/PDI) MSRP. Current incentives on the Micra bring that MSRP down to $9,348 CAD ($10,948 CAD with freight/PDI). Wind-up windows, a basic four-speaker AM/FM/CD/MP3/AUX audio system and six airbags greet you in the least-expensive Nissan. Its 1.6-liter four-cylinder engine pumps out 109 horsepower and 107 pounds-feet of torque, but is rated at 7.7L/100km (30.5 mpg) with the five-speed stick or 7.8L/100km (30.2 mpg) with its traditional four-speed automatic.

2015 Mitsubishi Mirage ES

Mitsubishi gets to keep its fuel economy crown. The 2015 Mirage is rated at 6.4L/100km, or 36.8 mpg, but is effectively a very fancy bus pass with its wheezy 1.2-liter three-cylinder engine with 74 horsepower.

2017 Mirage GT

The new, 2017 Mirage (Mitsubishi is skipping the 2016 model year) brings with it a more streamlined exterior, which should help it eke out an additional mile per gallon, and carry the honor of being the first Mitsubishi to offer Apple CarPlay and Android Auto in Canada and the United States. No pricing has been announced, but expect it to keep its $9,998 CAD price tag in Canada when incentives are calculated into the total ($11,448 CAD with freight/PDI). It also receives a bump in output to 78 horsepower and more robust brakes.

The 2016 Chevrolet Spark is on sale now, and it might be in your best interest to go north to buy one.

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80 Comments on “Cheap Car Wars Canada: 2016 Chevrolet Spark Gets $9,995 CAD Price Tag, and Americans Should Be Seriously Pissed Off...”


  • avatar
    maxxcool7421

    Wonder where the DUTY tax would be applied. To the Canada price or the US price. if it is still only 2.5% then 6k*2.5 import tax is not bad.

    • 0 avatar
      dash riprock

      Think there is an manufacturer/dealer agreement that new vehicles will not be sold to people outside the country. The last time the canuck buck dived, dealers from the US were coming up and buying diesel trucks. That caused a big commotion from the US dealers and the big 3 laid down the law on the Canadian dealers

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        @dash riprock – with the drop in Canadian currency against the USA dollar we will see USA buyers flocking to Canadian equipment auctions. That is probably already happening in Alberta. I used to see that sort of thing in BC when the Forest Industry took a nose dive. Good equipment from bankrupt companies or companies downsizing to stay afloat are pretty attractive with a 30% price advantage built in from the start. IIRC used equipment isn’t import restricted like personal vehicles.

    • 0 avatar
      mleitman

      Canada has free trade with South Korea, so I’d guess there’s no duty.

    • 0 avatar
      APaGttH

      As I understand it, thanks to NAFTA, you can bring one vehicle as a personal buyer from the US to Canada (or vice versa) duty free. There are a number of forms and requirements that have to be met, and my experience in this space was almost buying an ’89 Ford Probe GT from a Canadian seller (backed off when the guy gave off super scammy vibes).

      Now with that said, my experience was around a US car. If the car has US certification for emissions and safety (I would speculate a new Spark would) the bringing it over isn’t all that hard.

      Given you get one car – I wouldn’t waste my bullet on a penalty box on wheels. I also think if there isn’t a way via a DIC to switch the instrumentation from metric to English, you’re on the hook for the conversions to get your DOT certification to title and register in the US (new car)

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Hmmmmm spend $7K + tax and time for new wheels but be seen in a Chevy Spark?

    *strokes imaginary beard*

    I wonder if dealers can get in on this?

  • avatar

    “Either GM Canada is taking a massive financial hit on the Spark, or Americans are getting hosed ”

    I’m thinking it’s BOTH.

    SIMULTANEOUSLY.

  • avatar
    klossfam

    The worst part of this whether a Canuck or a Yank? You end up owning a Spark…

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    What is “PDI”? Pre-Delivery Inspection? They CHARGE for that in the Great White North?!

