By on September 1, 2015

Jeep Wrangler Eliminator

Like an NFL expansion team in Los Angeles, music in the hallways during passing periods, “welfare queens” and the full-time McRib, Jeep’s mid-sized Wrangler-based pickup might be the only thing we ever talk about. Guess which one may happen now?

According to Automotive News, the Wrangler-based pickup may make an appearance in 2018-ish, after the iconic Jeep platform gets is overdue overhaul, moves to an 8-speed automatic (maybe diesel, too) and incorporates more aluminum into its structure.

The General Motors twins prove there’s room in the segment for something not called a Tacoma or Frontier, so a mid-size makes sense — but a seven-slot grille up front may not.

According to the 2014 long-range plan for Fiat Chrysler Automobiles, Ram doesn’t have a mid-size on its radar until beyond 2018, at least, to replace its defunct Dakota. And Ram doesn’t have what it needs right now to make it happen — officially, at least.

“The formula hasn’t changed. The (North American) customer expects four elements in a compact or midsize pickup truck: the right size, right capability, right fuel efficiency and right price. We have yet to find a way to build a truck that meets all four of those criteria,” a Ram spokesman told us.

(Fiat will have a new mid-size pickup in 2016, but we’re more likely to get Elvis back from the dead than that car.)

The minute you start talking about a Wrangler-based pickup, Grandad’s fishing truck comes to mind; an upright-grille, standard cab and probably two-tone red and white paint with flannel-colored interiors. In other words: nothing like what mid-size pickups need to be today to satisfy fuel economy standards and expectations.

Ram has more flexibility with its design language to sculpt a body that makes more sense than a Jeep pickup ever would. Ram is also the caretaker of FCA’s trucks last I checked.

And in the words of Jack Baruth, “You really don’t want a Jeep pickup, you pansy.”

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55 Comments on “What If Jeep’s Mid-size Pickup Was a Ram Instead?...”


  • avatar
    RideHeight

    “after the iconic Jeep platform gets is overdue overhaul”

    Yep, Hummer’s right, the greenhouse will get aerodynamicized. Won’t look anything like that photo of the 2005 Gladiator concept.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      People (that aren’t even buying these) need to stop whining about the fuel economy, it’s a Damn truck, with ground clearence, solid axles, full length frame, visibility, and a windshield that doesn’t sit on your head. If it gets 20 MPG that’s plenty acceptable for 75% of American consumers.

      • 0 avatar
        RideHeight

        I’m in your choir. Ya gotta pay to play and this is about the only thing that would get me excited enough to play above the herd-ball* level.

        *Buddy of mine coaches soccer and that’s what they call the preschoolers’ group. God damn, ain’t nothin’ cuter to watch!

      • 0 avatar

        They have to care for CAFE. The current rumors are that the windshield is very vertical thou. There is a discussion about it at allpar.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        Driven moderately, even the current Jeep Wrangler can get 25mpg or better. And no, I don’t mean driving 45mph (you could probably reach 30mpg) I’m talking 60-65mph. How do I know? I’ve done it in an ’08 which doesn’t even have the newer Pentastar engine or upgraded gear ratios. (I ordered the tow package, so even the final drive is geared lower than the non-tow version.) I have photos, but because they were taken at night while I was driving (wife leaning over to my side to shoot with her iPhone camera).

      • 0 avatar
        NMGOM

        Hummer – – –

        You are absolutely right. Let’s take another look at FCA’s four criteria, and if they matter for potential Jeep pickup buyers. Scale = -5 to +5, with negative = “I don’t care”, to positives = “I care”.

        Criterion……………………Does it Apply?………..Care Factor………………Result

        Right Size………………………Yes………………………+ 4…………………..Win for Jeep
        Right Capability………………Yes………………………+ 5…………………..Win for Jeep
        Right Fuel Efficiency…………No………………………- 3……………………Win for Jeep
        Right Price……………………….No ……………………..- 2……………………Win for Jeep

        So, for me at least, bring it on! I’ll buy two, and trade in both my current Jeep and both of my current pickup trucks. Yes, it’s the right size; yes it will have more capability than ANY other comparably size pickup; yes, its fuel efficiency will be “poor” on the highway (couldn’t care less, —actually, I could: it could have been rated at -5); it’s price will be expensive, maybe $40K (Again, it does not matter much if it’s $30K or $40K, when talking monthly payments and trade-ins).

