By on March 18, 2015

TSISE1

At the launch event for the Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen in Austin, Texas, a chat with one gentleman from Volkswagen AG turns to a discussion of old Saab rally cars and his affinity for Swedish cars. The future of Saab seems up in the air, but in his mind, Volvo’s is more clear-cut. “These next few months will be crucial,” he says, as talk turns to the launch of the XC90, “this is their last chance to turn things around.”

By the end of the event, I’m convinced that VW has built a better Volvo than Volvo itself.

Last year, Volvo re-introduced the station wagon to American consumers on account of popular demand from the Volvo faithful. Apparently, the longer, larger and infinitely more practical XC70 isn’t a true station wagon thanks to a slightly higher ride height and a bit of cladding. Talk about the narcissism of small differences.

What we got was the V60, which is a fine car to drive, but a poor station wagon, when examined in the context of what a Volvo station wagon traditionally is; practical, with plenty of room for people and cargo, prioritizing utility over beauty. Again, the XC70 is a better wagon, but the Puritancial enthusiasts among us refuse to accept it as a wagon. The V60 is the inverse of that formula. As much as I liked driving it, it is simply too impractical and too expensive to recommend to most people.

The best solution now comes from Volkswagen, which offers something that fills the role of a traditional station wagon while costing literally half as much as a V60. The Golf Sportwagen takes the MQB platform of the Golf, GTI and Golf R and stretches it out a bit to create a proper wagon profile. The end result is a vehicle that keeps its car-like profile, while offering more cargo space than a Mazda CX-5 or Jeep Cherokee (30.6 cubic feet with the seats up, 66.5 with the seats down). Like every other MQB car I’ve sampled, there’s plenty of space in the back for passengers too. Certainly more than the V60, not to mention the Cherokee, which is unfortunately lacking in room for anyone over 6 feet tall.

On the road, the Golf Sportwagen has the minimum amount of engagement required to keep a keen driver engaged. As Jack said, the basic Golf is a remarkably composed car for something with a giant hole in the body structure. Extrapolate that to the wagon, which has a bigger hole in it, and you get an idea of what you’re dealing with here. There’s more body roll than one would like to experience in corners, and the steering is a bit light on both weight and feel, but having driven two examples with different wheel and tire packages, I suspect that good rubber would help remedy some of these issues. On the whole, it still sits on the right side of “fun to drive”.

The new 1.8T engine isn’t bad, but the diesel is a true gem. Like any diesel, it falls off towards the upper end of the rev range, but the low-end torque more than makes up for it. It’s also remarkably smooth for a compression-ignition engine, and only when you’re outside can you hear the signature “clackclackclack” that lets you know it’s an oil-burner. But that’s a small price to pay given the numbers: 150 horsepower, 236 lb-ft of torque and 31/43 mpg city highway (42 mpg if you opt for the DSG). For me, the diesel is the obvious choice. I like the low-end torque and the refined feel, but the TSI engine has a fair bit more oomph up to (170 horsepower and 184 lb-ft) and respectable fuel economy numbers(25/35 mpg with the automatic) and the TDI may not make economic sense for many drivers. Caveat emptor and all that.

The interior materials and quality appear to be head and shoulders above the competition. As my drive partner, Jalopnik’s Patrick George, said “getting into a Focus after a Golf is a lesson in abject disappointment.” I think it’s even better than the new A3, which really does look like a cut rate Audi. My main gripe is the antiquated looking infotainment system and the lack of a USB port. Both of those will be fixed for model year 2016, when Apple CarPlay and Android support will be added, as well as somewhere to plug your devices in. The overall styling of the car isn’t going to incite sexual arousal in any human being, but it looks elegant in a restrained sort of way, like a pretty girl does when wearing head to toe Ann Taylor. It will age well, if nothing else.