    Do Canadian prices include tax? What would the “on the road” price for one of these be in Nova Scotia for you Mark? Here on the other side of the Gulf of Maine, you would have $300 or so in dealer fees, 5.5% sales tax paid at the dealer (net of trade-in and discounts), then another 2.4% excise tax (on MSRP, no less) plus $50 or so in fees paid when you register it at City Hall. That last bit gets expensive on nicer cars, and no rolling it into the loan!

    • 0 avatar
      dash riprock

      Federal tax would be 5%
      Provincial tax varies but in BC it is 7%
      Battery levy
      Air conditioning levy
      and yest the ultra offensive document fees

      No title here…

    • 0 avatar

      Yes, PDI is pre-delivery inspection and all automakers charge it in Canada.

      As far as “on-road cost”, I’ll take my best crack at it …

      Spark LS MSRP: $9,995
      Freight + PDI: $1,600
      Misc. Dealer Fee: $300
      Sales Tax (15%): $1,784.25
      Vehicle Registration: $176.90
      A/C Tax: $0
      Tire Tax: $22.50
      Vehicle Safety Inspection: $25

      Grand Total: $13,903.65

      • 0 avatar
        eggsalad

        I totally dig safety inspections and I wish more localities had them. That being said, why do you have to get (and pay for) a safety inspection on a BRAND-NEW CAR??

        • 0 avatar
          TCragg

          Nova Scotia requires annual provincial safety inspections for all licenced vehicles, IIRC. Much of my family lives in Canada’s Ocean Playground, and even new cars are subject to this annual cash grab. BTW, the same car in Ontario would be as follows:

          Spark LS MSRP: $9,995
          Freight + PDI: $1,600
          Misc. Dealer Fee: $300
          Sales Tax (13%): $1,546.35
          Vehicle Registration: $14.00
          A/C Tax: $0
          Environmental levy: $29.00
          OMVIC fees: $10.00

          Grand Total: $13,494.35 (or $9,311.00 USD).

          • 0 avatar

            New vehicles get an inspection sticker valid for 3 years. Used vehicles are valid for 2 years. It used to be annual, but the government rolled it back a number of years ago.

          • 0 avatar
            Bimmer

            A/C tax in Ontario is $100, not 0. But, since Spark does not have A/C as standard equipment, make sure it somehow not added up by the dealer.

        • 0 avatar
          b534202

          PDI isn’t really a safety inspection. Its mostly to hook up wires to the battery, put in fresh oil, peel off all the tapes and put down the floor mat and stuff.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          Same here in Maine for safety inspection. And the funny thing is that my BMW dealer charges you for it when you buy a car from them, but then they are free forever! Might actually be a state requirement on new cars. Used cars from a dealer have to be freshly inspected before sale, but I have never had a used car dealer charge for it as a line item. All the new car dealers do. I’ve never bought a used car from a new car dealer, so no idea if they still do it.

          AS to why charge for it on a new car? Simple, all cars have to have the sticker on the windshield, and the state mandates what must be done to get that sticker. At $15.50 or $18 per, shops LOSE money on the inspections themselves. But of course, they typically get to fix what they find…

        • 0 avatar
          Lorenzo

          I don’t think it’s purely a safety inspection. When my uncle was a Ford dealer, he got cars that had a paint protection coating that had to be washed off, fluids had to be added/topped off, interior cleaned up, and other dealer preparation before the car was ready to sell. The PDI might be mandated by Canadian law, but if the dealer is getting any part of the payment, it’s probably going toward that dealer cost, unless they charge separately for that too!

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      The best place to buy for the purposes of US import would be Alberta, where there is only the 5% federal tax.

    • 0 avatar
      saskp

      I am not familiar with American duty rates but this car is imported from South Korea, so I’d image there would be import duties on top of that…

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    It gets even worse when you figure that these cars are built in South Korean Won currency, when you compare exchange rates.

    USD13,535 = 16,512,899.12 KRW

    CAD11,595 = 9,734,921.69 KRW

    In KRW, the US version costs a whopping SEVENTY PERCENT MORE!!