        So, FCA would be crazy NOT to build us a decent Jeep Pickup. People love the look, the tradition behind them, and their awesome capability. My current Jeep dealer gets a new shipment of Wranglers every two weeks, and they are gone in 72 hours.

        As far as reliability is concerned: my 2007 Wrangler X has had nothing, repeat NOTHING, that has gone wrong with it and I drive it all over, — treating it like a touring car, as well as off-roader, as well as snow monster, as well as grocery getter, as well as commuter, as well as boat-tow tug, as well as….well, you get the idea. There ain’t much it can’t do, except haul 1/2 ton of cow manure, and that is precisely why the new pickup would fill than last remaining gap!

        =======================

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    “In other words: nothing like what mid-size pickups need to be today to satisfy fuel economy standards and expectations.”

    Wrangler buyers do not care about this, have you met these people? I highly doubt anyone who wants to get into a midsize truck that isn’t a stones throw from a full size is going to care much either.

    The other factor is EXPORT. Jeep is popular in other parts of the world, already offers a diesel for export markets, and the capability of a bed matters to foreign customers. Did you know the global Chevy Colorado is the most important GM product in Thailand? Why? In their country the crew cab variant is very popular with families because it has real capability to go offroad, can haul/tow, and also function as a sedan for transportation. These people can’t afford/have room for multiple vehicles, they need the best of all worlds for their Baht. FCA could compete in those markets with a Jeep pickup (also Brazil, Indonesia, Russia etc) because buyers who have such needs in those markets see right through mall crawler junk like Dart based Cherokee. This is a good move for FCA and ‘Murica if the global sales are “there” so to speak.

    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2012/05/general-motors-adds-third-shift-to-produce-new-colorado-in-thailand/

    http://gmauthority.com/blog/2015/03/thailand-gets-a-taste-of-the-high-country-with-new-chevrolet-colorado-variant/

    Additional: Hell I might even be interested in such a thing. Colorado is too big as is the latest Tacoma. The previous Colorado with a V8 would have been perfect, but this trim is rare and crew cab only (and I could not have afforded one anyway in 2012 when they were last sold).

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Thailand taxes cars at a far higher rate than trucks. Single-cabs pay the lowest rates.
      ______________

      A number of Japanese automakers have set up operations in Thailand, drawn by the preferential excise levy on trucks. 1-ton pickup trucks attract a 3-12% levy, compared with 17-50% for passenger cars. As a result, the trucks make up more than 40% of new-vehicle sales in Thailand.

      http://asia.nikkei.com/magazine/20141127-Abenomics-on-the-ballot/Business/Thailand-s-love-affair-with-the-pickup-truck?page=2

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      Jeeps aren’t all that popular abroad. Lack of payload, durability, and plain old familiarity/parts availability limits their appeal.

      While I was over in the southwestern Siberian part of Russia not 2 weeks ago, I saw a dizzying number of a) Toyota SUVs and b) new UAZ Patriots. The Toyotas are comprised of new LHD Land Cruiser 200s and Prados, and then a vast array of older LHD and RHD Land cruisers: 80 series, Prado 70, prado 90, 100 series, 105 series. Many of the older imports had usable lifts, mud terrain tires, and they obviously had seen some real use. There is also a smattering of older Nissan Patrols and Mitsubishi Pajeros/Monteros (US imports) and Delicas. New Pajero Sports sell in somewhat decent numbers as well. I saw a total of 2 JK Wranglers while I was there, they are a novelty, and a wealthy man’s weekend toy. I saw just one US half ton, a new F150 supercrew in Platinum guise.

      The UAZ Patriot is an incredible value: BOF, solid rear axles front and rear, 2.7L gas or diesel engine mated to a 5spd manual and true part time t-case, super roomy interior, all for about $16k. There’s even a quad-cab pickup variant with a vestigal-sized bed. The caveat here is that build quality is incredibly suspect, UAZ component quality and assembly makes ChryCo blush. Despite that, the value factor drives sales along.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        “But international sales are climbing. In the first nine months of 2012, Jeep sold 117,198 vehicles outside North America — a 54 percent increase from the same period last year.”

        “”It is the only international brand Chrysler has,” said Ms. Krebs, of Edmunds. “People all over the world know what a Jeep is, partially from its military heritage, but it’s been sold all over the world.”