My ideal Sportwagen would have the 2.0T out of the GTI, but for now, I find myself desiring a TDI Sportwagen with a 6-speed. It is the ultimate in cerebral compromise. A base TSI wagon starts at $21,395, while a TDI wagon starts at around $26,000. Loaded examples of both gasoline and diesel Sportwagens just avoid the $30k mark. you’ll have to wait until 2016 to get an all-wheel drive Golf. Volvo will sell you an AWD wagon right now, and it will have a much more powerful engine. Even so, the Sportwagen’s sticker price is nearly half that of the V60, but it in no way is it half the car.

The Sportwagen could conceivably do everything you would ever want in a passenger car, and never find yourself wanting for more. Ok, maybe something with more sex appeal, but like I said, it is the ultimate car to appeal to your head. If it’s the heart you’re after, you may want to look at something entirely different than a station wagon. Then again, if VW wanted to put their 2.0L turbo engines under the hood, the case for buying a V60 would evaporate, since a T6 Volvo wouldn’t be any faster than a GTI powered Sportwagen.

When Patrick asked the same gentleman who he thought VW competed with in the United States, he suggested Subaru (pronounced Soo-BAH-roo) and Honda. Volvo was not mentioned. But if the upcoming Tiguan and Passat (which will both be built on MQB) are this good, Volvo may have some competition for the XC60 and S60 as well.

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72 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2015 Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen...”


  • avatar
    tedward

    2016 for AWD? I thought it wasn’t coming until at least 2017? Good news if I’m wrong. Who told you that? German or American?

    Also, according to the press release I thought it started at 22 and changeish and the diesel at 25. I’m shopping this car for two people (ourselves included as a second family car) so I was a little surprised to see the price change before launch.

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      VW has said that Puebla will be upgraded to support AWD in 2016, so my guess is that CY2016 but MY2017.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      AWD and the 2.0T in the Sportwagen would seriously tempt me, as well as I think anyone above a certain age remotely considering a Golf R. All the practicality of the departed A4 Avant but on a new platform for a lot less money.

      • 0 avatar
        Quentin

        I wouldn’t even have to have the AWD. Just give me the nice GTI bits (interior styling, exterior styling, suspension, and engine) in a wagon body and lots of past sins would be forgiven. I know this won’t happen, but I’d take VW off my ‘do not buy list’.

        Disclaimer: I’ve purchased a new GTI and a new station wagon in the past decade. I can make outrageous requests because I actually put my money where my mouth is. :)

        • 0 avatar
          sproc

          Normally, I wouldn’t care about AWD either. But starting next year, work will keep me on the road a lot and deep into serious snow country. Really like the MQB offerings from VAG, don’t need 292hp but don’t think I’m willing to give up the hatch.

      • 0 avatar
        gtemnykh

        A coworker just swapped his S4 Avant with the righteous 4.2 V8 for a brand new Golf R, says he loves the new ride.

        But boy I will miss the sound of that Audi V8 rumbling through a high quality aftermarket exhaust.

  • avatar
    Davekaybsc

    I agree that the Golf has the A3 beat on the inside. The Audi is basically a black plastic cave. The CLA and 2 series may not have much more in terms of materials quality, but at least they bothered to try from a design standpoint.

    Both companies use blank buttons, but VW at least has the sense to put them on the console around the shifter where they aren’t that noticeable. The Audi puts them right up in your face, basically shouting “here’s all the stuff you don’t have!”

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      Ehhh – they’re both very nice, but in different ways. The A3 has the Golf beat when it comes to things like haptics; The buttons and controls on the A3 have a much more satisfying feel than the Golf. The A3 has more soft touch as well. Plus, the MMI system is far nicer than VW’s system, especially with the MMI+Nav combo. The upcoming upgrade to VW’s system for 2016 will be a very welcome upgrade, however.

      The good news is that neither is a penalty box, they just have their strengths and weaknesses.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Agreed. The A3 interior styling is a bit spartan but everything feels expensive to me, from the switchgear to the door panels to the metal glovebox pull. Drab, perhaps. But high quality drab.

