By on February 17, 2015

2015 Chevrolet SS rear redIn September, we told you the Chevrolet SS didn’t sell as often as the dreadfully unpopular Cadillac ELR in August, the first time the SS failed to do so during the period of coexistence.

They tied in September before the ELR outsold the SS again in each of the following months.

In December, we told you that Chevrolet SS volume slid to a new low in November. With only 105 sales, the SS was outsold by ultra-rare cars like the BMW i8, Nissan GT-R, Volkswagen e-Golf, and yes, the Cadillac ELR.

Yet during the month of December, SS volume fell to yet another new low. Only 93 were sold, a 61% drop.

Surely this was a darkest-before–the-dawn kind of month, right? Surely with an available manual transmission (which is still not at all readily available, according to Cars.com inventory results) and a 168-day supply of cars overall at the beginning of the new year (according to Automotive News) the SS was about to shoot through the roof, matching or exceeding its peak of 350 sales in March of last year? Or at least the 232 SS sedans sold in January of last year?

No. Not quite. GM reported 115 SS sales in January 2015, a 50% cut compared with January 2014 results.

GM sales chart G8 SS Caprice CamaroOver the last six months, Chevrolet only sold 691 SSs in the United States, down 59% from 1671 over the course of the previous six months. Year-over-year comparisons are only valid in the last three months, but during that period, SS volume has tumbled 52%.

2015 Chevrolet Caprice PPVPut it this way, agencies responsible for purchasing big Chevy sedans are far more keen on the Caprice PPV than consumers are on the SS. 1762 Caprices were sold in the last six months.

Granted, year-over-year volume slid 19% to 700 units over the last three months. With just 124 sales last month, January was the lowest-volume Caprice sales month since March 2012. Ford sold 2041 Explorer Police Interceptors and 678 Taurus Police Interceptors in January.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

69 Comments on “Not Aussiely Influenced: Big Chevrolet Sedans Struggle All The More In January 2015...”


  • avatar
    PonchoIndian

    How does this compare to overall sales for everyone (cars not trucks)?

    It has been one of the coldest January/February on record, as well as having record snow falls up here in the Northeast. Hard to believe this doesn’t affect the sales of rwd cars.

    There is still almost a complete lack of availability of the manual transmission versions.

    These sales numbers don’t seem very surprising.

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      A few examples.

      The overall new vehicle market was up 14% last month compared to January 2014.

      Mustang sales have increased in four consecutive Januarys, rising (not surprisingly) most sharply in January 2015. After averaging 2543 January sales in the previous five years, Dodge sold 4592 Challengers last month. Camaro January volume reached a three-year high last month. Corvette sales slipped 6% this January, but that’s not surprising after last January’s early C7 surge. BMW sold 375 copies of the 2-Series. Porsche Cayman volume was up 9% (or 24 units) to 304. Certainly declining volume among exclusively RWD cars weren’t unheard of, either.

      • 0 avatar
        PonchoIndian

        Fair enough. I’m not trying to defend the SS. It’s pretty obvious GM doesn’t really care how many they sell, and it is a pretty specialized market segment in itself anyway.

        Realistically its competition is the Charger/Challenger SRT-8, BMW 535 (obviously not price or status but you know what I mean), Taurus SHO (sorta), Audi A6 (maybe? but similar to BMW in doubtful its cross shopped). Truthfully it is really on the the SRT’s from Mopar.

    • 0 avatar
      319583076

      It would seem reasonable to assume that sales will increase in the next couple of months as tax refund checks bring consumers into the showroom.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    The SS was an orphan when it was launched. The MT version will be a unicorn.

    With so few sales, it’s not even a halo car. It’s just a bad business decision whose effects will last for years, due to the need to support field units.

    • 0 avatar
      PonchoIndian

      How is it a bad business decision? It is doing exactly what it is supposed to do, use up some more capacity from the factory down under.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      It was a necessary tradeoff for taking subsidies for Holden.

      Now that the Aussie production lines are headed for the history books, the need for this car goes away.

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      ELR was a bad business decision, the SS is a compliance car which only exists due to Aussie politics and GM/Holden’s acceptance of bail out money.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        As noted, I believe that the ELR could have been a reasonable low-volume halo car if the roof had been chopped off. Perhaps this wasn’t possible (reinforcing the platform may have added too much weight), but that’s the route that I would have taken. Small two-door luxury cars need something special to catch the market’s attention.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Might have been more successful if GM advertised it existed. This has been said before I previous posts and threads. UAW was against the whole deal as the cars was built in NFTA

  • avatar
    Jean-Pierre Sarti

    I would love to buy a BIG comfortable car without all the electronic and high margin “luxury” crap. Kind of like the Chevy Caprice Classic of the 80’s. The Caprice PPV, even with the V6, would perfectly fit my needs and not be all that expensive. Hell they have a “detective” version already. Double Hell, they sell the damn things in the middle east as a Caprice so it’s not even like they don’t make the thing.

