By on May 7, 2015

2015 land rover discovery sport front right

With CUV sales surpassing those of their sedan counterparts, it should be no surprise every manufacturer is trying to get in on the high ride height action. Land Rover, virtually absent from the hot CUV segment, has finally released the all-new Discovery Sport to replace the dated LR2. The new Disco Sport is first vehicle in what will become a family of Discovery SUVs, all styled similarly with cues to the big Range Rover, but differing in size.

2015 land rover discovery sport grill

Aimed straight at the Audi Q5 and BMW X3, the new Disco is based on a modified Range Rover Evoque platform, giving it a longer wheelbase to increase rear seat volume. Most importantly, with some clever packaging, Land Rover has managed to squeeze an optional third row seat into the Discovery Sport. They call it a “5+2 seating configuration” and make no secrets the third row is best suited for taking kids across town.

Those without kids may ask: Why do so many parents want CUVs with a third row seat? The answer: kids have friends and those friends, along with one’s own kids, need to be chauffeured around. CUVs this size are popular because, due to their small footprint, they’re easy to drive. Yet very few – none in the premium segment – offer a third row seat besides the new Land Rover. Seating flexibility alone could be reason enough for buyers to choose the Discovery Sport over its direct competitors. (Please note the vehicle pictured was not equipped with the optional third row seat.)

2015 land rover discovery sport dash

The original Discovery, known as the LR4 in its current generation, is known for its commanding seating position. Unfortunately, due to the Disco Sport’s size, that same seating arrangement could not be replicated. However, it does offer windows bigger than most other CUVs. In concert with a huge glass roof, the Disco Sport evokes a sense of spaciousness. Likewise, rearward visibility is also improved over most CUVs, with parking sensors and a backup camera further aiding reversing, parking, and tight maneuvering.

The Sport has JLR’s new Autonomous Emergency Braking providing visual and audible warnings when it senses an impending collision. The system is capable of stopping the vehicle or, at the very least, slowing it down to reduce the severity of a crash. Other active safety features, such as Lane Departure Warning, trailer stability assist and hitch assist, are also included. (The Disco Sport can tow up to 4,409 lbs, although probably slowly.) An additional traffic sign recognition system displays the current speed limit on the gauge cluster, though it often sees yellow highway truck ramp signs and interprets them as normal highway speed limits. Thankfully, all of those features can be disabled for the driving heroes among us.

2015 land rover discovery sport interior details

The Discovery Sport has an all-new (or at least all-new-ish) infotainment system which will eventually make its way across the model lineup. It is similar in look and feel to the old system (hence, the -ish) but improved in every way, especially in terms of speed and ease of use. The system’s eight-inch screen has a somewhat low resolution at 800×480 pixels, but offers a WiFi hotspot and does a great job of streaming music from the various apps on your phone. You can connect up to two Bluetooth devices, with one of them being for phone and music and the other for music only. Four high-wattage USB ports make sure everything stays charged on the move.

The 2.0-liter turbocharged four-cylinder engine is a direct transplant from the Range Rover Evoque, but in the Disco Sport is mated to a new 9-speed automatic transmission, good for 20 mpg in the city and 26 mpg on the highway. The engine makes 240 horsepower and 250 lb-ft of torque, enough to move the little Rover around but not enough to win many stoplight drag races. The Haldex all-wheel-drive system is controlled by Land Rover’s Terrain Response system, allowing the driver to choose the type of driving surface so the Landie can automatically adjust throttle response, gearbox, braking, and stability systems for maximum traction. Few will take their Disco beyond the dirt in the little league field parking lot, but this system works surprisingly well in the bigger Range Rovers.

2015 land rover discovery sport details

It is difficult to describe how any new CUV drives, because they all drive fine. They’re all comfortable. They can all take an on-ramp much faster than they should. They all stop better than sports cars from a time not too long ago. Some manufacturers claim their CUVs are “sportier” than others, but how can you quantify that? Sure, compared to large SUVs such as the Lexus GX 460 or Land Rover’s own LR4, anyone can consider this to be sporty, but no one is going to autocross it, either. In the end, this Discovery Sport is a family-friendly, kid-hauling grocery-getter. And you know what? It drives just fine.

