By on May 5, 2015

2015-Volkswagen-Golf-SportWagen-02

The 2015 Volkswagen Golf SportWagen was the fastest-selling vehicle for April, besting many a truck and SUV in so doing.

The SportWagen only took an average of nine days between deboarding the car carrier and heading out onto the highway, Cars.com reports. The 2015 Ford Edge and Porsche Macan tied for silver at 11 days, while the Chevrolet Colorado crew cab and Subaru Outback only spent 12 days on the lot.

On the opposite end, the 2015 BMW 650i xDrive convertible took home the gold as the slowest-selling vehicle in the showroom during April, spending an average of 180 days before someone finally took one out into the sun. The 640i xDrive convertible left the lot five days earlier than its sibling, while the Kia K900 took 172 days from container to garage on average.

Overall, cars made up the slowest-selling list, while 18 out of 23 fastest-selling models were either trucks, crossovers or SUVs.

[Photo credit: Derek Kreindler/The Truth About Cars]

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86 Comments on “2015 Volkswagen Golf SportWagen Fastest-Selling Vehicle For April 2015...”


  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Looks like Cadillac has picked up. Good.

    I can see why the GSW is moving. It was a hot seller with the boat anchor 2.5. With this new 1.8T and the lighter MQB platform it’s a pretty solid offering. I’m definitely hoping to replace wifey’s Rabbit with one on a lease. Her commute is good for ~7500 miles a year and VW is usually good about leases.

    • 0 avatar
      FractureCritical

      this.

      the JSW was a solid design in terms of functionality. I HOPE they’ve solved the gremlins present since my 2010. the interior in the newer models are also more eurocentric and nicer than the older ones (IMO)

      Offering the 1.8T was the hot ticket. the 2.5 is a boat anchor (well said, sir! ) and despite internet love, no one who doesn’t know diesel wants a diesel, people who really know diesel don’t want a diesel, and the few idiots in the middle who know enough to get themselves in trouble (hey, that was me!) probably will sour to diesel after owning one for a while. Some don’t but sometimes, you can’t fix stupid ;)

      • 0 avatar

        My Jetta SportWagen was a 2014, but aside from a series defective sunroof shades, it didn’t have any glitches. The 2015 Golf SportWagen, on the other hand, stalled at a stop the second day I had it.

      • 0 avatar
        derekson

        You say no one wants diesels besides internet commenters, but the people who actually buy the SportWagens actually have a diesel take rate of around 80%.

        There’s a huge overlap in those who like Euro wagons and those who like diesels. The “brown diesel wagon w/manual” isn’t entirely an internet comment trope.

        • 0 avatar

          I’ve had three clatterwagons. My TDi, at 80k is reliable. It is the car my family fights FOR when the motor pool is allocated.

          39 mpg @ 80 mph. Clean burning (nothing on the rear hatch). Started at 10 below, no issues this very cold winter.

          Diesel prices in my area are back to “same as midgrade”, so that isn’t an issue.

          No, a diesel isn’t what you want for a two lane pass, or to show off, but it rocks for city driving and where I live, in the hills.

          I have a five door black manual hatch. I’d have gone for a wagon but none were in the pipeline when I bought.

          I didn’t want the Mini most of my area buys for a smaller car, nor did I want any of the Prius nonsense….I was influenced by a 320d I spent two weeks in Germany with….still wish I could buy an e90 320d in the US

        • 0 avatar
          Chicago Dude

          The diesel take rate was 80% because the other option was garbage. And good luck finding a non-diesel on a dealer lot.

      • 0 avatar
        rsfeller

        “people who really know diesel don’t want a diesel”

        What the hell does this mean? What is so wrong with the JSW diesel? A few complains about sever cold weather and moisture in the intake?!?! Maybe a complaint that they should be getting 55mph when my wives 2015.5 Volvo S60 gets 38MPG…but what is your point?

        Everyone in our family loves driving the JSW. They like the torque, acceleration and quirky sound of the engine.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Sick of the 2.5 “boat anchor” comments. Find a new analogy, it is a long-overused phrase by seemingly every autojourno in every publication to describe an engine they don’t like for one reason or another.

      And yes, incidentally I do own this engine. In my 2010 Sportwagen it’s torquey, tractable in real world driving, is incredibly easy to achieve EPA mileage with, and I would bet real money it has higher reliability and lower ownership and running costs than the TDI or 1.8T, as much as I love that 1.8.

