By on September 9, 2014

2014 Chevrolet SSThe Cadillac ELR flopped. Not because there wasn’t any for you to buy, but because there weren’t any buyers. This is what we knew back in April, and again back in May.

July volume, however, was double what General Motors managed in June, which was nearly double what the ELR managed one month before.

Now get this: August sales increased yet again. (There are no year-over-year figures available yet, as the ELR only arrived in December 2013.) 196 Cadillac ELRs were sold in the United States in August 2014, more than the total number of ELRs sold in December, January, February, and March combined.

196 sounds like a lot, right? Well, it sounds like a lot if we’re comparing ELR volume to the sales totals achieved by the Chevrolet SS. 

Let’s not forget, GM had no expectations for the SS. Edmunds reported last year that Chevrolet’s John Fitzpatrick figured 1700-2000 annual SS sales would be a success. (2055 have been sold in the last eight months.)  Mark Reuss had hoped for 3000-5000 per year.

And with numbers like March’s, when 350 SS sedans were sold, that’s exactly what Chevrolet was going to do, around 4200 SS sales in 2014. Those are Porsche Boxster-like numbers, Honda CR-Z-like numbers, Audi Allroad-like numbers.

Yet after averaging 291 sales per month between January and May, the SS has averaged just 203 monthly SS sales over the summer. With only 152 sold in August, the SS fell to its lowest full-month total yet.

It takes a long time for the SS-carrying ship to cross the Pacific. Your local Chevrolet dealer does not have the kind of SS availability to which a repeat Camry buyer has become accustomed. And it’s not as though the SS’s most direct rivals – SRT versions of the Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger, for example – are a dime a dozen.

Yet if you want to better understand just how rare the Chevrolet SS really is, take a moment to consider the fact that, for the first time, Cadillac sold more ELRs in August than Chevrolet sold SSs. (Say it with me, ess-esses.) Operating under the assumption that the ELR is becoming a popular car doesn’t alter this perception of SS rarity, of course, because the ELR is not becoming a popular car. Not by any standard.

Not by the standard of a really expensive Hyundai – Equus sales fell 42% to 253 units in August. Not by the standard of the most expensive SUV – Mercedes-Benz sold 248 G-Wagens last month. The defunct Acura TSX generated 240 sales. Mini sold 228 Pacemans, Scion sold 219 iQs, and Nissan sold 208 GT-Rs.

Here’s the thing, though: GM can sell expensive vehicles in very large numbers. Corvette volume more than quadrupled to 2679 units in August, and Corvette sales have totalled 23,483 units through eight months, more than twice the volume of the whole Jaguar brand.

Sales of the regular-wheelbase Escalade and long-wheelbase Escalade ESV are jointly up jumped 79% last month to 3534 units, more than the Mercedes-Benz GL and Lincoln Navigator lineups combined.

GM’s share of the volume-brand full-size SUV segment shot up to 83% in August as the company’s four nameplates grabbed the top four spots.

But Chevrolet sedans with base prices above $43,000 and Volt-based Cadillac coupes with $75,000 stickers? This is not how GM brings home the bacon.

Timothy Cain is the founder of GoodCarBadCar.net, which obsesses over the free and frequent publication of U.S. and Canadian auto sales figures.

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

Recommended

109 Comments on “Cadillac ELR Outsells Chevrolet SS In August...”


  • avatar
    Hummer

    I would certainly hope the vehicle with extensive advertising outsold something that practically no one knows exists.

    You have a lot of days worth of ELR cars sitting to choose from, most dealers got none or max 1 SS. No dealers near me have the mystic green, which is what I would choose.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      I’m just spitballing here, but this may have something to do with the $15,000 on the hood of every ELR.

      • 0 avatar
        VenomV12

        More likely the leases they are offering for it now. Something like $499/month with like $1,000 down. Still I have only seen a handful on the road.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I just turned in a rental Cadillac ATS, and now see that they are doing $249 per month $0 down leases on them (at least in Michigan).

          I don’t lease vehicles, but I honestly wouldn’t even consider even a fully loaded ATS even at a true $249/month, given what an epic POS it is.

          I am honestly and genuinely amazed that anyone is buying/leasing the ATS.

          There are vehicles that cost half as much that are twice as good.

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            At $249/month with zero down, there isn’t much at half the price.

