By on June 15, 2015

2000 Chrysler Voyager

Introducing a brand new column at TTAC: The Ultimate Fit, where you get to figure out the unfortunate souls who would best fit for the rolling relics of the used car world.

Let’s take this 15 year old, 3-door Chrysler minivan with only 59,000 original miles. Better yet, you take it and try to find the perfect buyer.

2000 Chrysler Voyager

This 2000 Chrysler Voyager represents the best and worst of the Clinton Era minivans. On the plus side, you get a stunning lack of standard features that were doomed to fail somewhere between the Al Gore presidential campaign and the undoing of the Patriot Act.

2000 Chrysler Voyager

No plastic wheel covers that would likely look like broken frisbees by this point. No passenger door for the driver’s side that would probably drop off its hinge. No rear air, which also happens to be a retail killer here in Georgia. As a sixth strike here in heat and humidity central, this minivan supplements the lack of a rear chiller with no tinting of any serious consequence for the side and rear windows. You better have a garage if you buy this one!

2000 Chrysler Voyager

On paper, this appears to be one of those unsellable cars. But wait, are those aftermarket power windows on the left hand side of the door? The interior is relatively clean which adds some healthy bonus points to what is a spartan interior. The 2.4L four-cylinder seeing a 16 year run in the Neon and PT Cruiser has a similar presence in these particular Chrysler minivans. I strongly prefer the widely revered 3.3L V6, but this particular van may be better than most others of its time, given it’s the last year of its generation and the interior hasn’t been hopelessly white-trashed all to hell.

 

This was more than likely a retiree’s van. All three rows are there and the little things, such as the plasticized bumpers and rear taillights, are still fully intact and in cosmetically sound shape. That isn’t too common when it comes to these 15+ year old mini minivans. So, who should buy it?

2002 Aston Martin DB7

Vehicle #2 is a rolling testament to the Travis Tritt song T-R-O-U-B-L -E.

2002 Aston Martin DB7

This is a 2002 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage. 4 owners. 29,000 original miles. Plus one of these unusual units.

2002 Aston Martin DB7

It may look exotic, but what you’re really getting are two Ford Duratec engines fused together in one powerplant. The 5.9 Liter V12 offers a rip roaring 424 horsepower and 398 lb-ft of torque, which apparently helps make this car the perfect long-distance highway cruiser according to the folks at Car & Driver. This Aston Martin may have never trounced a competitor in the comparos of yesteryear, but that doesn’t mean it’s not a helluva bang-for-the-buck for the used car shopper who can handle the maintenance and the fuel bills.

2002 Aston Martin DB7

Those seats are drop dead gorgeous… and the dash is…

2002 Aston Martin DB7

Pretty nice from about seven feet away. Let’s get closer…

2002 Aston Martin DB7

Well that looks a bit retro. I wonder about those three little holes. Up close it detracts a bit from the design – although, I would probably appreciate the ease of removing that section of the car soon enough. On the other hand, the steering wheel is…

2002 Aston Martin DB7

A bit large, and surprisingly spartan compared to the modern day 24 button à la carte which seems to come standard in everything from Camrys to Cadillacs these days. To be frank, I like the Aston Martin’s approach a lot better than the modern day one.

2002 Aston Martin DB7

There are some unusual benefits to owning a car whose design dates back to 1994 and was conceived in a less technologically complex time. The 11 miles per gallon in the city would make it a gas hog par excellence for intown, but the 19 miles per gallon on the highway would likely be worth the long-term experience for that highly unusual customer who wants to rack miles on an exotic convertible cruiser with distinctly British flair.

2002 Aston Martin DB7

Or maybe it would be better off as a Sunday driver and a glorified museum place. I always loved the looks of these things, but never enough to pull the trigger on one.

So what type of customers would make the best customers for the Aston Van… and the minivan? You make the call!

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117 Comments on “The Ultimate Fit: Aston Martin Van Damn!...”


  • avatar

    DB7 Vantages are lovely GTs with a fantastic engine note that are a lot cheaper to run than a comparable Ferrari. A run-on-the-cheap slushbox Volante isn’t the best entry to Aston ownership — but unlike a 456GT or something, the deferred maintenance probably won’t cost five figures to put right. (Especially good news for those who have priced out ownership of a modern Ferrari V12: The Aston Double Duratec has timing chains, not belts. Annual service is much cheaper. But they’re not without quirks: The early ones (like this one) have 12 separate ignition coils, which can be an expensive pain to sort when something starts missing, and it will.) It would all come down to the asking price: $30k leaves a lot of room, anything over $40k is stupid.

    Oh, and: Don’t buy one without driving it WITH THE TOP UP. If you’re over 5′ 11″ or so, headroom in a DB7 Volante is TIGHT. (You get maybe another 1-1.5″ in a coupe. I’m exactly 6′ and I just fit in a coupe, but it would require fiddling with the seat back etc to get away with wearing a helmet for track day.)

    So the right buyer? He’s not too tall, he has spent some time researching V12 DB7s and knows what he’s getting into (maybe he already has one), he knows a great mechanic who is actually an Aston specialist and not just a “foreign car” guy, and — ideally — he has looked at five or six others and so understands what a realistic price is. (Things to look for specifically on a DB7 Vantage Volante: sun damage, holes in the top, sun damage, rust in the under-car bracing, sun damage, and sun damage. It’s not cheap to re-do an Aston’s interior.)