    I never understood why car makers don’t allow new police cars to civilians. It’s not like I couldn’t get it eventually in the used market, just let me have one new you big dummies.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      Go see a fleet dealer. I’ve heard rumors in the past that some dealers have no problem selling to a civilian. I don’t think there is any law against a civilian getting one of these cars (as you said they get sold used all the time). Keeping them out of civilian hands is likely just an unwritten “policy” or due to the fact that very few civilians actually ask for them. Good luck and let us know what you find out.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Used to sell in the Middle East, but GMNA stopped Holden exporting to UK, Brazil and ME. That was one straw that helped sink Holden

  • avatar
    ponchoman49

    How many Azera’s does Hyundai sell a month? How many Cadenza’s does Kia sell. Better yet how many K900’s do they push per month? Bet it’s not much different than the SS as I rarely ever see any of these cars on dealer lots in a 200 mile radius. I mean how many people are looking to purchase a 40K plus RWD performance sedan in the crappiest months of the year(in the many WInter and inclement areas)?

    • 0 avatar
      Timothy Cain

      Hyundai did 603 Azeras a month last year. Kia did 772 Cadenzas/month. (http://www.goodcarbadcar.net/2015/01/usa-all-cars-sales-figures-2014-december-year-end.html) K900, which we looked at in October, is running at 132 U.S. sales/month. https://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2014/10/rare-kia-k900-becoming-rarer/

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      I live in the western DC suburbs. The closest Chevy dealer has had an SS on the show room floor forever. It seems to attract lots of Darryl and Tammy types. My closet Kia dealer has a K900 right out front. People walk right past it to look at their SUVs and the minivan. The K900 was designed to compete against the E class. The SS was designed to compete well, against something. What, a great many are not quite sure. If you like GM, a Caddy is cheaper.

  • avatar
    DeadWeight

    Cadillac & Chevrolet should be merged, with the Yukon & Escalade being sold exclusively at Slade Dealerships, with Slade being a new brand under General Motors.

    That way, heavily discounted and increasingly exclusive ELRs, Volts, SSs, ATSs, CTSs, XTSs, CT6s, CT8s, etc., can be sold side by side at the same dealerships.

    “Cadillac” could be a Chevy trim package name.

    • 0 avatar
      el scotto

      Chevy dealers would storm the Ren Cen with torches and pitchforks. However, and true to form; Chevy dealers do little if anything to differentiate between Corvette and Suburban buyers. Two models Gm consistently gets right BTW. The buyers of Chevy’s most expensive models get the same dealership experience as those who came in because they saw Cobalts where on sale, get glad handed from grifters in cheap sport coats and nicotine stained fingers, and service managers constantly working the hard up-sell because ya know your HVAC system has “Thelman Friction” and needs a complete flush and some new parts to reduce the friction. Caddy dealers would just send their attorneys. Lots of cash was paid out to be a Cadillac dealer. Or even better a Cadillac/GMC dealer. Two possible sales in one family! Win-win!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      Cadillac should simply be merged with either the old BPG channel or the Chevrolet one, and only offer two or three real models high quality/high cost but low volume models. They choose the opposite and want to maintain three channels of two distinct product lines: Chevrolet-Buick-GMC + Misc Opel and Cadillac.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        If the proposed solution is to further merge Cadillac with other GM brands/dealers, the real answer is to shut down the brand and market the Escalade separately. It’s already within spitting distance of a Denali anyway. Buick already exists as upscale Chevys.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          Why give up rebadge profits on other C-B-GMC models such as XTS or SRX? Just stop trying to be a volume faux luxury brand because its not working. Three or four models, with one of them being an actual Cadillac and the others enhanced copies of C-B-GMC.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            They needn’t lose those customers because Buick exists. Two cars chasing many of the same customers. Duplicated efforts.

            If they plan to do anything with Cadillac, they should move the product right out of Buick territory. If they can’t do it profitably, just forget Cadillac.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Buick could run Opels as opposed to US Chevrolet models, which is already starting to happen. They only reason Epsilon II XTS, Impala, and Lacrosse simultaneously exist is because of the three distribution channels. Combined Buick could have something else in this slot with Cadillac sharing the rebadge.