          • 0 avatar
            DeadWeight

            Not on the lease (though I’ve seen $129 to $149 leases on everything from Kias to Mitsubishis to Chevys), but 1/2 the price on the MSRP.

            Seriously, the people setting the MSRP of Cadillacs are smoking some seriously whacky tobaccy. I genuinely would prefer many cars that are 1/2 the asking price of the ATS, even IF PRICE WASN’T A CONSIDERATION.

            The ATS is not a refined, durable, quality product that is going to provide many years & miles of reliable service. – it will be absolutely shamed in this regard by “lesser” Hondas, Toyotas, Mazdas, Subarus, etc.

            That it’s less refined than many of these is the salt in the wound.

            Bad GM is back with a vengeance.

      • 0 avatar
        Hemi

        I will just leave this here

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      The SS is much more attractive now that it’s getting a 6mt and magnetic ride. I wonder how long a factory order would take to get to the east coast?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        There aren’t enough configurations to make a factory order worthwhile. The exact car you want will be somewhere in the country. The only meaningful choices are sunroof or not, color, and (for 2015) stick or automatic.

        That said, a factory order would take a long time on one of these beasts. My G8 GXP, not factory ordered, was built in late November 2008; shipped to the US (Long Beach) during February 2009; shipped across the country to Virginia during the first week of March 2009; and then sat on the lot until I bought it at the end of May 2009. All of the GXPs built (except a few early-production cars) were shipped to the US in only three big batches that arrived about three months apart. The same thing seems to be happening with the SS.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Hummer,
      Spot on if you do not advertise it, it will not sell and presumably no one wants an Electric Cadillac

  • avatar
    friedclams

    These vehicles are basically bespoke halo cars. I doubt GM is losing money on them, even though they make good blog punching bags.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The SS was an attempt to reduce the losses on the Holden Commodore by finding a new market for the car. It’s almost surely not profitable.

      The ELR surely cost a few hundred million to develop. (It uses the Voltec platform, but required a lot of customization.) It’s highly doubtful that the volumes are high enough to recover those costs.

      • 0 avatar

        You are probably correct. Neither one makes any business sense even if GM’s optimistic initial sales predictions had come true. An outdated Avalance sold 2000 units in a bad month, before it was dropped. An updated Avalance based on the K2XX platform would have sold 5000 units a month at insane margins. I like the SS and was hoping it would outsell the new Corvette. It is $10K cheaper, not a big difference in HP but can seat 5 adults. The market for sport sedans must be bigger than sport coupes.

        This is the fundamental difference between GM and Toyota. Toyota is run by business people who would never consider such a thing. GM is run by car guys who want everyone to drive the car they would.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          GM is run by shorts-sighted accountants. It has been for generations. There are enthusiastic engineers at GM, but I doubt anyone wants to build two-ton Camaros that look like they’re based on pickup trucks or reintroduce 6 year old cars that weren’t industry leading when they were current.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          Of course. The company that makes the Lexus LF-A and GT86 has no love for cars, while the builder of the Sonic and the Spark is all about passion and emotion.

          Enough already. The SS is a cost amortization exercise. The ELR is a cost amortization exercise.

          The SS was an attempt by pro-Holden factions within GM to justify the existence of a money losing operation in Australia. That tells you more about the fiefdoms within the company than it does about the cars.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            UAW pressure not to advertise the car, doomed it . It was a deal GM did with the Union, to allow the Holden ends to be imported

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            You sure make up some interesting stuff there Robert.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            Robert and reality don’t have a very good relationship.

          • 0 avatar
            28-Cars-Later

            There was also the matter of the Holden bailout by the Australian gov’t (which I believe GM is now in violation of by cutting off production in 2016). The original bailout plan called for Holdens to be exported to other markets in a bid to save Australian manufacturing.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @28-Cars-Later,
            Correct our little UAW friends cut a deal with the Company , not to advertise it and cut off then export markets, which cause a lot of angst
            amongst Holden supporters here
            This post from a US poster on a Holden blog sums it up
            “Thanks, GM….orphans have just been created all over the world!

            It’ll make the union bosses at UAW & CAW happy–and we know how important that is.

            So, does this mean…what? If GM is pulling Chevrolet out of Europe, will GM even bother to offer product in Australia after Holden closes–and where will these cars be built?

            I’d be inclined to think that Australians won’t be too pleased with either Ford or GM/Holden for their 2016-2017 plans to cease manufacturing in Oz, so their sales efforts may be for naught, no matter how good the products may be.