The Discovery Sport starts at $37,070 for the SE model. The HSE starts at $41,570 and adds power seats, HID headlamps, glass roof, power tailgate, 19-inch wheels, and various styling bits. The HSE LUX is $45,570 and it adds upgraded leather, better audio system, and a various items that are optional on lower models as standard. Third row seats are a $1,750 option on all models.

Land Rover finally brought a gun to the CUV gun fight. While it is not technically extraordinary, the Discovery Sport is a good looking vehicle, has all the features desired by its intended buyers including the cachet of being a Land Rover, and is competitively priced in its class. The Defender lovers of the world may hate it and all the other CUVs like it, but as our former Managing Ed. said, “millions of Americans couldn’t care less and have very rational reasons for buying them, nor are they in the grip of some false consciousness and in need of a vanguard to liberate their minds from the shackles of automotive marketing.” I imagine this vehicle will be the volume sales leader for Land Rover.

2015 land rover discovery sport rear left

Kamil Kaluski is the East Coast Editor for Hooniverse.com. His ramblings on Eastern European cars, $500 racers, and other miscellaneous automotive stuff can be found there. He once spent six weeks driving a Defender 110 around southern Africa and currently owns a green Bruder Defender 90.

Jaguar Land Rover North America, LLC provided the vehicle for the purpose of this review. 

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67 Comments on “2015 Land Rover Discovery Sport Review...”


  • avatar
    slance66

    If I were in the market for a new (rather than used) car, this would be high on the list. Just a great, all-around package. It should be a big hit.

  • avatar

    JLR nailed this. Not huge, not overpriced, doesn’t everything pretty well, with an appealing badge. It’s not a area of the market I’m very interested in, but this will be huge for Land Rover.

  • avatar
    gasser

    The pictures look great. Pricing seems to be reasonable, compared to the other luxury CUVs and even to the offerings of the CRV, Explorer, Escape, similarly equipped.

    • 0 avatar
      TrailerTrash

      how is this priced reasonably when compared to the Escape or CRV?

      • 0 avatar
        eamiller

        Fully loaded CRV: $34k
        Fully loaded Escape: $35k
        Fully loaded Cherokee: $41k
        Fully loaded Disco: $47k
        Fully loaded MKC: $46k

        The Escape lacks many features available on both the Cherokee and Disco, so it’s at a bit of a handicap. However, compared to the Cherokee, 6k extra for the LR badge and design isn’t bad in the luxury space. It’s definitely the value offering along with the MKC.

        If it were my money, I’d rather have the LR than the MKC.

        CRV is too utilitarian to compare here, even in Touring trim. It’s also far overpriced for what it is.

        For reference:
        Fully loaded BMW X1: $43k (teeny tiny)
        Fully loaded BMW X3: $60k+

        Looks reasonably priced to me!

        • 0 avatar
          Spartan

          Seriously, you factor the badge into play here? This thing has a 800×480 screen at $47K. That is a slap in the face for that kinda money.

          A fool and his money are soon parted. There are better options for this kinda coin and the Ford Explorer is one of them.

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            1. Auto enthusiasts who are aware of subtle advantages and disadvantages in vehicles and care about how they drive don’t care about screen resolutions. Their eyes are on the road, not gadgets.

            2. The cost of a vehicle consists of interest, depreciation, fuel, insurance, repairs and maintenance, and taxes. Of these, the most ignored and often the biggest is depreciation.

            In an era of low interest rates this becomes a minor factor. The difference in interest on a $37,000 vehicle or $47,000 one is a couple hundred a year.

            However, DEPRECIATION matters a lot. A more expensive vehicle of a brand that holds value well may often have lower depreciation costs than a cheaper car that plunges in value.

            Only “payment buyers” (who really can’t afford the thing in the first place) care about the initial cost, within reason. An affluent cash buyer knows it’s the total cost that matters, not monthly costs. They see their savings at resale time.

            3. Real world prices matter, not MSRP. Some premium vehicles have hefty discounts. Currently the Disco sport is seeing $4,500-$5,000 off 2016 models. A CRV that is $1500 off due to demand would effectively have a more narrow price spread.

            4. The driving experience. Those who care about things like handling have to pay for it. Todays cars handle so-so, that’s about it. If you want a more controlled high speed driving experience, you pay more for a European vehicle. In markets where most cars handle well, these cars cost relatively less than they do here. But in the US, you have to pay to play.