          • 0 avatar
            danio3834

            So basically, you’re more or less suggesting GM’s product strategy from the last 20 years. Import a few euro models and badgineer the rest.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            @danio3834

            I’m advocating they continue to do what they are doing for the time being but drop the volume aspirations, cut out the bean-counting on Cadillac branded models, and cull the third distro channel. Cadillac currently offers one exclusive platform and up to three models (CTS, ATS, ATS Coupe) the rest are direct copies. Sergio has proven to be wise by keeping all of his brands but selling them through one channel, this way he is able to offer different product by brand without competing against another sales channel. Although Alpha is exclusive, the other products are not and do compete with the Chevrolet/Buick sales channel. Bring Cadillac into one of those sales channels and stop duplicating everything, everywhere. If they merge it with Chevrolet, then Cadillac should focus on more exclusive models which are not derived from Chevrolet. If they use the BPG channel, then derive Buicks from Opel and then continue to copy some Chevrolets in the BPG channel (as Buick does now) but surround it by one actual Cadillac platform (which Alpha never was intended to be). Pretty much just build the Ciel and don’t expect to move any volume.

  • avatar
    michal1980

    It also shows that online enthusiasts talk more with their keyboards then their wallets.

    • 0 avatar
      raph

      I imagine the bulk of enthusiasts willing to spend 50k on a RWD GM performance sedan are pretty thin. Most of those I suspect lament BMW getting a little soft around the mid-line yet shell out the bucks for the status it provides.

      If Priced correctly in the high 30’s to low 40’s GM would have moved a lot more, the SS is a car that is drastically over priced like the Viper was before FCA put a 15k rebate on the snake.

    • 0 avatar
      redav

      This is a case where the difference between “then” and “than” matters.

    • 0 avatar
      Beemernator

      V8, check. RWD, check. Stick, check. Stealthy, check. The dream car of the internet commentariat. Pity that very few of them put their money where their keyboards are.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Nothing can really be done on the price, but a little bit of advertising would have really gone a long way.

    Once the caprice with the 6.0 starts heading to police auctions I may go look at one as a new toy.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Slow sales? What could it be?

    I’m sure our two Australian intellectuals, bulging with brainpower, will let us know the real reason – it’s the UAW. Yeah, that’s it. Sure.

    Or UNECE standards. Or smog, or because the US isn’t as rich as Austr alia, or the chicken tax improperly applied.

    The real reason is these things are overpriced and have no AWD. That’s why Ford is cleaning up around these parts – and with the winter we’re getting, a RWD SS slipping around on the world’s best snow tires is strictly SOL. Just like the crap old Panthers used to do – I’d pass those things routinely on our steep city streets, and times have moved on.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      More than the UAW, but not happy about a car that was going for US Police sales NOT MADE in the US. I guess GM came under a lot of pressure to make sure it was not advertised. A lot of US Police Departments also wanted US built cars

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        There are regs for gov’t fleet purchases but I think it was limited appeal which sunk Caprice. Many depts operate in areas of the country which see all four seasons, sometimes in severe conditions. Therefore AWD systems become attractive to some, and to other urban depts without those concerns fuel economy has become a big one in the past ten years. Therefore a RWD only model intended for V8 highway patrol (but available in V6) is only really attractive to (1) highway patrol and (2) depts in arid or hot areas which see no snow (similar to parts of Australia). In fact, a FWD type application was so attractive, Pittsburgh Police twenty years ago adopted the Pontiac Bonneville as a cruiser I kid you not. They did this for reasons of fuel economy but primarily because Pittsburgh is littered with steep topography which becomes treacherous in winter. The B-bodies and Panthers of the time did not handle these challenges well. FWIW today PPD still runs 3900 W-bodies but is slowly transitioning to Taurus/Explorer after decades of GM preference due to you guessed it, AWD.

        MY92 Pontiac Bonneville police cruiser, 3800 FTW. These things were still cruising as late as 2005.

        http://images46.fotki.com/v147/photos/4/42477/3898872/month25-vi.jpg

        Additional: Another thing which may be hurting GM here is Ford’s relationship with most depts. The Impala has been the FWD of choice for over a decade but Ford dealers had their hooks in depts through Panther and to a lesser extend Expedition sales. While Taurus/Explorer have many problems in police use (fuel economy being one), their AWD appeal, enhanced safety for LEOs, and dealer network I think are part of what moves them.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      The SS on a good set of snow tires would be an awesome winter car. My Challenger on Toyo Observe Garits treks through a foot of snow like a yeti.