            Maybe Holden should come up with a plan to buy itself away from GM and continue to build really cool cars…..

      • 0 avatar
        Chicago Dude

        The next-gen Volt is only about a year away, right? I’d guess that a lot of the technical work on the ELR was helpful for the engineers working on the new Voltec platform. Solving engineering problems when adapting a platform to a new car should give them a great understanding of how to design the next platform in a way that makes it easier and cheaper to be flexible.

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    but the SS cost GM nothing to make

    the ELR has a lot of custom engineering?

    • 0 avatar
      whynot

      The SS is built in Australia and shipped over the Pacific. That is expensive (why do you think GM is stopping production in Australia in a few years?) and why GM is only sending over limited quantities, with basically no options, at a high MSRP.

      • 0 avatar
        bosozoku

        I wonder how production costs (labor, regulatory, etc) compare between Australia and North America.

      • 0 avatar
        krhodes1

        Note that they do not ship it here for free – that is what the $995 destination charge covers. And having been involved in privately shipping a few cars around the planet, that is probably more than enough to get one from Oz to your local dealer.

        Cost of labor in Oz is a small problem. The big problem is they are just not selling enough of any of the Oz-built cars for that factory to be profitable. Just not enough volume overall, so the economy of scale is just not there. So it is going to be closed, and a chapter of automotive history will close with it.

        I am a little surprised that it attracts a $1300 gas guzzler tax – though in a few minutes of wandering around the Chevrolet website I was unable to unearth the actual mileage estimates.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        The shipping costs aren’t a factor. These days, international shipping is cheap.

        The overall low global volume is a problem. There aren’t enough Aussies who want them to make it sustainable, nor is there enough of an export market to make up for the lack of a domestic market. Volumes that low require high prices to make up for them, but there are few people who will people German luxury car prices for these things.

        Holden only worked when there were high trade barriers in Australia to limit the competition, but those have been since lowered to a point that they are less relevant than before.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          Holden Commodore is and has been the best selling large sedan in Australia. Unfortunately Holden was becoming a one man band and the rest of the globally sourced GM products were mediocre at best. You cannot run a Company on one product alone

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    I hope no one draws any conclusions about the rest of the market by looking at these dogs.

  • avatar
    xflowgolf

    I think it’s actually a pretty positive thing depending how you spin it. They aimed to sell 1700-2000 of them and they already sold 2000+ with 4 months left to go!

    One month does not make a trend, and I imagine there will be a few buyers who will wait and take the manual equipped version of these cars which should be available soon.

  • avatar
    MAGICGTI

    The 2015 is coming out soon, with a manual transmission. I would assume there might be a few (and I mean, a few) people waiting for the manual.

    It’s a cool car, and makes me think there is still a little Lutz in the company.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I wonder what impact this would have on Chev SS availability??

    Lots??

    http://www.goauto.com.au/mellor/mellor.nsf/story2/C97D51D70F94A80CCA257CAF0006A233

  • avatar
    mtr2car1

    I guess the whole notion of Win on Sunday, Sell on Monday no longer exists as the SS is GM’s face in NASCAR.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      And the Camry is Toyota’s and the Fusion Ford’s. I don’t know for sure, but I doubt their NASCAR pedigree has much to do with their sales one way or the other. That notion (win Sunday-sale Monday) has not been relevant for at least an eon.

      I know manufacturers would like to sell more of certain cars but to me it’s a plus that they sometimes don’t. I kinda like having a well sorted car and not seeing it at every other corner.

      All hail the Q-ship. Both in performance and visibility.

    • 0 avatar

      In a KBB poll: If NASCAR drivers raced in everyday cars sold at dealerships, which model would perform best in the Sprint Cup Series? The majority picked Chevy SS as their preferred car. I wonder how many who answered the poll knew the SS was high performance RWD sport sedan vs a Fusion/Camry or if they just based their votes on how strong Chevy is in the sprint cup series(Hendrick engines). If the former is true then Chevy should sell a high volume V6 to capitalize on this awareness. The SS is my kind of car and I am glad GM is selling it. Built by people who really really love cars for people who really really love cars, profits be damned.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        The high-volume V6 would almost certainly lose money, like it did when it was sold as the base G8. That’s why there is only one fully loaded V8 trim.