    But that won’t happen. Who will really buy this car? Some clueless person, probably young, who is impressed with the badge, has no idea what he’s really getting into, and thinks that $48k for an iffy DB7VV is a steal because it’s an ASTON MARTIN — and who will sell it on in a year or two, maintenance still un-done, after he finds out what he has really bought.

    What’s with the mis-matched nose? Trick of the light, bad repaint, or is there a 3M bra on it or something?

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I’m going with bad repaint.

      I wasn’t expecting the value to even be that high. What would a manual coupe version go for these days?

      • 0 avatar

        With needs, low $30s. You can sometimes find them lower. Nicest one I’ve seen in person recently was at Aston Martin of New England last year… looked, smelled, and drove like a 3-month-old car, they were asking $45k and they probably got it. I *almost* bought it, probably should have. The DB7 GTs go higher, a really nice one will get close to $60k. But they’re all under some downward pressure as the early 4.3L V8 Vantages are still depreciating and are now starting to fall into the high $40s. For people who are after the badge or after something that feels like a “sports car” rather than a GT, a V8 Vantage makes more sense. The DB7Vs really feel more like old-school Astons… like a muscle car with a smoother ride and much nicer leather.

        I often see less clueful dealers price them higher, but they tend to sit for a long long while.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Young clueless people can cough up 48K for fourteen year old oddball vehicles in the first place? Who is financing this?

    • 0 avatar

      $48K? That would indeed be stupid. For $48K, you could get a much newer Aston Martin…although even *that* would be stupid if you can’t afford to maintain it.

  • avatar
    RideHeight

    Bubble top, clean-ish absorbent materials and only 59K? The van is mine (after a thorough shampooing with a quat cleaner).

  • avatar
    ccode81

    From Jaguar XKR owner perspective, There are nothing to envy about DB7… Too much cheap switches borrowed from somewhere else just to make it different from the jag.

    • 0 avatar

      There’s nothing for you to envy about a six-cylinder DB7. But if you haven’t driven a DB7 Vantage, try one. That V12 is really nice. Not better or worse than an XKR all things considered, just different and very good in its own way.

      • 0 avatar
        ccode81

        Yep, V12 sounds something special and interesting, I’d like to try if having a chance.
        But these are hard to be a high speed cruiser, wheel base is too short for the purpose, I feel.

        If it is the same Denso A/C as jag, I would say it is very good, never had to be blowing at full load.

        • 0 avatar

          I don’t think it is the same A/C unit. I think it’s more closely related to the old XJ-S design. I know that servicing it is a dash-out job, one of those deals where it’s a $400 part but 2 full days of labor at Aston rates.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      10 years ago I would have agreed with you on all the cheap looking switches, but now I’m actually envious of all those awesome, straightforward HVAC controls and other simple switches, as well as the DIN head unit. Compare that to how awful recent infotainment systems will seem in a decade or more, if they even work at all.

      • 0 avatar
        statikboy

        Agreed, but I don’t know about the steering wheel. Though somewhat better in recent years, since driver’s side airbags have become the norm, there haven’t been very many attractive steering wheels. To me, this one exemplifies the typical obesity of early airbag wheels.

        I suppose that explains the move towards ever-increasing numbers of buttons on the steering wheel, however: a desire to break up the enormous expanse of unused real estate directly in front of the driver.

        • 0 avatar

          Eh…this one is inoffensive if not pretty. Like I said below, it was used by other manufacturers. Check out the Morgan Aero Supersports for a better application of this particular wheel.

          Early-airbag obesity, in my mind, was in the early nineties, when manufacturers would slap a big fat rectangle in the middle of your steering wheel with all sorts of embossed lines to make sure it actually opened up for the airbag, and ugly text. It was even worse if the wheel in question was a two-spoke:

          http://www.curbsideclassic.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/3277055.jpg

          http://www.curbsideclassic.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/02/11-25-2012-013-1280×852.jpg

          That was mainly American manufacturers, though. Somehow, the Japanese, in particular, never seemed to have to do that.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I think I’d rather have the XKR and save the difference in price for the inevitable repairs.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I find the idea of owning either to be positively terrifying.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Nah, AJV8s after June 2000 do not implode nearly as much and for about 10K LS swaps are available if necessary. If you get the XKR or XK8 at the right price its very doable, just don’t get suckered in on high price and then have to deal with deferred maint. I’d put the Aston in the same category if it could be acquired for a reasonable price (read not 30K+)

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I feel like it would paper cut me to death with weird problems.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Eh, well any ragtop is going to have more roof related issues than a coupe but I wouldn’t be afraid of it per se if the drivetrain will go the distance. You can wrench alot of the typical stupidity yourself, what you don’t want to do is buy an old car with a motor or trans known to blow up. What you must accept however is a Jag is the type of car which falls into the Lincoln/Cadillac category in that it can be a hard sell later. Based on my posting below, the post-Nikasil AJ-V8 can really rack up the miles – look one in Cali did 213K and was sold for $800. I’m sure it was on its last legs, but it didn’t go straight to the junkyard either. For a man with the right aptitude and resources, the price of admission doesn’t seem too steep for what you are getting assuming you find one that’s clean. The Aston will run you double to triple the cost with no guarantee of high mileage durability (since none of them have high miles).