        • 0 avatar
          wmba

          And then there’s people like me. I flat out prefer the Audi A3 interior to that of the Golf. One more dark brown VW dash that reminds me of my only VW purchase, a pathetically assembled 1980 Jetta.

          The Audi looks modern inside, the VW just more of the same old, same old. Everyone has different taste, but I like the Audi version much more.

    • 0 avatar
      cdnsfan27

      Why the hate on the A3? I sell both and I will tell you that the quality of the materials and the fit and finish on the A3 is impeccable. With the way VW leases the new Golf you can have an A3 for $50 more per month on a car with a $10,000 higher MSRP. That’s insane!

  • avatar
    7402

    I don’t know why Volvo bothered with the V60 if the idea was to pretend to go back to their wagon roots. Why not just take the XC70, lose the lift and cladding and make the AWD optional? They could even call it the V70!

    • 0 avatar

      The V70 is nearing replacement, there was no point in re-introducing a product that already hadn’t sold well here and was old. It also would have undermined the profits of the XC70.

      The V60 is newer and more fashionable, and had recently been facelifted.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I don’t get this either. Just bring over -some- V70s and make them special editions or some other nonsense.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Having sampled both the TDI and 1.8T, my opinion is opposite. I’d rather have the 1.8. Lots of torque, likes to rev, doesn’t run out of steam at 4000 rpm, and gets better mileage than the 5 cylinder, eroding some of the economics argument of the TDI. One wonders about reliability, though.

    I wholeheartedly agree that this is a satisfying and well-rounded vehicle. The outgoing generation is excellent and they haven’t lost the formula here.

    And I do want one with the GTI engine. The 1.8 isn’t enough to tempt me out of my 5 cylinder Sportwagen yet, but the 2.0T would.

    • 0 avatar
      Deaks2

      The 1.8T with a reflash ($700) should be a nice combo: http://www.goapr.com/products/ecu_upgrade_18tsi_gen3_mqb.html

      • 0 avatar
        sproc

        Very impressive, but even with the ability to quickly revert to factory settings, I just couldn’t do this to an under-warranty engine. Plus, this line really cracked me up: “Depending on driving style and fuel quality, better miles per gallon may be achieved.” Uh-huh.

        • 0 avatar
          Deaks2

          I had a GIAC flash on my then new MK6 GTI about 30 days after buying it :)

        • 0 avatar
          Advance_92

          I reflashed the ECU about two months after I bought my last car and haven’t had a problem in eleven years and 150,000 miles. It’s a Subaru, though. This VW looks like the only wagon worthy of replacing it, although all wheel drive has really spoiled me when the going gets messy.

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        Deaks2,
        That may just be the answer I need for my “they never make a Sportwagen with the GTI” whining. That would be a speedy wagon. Don’t know if I could handle the pressure of voiding the powertrain warranty, though.

    • 0 avatar
      Quentin

      I haven’t driven the 1.8T, but the 2.0T in the MKVII really is the all star. It has good torque down low, good power up high, and returns good gas mileage.

  • avatar
    Chicago Dude

    Derek, I respectfully disagree. The best solution does not come from Volkswagen. Volvo should bring back the V70 with the Drive-E engine and 8-speed auto. Drop the XC70 and sell a V70 CC. The V70 is already federalized (they sold the current generation in the US for something like 3 years) and it would cost approximately the same as the V60 does (based on the current price of the XC70), possibly even less.

    I have the current-gen V70 and wouldn’t trade it for a V60 or a Golf Sportwagen. Why? Well, it’s supremely comfortable – the seats are better than the V60 seats; they are the same as the S80. It has more room in back than the V60. Unlike the Golf SW, it has truly flat-folding rear seats in a 40/20/40 configuration. And the front passenger seat folds flat. I frequently fold the center section down – I have two car seats in the outboard position. The center pass-through on the Golf SW is not a substitute, by a large margin. I’ve even used the fold-down front passenger seat multiple times.