        And Jeep’s all-American image makes it a good fit in China.”

        https://www.toledoblade.com/Automotive/2012/11/04/Worldwide-clamor-for-Jeep-but-most-vehicles-U-S-made.html

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          28 Cars Later,
          Remember most realise this heritage is 70 years ago.

          I do think the guy is blowing a bit or wind out of his asshole.

          People buy the Wrangler because it looks cheap and is a budget buy compared to better off road vehicles.

          It might be capable off road but it must also be very reliable.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            “People buy the Wrangler because it looks cheap and is a budget buy compared to better off road vehicles.
            It might be capable off road but it must also be very reliable.”

            First off, I’m going to offer a disclaimer that I abhor the build quality of the Daimler-built Wrangler. I’ll explain later.

            That said, the JK Wrangler does NOT “look cheap” and is by no means a “budget buy” unless you intentionally choose the base model in 2WD. Personally, even the thought of a 2WD Jeep Wrangler is ludicrous, but Jeep does have a history of such vehicles dating back into the 50s. The typical price of a Wrangler is much closer to that of any well-equipped SUV or CUV while in many ways being much cruder in interior appointments and comfort. Granted, the JK series Wrangler rides a lot better and it somewhat quieter than its predecessors, but it is still a BoF truck on a shorter wheelbase than most pickup trucks. This gives it some interesting road manners, especially on graded roads, tar-and-chip and of course, asphalt that’s ground down preparatory to re-paving.

            These Wranglers are, in my opinion, more reliable than people are letting on. I have had only minor mechanical issues over the last eight years of owning mine, though admittedly I have had one puzzling electrical issue and a long-term brake issue which both could be traced back to Daimler cheaping out on materials quality (the hand brake lever literally broke teeth, causing the cable to not fully release the parking brake when the handle was released.) That particular problem took three years to diagnose because the dealership’s technicians would only fix the symptom and not try to discover the cause. The same held true for the electrical problem where a one-on-one discussion with the technician had me discovering he was never being told ALL of the symptoms I was getting, only that a given switch or sensor needed replacing. (I give the tech kudos for instantly recognizing the cause when told of the multiple, different symptoms.)

            With what I just described, when FCA took over, corporate headquarters worked diligently and with frequent communications about discovering cause and effect on both issues and in each case the fault ended up falling on the dealership’s ‘advisors’ rather than any lack of skill on the techs’ part and the cheap materials chosen by Daimler’s design team. Both new parts carry a different part number from the original–FCA part numbers rather than D-C part numbers. Outside of those two issues, the Wrangler has been solid and reliable, neither the engine, transmission nor any other part of the driveline and suspension failing and all interior instruments and appointments still functioning properly even after seven winters reaching well below freezing and even sub-zero a few times not too far from Harrisburg, PA. I bought the rig because it snows enough to make true 4×4 a necessity; more so than most AWD platforms when you have to go out during or immediately after the storm and before the roads have been plowed. I also volunteer to serve as emergency ride in bad weather such as hurricanes and blizzards when even some emergency vehicles end up grounded. The Jeep itself has never left me stranded despite the issues I mention above.

            That tells me the reliability is better than reported. Any vehicle is subject to issues of varying degrees and I’ve owned both GM and Ford vehicles that gave me far more problems on a repetitive basis. Every Chrysler product I’ve owned has proven more consistent and durable than any Ford or GM product–though I used to be a GM fan and owned more of those than Ford and Chrysler products combined. I refuse to buy Ford because three out of three required major repairs to the engine and I now refuse to buy GM because with the exception of the Saturn Vue, the last three I owned had either repetitive engine or transmission problems (the Vue had neither and carried me more than 120,000 miles in eight years.) The Jeep is the first Chrysler product I’ve owned that had any issues and FCA has resolved those issues.

            I look forward to the Wrangler-based pickup so I can trade both my ’08 Wrangler (which will be 10 years old by then) and my ’97 Ranger for a single, all-purpose vehicle that’s not too big the way the newer pickup trucks have become.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          I should have clarified, I was speaking specifically of Wranglers and any potential pickup derivatives. I’m talking about your claim of “because buyers who have such needs in those markets see right through mall crawler junk like Dart based Cherokee”

          Buyers with “such needs” buy tried and true Land Cruisers that can fit a lot of people and cargo and won’t blow out balljoints prematurely. Or they’ll buy an old carbureted UAZ 469/452 variant that they can fix in any remote village with an arc welder and a hammer.