            X308/X100 runs the AJ-V8 and ZF 5 spd used in other V8 euro cars of the period. Supercharged models use a Mercedes 5spd auto (W5A580). I did not display stats for the XKR/XJR models.

            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ZF_5HP_transmission#5HP24

            MY01 Jag XJ8 base (X308)

            03/04/15 SF BAY Regular $800 213,485 Below WHITE 8G A Yes
            04/09/15 PHOENIX Regular $1,600 118,180 Avg GREY 8G A Yes
            04/29/15 SF BAY Regular $1,500 115,675 Avg BLUE 8G A Yes
            04/29/15 KC Regular $600 102,266 Below RED 8G A No
            05/06/15 FT MYERS Regular $2,000 130,168 Avg SILVER 8G A Yes
            06/10/15 SF BAY Regular $2,700 86,503 Above GOLD 8G A Yes

            MY02 Jag XJ8 base (X308)

            04/08/15 NJ Regular $1,350 167,557 Avg GREY 8G A Yes
            04/23/15 FRDKBURG Regular $700 147,940 Below SILVER 8G A Yes
            03/31/15 NYMETSKY Regular $1,500 137,240 Avg BLUE 8G A Yes
            04/02/15 PALM BCH Regular $2,600 119,426 Avg L.GREEN 8G A Yes
            04/03/15 PA Regular $5,100 67,345 Above WHITE (N 8G A Yes
            06/09/15 NASHVILL Regular $4,400 61,181 Avg RGRN 8G A Yes

            MY01 Jag XK8 Coupe (X100)

            06/05/14 TAMPA Regular $7,700 68,213 Avg 8G No
            08/13/13 ARENA IL Regular $6,100 71,603 Avg SILVER 8G A No
            01/29/14 CALIFORN Regular $7,000 88,918 Avg BLACK 8G A No
            04/30/15 CHICAGO Regular $5,200 109,370 Avg BLACK 8G No
            04/28/15 NASHVILL Regular $6,000 114,816 Avg GOLD 8G A No
            08/27/13 GEORGIA Regular $3,600 119,575 Avg GREEN 8G A No

            MY02 Jaguar XK8 Coupe (X100)

            02/20/14 NEVADA Regular $11,800 39,638 Avg BLACK 8G A No
            08/06/14 NEWORLNS Regular $10,300 43,980 Avg BLACK 8G A No
            09/26/13 CHICAGO Regular $10,500 63,272 Avg BL 8G A No
            11/05/13 ATLANTA Lease $7,600 66,929 Avg BLACK 8G A No
            12/02/14 GEORGIA Regular $8,500 83,863 Avg Black 8CY A No
            12/11/14 STATESVL Regular $6,700 106,383 Avg SILVER 8G A No
            12/04/14 ST PETE Regular $4,500 119,080 Avg BLACK 8G A No

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I honestly, -honestly- feel the XKR has a nicer interior. It has a much less “found a pallet of Mondeo switches” feel about it.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Someone around here has an XK8 coupe…it’s the only one I’ve seen in this area, and I’m amazed it still runs. Unless it doesn’t, and that’s why it’s parked in the same spot every time.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Depends on the model year. Post Nikasil motors can go as I have shown, the Nikasil era motors like to fail which will doom the car to a swap at best or the yard at most. I could see an XJ8/XK8 of the period as a nice Sunday car, however I’d be wary of the X350 XJs because of the alum construction. The X308 did not have such an exotic body.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I want an X350 XJ. I’ll throw some Lincoln badges on it and crash it through the front door of Glass House.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            These were too new when I was around, we never got one so I don’t know as much about them. Same drivetrain AFAIK but different body. I would do some research before purchasing.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          You can tell if an XK is one of the earlier ones, because they started out with cartoony looking model badging at the back. After two or three years they switched to the more modern chromed XK badging.

      • 0 avatar
        FreedMike

        I think I’d rather have a Mustang GT 5.0 convertible…or if I must impress the ladies, a mid-2000s Corvette convertible. That Aston is probably a money pit.

      • 0 avatar
        ccode81

        I thought so too, but seems OK so far. not costing me any fortune to run.
        I think Jaguar of this era has robust base structure which is hard to kill, but it seems to be an over self defensive car that sensors occasionally telling something wrong.
        In reality, most of the time it is only the sensor it self getting mal functioning.
        As long as having Jaguar specialist who can figure out those issues, not much to fear about.

  • avatar

    One more thing about DB7 Vantages: One should have very low expectations for the air conditioner. They have a reputation for breaking a lot, but a good Aston mechanic told me that it’s actually very rare that they break, it’s just that even when everything is working as it should, it often seems like it’s barely functional. Open the windows (or with a Volante, drop the top) and listen to the engine instead.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    the van isnt a loss… get some plastic wheel caps from walmart, toothpaste and polish on the headlights, clean the interior and get the aircon looked at

    the DB7? ah man the mismatched colors scare me

  • avatar

    One last note and I’ll stop: The three holes in the wood under the clock… they all have that. I forget why, but it’s supposed to be like that.