    The V70 is what a Volvo wagon is supposed to be. Comfortable, safe, and practical. Luckily, mine is still as good as the day I bought it, because I don’t know what I’d replace it with if I had to.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree wholeheartedly. I quite like the current XC70. But until that vehicle exists (and it might – I hear that we’ll see a V90 wagon in the future), this is the best alternative.

      • 0 avatar
        jvossman

        I thought the article spent too much time on the Volvo comparison. Maybe worth a sentence or a paragraph, but it gets mentioned numerous times. Considering how geeked TTAC crowd gets for diesel manual transmission wagons, I’d appreciated a more detailed run through on the vehicle including driving impressions, engineering, pricing, etc. I assume instrumented testing wasn’t available in Austin. I own a 2010 JSW with deisel and manual tranny. I get that VW puts the 1.8 and a 5 speed in the Jetta or Golf because they want the sporty types to spring for the 2.0 6M GLI or GTI, but the wagon (or Passat) has no upgrade path. Oh those wacky germans…

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      Jealous of the fold flat front seat, its an awesome feature no wagon or SUV should do without. The outgoing Sportwagen rear seats do fold entirely flat, though it takes a few steps. The center pass through has accommodated skis and 8-foot lumber, so I don’t feel at all cheated with the utility of the vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      The MY15 XC70 is offered with the new 2.0 Turbo I4 “T5” in a Drive-E FWD configuration. I’m not up on any subtle differences between the 2007+ XC70 and V70, but they are both on the same platform (P3, aka Ford EUCD) and should be essentially similar.

      http://www.volvocars.com/us/all-cars/volvo-xc70/specs-features/Pages/specs-features.aspx

    • 0 avatar
      hreardon

      I drove a new V60 last year and found the seats to be absolutely wonderful.

      Unfortunately, there were too many downsides for a $41,000 AWD V60:
      1. Non-existent back seat
      2. Small cargo area
      3. Too much road and wind noise

      Yes, it’s a nice car, but I can pickup a CPO’d allroad for less money and a nice Golf Sportwagen for even less than that. While the Volvo is nice, it’s not $40,000 nice.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      We might also note that the loaded V60 and loaded XC70 cost THE SAME. As usual, Volvo pricing fail.

    • 0 avatar
      palincss

      I agree, the V70 is much more practical as a wagon. The V60’s too small to put a bicycle inside (full fenders, both wheels on) that will fit perfectly in a Jetta SportWagen. The V70s available in the UK are extremely attractive, as seen here: http://www.volvocars.com/intl/cars/new-models/v70 but sadly we don’t get those choices here in the US.

  • avatar
    NN

    This Golf Wagon looks like a tremendous value and something I would strongly consider for my commuter. My concern, as I’m sure not only mine, is warranty and maintenance…VW’s reputation in the US is terrible, a 100k warranty or a cheap short term lease with full maintenance would be the only way VW could get me into their cars.

    This is coming from a guy with a Chevy that now has a broken transmission at 90k miles…covered under warranty! I hate to say it, but with how complicated transmissions have gotten in reaching for maximum mpg, I would consider an extended powertrain warranty now on anything that isn’t a Toyota (or a manual–which my wife won’t drive). Toyota seems to be the only company that consistently puts solid transmissions in their cars. This is the real answer to Doug’s article on the Corolla yesterday…most people really only want something that won’t break.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Very clean smooth exterior look. Reminds me of the mid-2000s Honda minivan compressed into a wagon profile. As others have said, the reliability is suspect, but perhaps a good lease prospect.

  • avatar
    Superdessucke

    The Chinese apparently don’t understand the Volvo Faithful. The Volvo Faithful will clamor all day long for a “true” station wagon and a reincarnation of the P1800 but, unless they price it under $10,000, they’re not going to actually sell any cars to this group.