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          I don’t know GM’s cost structure, but I do know what the Caprice PPV (which does offer a V6 version) gets sold for, so is GM losing losing money on the entire Caprice program?

          • 0 avatar
            dal20402

            It’s a good question. I’m not sure what changed between the G8 and the Caprice PPV. The PPV is decontented substantially from the G8, but I don’t think it was content that made the G8 unprofitable — it was a combination of high Australian labor costs, logistics, and the cost to produce the relatively sophisticated Zeta unibody and suspension.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      I didn’t even realize the racing cars were supposed to be SS models. I thought they were still Impalas. You’d think they’d try to market something they might actually sell.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Again comes back to advertising the car generally. UAW not happy about advertising a non-NAFTA car, so no advertising to appease Union and it is a limited release car

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      That notion went out the window when people figured out that NASCAR had as much to do with stock cars as the WWE has to do with a sport called wrestling.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Yeah. Hemi Charger FTW. Cheaper, easier to find, and when Car and Driver hot lapped a Charger police and a Caprice police the Charger won…

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      That, and some people end up driving the Charger with the 3.6/8 speed and find it more than enough for their needs, which is how Chrysler can sell the Charger body style in volume.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        This. While I’ll always take the Hemi for the small premium, the 3.6L pentastar/8spd combo is plenty fast, smooth and offers great fuel economy in a large car. I wouldn’t fault anyone for going that route.

        • 0 avatar
          PrincipalDan

          Yes if I didn’t desire to have a large family, which pushed me into three row territory, the Charger V6 was on my short list of things to drive. Would love a battle of the V6 full size family cars here on TTAC. Taurus vs Charger vs Impala vs Lacrosse vs. Azerea vs Cadenza… Have Baruth rent them all. :)

        • 0 avatar
          340-4

          It worked for me. My ’14 3.6/8A AWD easily tops 30 mpg on highway trips and is a joy in snow.

          I’m surprised they don’t sell more of them in the northern US.

    • 0 avatar
      hubcap

      I’d take a manual SS with magnetic ride over a Hemi Charger. Having choices is a good thing.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      Caprice = 6.0
      SS = 6.2

      Not saying that changes anything, but two different things.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Depends on whether you care about suspension tuning or not. The Charger is nice on smooth, straight roads, but is outclassed by the SS when the going gets curvy. If I lived in Nebraska, I’d take the Charger. Since I live in Washington, I’ll take the SS.

    • 0 avatar
      Dan

      The Charger is a nice car and a screaming bargain but I can’t get past the sitting inside a bathtub.

      The SS (Caprice, etc.) is open and airy like nothing else left on the market, because it’s fundamentally 10 years old.

      I have neither the experience or the interest to judge which one’s the better race car but the SS is hands down a better car car if GM had the sense to sell it as such. It puts the Impala and every Cadillac to shame too.

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    price fixes everything.

  • avatar
    optflv

    I wonder how much of that is people (like me) waiting on the 2015 SS. I’m on the waiting list at my local dealer for the first order for a manual transmission 2015. Excited about the MRC as well.

    For me, the fact that it’s a rare car makes it all the better.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      I’m interested in the 2015, but not going to get on any waiting lists or try to get the first one. These cars will get cheaper once the initial batch of pent-up demand is satisfied. Ideally I’d be able to repeat my G8 GXP experience where I got $3k off MSRP together with a 0% loan. If you want that kind of deal it does help to be flexible on color… any non-bright color is fine with me. I just want a sunroof and the manual.

      • 0 avatar
        hubcap

        “…… any non-bright color is fine with me. I just want a sunroof and the manual.”

        dal, you’re killin’ me. Please don’t add to the rolling gulag of black, gray, white cars that are so prevalent on our roads especially now that he SS has an expanded color collection.

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          When the police are writing me tickets for 9 over the limit on a straight, lightly trafficked rural highway on a clear warm day (which happened to me in July), I want to attract as little attention as possible. That’s one reason I like the SS in the first place. I’m not going to screw it up by getting one in Ferrari red or Day-Glo green.

  • avatar
    86er

    Other than the raw numbers, I wonder how much profit GM makes on these. Or is it all in dealer markups?

    Was the platform already federalized with the G8, thus saving GM those costs?

    I suppose these questions have an expiry date of approximately 2017, at any rate.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      They are probably doing OK, but only because they have decided to sell fully loaded $45k configurations only.