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Minivan: A Tradesman who will leave the rear seats on the corner. Perhaps a Hispanic family. (I have five such owned Carager & Countrys sitting outside right now).

    Aston: Divorced retiree. White. Hell, I kinda like it.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Minivan: A Tradesman who will leave the rear seats on the corner.”

      This, perhaps a drug addled drywaller.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I second the Hispanic family idea. Gutless the 2.4L+3spd auto may be, it is also nigh indestructible. The TorqueFlite as I understand it is a crude but durable device.

      • 0 avatar
        indi500fan

        Just like the Toyota pickup is the “official” vehicle of the Taliban and Al Queda, it seems the vintage Chryco minivan is so closely associated with large Hispanic families. They seem to be quite talented at keeping these on the road, I always hear lots of Spanish at the local pic-a-part.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Yeah in my experience, the racial makeup of the junkyard on weekends (patrons wise) is something like 70% Hispanic, and then an even split of the remaining 30% black/white. I’ve been meaning to hit up the mexican roach coach next time I’m there, boy that food smells good!

          Minivans of all flavors are popular, along with older fullsize SUVs (GMT400 Tahoe/Suburban, 1st gen Expedition). Some of the guys favor 2wd extended cab trucks (again, GMT400) with those funny looking bodykits and fancy pinstriping (bleh).

          • 0 avatar
            VolandoBajo

            Calling those Hispanic food trucks roach coaches totally fails to do them justice.

            You will not get a better-tasting, more balanced meal for a better price anywhere.

            Wish we had one here in South Hair-say, I mean South Jersey.

            Though most of the non-coach Hispanic food around here is split between Central American and Dominican or Puerto Rican, and I prefer Southern Mexican (real style, not Tex-Mex).

            Don’t knock the tamales…real ones are tremendous bargains.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Here in Maine, those vans are the official car of the Somalian population. We don’t have Hispanics here really.

        I could totally see myself in a DB7 someday once I can’t get in and out of my Spitfire anymore. Darned thing just gets lower and lower every year.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      I think you nailed it, Crabspirits. I’d enjoy a story about the future owners! I suppose the pictures may be a little too sterile to provide the appropriate inspiration.

    • 0 avatar
      ClutchCarGo

      Here in Chicagoland, there’s a third possibility: contraband mule. My wife’s uncle had an even older Chrysler T&C in worse shape than this example stolen from his driveway last year. The cop who took the report said that these have become popular with gangs for hauling illicit materials around town since they’re capacious and nearly invisible in traffic. I’ve also seen security camera footage of similar vehicles used as battering rams for the newly popular late night smash and grab robberies. A van or truck is driven through the big front wall of glass and a cadre of robbers swarm in to grab pricey goods and run.

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    Chrysler Voyager? That’s a new one for me. That should tell you how far into the minivan market I’ve been.

    As for the buyer, I’d say it would be someone looking at the back of BHPH lots who is shopping a bit below their means. They will be amazed and excited by the low miles and will be willing to pay about what they thought they’d pay for a high mile Odyssey at the thought of a perspective bargain.

    I would LOVE to own an Aston, it is my keystone fantasy car once I make my first million. Not in your face like many exotics but different enough to get looks while driving.

    This one though… ew. It has managed to gather together all the wrong colors. The climate control knobs look really low rent, but I can get over that kind of stuff. With such low miles I have to adjust my gut instinct. My gut tells me that the buyer for this will snag it cheap but still pay way more than they can afford. If this car had 59k miles on it, this buyer would not be able to keep up with the maintenance and something non-inconsequential will break and a few years of sitting would commence. Eventually it would be sold and bounce around the wholesale market for a few years then disappear. Since the miles are so low, I predict that this car is one additional owner away but the next owner will only have it for a short time before buying up to something better looking.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    It’s hard to say without knowing the prices.

  • avatar
    Athos Nobile

    The van: strip most of the interior (maybe keep the second row), convert into elcheapo courier truck. It is still presentable and with a 4 banger probably not that bad on fuel.

    I also like cagrejospirits tradie wheels idea.

    The Aston, nice ride… is it in the clearance or premium lane? Either way, buon apetit.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Yes, the van would have to be a 4-cyl for any practical use. Clean up the wheels, remove 2nd and 3rd rows and it’s still presentable enough for a few years of yard/estate sale runs.

      Definitely a cheapskate’s dream-tote. Especially if you could park it behind the house.

      • 0 avatar
        Athos Nobile

        I was actually looking at one of these at the beginning of this year. The wreckers want a little fortune for a running one in much worse condition than that.

        On the upside, they have a LOT less kays than an equivalent HiAce, and are considerably cheaper. V6 only here.

        • 0 avatar
          RideHeight

          I too will go out of my way to look at an old van, preferably SWB, clean enough externally to be ignored by cops and homeowners, and with a virus-free interior.

          And, man, these things beat pickups all to hell for hauling things you’d like to keep dry.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I think both are bad buys. My MIL and wife are looking for a cheap van to share for garage sales and antiquing… to that end, this thing works great. But if we have family in town and want to pile everyone in, the lack of creature comforts is a no go. Especially once we have kids.

  • avatar

    “Better yet, you take it and try to find the perfect buyer.”

