By on November 12, 2014

Mercedes-Maybach 01

Mercedes-Benz is shaking things up as far as its long-standing nomenclature system is concerned, as well as introducing a new name to the portfolio: Mercedes-Maybach.

The first Mercedes-Maybach, the Mercedes-Maybach S600, will make its way down the ramp during next week’s 2014 Los Angeles Auto Show. On the boot lid, the new sub-brand will follow Mercedes-AMG’s display pattern: Maybach on the left, Mercedes star in the center, model designation on the right. The ultra upscale sedan is expected to set the pace for Mercedes-Maybach as a sub-brand “that sets a benchmark for exclusivity and meets even the most discerning of requirements in terms of its appointments.”

Mercedes-Maybach 02

As for the parent brand overall, with 30 vehicles set to be in showrooms by 2020 — including 11 all-new models — Mercedes decided it was time to do some housekeeping, with most of the attention going toward its SUV range. Thus, the following:

  • GLA: GL A-Class
  • GLC: GL C-Class; was the GLK
  • GLE: GL E-Class; was the M-Class, or ML
  • GLE Coupe: GL E-Class Coupe
  • GLS: GL S-Class; was the GL
  • G: No change due to lineage

The L serves as a linking letter between the main class and the five core classes, the latter remaining unchanged. Roadsters will be redesignated as SL beginning in 2016, following the same pattern as established with the G-Class. Engine designations also receive a reboot, and will be displayed in lower-case on the boot lid. Mercedes’ AWD system, 4MATIC, remains unchanged.

New nomenclature Mercedes-Benz model series

New nomenclature Mercedes-Benz drive systems

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53 Comments on “Mercedes Unveils New Nomenclature Scheme, Maybach Addition...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    I have a winter coat that looks like this interior, $24.99 Walmart

  • avatar
    Johann

    What a half baked attempt to make this work. Here is my suggestion. Which centres on NEVER having a model name with three letters and to align everything within the A,B,C,E, S and G sizes.

    I suggest:

    A150 – 5 door
    AC150 – 2 door
    AT150 – Station wagon or T-wagon
    AE150 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
    AX150 – SUV
    AL150 – Roadster

    Same then for all the rest:

    B180 – 5 door
    BC180 – 2 door
    BT180 – Station wagon or T-wagon
    BE180 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
    BX180 – SUV
    BL180 – Roadster

    C180 – 4 door
    CC180 – 2 door
    CT180 – Station wagon or T-wagon
    CE180 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
    CX180 – SUV old GLK
    CL180 – Roadster

    E280 – 4 door
    EC280 – 2 door
    ET280 – Station wagon or T-wagon
    EE280 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
    EX280 – SUV old ML
    EL280 – Roadster

    S280 – 4 door
    SC280 – 2 door
    ST280 – Station wagon or T-wagon
    SE280 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
    SX280 – SUV old GLK
    SL280 – Roadster

    And the G class stays as it is.

    etc

    This way you always have the pecking order first. The new SUV system does have the C, E and S in it but at the end, making it less obvious (and you have three letters).

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      EE280? That is not a Mercedes Benz, that is an engineering economics course. That naming scheme is not sexy at all.

      People don’t need a badge to let them know if a car is a coupe or wagon. The car will display that. It is important to show which model and engine a car has though, in this realm.

      • 0 avatar
        Johann

        I know its not perfect – and I put 2 minutes of thought into it. :-) In the UK EE is a mobile phone company! So EE280 won’t wash it here either.

        It is just to show you CAN have a more logical system that makes sense to the general public. What the second letter is should be up to Mercedes.