  • avatar
    AnotherMillenial

    I appreciate the SS for what it is. It’s a great car, I wish it had a better defining front end, but it’s an American performance RWD sedan that is premium in ways most US-branded cars aren’t. Who can be mad? I’ve always thought the SS should’ve been sold as a Buick, keep the price the same. No one is paying $50K for a Chevy unless it’s performance coupe or it can tow a boat.

    The Buick SS (Velite?) picks up Cadillac’s lost sedan volume between the ATS and the CTS. The ATS’s smaller size turned off buyers of the last-gen CTS, but the current CTS is also much more expensive. The SS, save for a sunroof and a spare, is loaded from the get go and still only costs as much as a base CTS which has much more features, can go up to the $70k V-Sport and that’s before the upcoming CTS-V, M5 fighter. A Buick SS allows GM to recapture that market without the massive discounting of the CTS that’s currently going on. Outside of prestige and equipment, the Cadillac sedans also have their own unique platform so there’s not much competition. However, if I had my way there never would’ve been the XTpala (love that name). So what the DTS is dead, send them to Buick and spend the money taking the LaCrosse upmarket to show them the Buick is no downgrade, I would’ve even included the XTS-Vsport’s engine and magnetic ride control at the top end. Cadillac’s product line-up didn’t need a confusing place-holder, but Buick sure needed a better fullsize FWD luxury boat.

    Buick has no Genesis competitor and the Lacrosse isn’t competing with the highest-end 300s. At best the LaCrosse competes with the reskinned-Avalon-Lexus ES, the Lacrosse itself being a reskinned Impala. Buick also doesn’t have an RLX/MKS style flagship and a Buick-badged SS makes 10x more sense than a 50K Chevy. With a Camaro and Corvette, Chevy could stand to sit out the RWD sedan fight. Charger SRT8 sales aren’t THAT important or at least not more so than the Buick SS vs 300S/SRT8 argument.

    I’ve also figured that if not the SS, the real RWD Aussie car to rebadge was the Caprice and call it the Park Avenue like they do in China. Obviously style it so Americans would like it, but it’s the kick Buick sorely needs. Soften it heavily so no one thinks of crying that it’s anywhere near a Cadillac and you have the modern-Town Car, K900 fighter America deserves. The police-only Chevy is a generation too late (needed this car in like ’07) so why not help out Buick.

    The Camaro makes sense, the Pontiac G8 made sense, why GM wasted good RWD platforms on mainstream Chevy over “premium” Buick will never make sense to me.

  • avatar
    FormerFF

    Look at Timothy’s “sporty car” market segment. What’s selling? As noted, the ponycars are doing well. The Corvette is still doing well, as is the 911. Going a little smaller, the WRX and GTI are selling at a good clip. Other than those, the rest of that group aren’t doing very well. Buyers just aren’t looking for sporty cars these days, as a general rule.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    So here’s a thought…

    Would an Impala SS that was really just a Cadillac XTS-V (with AWD and turbo V6) sell better than the Chevy SS?

    • 0 avatar
      psarhjinian

      “Would an Impala SS that was really just a Cadillac XTS-V (with AWD and turbo V6) sell better than the Chevy SS?”

      Yes, because it would be cheaper to buy.

      That said, near-premium cars don’t sell much at all: the Taurus SHO is a rare bird and Chrysler, well, Chrysler is special: they have an established platform that they can leverage the costs of.

      It would have been interesting to ask the reverse: what if the Impala had been a Zeta, instead of an Epsilon-2? Then you might have seen I4 and V6 SS’s that would have allowed V8 to continue as a legitimate Charger competitor. The bankruptcy, spike in gas prices and great recession kiboshed all that.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        OH I completely agree that the Impala should have been Zeta BUT then that would imply that A – GM wanted the Zeta platform to have a longer life, B – that they WANTED to sell a large number of cars made in Australia or set up a factory here.

        Neither of which they actually wanted…

  • avatar
    dman6549

    The only thing this piece does show – just how poorly the author researched the issue.