            5. Which brings up safety. Crash tests are great, but what matters most is active safety, the ability to avoid a wreck in the first place. Wallowy soft sprung vehicles with skinny tires will not do as well here. It’s hard to quantify.

            But even crash tests do not tell all the story. Some makes create vehicles that are not only built to ace crash tests, but to protect passengers in non-tested ways as well. (volvo). Again, you pay for this. The cost of saving a thousand a year or so in ownership costs could be your life if you choose wrong.

            6. Styling. People who love their cars and enjoy washing them and looking at them, rather than being bored by them, tend to keep them longer. They’re not wooed away by a new flashy design in 2 years. This alone may mean you save thousands over trading mediocre cheaper vehicles frequently. Again, hard to quantify.

            I have more than once regretted “saving” a few thousand getting something I didn’t really love. Because in a few years I was itching for something better.

            Now, the Discovery Sport is no world beater. It needs a better engine and some transmission tweaks. In 2 years you will likely see the interior improvements you want. But it’s “right sized” and can tow enough to be useful w/o being a huge load to drive. Few vehicles in the category, if any, combine all these attributes.

            7. Finally, the concept of “loaded” cars is for suckers. Options you have to look up to remember if they even exist are obviously ones you can do without. Leather, a good stereo, some safety tech, bluetooth streaming, that is all you need. The huge price differentials usually come from buying “loaded” versions.

            I can buy a DS HSE with upgraded 19″ wheels and stereo for $41,000 plus fees and taxes, today. It drives 100% as well as the $47,000 version. I would rather have that than any CRV or such.

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Are they buying the sheetmetal from Ford? This thing fairly screams rebadged Explorer. Ford did such a good job of building a faux Land Rover that they predicted where the Indian company was going.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      The Explorer looks better. Ford managed to make the LR Discovery Sport look like a knock off of a knock off.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        This is D3?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          EUCD

          LR calls it the D8 platform. It’s related to the Evoque.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Great so its an XC60/70 with the Ford 2.0 turbo shared with Evoque for big money. Pass.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “Great so its an XC60/70 with the Ford 2.0 turbo shared with Evoque for big money. Pass.”

            Isn’t this thing priced more or less on top of the XC60? I don’t remember the Volvo being much cheaper than $37k.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            I just pulled the MSRP for the post below. The 5D hatch is 45K with Truecar reporting an ATP of 43,5.

            https://www.truecar.com/prices-new/land-rover/range-rover-evoque-pricing/

            What kills me is many years on P.A.G. strategy seems to be paying off for Geely/Tata after Ford lost billions getting the ball rolling.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            “I just pulled the MSRP for the post below. The 5D hatch is 45K with Truecar reporting an ATP of 43,5.”

            You pulled the MSRP for the Range Rover Evoque. This is a LR Discovery Sport, which as stated below, starts at $37k. I think the XC60 starts in the $36k range.

            “The Discovery Sport starts at $37,070 for the SE model. The HSE starts at $41,570 and adds power seats, HID headlamps, glass roof, power tailgate, 19-inch wheels, and various styling bits. The HSE LUX is $45,570 and it adds upgraded leather, better audio system, and a various items that are optional on lower models as standard”

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            You’re right, my bad.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @bball

            Since this model is very much a UK assembled Ford EUCD model, would you think it stands to have a chance outside of warranty?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          28-

          Did the Freelander/LR2 stand a chance out of warranty?

          That’s what this is, just by a different name.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Ah. Run baby run.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            It could be better. EUCD has been refined and some of the products are reliable. I don’t think I’d buy this over a new Edge/MKX or Grand Cherokee. The Edge/MKX is less than half a foot longer. Plus…V6 either standard or a sub $1000 option with the MKX or edge.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Google “2009 Explorer Interior” and compare steering wheels to this new LR.

        Mind = blown.

        Did they literally just use the same one?

        I’d say functionally and pricewise, this strikes right in the sweet spot of the CUV kingdom. I can already see places like NYC absolutely crawling with them, what with all the aspiring young professionals finally being able to afford a Range Rover with a warranty.