      No offense intended, SportyAccordy, I normally like your comments but a man can only take so many insults about his engine.

      • 0 avatar
        SatelliteView

        I remember my 2005(6?) leased Jetta with 2.5 and it was above average and made a very nice gargle under acceleration.

      • 0 avatar

        I agree. The 2.5-liter doesn’t exactly get the most competitive fuel economy, but it’s a very good engine…probably the most reliable one in Volkswagen’s arsenal. Now the 2.slow…*that’s* a boat anchor.

      • 0 avatar
        vwgolf420

        I have a 2010 Golf with 2.5 and think it’s a darn good engine. It feels and sounds so good under acceleration. Without a lot of effort, I can coax out 35 MPG on the highway and about 25 in town.

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Welp, as a fellow 2.5 owner I’m gonna stand by my boat anchor comments. It is indeed a reliable, simple engine, but that comes at a needless price. I don’t know what gas mileage it gets as it’s my wife’s car, but on road trips it didn’t do much better than my 350Z did, which had 2x the HP and 40% more displacement (and bigger, stickier tires). It’s not particularly powerful either…. yes it makes more torque, but it’s not any faster than my “gutless” 140HP/128TQ Civic. Probably doesn’t help that it weighs 3100lbs.

        If I sound like I’m slamming the car I apologize. It’s a good car. Quiet, smooth riding, luxurious for what it is. But the new GSW addresses all my gripes with it… namely needless heft and a weak gas mileage to performance ratio. 6th gear has also been mercifully shortened for use on non-flat grades. I really think the GSW 1.8T will be the bees knees.

        • 0 avatar
          vwgolf420

          I’d love to try out a 1.8T, but i fear I’d be tempted and I like not having a car payment.

          • 0 avatar
            VW16v

            The 1.8 tsi is brilliant engine. The automatic being that is not the DSG with the TSI in the wagon does hold back its potential. Don’t test drive it with the 6spd manual because you will drive home with one. But, my local VW dealers are giving some great deals, and I doubt it is just in Central Florida. Friend of mine got a ridiculous deal on a base Golf with that you will drive home with one 6spd. He is also getting avg 40 mpg with a 20 mile commute, with about 95% hwy.

          • 0 avatar

            Next door neighbor just got the “introduction editon” TSi with manual. The car is stripped, but still has IRS and bluetooth. Manual. Transaction price 17k. MQB.

            What a deal. The NA build is still more hard plastics than the German build, but for 17k…what a deal.

      • 0 avatar
        rsfeller

        “higher reliability and lower ownership and running costs”…yep those items fit a boat anchor.

        I got the TDI and the neighbor has the 2.5L…sorry but that engine is pathetic. Not sure if it’s an improvement over the 2.5L in other Vw but what an uninspiring engine.

        Gas mileage is terrible. That engine should be getting 35mph all day…and for those of you claiming it does…blah. I know the drill. I’m on the TDI forums and listen to guys all day saying they are getting 60+MPG. Dream on.

        SOrry but like usual Vw doesn’t understand the US market and the 2.5L is an engine for people who don’t like cars just like the 2.0L NA of old days. People like my wife…just a girl who wanted a Jetta. a Turbo and TDI should always be avaialble on all Vw or it just confirmed for me that Vw has no clue how to sell a car in the US market.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          We’ll see who has the boat anchor after that lovely high pressure fuel pump in the TDI shreds its innards due to minuscule fuel contamination and contaminates the entire fuel system. At which point it will quite literally be only useful as a boat anchor.

          The old 8 valve 2.0L and I5 2.5L, as much as you deride them, are perhaps the only 2 motors in the past 10 years of VAG cars that aren’t riddled with issues.

          2.0T: burning oil, PCV issues, carboned up valves
          V6 motors: timing chain stretch and tear
          TDI: massive fuel pump failure+ fueling system contamination
          1.8T (new EA888): rear main seal leaks (smells like PCV issues)
          TSI motors across the board have suffered from gunked up intake valves.

          • 0 avatar
            rsfeller

            I won’t argue reliability on the 2.0 or 2.5 but not inspiring…like driving a Chevy Geo fun! My wives all 2.0 in her 2001 jetta was a buzzy little thing that tach’d way to high at highway cruising speed.

            I had a 2.5 in an old Eurovan that was rock solid but that is prob not a fair comparison.