    The first batch of MY2015 deliveries has made it out of west coast port around mid-January’15 and the first delivers from the first east coast port ship are just starting now. A year ago, the first batches of MY2014 cars made it to US in December 2013 and deliveries in January 2014 were in full swing, not constrained by available current-modelyear stock. This makes year-over-year comparison retarded and meaningless, just reflecting the general downtrend in sales of MY2014 cars very late in the model year (plus dealer unwillingness to discount those heavily). Deliveries will uptick in February as the first MY2015 batch gets delivered to states east of Chicago, and will probably move higher in March, unless there’s a major west coast port strike escalation.

    TL:DR Get your shit together TTAC contributor. Just a blind look at WARDS numbers is not a publication-worthy story.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    It would have sold better as a Buick – it just makes no sense as a Chevy given the content and price point. This would have been such a logical revival of the Grand National. They could have used the Buick Park Ave interior bits from China to fluff up the seat materials and dash more, given it the magnetic ride control, put something better than the gas gulping LS3 under the hood (new Corvette engine, as was the original rumor for the SS), the Buick front clip (if it passed US crash/pedestrian standards) from the Chinese Park Avenue and called it good.

    I know, I know, Buick dealers saw it and said no so the story goes.

    Lots of people laughed at the iPad when it came out too (not saying this would have sold like iPads, just pointing out that focus groups sometimes don’t always really know what they want)

    Given the non-existent sales and the increasingly uncompetitive nature of the Zeta platform (no matter how good of a platform it is, it is pushing up to 9 years old) it certainly wouldn’t have done any worse as a Buick – that would be a tough point to argue.

    Finally, anyone coming in to see the Grand National that can’t cough up the $50K MIGHT, just MIGHT, have driven out in a Regal GS – that’s a halo car, that’s winning.

    This fits nothing beyond meeting Australian government regulators promises and adding a shred of capacity to a factory struggling to keep the workers at it occupied until the whole thing is shut down.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      I like the idea of a Buick Zeta sedan but using the Grand National badge for a vehicle with an LS V8 is pissing all over that name.

      It’s like the only car GM has in the stable that SHOULD use the turbo V6.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      At the very least, the car should have been marketed with a nameplate that had some equity rather than the anonymous “SS” moniker.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        I agree with you. The SS name was GM-quality stupid.

        There’s no way being a Buick would have helped its sales though. Buick may be the least valuable brand name extant, in the US at least.

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Well it’s upholding the tradition of other Chevrolet products with vague product names that include SS in them that bloated to more than 1/2 a year inventory even with limited production.

          SSR anyone?

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            Another plum for the Reatta Craft Center.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lansing_Craft_Centre

            http://jalopnik.com/for-3-200-you-oughta-reatta-513798371

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            This is interesting, 1991 Orlando Sentinel article talking about GM building electric vehicles in the Reatta Craft Centre. The EV1 was later built there but I wasn’t aware it was early as 1991 it was supposed to happen.

            “However, GM announced recently that Reatta production soon will end to clear factory space for electric vehicles. Only 1,500 Reattas are scheduled to be built for the 1991 model year.

            The Reatta’s special factory in Lansing, Mich., called the Reatta Craft Centre, will be renamed the Lansing Craft Centre and be used to make an electric car based on the high-performance Impact show car. However, GM officials say the car that eventually reaches the market would not be named Impact, though it will resemble the Impact concept car and be based on it mechanically.”

            http://articles.orlandosentinel.com/1991-03-21/topic/9103190713_1_reatta-fiero-electric-cars

        • 0 avatar
          APaGttH

          Ya, because Mitsubishi has such a strong brand – in the US. Or Scion for that matter.

          /facepalm

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    A quick check on Auto Trader shows the first page of SS models clearly with a fat stack of ADM on them – the worst offender is a local dealer – asking over $57K – $10K ADM. Saddest part of all is some moron will pay it.

    When you go to any range and look at used SS – most of them admittedly with very low miles, the price break is only about $7K for an unwanted sedan, one model year old, previously titled.

    GM doesn’t seem to have any cash on the hood either – pretty clear they don’t want to sell these.

    Given the Charger and Challenger products out, and a C7 Corvette starting at $57K – the local dealer asking $57K for a 2015 SS is HIGH HIGH HIGH….

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    @APaGttH

    You are correct the price is entirely too high and the aftermarket is not willing to bid them up very much. Pity it had to be a high cost compliance car.

    MY14 Chevrolet/Holden SS

    01/28/15 DENVER Regular $37,750 827 Above RED 8G A Yes
    02/11/15 KC Regular $36,500 1,481 Avg BLACK 8G A Yes
    01/23/15 PA Regular $34,200 3,620 Avg BLACK 8G P Yes
    01/14/15 DETROIT Regular $34,000 7,778 Avg Silver 8CY A Yes
    02/09/15 ORLANDO $35,000 8,480 Avg SILVER 8G A Yes
    01/22/15 SO CAL Regular $31,250 8,591 Below BLACK 8G A No

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      Compliance car? Do you mean that GM had to price it at 50% more than its worth so that it wouldn’t hurt their CAFE number?