    • 0 avatar
      Johann

      So after more thought and realising Mercedes has some niches not yet covered (the CLA and CLS four door coupe shooting brakes and the new X6 clone, MPVs and four seat cabrios). Also as stated EE was silly AND E is a range so had to replace E with something else so picked R (I kept C since it has always been Coupe for Mercedes even though it is also a range):

      A150 – 5 door
      AC150 – 2 door
      AT150 – Station wagon or T-wagon
      AR150 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
      AF150 – CLA type 4 dour shooting brake
      AM150 – MPV
      AX150 – SUV
      AZ150 – SUV 4 door coupe
      AP180 – four seat cabrio
      AL150 – Roadster

      B180 – 5 door
      BC180 – 2 door
      BT180 – Station wagon or T-wagon
      BR180 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
      BF180 – CLA type 4 dour shooting brake
      BM180 – MPV
      BX180 – SUV
      BX180 – SUV 4 door coupe
      BP180 – four seat cabrio
      BL180 – Roadster

      C180 – 4 door
      CC180 – 2 door
      CT180 – Station wagon or T-wagon
      CR180 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
      CF180 – CLA type 4 dour shooting brake
      CM180 – MPV
      CX180 – SUV old GLK
      CZ180 – SUV 4 door coupe
      CP180 – four seat cabrio
      CL180 – Roadster – old SLK

      E280 – 4 door
      EC280 – 2 door
      ET280 – Station wagon or T-wagon
      ER280 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
      EF280 – CLA type 4 dour shooting brake
      EX280 – SUV old ML
      EZ280 – SUV 4 door coupe
      EP280 – four seat cabrio
      EL280 – Roadster

      S280 – 4 door
      SC280 – 2 door
      ST280 – Station wagon or T-wagon
      SR280 – CLA type 4 dour coupe
      SF280 – CLA type 4 dour shooting brake
      SX280 – SUV old GLK
      SZ280 – SUV 4 door coupe
      SP280 – four seat cabrio
      SL280 – Roadster

      NOT sexy at all on the whole BUT it has a German logic. Though there are very few sexy letters left if you have so many niches! I mean really who would drive a BP180 cabrio?!!? LOL (What will happen if you want to put fuel in it that’s not from BP? hehehe)

      Though as I did now you can easily and logically add a whole range within a series with ease with just one letter. So a future [insert niche here] Mercedes of the size of a C-class can have the letter K and be called the CK200h and everyone will know that is a C sized car with a hybrid engine.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I hope the comments on this move are just as positive as the feedback Cadillac got.

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    So that Maybach will be an “S”? Why expect people higher prices when it is named the chrapet S?

    And why give up the popular easy E, C etc.? Besides enthusiasts no one will know what is what. And enthusiasts don’t buy new cars. Ask Lincoln how well that works….

    • 0 avatar
      MBella

      Maybach will be a sub-brand now, like AMG. In the way that an S 63 AMG is still a S-class, a Maybach S-class will be similar. Also, C,E,S aren’t going anywhere according to the chart above.

      Going back to the article, AMGs have the model on the left (IEL E63) and the AMG is on the right. This means the Maybachs will be backwards with the badging.

  • avatar
    Rod Panhard

    I can see it now, over on Jalophose in the year 2021. “Why buy a new brown VW Diesel Wagon with a stick shift when you could buy this Mercedes-Benz S600 Maybach for the same money?”

  • avatar

    My only problem with this is that the GLC was a tiny Mazda hatchback in the 80s. It wasn’t a bad car, it’s just probably not the image you want every baby boomer to think of when they are cross-shopping your luxury CUV.

  • avatar
    BMWnut

    I will reserve judgement until I have seen the rest of the car, but the back seat has given me very low expectations.

  • avatar

    Maybach = Brougham for the new generation.

    Call it Brougham. Its more honest.

    Just sayin’…

    Also, stop trying to make Maybach happen; its never going to happen…

    • 0 avatar
      WaftableTorque

      They really should have designated any non-AMG V12 engine configuration as Maybach. That would set the stage for engine branding without displacement numbers. A V8 could become a Grosser, and a V6 could be called a Pullman.

      It certainly wouldn’t be any sillier than this naming scheme, and would p*ss everyone off just the same.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      That is sooo Maybach!