    I’ve played this game before…

    The Voyager gets AutoZone wheel covers, a thorough douching, photographed, and listed for $2995. And then you can Choose Your Own Adventure:

    A) Sold to an overweight and unkempt ‘rural’ couple who delivers newspapers for $3900 +TTL. They give me $500 down and I barely get them financed through UACC or some local subprime for a 24mo term at 27.9% APR due to their stellar FICO (“My credit’s good…like a 528!”) and difficult-to-prove income. They call every week to complain about the driver’s window not working, but they owe me $250 for new license plate since theirs wouldn’t transfer as it was in the woman’s ex-fiancee’s name only, so they never actually come back to the lot.

    B) Sold for $1800 +TTL to some guy from the Balkans who saw it on “Greg List.” Comes by with twelve fellow Serbians who all have an opinion about the accuracy of the odometer, the paint quality, and omnipresent rattles during the five drives around the block they take. The buyer’s brother/cousin/nephew/whatever keeps trying to beat me up on the price of a ’12 Mercedes C250 I have on the lot that he’ll never buy anyway. I let the thing go for so little because I’m tired of listening to how he can go to the auction himself if he wanted to and I have a real customer coming by in about 20 minutes anyway. I usually turn this person over to my salesman, but he saw this coming from a mile away and is conveniently out getting cigarettes and a sandwich.

    C) Sold for ??? to a ‘friend’ of the dealership’s owner (who also does home construction). This friend – an unlicensed handyman – comes by, asks for the owner, and insists he’s ‘got it all worked it with him.’ Whatever. I never see the van again and any time I ask, my owner says “he’s a f-ing dirtback, don’t register the car.” After I remind him I am compelled to register it, I lien it in our name and we add the title to our small but growing collection of Unpaid Owner Friend Deals.

    The Aston gets detailed, thoroughly-photographed, and a wax poetic about it in the description. I list it for $34,995 and…

    A) Eight months and four-hundred tire-kickers and old white guy stories later, I retail it for $800 net over what I own it for. I’m thrilled to see it gone because, no, I can’t get you an extended warranty and, no, I can’t get it financed. I don’t know what I take in trade on it, but likely an even more unsalable Jaguar with an inop power top or ancient Merz SL with a non-functioning odometer and either the hardtop or a decent ragtop but not both.

    B) It sells on eBay to some unknown party in Michigan. I exchange dozens of e-mails about things that broke on the car three months after he took delivery. Negative feedback received.

    C) I dump it at Manheim Tampa. Let some other dreamer impress his arm candy for the weekend before the dash Christmas trees.

    • 0 avatar
      RideHeight

      Now *this* is Sociology.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      This is a man who knows his business. I only had one experience with a an Aston of that vintage and it convinced me they’re more trouble than their worth.

    • 0 avatar
      rpn453

      That satisfied my craving for a morning story. Well done!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Option B is my favorite on the van.

      So I see oddball DB7 CONV for 35K and I’m thinking WTH this should act like a Jaguar and sink like a stone but…

      MY02 Aston Martin DB7 Vantage CONV V12

      08/29/13 PA Regular $44,500 18,734 Avg BLACK 12G A No
      09/11/13 PITTSBGH Regular $26,250 46,678 Avg GRAY 12G A No
      12/12/13 RIVRSIDE Regular $28,000 50,362 Avg SILVER 12G No
      02/24/14 PA Regular $37,000 20,178 Avg Gray 12C A No
      04/03/14 PA Regular $35,000 33,392 Avg GREY 12G A No
      08/07/14 PA Regular $32,000 21,873 Avg GREY 12G P No
      01/22/15 TX HOBBY Regular $22,500 48,949 Avg BLACK 12G A No

      So… are these not junk then? Evidently people are spending some serious coin to acquire them. I can buy several headache cars for the DB7 price of admission, what gives?

    • 0 avatar
      SaulTigh

      That was awesome. You should totally write for TTAC.

      Also, I know the first couple on the Voyager…they used to deliver newspapers in my apartment complex using the smokingest Chevy Astro you every did see. Some days he’d have a woman with him, some days a dog. Don’t know which one he was married too!

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I like when you write about how terrible used car customers are.

    • 0 avatar
      VolandoBajo

      I’d bet option A for both cars, though all are possible.

      You just have to be “lucky” to get a chance at deals like those.

      Though the van probably really is a good serviceable vehicle, if you buy it for the long haul and take care of it.

  • avatar
    ajla

    The miscolored nose on the Aston Martin makes it look like a ’96 Camaro.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    “The 2.4L four-cylinder seeing a 16 year run in the Neon and PT Cruiser has a similar presence in these particular Chrysler minivans.”

    Nitpick. This motor was never installed in Neons from the factory, though it’s a popular swap. They were usually the standard motor in the cloud cars and of course the PT.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    That Aston Martin DB7 sold for $160,000 in 2001, or about $200,000 in today’s money.

    I’m willing to go as high as 3 big ones, let me know THX!