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Compliance because GM/Holden took Aussie bailout money in 2012 and was compelled to keep local production through a certain date.

        http://www.adelaidenow.com.au/news/holden-to-stay-in-australia-after-200m-deal/story-e6frea6u-1226306739456

  • avatar
    Jimal

    The biggest problem with the SS is its lack of identity. The SS moniker has traditionally been attached to a trim package for other models. It doesn’t work as a name.

    That being said, I don’t think GM is putting all that much of an effort into selling them, which I don’t understand. I like the way the SS looks and if I were in the market for for this type of car it would be at the top of the shopping list, as would a G8 if I wanted to go the used route. I like the way it looks and I like V8 Supercars.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      “I don’t think GM is putting all that much of an effort into selling them, which I don’t understand.”

      It’s almost certainly a money loser. Can’t use volume to make up for it.

      • 0 avatar
        BrunoT

        Not necessarily. Do you know the cost numbers vs the actual selling price? What about the Australian dollar/US dollar exchange rate? What sales volume is the break even point? Do you count sales volume in Australia? These are just added sales from a paid-for factory with paid-for sunk engineering costs (other than some minor trim items).

        Why would they bring a car here to sell if selling 100% of them at modest discounts from MSRP (certainly lower than most Chevy products) would yield losses?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Yes, necessarily. The Aussie production business is being shuttered because it’s a money loser. And the cars sell for less in the US than they do in Australia.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            No, the business was a profit maker for many years, to the point of having that money sent to help out design the then Silverado Pickups,
            GM diesd prior to the 2009 meltdown , although Holden was still a very profitable business and was not made bankrupt unlike the rest of GM
            The U.S. Government wants., the Automobile companies to bring production back to the NAFTA region

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            If Robert thinks that it was successful, then you can safely bet on the fact that it wasn’t. This guy never gets anything right.

    • 0 avatar
      STS_Endeavour

      Thank you! Whenever I speak of this car, it confuses people to no end. “Do you mean a Camaro SS?” No. “A Cobalt SS?” No, it’s simply called SS (as if SS itself didn’t have a negative enough connotation.) Really it’s a rebadged Holden Commodore. “I’ve never heard of it!”

      Apparently, very few have.

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Aw, it’s all about function over styling. Chevrolet should run off about 5,000 copies of their 1978 model Impala with modern underpinnings, and see how many they sell. I suspect full size sedan families are not interested in “4-door coupe” styling, and just want a spacious 3-box design with a higher roof, less raked rear window and bigger trunk lid.

  • avatar
    BrunoT

    Ok, here in the south, where one might actually own a RWD vehicle, my local dealer has ZERO SS on the lot. The highest volume dealer in the area has a whopping THREE. No two in the same color. Checking a third dealer…ZERO SS on the lot. Let’s keep going. At the fourth big dealer here…ONE SS IN TRANSIT! Let’s go visit the dealer where I first went to find one last year. Oops, again, ZERO in stock. So, between 5 dealerships they have 4 Chevy SS in stock.

    Some big backlog, eh? Ever think maybe you can’t sell them if you don’t have them to sell?

    You “journalism” types really love a negative story, don’t you?

  • avatar
    BrunoT

    You think maybe the whopping $2300 price increase from 2014 to 2015 might play in? An SS at a major pricing site has a less than $2,000 discount from MSRP. You know many Chevys like that?

    Think maybe dealers would rather sell fewer cars and make $5 grand with holdback rather than $1500?


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • JimZ: Yep. We’re already seeing Supras and Integras go for astronomical prices.
  • JimZ: Sample size of one.
  • JimZ: I don’t think you people understand how recalls work.
  • DaneClark: “Do you find something comical about my appearance when I am driving my automobile?”
  • Redshift: Have had my RX8 for 16 years and counting. Only failures have been a fuel pump and a catalytic converter....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributors

  • Timothy Cain, Canada
  • Matthew Guy, Canada
  • Ronnie Schreiber, United States
  • Bozi Tatarevic, United States
  • Chris Tonn, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States
  • Mark Baruth, United States
  • Moderators

  • Adam Tonge, United States
  • Corey Lewis, United States