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    For me, it raises more red flags, like “What’d they do to make it so cheap?” Does it come with a real engine, or just a picture of one?

    http://vignette3.wikia.nocookie.net/familyguy/images/6/64/Carengine.jpg/revision/latest?cb=20140706010532

  • avatar
    50merc

    We USians have to pay six grand more?? I’d take an anti-depressant, but medicine also costs a lot more south of the border.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Many consumer products are sold at prices in which the buying public is willing to pay.

    The competition in Canada for vehicles in this segment would be more competitive than across the border.

    There would be vehicles sold in Canada that are more expensive than an equivalent in the US.

    We see this often in Australia to a greater degree. Is it fair that in Australia we pay less for many vehicles than the US?

    A number of factors come into play, what was the value of the Loonie when these vehicle orders were placed? With the lower CAD dollar does this impact the overall pricing of vehicles due to lower wages? Are the Canadians’ better with logistics than the US? And, most importantly the Canadian market for this vehicle is more competitive.

    I’ve seen people tell untruths about the price they pay for a home, car, TV, etc. Why? Because people want to think when they buy, they buy the best product at the best price.

    We live in a consumer driven world.

    Why worry if the Canadians are paying less? Who really cares. If this is that important, then immigrate to Canada.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      The other issue is why haven’t US prices come down? The US dollar is up 30% against most currencies in the past year, but imported cars aren’t any cheaper. Somebody is benefiting, and it’s not the US consumer.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        heavy handle,
        The value of the dollar and pricing of consumer goods does not move proportional to each other.

        A number of years ago I did some research into importing products from China as I wanted to start my own business.

        Get onto the net and look at buying in bulk for items like chainsaws, Leatherman style utility knives, etc.

        You’ll be amazed that the Leatherman knives start at around 50c each. I saw 35cc chainsaws with a 14″ bar start at around $27 each. What do these items sell for at Lowes?

        The biggest cost to consumer goods isn’t the actual product cost from the factory. The cost of logistics, taxes, putting the item on the shelf, rent/lease for property, etc play a far larger role in the end cost the consumer pays.

        It probably costs as much to move an item from the back of Lowes and place onto a shelf than the item actually cost Lowes. The same for supermarkets.

        Also, items sitting on the shelf cost. If you have product that doesn’t move, how much interest could this item have saved the company if the item wasn’t bought?

        Right now in Australia our currency has devalued significantly since it reached it highs of $1 AUD bought $1.12 USD to $1AUD now buys only $0.70 USD. Yet our prices haven’t risen.

        Pricing governed by many factors.

      • 0 avatar
        John

        Bingo. Here’s another question – oil prices are down abou 70%, gasoline prices down about 50% – so why are we being charged the exact same price for motor oil that we were charged in 2013?

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          John,
          Again look at how gasoline/diesel is managed logistically. It is essentially distributed via bulk, right up until it is pumped into your car. How much “handling” by people is there with gasoline/diesel?

          Oil sits on a shelf longer, much be packaged, moved manually around stores, etc. This is where the costs really are, and the employment. Not in the manufacturing side of the business.

          If oil was distributed using the same techniques as gasoline/diesel I’d bet the prices would have dropped.

          • 0 avatar
            Corollaman

            Also, why have air fares not gone down, jet fuel has decreased as well as gas, I suppose, but the savings are not being passed on to the customers, ditto for electric bills.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Corollaman,
            You can’t be serious? Are you?

            What shape were most global airline companies only a few years ago due to high energy prices?

            Energy prices drop, they can now profit form the efficiency gains they have made when energy prices were high.

            As for energy. What is the biggest cost to have your energy delivered to your home. Is the total cost of powerlines and related infrastructure greater than that of the coal, gas, uranium, etc.

            The energy comapanies have loans to pay down to build and supply infrastructure.

            Do you think they go down to Home Depot and buy a powerstation? This stuff takes years and billions of dollars to bring into existence.

            It’s not like buying gas for your car.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Corollaman,
            The simplest way to look at this is how much does it cost to own and operate a vehicle?

            So, you save at most $20 a month on gas. It costs at least $400-$500 a month to own and operate your car, ie, insurance, tyres, maintenance, deprectiation, and on and on. Gas is not the larger expense in vehicle operation.