      On the G8 they lost money on the V6 and GT trims at real transaction prices between $25k and $33k. Only the GXP, with transaction prices around $40-41k, made them any money.

  • avatar
    Numbers_Matching

    The market is extremely small for this type of car today and most of those who would actually go out and order one have probably done so already….it’s a two year roll *at best* for this baby.

    There is no association with modern production cars in the NASCAR world anymore. That ended in the 80’s.

  • avatar
    ajla

    “SRT versions of the Chrysler 300 and Dodge Charger, for example – are a dime a dozen.”

    How many SRT Chargers and 300s has ChryslerCo actually sold this year?

  • avatar
    cRacK hEaD aLLeY

    Between the Charger and the SS I’d take the Accord Sport Sedan 6-Speed Manual Transmission.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Which is likely more rare than the actual SS. Even the plant manager likely forgets that they build manual trans Accords, unless he’s a personal friend of Jack Baruth.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      Hmm… half the power and only slightly more than half the price. Probably a better value for the sensible manual transmission lover.

      The four is just not quite enough motor for me, but I probably would take a V6 Accord Sport manual, if there were one, rather than the SS. Although I’d need to set aside a few bucks to upgrade the pads. My G8 GXP’s brakes, which are the same as the 2014 SS brakes, are worlds better than any of those on any of my Hondas. (Jack’s observations on his Accord Coupe make me think the situation hasn’t changed since I owned a Honda.) And the 2015 SS brakes are supposed to be upgraded further.

    • 0 avatar
      SOneThreeCoupe

      The Accord Sport Sedan isn’t a RWD car with bucketloads of torque.

      I don’t understand why one would even consider it to be in the same realm.

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        It’s a stickshift non-luxury sedan with lots of room and an emphasis on a good ride/handling balance. There aren’t many of those around, no matter what the drive wheels. I could easily see someone who liked the SS but found it too spendy deciding on an Accord Sport instead.

        If all you care about is bucketloads of torque, you’re not buying an SS anyway, you’re buying a SRT of one flavor or another, and your handle is BIGTRUCKSERIESREVIEW.

  • avatar
    geozinger

    Great juxtaposition of the two cars; one is a sales flop, the other is under the radar. I don’t really know what GM was thinking with the SS, the marketing is a bit fuzzy to me. If there were any. I’ve yet to see an ad for one and I get a lot of NASCAR viewing time. I’ve not seen print ads and up until last month our biggest Chevy dealer in Grand Rapids, the legendary Berger Chevy, didn’t have one on the lot! Of course, that could be a dealer decision. But in our midwestern town, with a dealer of that stature, there should have at least been one on the grounds a lot sooner…

    I guess they plan on selling them through word of mouth; but it seems to be working – they’ve met their low sales goals. I’ve noticed something else that lately that many of GMs predictions for their sales have been pretty good, certainly a lot better than it once was. The supply line for the SS is terribly long, I imagine the logistics are horrible. But it is definitely the most unique offering from Chevy, there’s nothing else like it in Chevy’s line up and only a few rivals. $45K sounds like a pretty good deal for a ride like this.

  • avatar
    VenomV12

    I remember when I was at the Auto Show at the beginning of this year and there was an old guy who was genuinely interested in purchasing one of these prior to seeing one, after he got done looking at it and sitting in it, saying that he was not that impressed with it, thought the interior was so so and that it looked too much like their regular cars and not special enough. I knew then it was going to have problems selling.

  • avatar
    22_RE_Speedwagon

    Raise your hand if you’ve seen an SS in the wild. I haven’t and it’s not for lack of looking.

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      There are a couple of black ones that hang around north Seattle. Each time I see one of them I do a double-take. But if you aren’t really looking they’ll blend in very nicely with all the Malibus and Impalas out there, especially if not red (or, for 2015, orange, bright blue, or puke green).

    • 0 avatar
      George B

      I think I saw one at Cars and Coffee Dallas, but I’m not 100% sure. That’s the problem. Based on specs and RWD V8 goodness, I think I would want an Australian car. Then I see pictures of cars that are bland and cheap looking compared to their selling price. No sale. With the Camaro GM took Australian underpinnings and boosted the design “testosterone” to cartoonish levels, but at least people notice the Camaro. Chrysler has shown that there is a market for RWD V8 sedans, but the design needs to be bold and the price has to be appropriate to the brand.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        @george, yes Australian cars look like RWD Camrys. The only thing that kept me lusting after a Falcon was the I6 for the smooth I6 goodness of the whole thing. Someone needs to build a restomod 1st generation Mustang with the last Aussie Ford I6 under the hood instead of a Coyote V8. That would actually be interesting.