    Their wagon should have been aimed at the car buying public — people who buy Outbacks and Golf wagons. I guess now it doesn’t matter. Volvo will be out of business in 5 years, while VW, despite it’s recent troubles, will be going strong.

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      I’m not the Volvo Faithful, but I think my XC70 is a “true” wagon enough for any sane person.

      (Of course, I also bought it lightly used, so Geely doesn’t care much…)

      I did test drive a V60 and liked it well enough, but it’s definitely aimed at a different market that the JSW/GSW is, or even the Outback.

      And that market is much smaller.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “I find myself desiring a TDI Sportwagen with a 6-speed.”

    How many shades of brown is offered for this configuration?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      “Take the $20k you saved by not buying an Allroad or Volvo and paint it any color you want!”

      Though I must say the Volvos have a *really* good infonavtainment system, as do the Audis.

      I haven’t tried the current VW one, but if it’s “antiquated”, it won’t be as good as the Audi one, let alone Sensus; of the ones I tried in my recent test-drive spate, Volvo’s had the best UX.

    • 0 avatar
      1998redwagon

      1. but you have to order it with a light colored interior.

  • avatar
    sirwired

    Durn it! For a couple of years, the answer to the question of “Should I replace my ’04 1.8T Audi-in-Disguise-Passat Wagon”, now with 140k, has been a clear “no”. The competition has been entirely swept from the market, with the last even remotely viable replacement, the TSX wagon, disappearing last year.

    It’s now starting to show it’s age; worn interior, in need of a suspension refresh, an axle re-booting, timing belt service, and new tires. I have a real decision to make now, as this is an awfully tempting replacement. The cargo room approaches that of my Passat, the MQB cars and the new 1.8T engines (no relation at all to my 1.8T other than the displacement) have been fairly well-received and haven’t shown any particular reliability issues.

    Financially, it makes no sense to replace my car (although I could certainly afford to, and the wife would not object). But the siren call of the new, shiny, and pretty decent is calling my name…

    • 0 avatar
      PartsUnknown

      I’m with you – this would make a great replacement for my ’04 A6 Avant. Problem is, I just did my timing belt, tires and brakes, so at 102K miles, it’s set for a while. Makes no economic sense right now.

      The fuel economy (1.8T or TDI) makes my mouth water though – the 3.0 V6 in my wagon is a sweet engine, but crikey it hoovers premium gas like Miley Cyrus on a weekend coke bender.

  • avatar
    mikedt

    The Volvo V60 MSRP is a beyond ridiculous. At the recent auto show they had a v60 that was spec’ed to around $41 grand. That’s a lofty area inhabited by numerous BMW, Mercedes and other prestige models. If that’s what Volvo really needs to charge to make a profit then they aren’t long for this world.

    • 0 avatar
      duncanator

      No kidding. I was looking at the Volvo S60 and it was over 42,000. I then checked Carmax where they had several 2015 S60’s, each with less than 10k miles and they were selling them for 27,900. That is a massive depreciation and I wonder who would want to buy new after seeing that.

      • 0 avatar
        Sigivald

        Note that Volvo did a mid-year refresh of the electronics; 2015 and 2015.5 Volvos aren’t quite the same, and I suspect that accounts for some of it.

        (And the set of barely-used XC70s that includes the one I bought.)

        If you’re worried about depreciation, never buy any luxury car.

        (And note further that the S60 starts at $34k, not $42.

        CarMax shows *Fleet/Rental* S60 T5 Premiers at $28k – MSRP for a non-fleet Premier is $37k, and that’s the 2015.5 model, not the 2015; Sensus Connect adds some cost and some value.

        There are $42k+ S60s, but they’re not FWD T5 Premiers. That’s AWD Platinum, or T6 territory.

        Add in that a lot of people expect a rental to be abused, and it explains even more.)

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Yep, and as I mentioned above, that’s the same price as the much larger and more usable XC70.