            That’s another one I laugh at in relation to the cost of owning a vehicle. Gas is the easiest and most identifiable cost that hits the nerve, but I would rather save a lot more in other areas of vehicle ownership than paying for fuel.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          John,
          Further more.

          This is why I laugh at those who view auto manufacturing as the “ducks guts” of the auto and related industry as a whole.

          If one looks at how many people are employed through dealerships, gas stations, car accessory joints, road infrastructure, etc you will realise that the actual manufacturing sector is minute in comparison.

          How many are employed in total with the financing side of the vehicle industry? Ten of thousands. How many motor mechanics? 100s of thousands, tyre fitters, Auto One, Pep Boys etc, even Sears employs people to sell automotive product. Even your local supermarket sells waxes, polish, tyre shine and on and on.

          Manufacturing is small in comparison economically and from a employment perspective.

          Keep the design and engineering part of the industry and off load the rest and use these people to work and create better and more viable industries, that are not subsidised.

          • 0 avatar

            Great points. As I have always tried to teach people, buy higher quality vehicles and do not let gas mileage be the first item on your list. Pare down the list and call your insurance company to get the least expensive to insure. Insurance is a vast expense. I also call my insurance company after my vehicle is over 5 years old and ask for discounts. Vehicles depreciate, your premiums do not reflect that your vehicle is worth less and less. Pure profit gouging by the insurance companies.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    How much is the version with AC in Canada? A lot of manufacturers sell loss-leaders without AC, which even Canadians wouldn’t buy.

    I remember when Kia had a similar $9,999 promotion a few years back, the same car came to almost $20,000 with AC. AC could only be had in a higher trim that cost roughly $5,000 more. So that’s $15K instead of $10K, with another $2K in fees, $800 for snow tires (mandatory in Quebec, necessary everywhere else), and 13% tax.

    • 0 avatar

      “How much is the version with AC in Canada?”

      That’s where this situation gets REALLY tricky. You need to go up in trims to compare the real difference in price. The GM Canada feature matrix states that the Manual LS can be equipped with A/C, but you can’t actually select that option in the Build and Price configurator.

  • avatar
    formula m

    GM Canada wants to make sure the Syrian refugees they are training and hooking up with jobs can afford a car to get to work in when it snows.

  • avatar
    johnny_5.0

    I just had to book a last minute work trip to America’s Hat. I hadn’t been paying attention to exchange rates, but I was surprised at how cheap the hotel and car rental were going to be. A reasonably nice hotel was half what I’d normally pay for a mediocre stay in the Bay Area. I need to plan a family vacation up north!

    • 0 avatar
      NickS

      Where in canada was that? Toronto can be expensive. But I do agree the San Francisco bay area is probably the he most expensive area to travel to (only surpassed by NYC).

      • 0 avatar
        johnny_5.0

        Vancouver. I know Toronto can be expensive (especially property). I assumed Vancouver was the same which is why I was surprised at the rates. One of the problems with the bay area is that there’s always some kind of big event or conference going on so hotel choices can be slim if you don’t book early enough. I don’t know whether to laugh or cry when I see some crappy Double Tree with rooms over $300/night.

    • 0 avatar

      Please come spend all your money.

  • avatar
    mikeg216

    I don’t need one but for 10k with ac… I might. Do people actually buy these things up there?

    • 0 avatar
      TCragg

      I see far more Accents, Rios, and Micras than I do Chevy Sparks where I live in Canada (SW Ontario). In fact, I think the Mirage might outsell the Spark here. The Spark is a rare bird. Most people that venture into GM showrooms seem to migrate to the Sonic or the Cruze. The current Spark is a real penalty box compared to a Micra or a Rio.

      • 0 avatar

        Yeah, there were a number of factors working against the Spark, and two of them were in the same showroom: Sonic and Cruze. The price spread was so narrow, the jump up to a Sonic or Cruze could be measured in partial cups of Tim Hortons coffees per day.

        However, one must remember that Hyundai and Kia had a head start on the cheap car market compared to GM, Nissan and Mitsubishi. As Tim Cain would say, the vehicles on the road today are not indicative of car sales today.