    • 0 avatar
      VenomV12

      Couple running around where I live and I have seen a few elsewhere. I see more of them than I do ELRs, that’s for sure.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I’ve seen at least 4, two in the middle of no where.
      Seen 0 ELRs and 1 Tesla

      • 0 avatar
        turboprius

        There’s a Tesla store in Marietta. So, I’ve seen a bunch. Never seen an ELR or an SS. Getting an SS in a bright color would be awesome; I love bright colors. Just drive the speed limit, and you’re fine.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      A red one several weeks ago. Looks better in person than in print. I’d go for the MT6 but I’m cheap and the used ones will not come down to my price range until they are too worn out.

      There is a MT6 G8 GXP for sale nearby for $28K (86,000 miles) or I could get the auto version plain GT for $23K (only 4500 miles).

  • avatar
    stingray65

    When car shopping this summer I looked up the SS inventory at Chevy dealers within 300 miles of home, and not one had an SS in stock. Thus I suspect the low sales are due to lack of supply rather than lack of demand. I also suspect that GM Australia makes a “profit” from the SS, but that GM USA does not, and since they are shutting down the Oz operations they no longer need to “subsidize” the operations there as the expense of overall GM profits. Thus I doubt the boat between OZ and the US is moving at full speed to reduce further losses, and would not be surprised if the SS is quietly dropped soon.

    • 0 avatar
      Hummer

      I doubt it will be dropped, its on track to outsell its forecasts by its own company. And they’re introducing several new colors, a manual, and magnetic ride control.

      With advertising and having actual cars for sale at the dealerships rather than 1 car at every 5th dealer, I truly believe GM could sell 10k in a year.
      Will that happen? Almost certainly not, GM isn’t willing to let the SS succeed. It singlehandedly shows up the entire Cadillac division, (minus the SUV/CUV for obvious reasons). And it shows up the division at a much more reasonable price, I mean an ATS can be priced into the SS range.

    • 0 avatar
      pragmatic

      I doubt they will drop it either. They either ride out the shutdown of Holden and then drop it. Or they build the new one along side the new Camaro and export back to Australia (what I’m hoping for).

      I like it better than the Charger (better weight distribution than the iron engined Hemi). The fact that a MT will be available just increases my desire for this vehicle.

  • avatar
    MK

    I’ve been trying to figure out what the deal is with this car since I first heard about it. In still have no clue other than its an impala with a bigger motor…i guess?

    I’ve never seen an ad for it and I rented a 2014 impala and both the wife and I were SEVERELY underwhelmed with it. Mediocre interior quality, crappy power (4 banger so..) and terrible rear visibility. Yes it looks nice from the outside but that’s not enough at this price point.

    Will 200 horsepower make the SS better? Sure but its still basically an impala. For the same scratch ill take a Charger or challenger.

    I don’t WANT to actively see GM fail but I see nothing compelling to make me root for them to succeed.
    Why should I buy this over the competition?

    (note: I’m not interested in resale value in twenty years).

    • 0 avatar
      FreedMike

      The SS is on a completely different platform than the Impala – it’s a RWD car, and the Impala is FWD.

      • 0 avatar
        MK

        Ok, thanks for answering that.

        Ill admit that i still have no real clue about why its special. So is this the G8 redux or something? I’m not being deliberately obtuse here but is this supposed to be the sleeper hit of 2014-15?

        Does GM actually want them to sell or is it just some accounting voodoo to make it “available” and WGAF if it actually sells?

        Why should I part with 40k of my moderately hard earned dollars for this over the competition?

        • 0 avatar
          dal20402

          The SS is essentially a refreshed G8. The G8 was on the “VE” Holden Commodore platform and the SS is on the “VF,” which is not all-new but a major facelift. The unibody, suspension, and powertrain are mostly unchanged from the G8. The interior, steering, and electronic architecture are all-new. All of the styling forward of the A-pillar and back of the C-pillar is new.