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Steve I’m not sure what the purpose of those holes was supposed to be, but it appears in two random images from Google (and MY99 and an MY02). The Zoomed in pic of the 1999 it appears they may have been LEDs or indicators of some kind.

    http://ipocars.com/imgs/a/a/h/o/v/aston_martin__db7_vantage_volante_automatic_2002_5_lgw.jpg

    http://www.netcarshow.com/aston_martin/1999-db7_vantage/

    DB7: US male between 40 – 55 who just came into his inheritance and thinks “what the hell”, possibly someone foreign with money offshore who is impressed by British cars for some reason, or possibly someone involved with illegal drugs. Price of admission is to high for the random glutton for punishment and prole level financing near impossible.

    Van: Anyone with children but I get vibe of the irresponsible in her decisions single mom who then demands more than scrap on trade of her much rattier van.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I think the van goes to an auto shop, who wants something cheap and super basic to run get parts etc. Back seats get dumped, and they don’t need AC in the back. White means it’s easy to put the store logo on it. It lives a long life of short trips to and fro around town, until eventually being scrapped after years of dutiful service.

      The DB7 goes to a Nigerian drug dealer or cellphone refurbisher, who likes it because it’s not a Jag, and is much more exotic. It runs for about two weeks then gets parked when something electrical fails, and collects pine needles and leaves until getting towed. The car is never insured.

  • avatar
    turf3

    Sell the van to me; I will take out the 2nd and 3rd row seats (does this have the folding ones? In that case, just fold’em down into the floor), clean it up, spray paint the steel wheels silver, and use it to transport the double bass, amplifier, music stands, PA system, drums, etc., etc. Or, when not carrying that stuff, lay down big sheets of cardboard over the carpet and haul things like cinder blocks and 2 x 4s.

    I’ll pay in cash; yes, fresh folding Franklins.

    I am neither drug-addled nor improvident, just a stingy old guy with big stuff to carry around.

  • avatar

    I’m not sure who the supplier was for that particular steering wheel (it may have been Aston itself), but I’ve seen it in other low-volume cars, including several RUF-tuned products, like the 911 and Beetle, and the Morgan Aero Supersports.

    http://imagenes.km77.com/fotos/bbtcontent/clipping/KM7KPH20091222_0070/3.jpg
    http://www.autobahnbound.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/porsche_ruf_ct3_interior.jpg

    Don’t ask me how I remember that…

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Of the two vehicles listed, the van to me is worth far more. Easier to service and sell as it appeals to a wide audience.

    I plan on selling it to a young man who hardens back to the days of following the ‘dead’ around the country in his bus, only now he has to follow Phish and air cooled buss are worth way too much dough. So he buys the van has another friend promptly limo tint the back windows, leaves the seats by the curb and puts his dog and air mattress in the back and sets off to see America.

    I buy it back in 6 months with 12k additional miles on the clock two additional dents, one in the passenger bumper and the drivers rear bumper. Oh, and it smells like a cross between a gym locker doused in weed.

    I air it out and clean it up and advertise in the upcoming senior graduation hand bill and sell again to another bro’ who wants to see America.

  • avatar
    Steven Lang

    The Aston Martin was a POS compared to it’s brethren. Chipped side panels. Cracked bumper, and the front clip was as far away from the rest of the car in terms of color as Mercury is to Pluto. It received only one bid, $25k, and that’s where it sold plus the proverbial $500+ auction fee.

    The minivan had plenty of scuffs on the front and was riddled with the headliner sag that is all too common for cars parked in the sun here in the South. I was the 2nd highest bidder at $1500. Once it went to $1600 I had a flashback of all the slow moving minivans I had bought over the years, and remembered their uber-cheap cloth interiors. So I begged off.

    I did buy a 2003 Mitsubishi Eclipse GS in a nice burgundy with a little less than 130k for $2000, and I also got a 2000 Toyota RAV4 All-wheel-drive with leather for $2000 as well. The Eclipse lost it’s oil cap and went through the lane with the hood ajar and the ‘service engine’ light on. The bidding on the RAV4 fell to the floor (down to $1000) and I was able to pick up the pieces and buy it for $2000.

    Both of those vehicles had a nasty $220 buy fee. I swear I’m paying double what I did 5 years ago but both vehicles look extremely promising. The RAV4 was only driven 4500 miles a year for the last 8 years and the Eclipse was driven at a 10k clip which is a little less than average here in metro-Atlanta.

    It was fun. Now I’m sitting at my house waiting for the folks from Inside Edition to show up at my door. Something about a crazy guy in Dallas.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      “Now I’m sitting at my house waiting for the folks from Inside Edition”

      No [fracking] way.

      You sound like you did will on the RAV, and I suppose you know what you’re doing on the Eclipse.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Lol, same thought on Eclipse. Like, “Ehhh, really?” Do poor kiddies even want those anymore?

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          If its relatively clean, then maybe. My thought was the same cars frequently come back to used lots through repo or trade. Ideally one would rather have solid cars in “circulation” as it were.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            You’re right. You can come to Corey’s Civic and Corolla Outlet any time then.

            CCCO, you kno where 2 go when yo whip hit da flo.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Actually that’s not a bad target audience but it will probably be hard to cut a profit. Eighty percent of your profit come from twenty percent of your product. Civrollas are typically expensive no matter the model year/condition and unless you can get them at the right price with room for margin, you either price yourself out of your customers budgets or people say f it and go to the Toyonda dealer for new or CPO.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Fine I’ll sell abandonware like a Prizm and Matrix/Vibe! Maybe a couple random Acura EL/CSX, ha.