  • avatar
    Advance_92

    “Americans are getting hosed — by $5,780 USD, to be exact — for the Korean-made hatchback.”

    They’re getting hosed for a lot more if they buy an American-made pickup.

  • avatar

    This appears to be a forbidden topic, even on the internet, but…

    What is the actual cost of production for a car ?

    We can only question the retail in light of this. Anecdote says back in the day the difference between a Lincoln Continental and a Pinto was $500 in actual production costs, yet one sold for $4k and the other for almost $20k.

    Are they being stamped for $2500 each ? A car company is like a government though, so that $7500 over is eaten quickly.

    Everyone kills for the proverbial 3 series buyer. Is it a $10k car sold for $50k ? Is that why all car companies want to do the “next three”.

    I’ve oft thought the mean interiors in cheap cars are purely intentional and not about the $50.00 difference in price at production. Much like Detroit tried to teach us that small cars are cheap cars, the lack of $10 of soundproofing can’t be an accident.

    So, wikileaks, what does it cost any major to make the car ?

    • 0 avatar
      deanst

      I’ve seen a report from Merrill lynch citing the cost of the parts in an average car at about $13,000. All the r& d, overhead etc. probably doubles the “cost” of a car. So a cheap car could be sold at $10,000 and cover the cost of its parts, but really not cover any of the associated r& d etc.

      It’s often been estimated that Ford pickups make up about 90% of the profits for Ford globally – probably not far from the truth.

    • 0 avatar
      Preludacris

      Yesterday I spotted two old Honda Preludes. Bear with me, I have a problem. Anyways, this is relevant.

      One was a top of the line SE. Leather seats, 4ws, power everything, something like 145hp from its 2.1L fuel injected engine.

      The other, a base model 2.0S. Manual everything, probably lacking cruise control, a carbureted engine good for 104hp.

      But the biggest punishment for those cheap buyers? Not the crank windows – the car was small enough to reach across. Not the wheel covers, which were styled similarly to the alloy option. Probably not even the missing 1/3 of power. No, the 2.0S buyer had to live with “unpainted” black bumper covers which, and this is the insulting part, were actually painted only on the upper part above the trim. How could a half-painted bumper be any cheaper to produce than a fully painted one? It couldn’t. It was just there to remind the owner of his cheapness on a daily basis.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        “How could a half-painted bumper be any cheaper to produce than a fully painted one? ”

        Today’s version:

        Ugly flat black plastic where fog lamps would be…

        On many cars, it’s some $1000-2000 option package to fill those in with a little “bling”.

  • avatar

    All you stateside people looking for a bargain, make sure those warranties are transferrable.

    I know a few fellow dealers who pulled the trigger on Wrangler Unlimiteds from the Great White North only to find out that not only can they NOT be ‘CPO’d’ stateside even with a converted US title, but the warranty is 100% NULL AND VOID.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    If I’m buying a vehicle in Canada, it’s going to be from Leo Racicot, eh.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dAFNnh-FRqg

    • 0 avatar
      TCragg

      Thanks for that link. I grew up in the Windsor area. Racicot Chrysler commercials figured prominently on local TV. I have to say that the quality of the ads has improved over the years. Here’s a classic. Gotta love that new “Canada K”.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      Drinking beer (Molson Golden 7.5% alc) for $1.50 CAD a bottle (USD bought $1.56 CAD) in Windsor while 19 in the 1990s, while watching the Red Wings in the playoffs, while seeing Don Cherry and his wonderful wardrobe on CBC Hockey Night in Canada, while seeing Leo Racicot commercials and Windsor House of Lights commercials –

      – good times, eh!!!

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    If only Canada were a bit warmer,ahh! Love them small cars. But we’re in the land of behemoths and now with ever dropping gas prices. we should be seen less and less selection of small, fuel sipping cars.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    Back when the Canadian dollar was at par, an obnoxious number of people were getting bent out of shape about how our higher prices meant we were getting ripped off, and the car companies should lower prices for us. They’re mysteriously silent now that things have gone the other way.