            Yes I really think Vw and many VAG and euro cars are terrible at engine reliability…some times I think VAG tries to make complicated engines. They could easily put a LPT on that 2.5L (like Volvo) and had a great engine…but it’s Vw.

            Lastly all TDI I’ve owned have had no issue with fuel contamination causing pump failures and as you and I know this has only occurred on recent years, in very low numbers and according to Vw is mostly caused from people putting gas in their TDi. At a 160K miles on a 2010 this data point is doing just fine.

            Many cars have their common and not so common failures designs…most are not quite so catastrophic but I can name similar issues on my Honda Ridgeline, BMW 635…and others.

            To be honest the only cars I’ve EVER own’d that was not a love hate relationship is Volvo. Fixes are simple and cheap for a DIY. VAG as at the bottom of my wish list most of the time. We all know why

        • 0 avatar
          sportyaccordy

          Yea everyone on the internet gets 50% more MPG than the EPA or Fuelly. Always gives me a chuckle. I’ve owned about 8 cars and have hit EPA mileage on the nose on all of them. So that’s my guide….

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          rsfeller,
          I find it amusing that a person who owns a TDI will smugly proclaim to another that he “doesn’t like cars” because he opted out of an overpriced, overly complicated, *economy* engine. Don’t pretend a TDI is anything other than that.

          “Turbo and TDI should always be avaialble on all Vw or it just confirmed for me that Vw has no clue how to sell a car in the US market”

          Is that why old Passats with the 2.0T and Golf TDIs set the North American sales charts on fire?

          Your post is claptrap. Keep your diesel snobbery to under a bushel where it belongs.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            It just dawned on me why his comment irked me. This is the owner of a semi-premium compact with a premium pricetag looking down on the owner of a semi-premium compact with a basic pricetag. This is a Camry hybrid owner telling a Camry 2.5 LE owner that he doesn’t like cars because he didn’t pay more to spend less at the pump. The premise is pathetic and the tone irritating. Let me know when you have a car worth actually bragging over.

          • 0 avatar
            rsfeller

            WTF is this guy talking about?

            I never claimed that the 2T or TDI were hug seller. I’m simply saying they are a far more enjoyable driving experience. VW has done a terrible job of understanding the US market (remember they almost pulled out) so having a Vw w/o a turbo or TDi is another average car with very average engine options at Jr German prices.

            I hardly have Tdi snobbery considering I’ve own 5 other gas cars and have owned 40 gas vs 3 Tdi but those Tdi were untouchable in MPG until recently and at 30K miles a year the savings are huge over the life the of car. Silly cars to buy due to cost if you drive 7500 miles a year like many on here due but at 380K on our 97 passat…we got our money back in spades when fuel was at $4

        • 0 avatar
          tedward

          rsfeller

          I think it comes down to driving style. i find the 2.5 to be more entertaining than the tdi, while my father in law, also in a JSW, strongly prefers his diesel. The only boat anchor in the 2.5 drivetrain is the flywheel. I’ll agree with any criticism of that. The value that the base JSW, and now GSW, represents is utterly insane as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      From anecdotal sources, the 2.5 powertrain was, by VW standards, a godsend of reliability.

      If you’re VW in North America, you will take all the reliability you can get.

      -Former owner of a B5 2.8, aka “Rolling Maintenance Nightmare”

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Good to hear but there is not much competition for a mid priced wagon both in gas and oil burning, I hope VW can keep this selling fairly well, my 11 VW jetta wagon has held up pretty well so this and the golf may help turn the tide of very bad VW sales. There was a bunch of pent up demand for this car.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      Imagine how many more would sell if it was available in brown. Manual and diesel are available so they are one option away from world domination.

      • 0 avatar
        runs_on_h8raide

        JMII, would you take in the brown?

      • 0 avatar

        I presume the reason that Toffee Brown Metallic was dropped is that it didn’t sell well on the Jetta SportWagen.

        • 0 avatar
          30-mile fetch

          If the Toffee Brown with tan interior were available on my year/trim of of Sportwagen I would have ordered it in an instant.

          • 0 avatar

            I couldn’t find one within 1,000 miles of my house when I bought my JSW, so I settled on Black Uni. But black is just too much work for a daily driver and I’ll never do it again. The GSW is Platinum Grey Metallic.

        • 0 avatar
          rsfeller

          They didn’t sell well or many were not available?