            I could never have a used car lot like that, don’t nobody got time for finance trouble and sob stories.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            “Maybe a couple random Acura EL/CSX, ha.”

            Did you suddenly become Canadian too, eh?

            Prisms are long gone, Vibes might still have a few years left on supply.

            The used car world is full of sob stories.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            I hear them even when I try and sell one car, every few years.

            Asking $9 for my GS430.

            “Well I really like it, and I really want one. Would you consider $5,500? I’ll be driving from pretty far away. I can get them at auction for that any time. ”

            Me: “Then that’s what you should do.”

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Corey-

            Will you take a out of state lottery check for that GS? It’s for $15K. Just give my $5K back and sign over the title to your car.

            Also, I tried to buy a ’64 Continental at lunch today….couldn’t agree on a price. I think he’s going to sell it to a guy that’s going to do a restomod….

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Who couldn’t you and the seller, or you and your bank account?

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            As long as out of state means Puerto Rico, then sure.

            Ohmagad was it red?

            http://img.tapatalk.com/ae36a966-231a-ddf0.jpg

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            A bit of both.

            It’s unrestored and running, so the price wasn’t crazy. He just had a better out of state offer that my bank account didn’t want to match. It was white

            Maybe I should look at a later Conti instead.

            It was white with a black interior. If it was that color red, I might have found more money. Daaaaaaaaaaamn.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Unrestored? M’eh. Unless you can operate a restoration shop out of your home.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            Fully restored 61-68 Contis are getting big bucks. A bunch of them are murdered out and priced waaaaaay too high for anyone that isn’t insane.

        • 0 avatar
          Steven Lang

          Kid’s 1st car. Anything sporty, automatic, and built after Y2K with decent miles will do fine.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Parents today, I can recall my father telling me specifically I was not to have anything fast or sporty as a first car.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            “Parents today, I can recall my father telling me specifically I was not to have anything fast or sporty as a first car”

            If my daughter was 16, I would be asking her, “Which D-platform Ford sedan under $10K would you like, sweetheart?”

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Right, so 25K for the Aston. Look how much Bentley you can get for that, in great condition! Aston is a CP.

      http://www.ebay.com/itm/Bentley-Arnage-Red-Label-Sedan-4-Door-/201368058289?forcerrptr=true&hash=item2ee278b9b1&item=201368058289

      • 0 avatar

        So much want! When my dad decides to trade his Sonata in for another family-sized sedan in the $20K-$30K range, I’m going to suggest this instead. He doesn’t live too far from the Bentley/Rolls-Royce dealership, so maintenance shouldn’t be that big of a deal. He’ll be the envy of all the other grade-school teachers when he pulls up in that land yacht.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          The Arnage is purity of modern Bentley and is to be forever revered!

          Particularly in dark green or navy, without chrome wheels. I can just imagine slipping into the parchment interior after a day at work, closing the door with a reassuring bank vault thud after me. Sitting there a moment, just enjoying the rich leather perfume… pondering whether it will start this time or not.

          Time for another prestigious electrical issue!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I love the Arnage. I even like the 90s Brooklands, but I feel dirty about it.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Howcome you like the Brooklands from the 90’s – it was just a cheaper version of the Turbo R!

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            I like the Turbo R too.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Probably the best choice for the semi-poor Bentley enthusiast. A manageable amount of electronics, full depreciation, and a GM transmission.

            And I prefer it over the poncy RR version. The grille on that one and the sealed headlamps made it too stodgy.

      • 0 avatar
        NoGoYo

        Was the Red Label the performance model? If that thing has like 400 hp for 15 grand, that’s the bargain of the century!

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          I think it was? There’s:

          Red Label
          Green Label
          Arnage RL (LWB)
          Arnage T
          Arnage R

          We need a British car expert to explain the differences!

          Edmunds will do.

          “The Bentley Arnage is available in three trims: the regular Arnage R, the stretched-wheelbase Arnage RL and higher-performance Arnage T. All are powered by Bentley’s venerable 6.75-liter V8, twin-turbocharged to produce massive power. That power is slightly more massive in the Arnage T, with 500 horsepower and an Earth-shaking 738 pound-feet of torque. With power flowing to the rear wheels through a six-speed automatic transmission, the Arnage T is capable of zero to 60 mph in 5.2 seconds. The R and RL get by with 450 hp and 645 lb-ft of torque.”

          “Initially, the Bentley Arnage was available in Green Label and Red Label trim levels, whose differences mainly related to the engine. The Green Label disappeared after 2000, while the Red Label was replaced by the Arnage R for 2002. The latter featured the modern safety equipment, suspension modifications and recalibrated twin-turbo V8 of the Arnage T introduced a year earlier. The R and T differed in power outputs, however. The long-wheelbase RL arrived for 2003, while there were significant exterior styling changes made to all Arnages for 2005.”

          Good Lord! 500HP and 738 torques.

          • 0 avatar

            I think the Green Label is the one that had the BMW engine, back when both BMW and Volkswagen simultaneously had their fingers in Bentley/Rolls-Royce. It was actually more powerful and efficient than the heritage 6.75-liter V8, but owners preferred the 6.75-liter, which Volkswagen Group has continued to provide to this day in the Mulsanne (somehow, they got it to pass the latest round of Euro emissions regulations with flying colors; don’t ask me how). You can see the BMW switchgear (steering wheel buttons, HVAC controls) in the Arnage you posted.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            That’s correct – seems there was an argument between BMW and VW, as to who’s engine got put in there. The Green Label got several special trim things as standard equipment.