    That said, I think the number of Americans who’d care even a little how much cheaper they could buy a Spark anywhere has to be almost non-existent. On the other hand, full-sized pickups aren’t too differently priced in each currency. Going with a pretty average F150 (I built up a SuperCrew XLT 4×4 with the EcoBoost) came out to $43k and change in both countries, taking current incentives into account (admittedly, almost $3k more in Canada right now). But that $43k and change in Canadian dollars comes out to a little under $30k US.

  • avatar
    deanst

    Also, look for lots of Canadian used cars to make their way to the u.s. – apparently this has already started.

    • 0 avatar
      TCragg

      I was on the westbound 402 (Ontario highway) last week and passed two car haulers with Michigan plates loaded with late-model used vehicles (primarily pick-ups and SUVs) headed (I assume) to Port Huron, MI. The way the CDN dollar continues to drop, these things are getting cheaper by the day.

    • 0 avatar
      JimZ

      that’s where my Ranger came from.

      • 0 avatar
        mikey

        Late model , clean low mile trucks, all makes, are being shipped south, within days of being traded.. Some of the dealers will let them sit for a couple of weeks..,All with a frightening price tag.,attached. I’ve even seen dealers advertise “American wholesales on site”

  • avatar
    Joss

    Crappen ze arsen.. the dilemma of choosing which one of these three lowbies is killing me.

    If you must auto & a/c bet not much difference on the monthly lease to an outgoing 2015 Civic/Sentra so equipped.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    The Spark is smaller than a subcompact (B-segment), though. It’s a microcar/city car (A-segment).

  • avatar
    shaker

    At least Chevy improved the looks of the front end – is looks a little less like a cartoon car from a kid’s picture book.

  • avatar
    OldWingGuy

    Not to worry. Once Ted Cruz gets elected, he will get this fixed.
    Finally, a Canadian for President of the United States. Woohoo !

  • avatar

    If GM was selling this here, how many people would actually buy it? Stripper cars have normally existed mostly so that dealers could advertise a cheap car to get in the door. I suspect most Americans want more features, and will pay for it – or will buy a better-equipped used car.

  • avatar
    Robbie

    TTAC Best and Brightest: is there a guide somewhere for importing vehicles from Canada? The Canadian dollar is at an all time low; this must be a great proposition now.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Not yet forecast to go lower.

  • avatar
    islander800

    Wait a minute. The Canadian-U.S. Chevy Spark price comparison is maybe more complicated.

    Sure, GM maybe is selling the car at a more attractive price point in Canada, since the market for sub-compact cars is relatively larger in Canada than in America, but what is the impact of the Canadian-Korean currency exchange rate, vs. the US-Korean rate? Because that could account for a significant part of the total US-Canada price differential. But we don’t know that from this article.

    So don’t be so quick to blame GM for it all – though GM does have a lot to answer for.

  • avatar
    fishiftstick

    Usually it’s Canadians getting hosed by high prices, even considering the exchange rate. So mazel tov, Americans: now you know how it feels.
    Right now there’s an anomalous situation. For years, the Canadian dollar traded almost at par with the US. Now it’s down to $0.69, and sinking fast. (Thanks, Saudi Arabia.)
    Obviously, this makes imported goods more expensive. But if prices changed overnight, consumers would quit buying anything. Instead, prices will get hiked gradually.
    Besides, how many people really buy a base Spark? It’s a bait-and-switch special, which only works if the bait is palatable.

  • avatar
    Nick

    ‘wheezy 1.2-liter three-cylinder engine with 74 horsepower.’

    Good Lord. Anyone in BC who buys this has a death wish.

  • avatar
    09box

    If Nissan bought the Micra over the border into the States, that thing would sell like hot cakes. That thing would be a hoot to drive.

  • avatar
    namstrap

    I think the Daewoo Matiz, the car the Spark evolved from, was a hell of a lot better looking. I’m only 5’10” (maybe 5’9″ now), and my legs are bent more than I want them to be with the seat in the most rearward position.
    I want to like it, but I’m afraid I just don’t.

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