          I don’t see any sitting on lots when I go. I just see white, grey and black all day long. I think it has more todo with production and projection then availability.

          My rant? I just want black leather interiors…and they can be hard to find. Thank goodness that Vw and Germans still produce them. I can drive around all day looking at cars and not see a black leather interior in what I like (new or used). Who can keep that tan so clean when they are a slob in the real world?

  • avatar
    manny_c44

    The new Passat wagon is so nice, I wish they would bring it here…

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    What I took from the list in the link is that BMW is offloading far too many 6 series cars, with four model variants near the bottom.

  • avatar
    whynot

    The 2015 Ford Edge is out? That was a very quiet launch…

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I hope they fixed the door handles, the 15 Edge at our autoshow felt like the exterior door handles were going to fall apart in my hand.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        The one I was driving a couple of weeks ago didn’t have an issue with the door handles. Hopefully what you experienced at an autoshow was a one off.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      “The 2015 Ford Edge is out? That was a very quiet launch…”

      Units are slowly trickling in. The Edge is kind of a set it and forget it product for Ford. It seems to do between 100K and 150K units without the Ford marketing machine pimping it all over the place.

  • avatar

    I’ve had my Golf SportWagen TDI SEL with Lighting Package since April 17 (possibly the first person in the state to have one). In that time, I’ve gotten to know it quite a bit. It makes some excellent strides over the Jetta SportWagen TDI that preceded it. But the “Discovery” infotainment/nav system is glitchy and has inconsistent performance. I’m only griping about that just now because all afternoon, it would let me stream music through Bluetooth, but would throw up a “Please connect phone” error when I tried to place a call…and it took the presence of a service tech and about 45 minutes to rectify the issue.

    As far as the GSW being the fastest-selling vehicle, I wouldn’t put too much stock in that. Demand is high and allocations are low. Once it’s been out for a while, it will probably drop back to Jetta SportWagen sales levels (which weren’t *bad*, just nowhere near the top of any list).

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      Just to clarify, this story is about inventory turnover, not overall volume. This car simply moves quickly from delivery truck to customer, but other models sell more volume even though they sit on the lot longer.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Kyree, didn’t you buy your Jetta SW just a year or so ago? Curious why you traded out already. Problems? Golf SW just too tempting?

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        Seconded, when did this happen?

      • 0 avatar

        It wasn’t a year ago…

        It was ten months ago. I bought the Jetta SportWagen new at the end of July 2014.

        But yes, the Golf SportWagen was just too tempting. I happen to be a bit of a snob, so I like luxury cars or at least luxurious cars. However, the Jetta SportWagen was just unavailable with a lot of the features I wanted…things like full power-seats, bi-xenon headlamps, BLIS, automatic/dual-zone climate control, *automatic headlamps*, fog lamps…etc. And I didn’t think that stuff would bother me when I bought, but the Jetta SportWagen’s lack of available features sort of had me wishing I’d just bought an A4 Avant or allroad after a while. The Golf SportWagen, OTOH, had everything I wanted, and the chassis felt far more solid (remember: even though the JSW received the Mk.6 Golf’s front end and dashboard, it did not receive the Mk.6 chassis upgrades and so was on the Mk.5 architecture). There’s a lot more, and when I finish my review, I’ll explain it all.

  • avatar
    Menloguy

    Although I am not in the market for a VW Golf SportWagen, it’s good to know that a compact station wagon is enjoying brisk sales in the US. Perhaps this trend will spur other carmakers *Ford* to bring their compact station wagons to the US. Keeping my fingers crossed.

  • avatar

    Good to see they are building the future demographic of people who won’t touch a VW with a 10 ft pole.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      My thoughts, also. Just a few commenters here, and already there is mention of serious problems with their VWs.

      My former 02 Passat put me into the demographic you describe.

      • 0 avatar
        seth1065

        I would hardly say serious problems with their VW’s I had one ‘serious” on my 2011 sprtswagon , out of warranty no less and VW fixed it no questions asked in three days, Kyree had a 14 and now a 15 and he has not had a serious problem that I heard about. Mine is at 107,000 miles and according to this board it should have blown up about 57,000 miles ago. Now are VW’s Accord dependability no they are not but people who drive them put up with some ” head shaking VW annoying things ” but so do Mazda drivers, Subie drivers, and most others.

        • 0 avatar
          Whatnext

          Too true. Some people just can’t help themselves from jumping on an internet bandwagon bashing VW. I see far more Subies behind tow trucks around here.