          I’m willing to bet those are largely Renegade/Cherokee sales in your linked articles. As the articles state, Jeeps sell on image and branding elsewhere in the world, not on any sort of utilitarian and practical merits.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          I can tell y’all that there are a crapload of Jeep Renegades cruising around Rome. And Chrysler 300s dressed up as Lancias, of course. I’ve seen a couple of Wranglers on this trip, but about 20X as many Renegages. Lots of Grand Cherokees too, of course.

          I also saw a full-boat 4dr RAM pickup dripping in chrome in Vienna, can’t even imagine where that guy actually parks the thing (on top of other cars, maybe?). Finding a parking space wide enough for my little 2-series is hard enough!

          • 0 avatar

            Grand cherokees were the most popular american car I saw when I was in Europe in 2012.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            Things change, Mopar. The Cherokee, Wrangler and Grand Cherokee appear to be Jeeps three top sellers, each of which sold in the area of 200,000 units last year plus or minus about 10,000 with the Cherokee itself selling more units than even the Grand Cherokee, I believe.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        gtemnykh,
        It’s much the same here. Anyone who wants to seriously off road or use a 4×4 will not buy a Wrangler.

        Wranglers have improved in number in Australia, but as we say it’s the hairdresser’s that buy them because they look the part and cute.

        Prado’s, 70 Series, Patrol, Cruisers are the choice.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    “Grandad’s fishing truck comes to mind; an upright-grille, standard cab and probably two-tone red and white paint with flannel-colored interiors.”

    Yes that sounds lovely. Can you make it say IH or Studebaker on the front as well?

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/f/fb/1959_Studebaker_Deluxe_4E.jpg

    It needs the JEEP styling. People don’t want a Dodge/Ram midsize, that’s why the long-in-tooth Dakota/Raider/Mitsubishi Blah failed.

  • avatar

    On forced advantage of a Wrangler truck is the size. If they built it off Wrangler, it’d be harder to make it too oversized, keeping it more in the compact segment. Yes it has to be cheaper than a full size truck, but some people do truly just want smaller, so how much cheaper it must be is up for debate. The concept above is better looking than any truck out there even if it would be less functional. I sell Fords, so I’m bias against it.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Why does it have to be cheaper? A Wrangler sure as heck is not cheaper than a much larger 4×4 full-size truck once the obligatory discounts and rebates are applied. People pay a huge premium for that styling.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        No, they pay the huge premium for the luxury appointments. An F-150 looks like an F-150, whether it’s an XL or a King Ranch. The only difference is a bit of chrome or custom paint on the outside and a ****load of luxury inside.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    “What If Jeep’s Mid-size Pickup Was a Ram Instead?”

    It would sell for less money to less people and be less profitable.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Bingo-bango. Jeep people pay silly money for Wrangler branded items, and are more loyal than Subaru customers. This is fact.

    • 0 avatar
      MrGreenMan

      There is a concept floating around – Left Lane has the picture up – of a new Wrangler-based Eliminator. I don’t pay attention to these, so it may have been real, maybe a PhotoShop – don’t know, and kind of don’t care, because your point holds either way:

      As a Jeep, even somebody who has no love for pickup trucks like me wants to own that thing.

      It would not work the same as a RAM.

      I saw that concept, and, of course, my first thought was that two things were wrong with it. What was right was that, unlike the Gladiator concept, it doesn’t look like it’s trying too hard. What was wrong with it – it didn’t have the right name – it needs to be named the JEEP COMANCHE Eliminator. Second, it needs to have a long-legged girl in it in all of the pictures. That’s how you sell a Jeep pickup!

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      bball,
      Maybe in the US, but her Jeep is considered a budget vehicle to get into in comparison to the competition.

      It does look cute and I do see its appeal to the wannabe’s, but you really can’t compare a Jeep to a 70 Series for off road durability and overall capability.

      This is where the Asian’s have it all over the US manufacturers. For the US to catch up to the Asians in SUVs (real SUVs with 4hi and lo) even the cheaper Grand Cherokee will need to lift it’s game in the reliability department.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Well we aren’t talking about Australia. A Wrangler pickup will be built in Toledo, OH for primarily American consumption. It will sell better and with a higher ATP than a Ram midsized pickup. People here love Wranglers. In the last 56 months, we have bought fewer than 10,000/month only 10 times (and only once since 2013). Jeep is on pace to sell over 200K Wrangler’s in the US this year (17K a month!!!!!). That’s almost 20% of 2014 TOTAL VEHICLE SALES in Australia.