  • avatar
    bam210135

    A few things I see from new naming scheme:

    One: CLS is not named correctly for a car based of off the E-class. It should be the CLE.

    Two: we are getting an ML based “coupe” SUV abomination.

    Three: MB is willing to trade in almost 20 years of history on the ML and SLK names for them to make more sense. How much confusion or loss of sales will this cause when people go to trade their cars in and no longer have the option to replace them with the same thing. (I know they are the same thing with a different name, but some customers don’t.)

    Four: Mercedes is following the crowd instead of leading it.

    • 0 avatar
      Johann

      The W124 Merc used to be called 200E, 230E etc when it came out. That got changed to E280 and E300 etc. And? Did Mercedes sales fall from a cliff because the average buyer was too thick to realise what is what? It certainly did not. Mercedes is big enough and their customers hopefully clever enough to handle a name change like this. But then they should do it properly and not as half baked as this.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    The quilty leather, yes I like. It evokes luxury. The button tufting I dislike. It evokes old Broughams. As well, the pattern of the button tufting nearly matches button placement on a double-breasted suit – which is just as out of date.

    I think the name change is a mistake. They’re making it too long and complicated, just like BMW has done with all their letters.

  • avatar
    redav

    One of the fundamental flaws of systematic naming is it inherently limits your product line. If they want to introduce something actually new, it throws a wrench in the works, and the once logical, ordered nomenclature turns to rubbish. See: BMW.

    It would be an interesting study about people’s emotional attachment to various types of names. We already know certain names have value: Corvette, Escalade. We know certain non-names have value: S-Class, 3-series. It’s reasonable to assume that if someone can’t recognize/associate a name, it will have less value to them. I suspect that’s also true for number strings (it’s certainly harder to remember ISO specs that are only numbers than API specs that mix numbers & letters). So, the question is at what point do names/non-names lose value because of lack of association? I expect a 3-200-1-4 wouldn’t stir any emotions, but for some reason a 320ix does.

    All I can say is that for myself, these conventions are nothing more than part numbers like I’d use to spec an o-ring from a catalog. Knowing what it means (or that it means anything at all), isn’t enough for me to feel anything about it.

  • avatar
    NoGoYo

    It’s cool to see SLC back, even if it’s not being used the same way as it used to be.

  • avatar
    wmba

    As my admiration fot MB knows no bounds, they can name a galumphing CUV after the Mszda GLC for all I care, just like they copied Mazda’s phablet on dash.

    Mr Walrus Mustache, your’re da man.

  • avatar
    PJmacgee

    Darn, still didn’t fix *the* stupidest nomenclature of all: 4MATIC, soooooo dumb! Even VW’s 4MOTION is slightly better, since it at least suggests that the “4” has something to do with the car’s “motion”.

    • 0 avatar
      matador

      quattro was taken.

      4Motion was taken.

      X-Drive was taken. (I don’t get it personally).

      What are they supposed to call it? The Mercedes-Benz Z71 package?

      What was wrong with using what Subaru does: “All Wheel Drive”.

      Isn’t that good enough?

      • 0 avatar
        PJmacgee

        Yes, a diminutive “awd” on the trunk would certainly be better than 4MATIC, which sounds like a Mercedes 4-speed Powerglide or something.

        Oh don’t forget Mini’s “All4”, ugh.

        “X-Drive was taken. (I don’t get it personally).”
        Visually, the letter X sort of looks like “all four corners are connected to the power (via center diff, natch)”

      • 0 avatar
        MBella

        The only one of those that pre-dates 4-Matic is quattro. Mercedes uses “Matic” and “Tronic” suffixes for most of their proprietary systems.

  • avatar
    Spike_in_Brisbane

    I just hope that MB includes instructions on how to remove these badges without damaging the paint. The “Clean rear” look is more upmarket to my eyes. And for those of you who bought the car just for faux prestige reasons, the smooth derriere leaves your admirers guessing. (Maybe Maybach?)

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