          • 0 avatar
            vwgolf420

            I think there’s a higher likelihood of someone having a VW lemon than a Toyota lemon, but the majority of VW owners I encounter love their cars. I’ve owned my 2010 Golf since new and haven’t had a single problem. I’d buy another without hesitation and the only other cars in my price range I would consider are the Mazda 3 and 6 and maybe a Ford Focus.

      • 0 avatar
        Chan

        Former 01 B5 owner here. Which engine was yours?

        I was led to believe the sludging 1.8T was even worse than the 2.8L 30V V6, but I had the latter and it had all sorts of problems.

        I wish I could say it was just the engine, but the rest of the car also started falling apart piece by random piece after about 7 years. I’ve lost one headlight (not once, but twice), one side signal repeater, a glove box handle, the rear cupholders, etc.

        I still won’t touch a VW with a pole.

  • avatar
    genuineleather

    Not terribly surprising considering the lack of competition, pent-up demand, and a relatively affluent customer base. I’m guessing VW isn’t providing too much financing support, either.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    Could this be the reintroduction of wagons to the US??? I’ve seen some very good wagons in Europe and Japan- I’d think they would do well here. We need a change from countless SUV/CUVs to wagons (and sedans…)!

    • 0 avatar
      runs_on_h8raide

      No don’t look into that metric too deeply. Power6 is right…low volume; early adopter status for the hipster couples that buy them. They’ll all be traded in for Subarus within 2 years of ownership after multiple trips to their dealership for “issues” with their ‘”dubs”. Das Auto.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      Dream on. VW and to a lesser degree Subaru have carved very small niches. I’m in the market for a GSW… no way I would get something like a Corolla wagon. You wouldn’t want one either, wagon backs don’t turn bad cars good.

  • avatar
    Power6

    Probably 9 days is the time it takes the guy who ordered it to pick it up.

    It does provide a bright side to the grim reality laid out by Jack for low volume models. If they are likely to sell quick dealers might no mind taking the brown wagons.

  • avatar
    haroldingpatrick

    It’s a nice automobile and just what some folks want. I checked one out when I was car shopping with my wife last week. Much to my surprise, she bought a Beetle TDI, quite the departure from her normal Ford /Jeep SUV or Mustang. She loves how it drives and is happy with it – that’s what really matters. She doesn’t like Japanese cars and won’t own one, regardless of their statistical reliability advantage. I talked her into a Honda once and had to listen to her piss and moan about it for two years before she had enough and bought another Mustang, which did have few problems, but she liked the car, so no big deal.

    People need to get over the VW reliability thing. Cars are like produce – always a gamble, some a little more than others, but just a little in absolute terms. I’m about as worried about my wife’s new VW having a HPFP, DPF, or DSG failure as I am a cloudy day. If something breaks, I’ll get it fixed. If the car turns into a lemon, I’ll make lemonade. If you get a problem car, get rid of it for goodness sake and try another one. Many a wise man, from Dale Carnegie to Jesus Christ have taught people to stop worrying about tomorrow’s imaginary problems today. Each day has enough real problems of its own and there are many people cooling off in the hospital basement this evening who didn’t know when they woke up this morning that this is the day they are going to die. . Planning is fine, worrying is not. if owning a VW causes you to worry about a very small but possible chance of a 5k repair on a DSG or HPFP or some other angst causing failure, then buy something else.

    I’m a MK IV Jetta survivor and currently drive a Honda CRV for full disclosure.

    • 0 avatar
      Chan

      I’m a VW survivor. The problem I had with VW was not as simple as “reliability” and trying a different car.

      My Passat was not poorly built. It was poorly Designed. If it was just one or two particular issues traceable to faulty parts or assembly, I would have let it go by now.

      My VW leaked out of the radiator (as opposed to a coolant line, but it also leaked out of a coolant line at the water pump, because the port was plastic). It leaked out of the oil pan (as opposed to an oil line). Exterior light mounts failed because they were plastic. The glove box latch failed because a pivot was plastic.

      These are things that should not happen to modern mass-production cars. VWs at the time were not designed with the proper materials for robustness and durability through usage and thermal cycles. Does that mean I should consider a VW now? Should I hire an ex-convict because he is a “changed man”?