            The BMW engine was more modern, and -way- more efficient, but less traditional.

            Wiki indicates that ONLY 7 Green Label Arnage examples were built, and all were LHD, and only for the 2000MY. But that doesn’t sound right to me, and there’s no citation.

          • 0 avatar

            I agree; I’d think there would have been more of them than that. I’ll ask my Bentley/Rolls-Royce expert friend. I’m sure he’s *seen* more than seven of them.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      That Eclipse would be a tough sell at 3 grand around these parts. What do you think you can get for it?

  • avatar
    sgeffe

    Mismatched Aston paint and urethane bumper — yeesh!

    And not even CRUISE CONTROL in the Voyager! Did it have single-zone A/C? (Couldn’t tell from the pix!)

  • avatar
    VolandoBajo

    *”cangrejospirits”. And it’s ¡buen aproveche!

    Channeling the ghost of Pancho Villa, via XEG in Monterrey MX, 50,000 watts of clearchannel power.

    Buyers: the Aston Martin — a successful big city yuppie who commutes by subway. Wants a weekend getaway car with panache. Can afford Aston Martin labor rates. Wants to one up his competition, also in rising careers, by driving something a bit more exotic than an M-series Beemer. Will pay twice, once for the car, and once more for his hubris in thinking his success will be able to keep up with the cost of maintenance and/or repair. Still, it will be better than trying to keep a 944 going, and a bit more unique. Age guess, late twenties to early thirties, recently divorced or never married.

    The equivalent in my real life experience was the programmer analyst who bought a used Maserati Biturbo to compete with things like the boss’s new C4, my 88 V8 Bird, another guy’s older Vette, another couple’s strip-ready AMC, a drophead XK140, etc. Only difference was that he was married, though the repair bills on the Biturbo were putting a lot of strain on the relationship. Car only sounded good when it was running right, a couple of times, once on a Tuesday afternoon, and once on a Friday morning. Thought he was the big winner in the one-upmanship game, until the first repair bill came in. Oh, and the public transportation sucked in this state capital city, and he commuted over seventy five miles one way to collect his bit of the dream.

    The van: any hard-working Hispanic family with a lot of family members, a/k/a any hard-working Hispanic
    family in the US. But the most likely subset would be a family that owns a bodega in the hood, and that makes twice weekly runs to the wholesale market to restock. Seats out for work, back in on the weekend for softball and church, or something like that. May well be a second car, the first one likely a Panther or an older Impala, which the family head has owned since his youth, and has maintained. You wish he’d trade it, but he won’t.

    If the car is basically decent, they won’t bug you and may send a friend to look for a similar vehicle at your lot.

    The yuppie, on the other hand, will hound you to death with nitpicking complaints about how he just discovered yet another discrepancy from showroom stock, which you failed to disclose under your “As Is” sales agreement.

    The more the money is worked for, and hard, the more the new owners can appreciate your need to make a little yourself.

    Keep the yuppie on your Roladex or equivalent, so you can try to dump the next semi-obscure exotic you take in trade in a moment of weakness, but send a Christmas card to the Hispanic family every year…they will remember you in their prayers, and when talking cars with their friends.

  • avatar
    daro31

    I am probably your DB7 guy, only the lower paid Canadian version. I have worked for the Big 3 all my life in automotive production management and Quality. I am now 60 years old and wanted a toy for our nice garage.
    Over the years I have bought 3-5 year old European cars which depreciated like crazy for the first guy so I got them for a steal and have had very good luck with them. Audi, BMW, Porsche for a toy and Jaguar. I do my own regular maintenance, enjoy working on the cars doing preventative maintenance and find my cars to be more than just transportation. 2 years ago in November I bought my dream car, 2004 XK8 convertible. In spite of all of the horror stories about Jags I researched and found if it was well maintained it was probably a good car. I spent some winter evenings last year cleaning it up, detailing, and changing all of the fluids and maintenance items like belts and hoses on an 11 year old car.
    I had an XJ6 in earlier years which treated me well so I was not totally ignorant about them, and if you want a highway cruiser this is it. At the time I bought it I could only find 4 in all of Canada for sale, around here it does also get that panache of uniqueness. I started out driving it last spring with nervousness; everybody goes wow nice car, but don’t you know about Lucas, Prince of Darkness or has it got the V12. She is now away in the garage for the winter, getting some routine stuff you do to a 12 year old car.
    This past summer I drove her every day and we made 2 long trips, to the East coast of Canada and one to Myrtle Beach. 15000 perfectly trouble free KM’s top down through the Smokey Mountains and cruising the Grand Strand in style.
    Oh by the way, When I put the Jag away I started driving the winter beater, 2006 Dodge Grand Caravan. I really missed the real dashboard made of wood and the leather. Just traded it 3 weeks ago for a 2006 X-type, now 2 cats and I thoroughly expect to have some maintenance items, but reliability is not something I worry about anymore.
    The DB7 like the JAG is a niche car and that is why it rates discussion.

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