        Americans. Want. More. Jeeps.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          bball,
          Sorry, I somehow clicked on the incorrect “Reply” icon.

          The comment should of been directed to 28 Car Later.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Fair. I don’t want to get into the offroad comparison of Land Cruisers, Wranglers, and whatever else. I just know that people in this country snatch up Wranglers like kids do candy. The thirst is real.

    • 0 avatar
      JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

      Couldnt agree more bball.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    The Strada could be brought to the USA and keep Vulpine and a few thousand other people happy.

    A Jeep pickup might sell better since the Wrangler has become the preferred soccer mom vehicle over CUV’s and minivans. That magic might cross over to the pickup segment.

    The questions are:

    1. how many passengers will it comfortably carry if you give it a useful box length (in my books minimum 6 feet).
    2. will it still be a “Jeep” in off-road capability if you make it useful as a pickup?

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      If it is midsized, it’ll probably be an extended cab/6′ bed and crew cab/5′ on the same WB, with an extended WB for the crew cab/6′ bed, like every other midsize.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        Drzhivago18 – Colorado/Canyon has extended cab long box (6 ft) only and crewcab has both long (6 ft) and short (5ft) box. That applies to both USA and Canada.

        Tacoma in Canada only has 6 ft box with crewcab and Access cab.
        In USA it looks like they offer 6ft box with extended cab and 5 ft with crewcab. (unless I’m reading spec sheet wrong).

        Long gone are the days where consumers will accept a crewcab with a small box. Ford was the first to offer a long box 1/2 ton crew cab. GM and Ram finally offer the same configuration.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      Lou,
      I do respect your 6 foot bed, but it appears most in the world are happy with around a 5 foot bed when in a dual cab configuration.

      A six foot bed will help with CAFE though.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “The Strada could be brought to the USA and keep Vulpine and a few thousand other people happy.”

      Lou, even if the Strada arrived here next year, if FCA confirms plans for a Wrangler-based pickup that actually LOOKS like a Wrangler-based pickup, I would wait until the Wrangler-based pickup hits the market before trading my current Wrangler and Ford Ranger in on one. (Then again, I’d probably make a lot more money off the Ranger selling it outright with only 21K miles on it (probably more by then, but still well under 100K.)

      As for passengers, I couldn’t care less as long as the offer at least one ‘extended cab’ version rather than four full doors. The back seat only carries a dog anyway so wouldn’t be used often enough to mandate a permanent back seat. And you could be pretty sure it would retain the 4×4 prowess. On the other hand, the current rumor is for a 4.5 to 5-foot bed. Big enough for most of my needs as long as it’s wide enough to lay down some plywood and hold it secure. Yes, I’d prefer 6 feet–my Ranger has a 6-foot bed–but for most purposes I could lose a foot and not be hurting.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I would like to see FCA produce a midsize Wrangler pickup.

    But, this would then make it necessary for Jeep to have 3 chassis available.

    Short WB, 4 door WB and a pickup wheelbase.

    The 2.8 diesel like we have would be an ideal engine.

    Even with the 2.8 diesel our Wranglers are still way uncompetitive in the FE deparment. The Pentastar powered Wranglers are averaging around 14 litres per hundred kilometre FE or between 16-17mpg US gallon.

    The diesels are returning roughly 11-12 litres per hundred kilometres or 21mpg US gallon. This is around 20-25% worse than other 4x4s that are much more comfortable.

    This is very uncompetitive as a V8 Landcruiser is returning the same.

    The shape needs to change. If and when the Wrangler is redesigned for better aerodynamics the style might be altered enough to ruin it’s aesthetic appeal.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      When will you learn to spell? You put it’s for its every single time in your tedious navel-gazing blah blah blah responses on this page. As ever.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      “Even with the 2.8 diesel our Wranglers are still way uncompetitive in the FE deparment. The Pentastar powered Wranglers are averaging around 14 litres per hundred kilometre FE or between 16-17mpg US gallon.”

      I assume you’re talking about in-town mileage, where here they’re EPA rated at 17 in town. On the other hand, my non-Pentastar model has achieved 25 mpg on the freeway (I have photographic evidence, but it’s a poor photo and hard to read due to motion blur) but typically gets between 21 and 22 on the highway (10mph faster makes a very visible difference in economy.) And that’s the gasoline model, not the diesel.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Since when did/do people cross shop a Landcruiser with a wrangler?