        However… I would not touch one of these without a full comprehensive warranty with a 10 foot pole. Hell even WITH the warranty I wouldn’t want the hassle of spending hours running back and forth from the dealer. The upshot: when your Disco Sport is in the shop, the LR dealer will set you up with… another Disco Sport as a loaner! My understanding is that a lot of Range Rover owners in the past have been upset with getting stuck with LR2s for days at a time while their much nicer truck is in the shop. So with a Disco sport, at least you’re not being downgraded at the rental desk.

        I was recently watching some youtube videos made by some Russian guys that do really comprehensive second hand car reviews. The one I saw was a Range Rover Sport (2008ish?) with 80k miles, with the euro-exclusive turbo-diesel V8. It needed some new exhaust manifolds, and an intermediate steering linkage that had jammed up (resulting in loss of control of the vehicle, scary). In order to get at the manifolds and the particular part of the steering linkage on one of these, the body has to be lifted off of the chassis. Quite an eye opener.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          I think people buy Land Rover products to show that they’re so wealthy that they don’t need to be smart. They’re aspiring Kardashians.

          • 0 avatar
            BrunoT

            You can get into a perfectly fine Discovery Sport SE for about $36,000 after discounting. Hardly budget busting in an era of $51,000 Ford Explorers and Honda Pilots.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            That’s a good point Bruno, but what are the features at 36 and change? Do I have to spend on 6K options packages to get what I consider basic things on a luxury ride (heated/cooled seats, moonroof, leather seating etc) or does 36 get me most everything?

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    This thing will suffer MASSIVE depreciation AND horrid reliability, as all JLR products do (it’s like they say, “Hey, let’s take this component commonly used in many other branded vehicles, and put a British/Indian touch on it”), but because the price ends up lower to start with, it’s going to work its way to BHPH lots even sooner than other JLR vehicles.

    I can see it now in 2021: “2016 Land Rover Discovery Sport! Cream Puff! 53,000 Miles! Only 15,500.00 With $2,500.00 Down & You Drive!”

    No mention of Christmas Tree Dash.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Late 2018.

    • 0 avatar
      slance66

      Fail on this DW. Look at the Evoque. Resale is incredible and reliability is good. I’ve never owned a JLR product, but you’re several years behind in your thinking.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        MSRP $45,095 for MY15 Range Rover Evoque “Pure” (I can’t find a reliable figure for MY13/12)

        MY13 Range Rover Evoque “Pure” 5D Hatch

        04/16/15 PA Lease $36,500 8,009 Above WHITE 4GT A Yes
        04/30/15 PA Regular $33,000 15,372 Avg GREEN 4GT Yes
        04/09/15 ATLANTA Regular $34,500 19,561 Avg SILVER 4GT A Yes
        04/24/15 PA Regular $33,750 21,088 Avg SILVER 4GT P Yes
        05/04/15 PA Lease $34,300 25,444 Avg RED 4GT A Yes
        04/09/15 PA Regular $33,500 26,625 Avg White 4GT A Yes
        04/27/15 PA Lease $34,000 27,852 Avg WHITE 4GT P Yes
        04/10/15 PA Regular $31,500 38,915 Below WHITE 4GT A Yes

        MY12 “Pure Plus” 5D hatch

        04/09/15 RIVRSIDE Regular $32,750 45,550 Avg GRAY 4GT A Yes
        04/10/15 PA Regular $33,250 48,187 Avg BLACK 4GT P Yes
        04/20/15 PA Regular $35,900 16,191 Above BLACK 4GT A Yes
        04/23/15 RIVRSIDE Regular $34,000 30,164 Avg WHITE 4GT A Yes
        04/29/15 CALIFORN Regular $31,000 38,599 Below RED 4GT A Yes
        04/29/15 ATLANTA Regular $32,000 46,709 Avg SILVER 4GT A Yes
        04/30/15 PA Regular $33,900 33,386 Avg SILVER 4GT P Yes

        Demand seems high on these things, women of the world unite.

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Slance, according to Consumer Reports 2015 Reliability Index (I checked tonight), the Evoque is among the least reliable of all vehicles having sufficient repair data, and they also described it as noisy, with a choppy ride, cramped rear seat (with little head room), and having poor fit/finish.