    • 0 avatar
      palincss

      If we’re talking about wagons here, “numerous other models” doesn’t come even close. There are two competitors: the 3-series BMW, which for a car comparably equipped to a 40K V60 will sticker for around $50K, and the E350 Mercedes, which comparably equipped will have an MSRP between $60-70K.

  • avatar
    Master Baiter

    This would be great if everyone drove cars instead of SUVs, pickups and minivans. As it is, with this Golf, you won’t be able to see around/through half the vehicles on the road.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    Fantasic looking inside and out, this is the antithesis of the useless V60 IMO. $21k for the base car with the 1.8T and I assume a stick shift sounds like a bargain to me, just looking at that interior.

    Others have already brought it up, but boy would I worry about the reliability of that new 1.8T. There’s just too long of a legacy of coked up intake valves, engine sludge, and failed coil packs to ignore.

    But even as a dyed in the wool Honda/Toyota guy and despite those aforementioned concerns, I find this vehicles incredibly tempting.

  • avatar
    brettc

    Such a nice looking car! I’d love to replace my 2012 wagon with one, but can’t justify it. At least not until it gets a better head unit. So maybe in 2017 I’ll consider one. Nice to see that this unit has Pirellis on it instead of the garbage Bridgestone EL400s that came on mine, which I promptly replaced with a set of Pirelli Cinturatos.

    I see that VW finally put the build your own option back on their site, but the Golf wagon isn’t listed yet. Oh well.

  • avatar
    Wraith

    A few questions:

    – Is the infotainment at least reasonably functional, easy to live with, if not as pretty as more advanced systems?

    – You can buy VW’s USB dongle, if you want to hook up your phone/iPod/etc, right? Just doesn’t have a standard format USB port?

    – Have they said anything concrete about AWD being available next model year / when we might see it?

    I’ve been looking at my options for a new car for a while. Leading options with AWD are CX-5, CX-3 (not available yet), and Legacy. I test drove the Jetta, Passat, and Golf TSI. Jetta’s a bit downmarket, Passat’s a bit big. And of course none have AWD. But an AWD Golf Sportwagen sounds promising.

  • avatar
    srogers

    I’m probably wrong, since nobody else has mentioned this yet, but…
    Isn’t this still the pre-MQB bodied Sportwagen? I didn’t think that we were getting the MQB wagen yet.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I like the styling, though the rear bulk overhang gets to be a little much at the back (from a side view). It’s the amount of metal there to my eyes.

    Just considering now, what made them stop selling the Passat wagon here? Think of the size of that thing, now that’d be a real Volvo wagon!

    • 0 avatar
      sirwired

      VW killed the Passat Wagon here because they couldn’t make the economics of the European Passat work. (In fact, they never could make them work, even in the Glory Days when the B5 Passat was racking up various “Best Midsize Car” awards right and left.) VW simply could never get the US market to pay what it cost to manufacture and import; it was simply too nice of a car. (It would have been suitable for a mid-market brand, but VW doesn’t have one of those in the US.)

      They never made a wagon version of the new NA Passat because it certainly would never pay off to roll a wagon version of a North America-only car.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Thanks. So it would have been a US Skoda is what you’re sayin.

        • 0 avatar
          V8Roving

          No, it would’ve needed to be sold as a Buick level entry to VW’s Chevy.
          The B5 Passat was basically the same underneath as the A4 of the time, just slightly longer.

          I learned to drive in and spent a lot of time driving my parents 05 1.8T sedan and it was a hell of a car for the money. Lasted 130k before my parents traded it on a new 14 Tennessee built American passat. Also a good car but totally different in terms of feel and mission
          The 05 felt like a true European sedan, whereas the 14 gives off a Chevy Impala as interpreted by Ze German’s vibe. It’s more a big cruiser

  • avatar
    deanst

    Note to Canadians – we can not buy the Sportwagen. But we can purchase a Sportwagon.

    Wonder how much time and money was spent on that spelling decision?