    Here in the states you can buy two new Wranglers for one LC. Granted one jeep will have four doors and one will have two….

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      They don’t, I think I was the first to bring them into the conversation, when 28 days suggested that people in developing/rugged countries would buy Jeep Wrangler pickups if they were sold there. I replied with my recent observations from a trip to Siberia, a place that defines rugged. It’s all used Japanese 4x4s (capable, reliable/durable) and Russian iron there (capable, dirt cheap, easy to fix). The Wrangler, particularly with the current exchange rate, probably costs in excess of $50k over there right now, and as expected, sales are almost nil.

      • 0 avatar
        sonofawat

        Location also probably has something do with it. Siberia is somewhere the Everyman buys used and the rich buy new to show off. Lots of Old Russian products are westward in more populated areas while lots of old Japanese trucks are just offshore. Both likely relatively easy to get a hold of compared to an American truck

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          That’s exactly right. As an addendum to that, the Russian products aren’t just the old Nivas and UAZ family (albeit there are plenty of those), there are also a TON of brand new UAZ Patriots, and “Lada 4×4” (the same old Niva with a new name fuel injection, and a few suspension and drivetrain tweaks). Novosibirsk in particular has an interesting car landscape in that it’s just far enough west, and wealthy enough to get a fair amount of used German cars, and there are Peugeot and Renault dealers in town. Increasingly, the Japanese cars aren’t used JDM imports but LHD cars either brought from America (first gen Highlander, RX330 is particularly liked), or bought new at a Russian dealer (CRV, Rav4, Outlander, Pajero Sport). But the Eastern influence is still stronger, with approximately 50% of all cars being JDM RHD imports. Russian cars are about 25% of traffic. Moving south to Biysk (not as developed, more agrarian), Russian cars make up 50% or more of the fleet, with most of those being the Fiat-based RWD family of Ladas (made up until 2011ish) and older fwd Samaras. Volgas of all ages are thick on the ground, and even ‘412’ Moskvitches are still a thing there, albeit rarer with every visit. The rest is older JDM imports: mid 90s Toyota Carinas, Coronas, Camrys, Caldinas, Corollas, Crestas, Crowns, etc.

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    FCA should make a Jeep pickup as pictured above on a Wrangler platform. It might not sell in Australia but in the US and Canada it would do well. Those who are loyal Wrangler buyers would buy this truck and it would not have to be priced as low as other comparable trucks. At the same time a Ram compact truck based on the Strada would do well if the price was kept low. FCA should just pull the trigger and make this Jeep pickup and use the Toledo plant to manufacture it in.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      I just hope that they do come up with a 3rd frame length. Using an Unlimited frame and chopping off back doors and adding a box would create a truck as useful as a Hummer SUT.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Agreed. I think sacrificing some departure angle and extending the bed rearwards, increasing overhang while keeping the JKU wheelbase is the most amenable solution. The JKU’s wheelbase is already surprisingly long at 116 inches, that was their engineers decision in order to keep approach/departure angles incredibly good while gaining the needed passenger space. By contrast, my 3rd gen 4Runner has a 105 inch wheelbase, while at the same time having a more comfortable rear seat and significantly more cargo space (blame the jeep’s roll cage for a large part of that). Where I pay for it with my Toyota is departure angle. Made significantly worse by my OE hitch mount, I’m constantly dragging ass offroad ;p

  • avatar
    wstarvingteacher

    FWIW, my wife likes it. Scoff if you choose but that’s important because I would like to get down to one vehicle. We will see how big it becomes but Dakota or smaller might get my $.

  • avatar
    FJ60LandCruiser

    I’m guessing it will be some streamlined mid-size pickup body on a chopped RAM frame probably running the V6 Pentagram engine (or some fruity 4 cylinder turbo Italian POS grenade). It will only be a Jeep by the logo on the hood and some garish styling cues.

    The odds it will be factory production version of the AEV double cab monster are infinitely low.

    • 0 avatar
      Vulpine

      I think the odds are higher than you think, but I do hope they leave the double-cab to AEV and build an updated version of the Gladiator concept–the size and configuration are almost perfect for my needs and desires. A four-foot-wide flat-bottomed bed with a drop tailgate would be the perfect bed style. Leave the crew cab to the people who want a people hauler more than a truck.

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