        From what everyone is saying, this Discovery Sport is essentially the Evoque.

        I’ve been to enough owner forums (such as FR-S/BRZ ones) where the fanboy blindness is strong, and they love Consumer Reports UNTIL CR’s data dings their vehicle, in which case they suddenly describe CR’s methodology & data as rubbish, so YMMV.

        • 0 avatar
          krhodes1

          The Disco Sport is an Evoque without the fashion-victim styling (and wheel sizes for the most part), so should not suffer from most of those complaints. The one I looked at in the dealer’s showroom (but did not drive) looked nicely put together and was very roomy. I think it is the best looking CUV on the market.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      Is 75% resale value after 5 years really ‘MASSIVE’ depreciation? It’s not great, but it seems like it’s not that far off, either.

    • 0 avatar
      krhodes1

      Hoping for the massive depreciation. I’ll probably replace my P38 Range Rover with one of these eventually. The only vehicle in their current lineup that I like.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      So go buy a Honda CRV or RAV4 and enjoy being asleep at the wheel.

  • avatar
    duncanator

    As a former owner of a Land Rover, I would miss the adjustable armrest so the fact that this Disco doesn’t have it would make it a non-starter for me. Plus, I don’t miss the expensive (and frequent) visits to the service departments. It got so bad that if I just drove by the dealership and a service tech happened to glance at my car, I think I got charged.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The exterior is very plain and boring, and a cross between a CX-9 and an Explorer. The interior is almost entirely without decoration, and looks like it’s for poor people.

    I was into this thing from the auto show photos, but now I’m not. I hate it, and it costs too much money. I’d rather have a very tasteful ML350 for a few dollars more (all of which are dollars I’d get back at resale time) and enjoy much better reliability.

    Or I’ll save money and get a much nicer and better looking, fully loaded XC60.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    “Few will take their Disco beyond the dirt in the little league field parking lot”

    Is that a fact? Does it need to be mindlessly re-stated in every SUV review?

    As a Canadian, I find this premise absurd. Never mind the fact that most paved roads are much much worse than a little league parking lot, we’ve got 6 months of blizzards, followed by 6 months of unpaved, ungraded roads going to the cottage every weekend (for those in Land Rover tax brackets, of course).

    The AWD and ground clearance get used, all the time. The fact that you only see SUVs in supermarket parking lots tells me you oughta get out more. It’s not something to brag about.

    About the Discovery Sport: loved the LR2, almost bought one, except for the fact that Land Rover will not import a single base model into Canada (they do plaster the price of the base model all over town, however). I asked my dealer to do a stock check Canada-wide: not one. Then we checked all models in transit and on order: not one base model. That means you pay an extra $5000 for a sunroof (which I don’t want), and lower profile tyres (which make it worse). You could theoretically custom-order one, with a 6 month wait, but then the dealer won’t budge on the price because they have too many heavily-optioned models in their back lot.

    Too bad they loaned you a gray-on-gray model, it’s stunning in different colours.

    • 0 avatar

      Why you so mad? Did I pee in your cereal?

      I live in Boston, we just had the worst winter ever here, or as you Canadians call it, October.

      Geez, I write a good positive review and someone will always find something to complain about.

      Regarding the last part, please read Jack’s piece:
      https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2015/04/no-fixed-abode-paved-manuals-put-four-door-coupe/

    • 0 avatar
      SatelliteView

      It is a fact. Most of the these sold in NA market, like 98%, will not go “beyond the dirt in the little league field parking lot”. Canada has no people, and a negative balance of people who buy these.

      On the other hand, the review sucks. Empty and useless sentences: butter is buttery, and water is wet; 3 bedrooms is more than 2 bedrooms, and third floor is higher than the second; Monday follows Sunday, and Sunday follows Saturday. What the hell???? How does stuff like this gets posted up????

      Compared to european reviews, american reviews are moronic. As if they’re aimed to most lowest common denominator. Kamil Kaluski, next time in europe, grab any car magazines, and see what a proper review is, what items it covers, and so on and so forth

      • 0 avatar

        Will do! Thanks for the constructive criticism. Man, you are going to hate my GMC review. I’m off to read some Auto Motor und Sport. Nastempne Ci napisze tak ze Ci oczy wypadnom z czaszki.