          The difference in pricing between the G8 and the SS is because the SS comes only in fully loaded form with the 6.2L V8 and a lot of options. Every SS is quite a bit better equipped than the old G8 GXP, which was a $42,000 car in 2009. I think the SS is actually a better value than the GXP was (and I’m a GXP owner).

          It’s a halo car for Chevy and a way for GM to sell a few extra VFs while Holden is still producing cars. It will either disappear or be replaced by a North American-built car after the 2016 model year.

        • 0 avatar
          danio3834

          “Why should I part with 40k of my moderately hard earned dollars for this over the competition?”

          Depends what you’re looking for. The SS is a performance sedan with performance figures that meet or exceed most cars in it’s price range. In GM’s product lineup, there is no Impala that comes close to the SS’ level of performance, and any Cadillac that comes close costs significantly more.

          Think of it as a 4 door Camaro SS. The only thing that really miffs me about this car is that Chevy didn’t even bother to give it a real name.

    • 0 avatar
      SC5door

      I’m actually very impressed with the Impala’s interior (at least on LTZ models), but for the $$ why 18″ wheels with Hubcaps on lower end models!?

  • avatar
    johnsha

    How many SS are on Chevy lots nation wide? In the Charlotte Region there were about 10 on Chevy lots in April. Today there is only 1 black SS. My guess sales are slow due to a lack of dealer inventory!

    • 0 avatar
      dal20402

      5 cars in the entire Pacific Northwest, four in the greater Seattle area and one near Portland. They seem to arrive in batches — hopefully either a last batch of 2014s or the first batch of 2015s is on the way soon.

  • avatar
    ydnas7

    I assume this is a Holden Caprice
    http://www.holden.com.au/cars/caprice

    interesting choice of engines in its native land

    3.6 V6 LPG
    6.0 V8 Petrol

    they are the standard vehicle for the prime minister but will be replaced by 7 series BMWs

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      I am not sure, I think it’s closer to the HSV offerings yet for some reason toned down for export. That’s why I was shocked to see some here call our cars bland. Call HSV what you want but it ain’t bland.

      http://www.hsv.com.au

    • 0 avatar
      Alfisti

      It’s a SS-V, see here http://www.holden.com.au/cars/commodore/sedan-range/ss-v

      Who else wants the wagon?

      • 0 avatar
        dal20402

        It’s above a SS-V — it’s somewhere in between a SS-V and a HSV Clubsport. It’s got the Clubsport’s engine, brakes, and suspension but is packaged and contented more like a SS-V.

  • avatar
    SaulTigh

    I’m totally ready to buy a vehicle that will be sold by a dealership that treats it like a Unicorn and acts like I’m asking to touch the Crown Jewels if I want to sit in it and lord help me if I want to test drive it without first signing some sort of “intent to purchase” form. Yee haw!

  • avatar
    Alfisti

    Expat aussie here. Commodores have a reputation for poor interiors in terms of content, looks and quality. However they also have a reputation of a brilliant (for the development budget anyway) ride/handling equation for such a large car. Comparing it to an Impala, I mean really, it’s MILES from an Impala.

    Aussies traditionally lean a little more Euro han Americans in terms of handling but the engineers in Melbourne manage to create decent ride comfort as well.

    It has it’s weaknesses, no doubt, but if you can get one in the 40’s it’s a good deal.

  • avatar
    Boxerman

    Maybee when the scrap the program the last ones will get sold at severe discounts like the G8, at 30K its a steal. Plus yes you dont stick out in the corwd, its one of the ultimate sleeper cras.

Read all comments

Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Recent Comments

  • Opus: I think the “back seat optional” was only on the Chevette Scooter, the ultra-economy (cheap) model.
  • highdesertcat: I had that 460 in a 1960 Mercury Montclaire 4-dr sedan, 4-barrel, twin exhaust from the factory. Sweet...
  • Arthur Dailey: Called a ‘Scooter’. But none were in stock at any dealers. And if you tried to order one...
  • highdesertcat: “500 cu in or 8.2L” of slow turning, stump pulling, gnarly low end grunt. I miss those big...
  • Arthur Dailey: Not to disparage the A bodies, as the Celebrity sold just over 2 million during its production run....

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Who We Are

  • Matthew Guy
  • Timothy Cain
  • Adam Tonge
  • Bozi Tatarevic
  • Chris Tonn
  • Corey Lewis
  • Mark Baruth
  • Ronnie Schreiber