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    This looks very nice . . . and my Golden Retriever would be fine in the back. My only gripe is that it appears to have pretty low-profile tires. I don’t get this on a car that lacks sporting pretensions. A wider sidewall has a marginal deleterious effect on handling (which probably would be unnoticeable in this car) and it offers the rim more protection against potholes, etc.

    Needs to come in brown, of course.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      The basic “S” trim has wonderful 15″ wheels with fat aspect ratio tires, for us curmudgeons that like cheap replacement tires and ride comfort :)

  • avatar
    epc

    Is that spare wheel well LINED with carpet? Never seen that before!

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    I have a 2012 Sportwagen tdi upgraded with Koni FSD’s, a larger rear swaybar, and stickier tires, and it is a great car to drive. Plenty of room for stuff, lots of torque, quality materials and build quality…it really does not have any negative points, for me anyway.

  • avatar
    Fred

    I liked the 2014 just not enough to make the purchase. So far I don’t see anything here that would change my mind. Curious to what the full reviews will be.

  • avatar
    manny_c44

    I think the New Euro Passat Avant looks better ‘stretched’ :

    http://tinyurl.com/n3ld3ov

    I guess it is just too expensive/niche to be released in the US. The Golf is sharp looking in its small package, don’t get me wrong, but as a wagon I like the Passat.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    I’ve seen Golf wagons in person, really fine looking cars that manage to combine a similar sense of practicality and good design, as old “proper” Volvos.

    If I had the income I’d gladly drive a diesel automatic Golf wagon, I like low-torque engines that sound a bit “agriculture”.

    I’m not exactly Volvo faithful, not after trying on an 850.
    Loved my 240s, couldn’t care less for the 850.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    I want one of these for my wife so bad. But I will hold off for the 2.0T and DSG. Perfect road trip/going out ride.

  • avatar
    drivrBob

    Somehow I would never think of comparing this car to a Volvo. Maybe a Passat Wagon would be a better comparison. I once had a Volvo 240 wagon and I was kind of disappointed in it. I somehow thought those Vikings knew how to make cars for the snow. But this one had some kind of weird traction control (differential slip) that made the car go sideways instead of straight. Finally I got rid of it after hearing a big cracking sound after going around a sharp hilly curve.
    Anyway, I now have a golf wagon TGI (has an extra tank for CNG) that I just traded in my 8 year old 2006 Subaru Legacy for. It was also a wagon, so I’ll compare it that. Yes! Its a wagon and has amble room for my needs. Even though the fact sheet says it has more capacity, somehow I still feel my Legacy was roomier (definitely in the horizontal direction). With the seats down I could layin a twin size mattress. But the main reason I did the trade in was for the better mileage and with CNG it is now costing me half as much to drive. On top of that with the extra tank I can go over 800 miles before I need to refuel. As for the fun factor, with the golf the pleasure of driving is still there. Basically its a great car to drive and handles exceptionally well for a 2 wheel drive. However, next time around I’m going back to all wheel drive. One more reason I got this car was it looks. I never really liked how golfs looked in the past. But the latest generation is a huge improvement and finally large and roomy enough for my tastes. For a small car it now has that mid size car feeling to it.

  • avatar
    ismasl

    I have been driving one of this for 35000km. in the last 6 months in Spain.Not a problem so far.
    2.0TDI 150hp DSG with allmost every option in it google maps, sunroof, DCC…

    Coming from a VW CC 1.8TSI I have to admit that this oil burner is way faster in real word. The DSG is much faster than me down shifting whe needed, The DCC makes it very stable at high speed on the motorway 180km/h. way easy without the nedd to correct your steering on the way.The driving position is much better than the old Golf or Passat for a tall person 1,86m myself.

    It it faster than the CC but feels a bit cheaper because it is a bit louder inside, probably made on purpose to difirienciate it from Audi.

    But what you need is this Golf Variant GTD with the 180hp engine and GTI interior and exterior trim.

    http://www.volkswagen.es/es/models/nuevo-golf-variant/gtd.html

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