        • 0 avatar
          SatelliteView

          Just add more details about the construction of the vehicle, rather than listing features.

          і друже, зіспокойся. якщо треба, попий водичкі

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            SatelliteView,

            Давай ка ты сам чего нибудь опубликуй, раз ты у нас такой крутой критик.

    • 0 avatar
      BrunoT

      Some of these pasty car reviewer types have never been to the beach and driven on sand. Or gone to a mountain cabin where you have to negotiate a steep gravel driveway with snow on it. Or had to hop a curb to get turned around in a traffic jam and headed to a detour route.

      You know, things people with disposable income do routinely.

  • avatar

    I think part of the reason for the appeal of 3-row SUV’s is probably child seats. Kids are required to be in them pretty late, and if you have more than two kids to transport, you need a 3rd seat for the 3rd child seat.

    While it looks considerably better, I still can’t help but see a little Freelander in it, and that makes me not like it.

    • 0 avatar

      That too, but most people who had three kids or more will get a bigger vehicle, either a minivan or a something Suburban-ish.

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        3 across isn’t too bad. Just spend the extra $200 per car seat to get the good ones: narrow and safe at the same time. That’s $600 extra for 3 seats. Or you can spend thousands on a larger car and $20-30 more per week on gas…

        This LR is interesting; I think it will be a hit among those that really want a CUV with a “respectable” badge.

  • avatar
    legacygt

    “The Haldex all-wheel-drive system is controlled by Land Rover’s Terrain Response system, allowing the driver to choose the type of driving surface…. [T]his system works surprisingly well in the bigger Range Rovers.”

    Bigger Range Rovers may have the Terrain Response System but I don’t believe that they use the Haldex system. This is a meaningful difference that would presumably make the Discovery Sport less capable off road. Not important for most buyers but the distinction needs to be made.

    • 0 avatar

      Er…that is correct. They wouldn’t use Haldex, principally because Haldex is used in transverse-engined applications. The Discovery Sport and related Range Rover Evoque have a transverse-mounted 2.0-liter tubrocharged four-cylinder that is essentially a Ford EcoBoost, but the other cars in the lineup have longitude-mounted engines.

  • avatar
    Blanchman

    Come on guys, this unit has a FORD engine in it. JLR has joined the modern era, mainly compliments of FORD. I don’t think they will have th e issues of the OLD LR !!

  • avatar

    It is worth noting that the Range Rover Evoque also got the 9-speed transmission, for MY2014. I believe it is a variant of the 9-speed transmission that is in some newer FCA products (like the Cherokee and 200) and Honda/Acura products (TLX, 2016 MDX, possibly the 2016 Accord V6).

    Hopefully, though, the Discovery Sport’s name being what it is means that the big Land Rover will be called the Discovery again, as it is in Europe.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I have always loved the “HSE” trim. Bristling with Britishness. But they should go balls deep with the top of the line trims. “Yorkshire” “Edinborough” “Donningtonthorpe” They need to cash in on… no, EVOQUE the imagery of fox hunting in English forests. Really sell the dream.

    Regading the car… it looks OK. I suppose the upcoming Defender may come in a 4 door trim and occupy the space left by the old Discovery.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    Can’t help it.
    I just see FORD written all over Land Rovers and Jaguars. They just look like they are still using the basic design language they began while under Ford.
    If you look at most Jaguar sedans, they all look like miniature MKS. Especially the roof and side window lines and rear.
    Now this has the Explorer look everywhere. Even the grill and rear D pillar/window design looks like a Ford job.

  • avatar
    gasser

    When will JLR get the newer 2.3 Ford Ecoboost engine to work with?

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    It’s a good looking vehicle, has a nice interior and seems well-proportioned. Lots of usable space and does everything fairly well.

    The only thing I would have liked to see would be a V6. Turbo or not, but it’s big and unaerodynamic, a 6 is probably going to do better in real world performance and economy than what an overloaded 4 can wheeze out. Not to mention, it would be the English Grand Cherokee.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Can’t wait for the Ingenium engine in this vehicle to replace the boat anchor Mazda (Ford) 2 liter turbos.

    In any case, if you really want a decent 7 passenger CUV, get a Hyundai Santa Fe XL with that lovely V6. It’ll eat this thing for breakfast and probably won’t break down. It looks no more dowdy inside than this Discovery Sport.