      • 0 avatar
        haroldingpatrick

        These things are subjective. What was the ex con in jail for? Seriously, my wife is not that bothered by problems and we have no compunction about dumping a car that the dealer can’t get right in the warranty period. I have opted for Japanese reliability for my last several cars and I anticipate that to keep on going. That being said, the absolute worst car we have had was a 2006 Subaru Forester. Has anyone else had to put stop leak in a one year old car? Then there were all of the wheel bearing issues, the alignment issue that burned the tires up prematurely, the paint issues, the squeak an rattle issues, etc. My MK IV Jetta was a much better car – like I said, they are all a gamble. Solid red dots from Consumer Reports doesn’t mean you won’t get a lemon.

  • avatar
    jdiaz34

    Got our TDI SE manual on 4/22. I placed a deposit on 3/21, the dealer traded for it while the car was in transit, and called us to come and get it 4/20. So it was on the lot for three days. Very pleasant purchase experience using the VW Partner plan.

    We have an old Passat 2.0T wagon as well. I’m planning to corner the market on wagons. LOL.

    • 0 avatar

      Sweet! So someone else has a GSW here, too. Mine is a TDI SEL, but I would vastly prefer the faux brushed-aluminum trim in the SE to the fingerprint-collecting shiny stuff in the SEL. I could buy the trim online (eventually), but the SE doesn’t have automatic climate control and so it’s missing two button cut-outs on the climate control bezel that I’d need.

      Have you had any issues with the Discovery infotainment system?

      • 0 avatar
        jdiaz34

        Nothing weird yet. My wife’s phone was synced as the primary, but mine seems to connect just fine. Then again, we also have a Fiesta with Sync I, so just not having to shout “Bluetooth Audio” to get music to play is a step up.

        I’m enjoying the details. The way the cruise control pauses while you make a shift, then re-engages after the shift is complete…..love that. Strong midrange torque for passing on two lanes. Very tall gearing in 6th for relaxed cruising.

        Not many nits so far. Clutch is a bit hair-trigger. One assembly defect in the hatch area with a piece of plastic. Our VIN seems to indicate that this was the 90th car down the line, so I suppose that means our car was built around break-time on the first Monday of production. Here we go. :)

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    12 day lot turn for the Colorado…clearly a failure.

  • avatar
    MrFixit1599

    I don’t keep up with such trends normally, but am I the only one surprised that Subaru has 5 different models in the top 23 listed? I know they stopped building Toyota’s to make more Subaru’s, and now I see why. It appears they can barely build them fast enough to keep up with demand.

    • 0 avatar
      Dave M.

      Subaru is slaying it with the new Outback. I went by 2 dealers this weekend to kill time…a couple of base models, but it’s the loaded Limiteds in short supply. And I’m here in sunny Houston.

      Soooo tempted to trade my ’13 in for the ’15 with the BLIS and Eyesight. Totally out of my nature since I normally keep my cars 12 years/250k miles.

  • avatar
    eggsalad

    The Sonic sedan is at the bottom of the list – I wonder where the Sonic hatch sits. There’s a dealer about 300 miles away that’s sitting on TWO Dragon Green Promo LT Turbos. They haven’t dropped the price, and Chevy only has $500 on the hood.

    They’ve been on the lot since at least December. If they’re still there by Labor Day, I may drive up there and shoot them a lowball.

  • avatar
    Lou_BC

    “Fastest selling vehicle” just indicates supply versus demand. Most of the vehicles on the list of quickest selling are even in the Top 10 for volume sales.

    I’m surprised that BigAlfromOz hasn’t pointed out that the Colorado crewcab sat on the lot for less time than the aluminum crew F150.
    (12 days versus 19)

    But hey, we all know the F150 is a complete failure for Ford ;)

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      19 days on the lot is crazy fast for a full sized truck. I’m getting interested in the Colorado/Canyon though. I still think it’s a bit too big on the outside while being too small on the inside. I doubt a GMC or Chevy dealer would let me take an extended test drive with one. They are selling too many.

  • avatar
    wmba

    The fastest selling vehicle?

    Rubbish.

    They’ve only sold about 4 or 5 thousand Sportwagens this year so far in the US.

    Another silly TTAC headline. All we’re talking about is how long the few cars VW actually gets around to supplying stay on the lot.

    Whoop-de-do.

    If days on lot equated with sales success, the Camry and Accord would be worse, despite actually selling about 15 times as many each as the dowdy Sportswagen.


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