    Since we are reliably informed by the author that all CUVs handle fine and outbrake sports cars from “only a few years ago” (Right, sure it’s all the tires, nothing else, if one has been keeping up), why bother “reviewing” them?

    I’ve driven a few and was completely unimpressed with their “handling”. Also, there were marked differences between makes, contrary to the author’s assertion. But of course, having said that all CUVs handle fine, the author relieves himself of the task of comparing models to each other. Lazy.

    This “review” told me almost nothing. Useless.

    It is a capsule review, a once over lightly, not particularly insightful collection of words. TTAC needs to do a lot better.

    • 0 avatar
      heavy handle

      In terms of handling, the LR2 was much much better on unpaved roads than anything comparable. I remember it being completely stable over a rutted ice-covered road that kicked Wranglers and FJ Cruisers around like a ping pong ball. The main thing that bothered me was the unnatural feel of the Haldex AWD. You could tell that it was constantly adjusting parameters, and that saps a lot of the enjoyment. You have to totally defer to it. If you try to do anything interesting, like countersteering, it will step-in and kill the fun.

      There’s no fair way to compare it to “soft roaders” (as they call them in Europe). An Escape or CR-V is always 5 seconds behind you in the rough stuff, and it complains the whole way. The other Europeans (X1, Q3, GLA) are more pavement-oriented, like the Evoque.

      This new Discovery Sport is obviously an evolution of the previous LR2. (aka Freelander in the rest of the world). They say it evolved from the Evoque, but that was based on the LR2 platform. I suspect that the new one is every bit as good as the old one.

  • avatar
    Acubra

    Do they plan to install some real engine in it?

  • avatar
    iMatt

    I suppose 9 speed transmissions are becoming so common place, a few words in regards to its operation is unwarranted.

    I’m also curious about the AWD system but I can always just go read the brochure.

    Having said that, there is absolutely nothing about this car as it is presented here that appeals to me.

    Give me a proper SUV or a proper luxury sedan, but not watered down versions of both….even if they do have good brakes.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Unless the third row is a must (which is no minor thing), or you suffer from badge snobbery, there is absolutely no reason to pick this over a Grand Cherokee with a 3.6/8spd.

  • avatar
    fendertweed

    If I’m going to spend on a pricey CUV-ish thing like this, I wonder why this instead of an Audi Q5? — they’re both premium lux-ish rides with poor reliability history and high depreciation…

    I keep fearing I’ll waiver and go to a Q5 when I part with my ’09 Outback Limited in 2-5 yrs (forgetting my love/hate/hate/love/hate relationship with my Audi A4 and A6 Avants (’98 and ’01). ;-o

  • avatar
    ash44

    we bought new 2015 Land Rover Discovery Sport in August. It had always been a dream of mine to own one. It was a gorgeous gorgeous car…..but that’s as far as it went. It had many strange quirks and Land Rover mgmt. handled these “quirks” poorly. when you start the car – the radio comes on. yes, even if it’s turned off when you turn the car off. as a woman, i don’t want a radio to come blaring on, when i’m in a parking garage or on a dark street. i told them that this had to be wrong – they said “all cars do that.” er,no. they don’t.
    Also, on the steering column you could change the channels on your radio…..but it only scanned ALL the channels….NOT your pre-set channels. So if you wanted to go from 08 to 26 on Sirius, you had to scan all the way , while looking down at your dash. or you have to look at your dash and find the button for 26, which is difficult because it’s a touch screen. not safe. Mgmt. – all cars do that. er no. they don’t. They conceded that the radio coming on automatically could be fixed with a computer fix. which they did. they didn’t concede on the scan/preset issue.
    Nevertheless, the final nail in the coffin was NOISE. there were severe vibrations in the dashboard, in the front doors. we filmed and made audio of the racket. the tried to fix it 3x – to no avail. They gave us an Evoque to drive while they tried to fix the noises – The Evoque died – just stopped – in the middle of a residential street ( thank god it wasn’t on a freeway ) showed the axle configuration . scared the hell out of me. after about a 6 weeks – traded it in for a new Toyota Highlander – not as gorgeous, but it’s reliable, quiet and safe.


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