By on February 11, 2017

2016 Nissan Frontier, Image: Nissan

European drivers have a problem. Motorists who own Nissan Navara pickups keep finding their trips cut short by an annoying noise: the sound of their trucks splitting in half.

So many Navaras — sold in North America as the Nissan Frontier — are snapping in two due to extreme frame rust that owners are pressuring governments to do something about. Check out these photos if you think it’s an isolated problem.

In all instances, the rusty chassis snaps at the point of maximum frame stress — just ahead of the rear axle, where the body and bed meet. Once corrosion reaches a point, the vehicles fold like Superman on laundry day.

In Britain, Tory member of parliament Huw ­Merriman plans to raise the bendy Nissan issue at Monday’s Transport Select Committee meeting.

“To reassure the public, Nissan would be well advised to recall all affected vehicles,” he told The Sun.

The vehicles involved all appear to be second-generation Navaras, built in Spain between 2005 and 2014. Many of the affected vehicles seem to be 2007 models. U.S. Frontiers maintain the old bodystyle of these Navaras, though Nissan builds that model at its Canton, Mississippi assembly plant. Despite serious instances of frame rust in older Pathfinders, the Navara’s problem doesn’t seem to translate to its American Frontier cousin.

In response to the controversy, Nissan declared the frame-splitting issue only affects higher-end D40 Navaras built from 2005 to 2008, though serious rust has been found on some newer models. The automaker advises owners to have dealers inspect their vehicles, with repairs or a possible buy-back offered to those who discover their trucks are on the verge of becoming a drinking straw.

[Image: Nissan]

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113 Comments on “Be Glad Your Nissan Frontier Wasn’t Built in Spain...”


  • avatar
    claytori

    These owners should consider buying a Toyota Tacoma instead!

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Look at it this way get 2 for the price of 1, you just have to wait till after you drive it.

    Tacomas also have rusty frames. Maybe the manufacturers are building more obsolescence into their trucks.

    • 0 avatar
      LS1Fan

      It is an industry wide trend.

      Manufacturers don’t make money off the customer who keeps their car for 15-20 years. Forcing that person to buy or lease two cars in that period from them puts more money in the automakers hand instead of auto parts suppliers or the used car industry.

      The best way to do that is to make old cars totally uneconomical to drive past a certain age,both financially and logistically.See used European luxury cars for an example of this . Basically you can spend $10,000 per year in combined maintenance and labor plus downtime costs keeping a classic E38 BMW rolling ,or you can spend $10,000 a year and lease a new BMW. Option A pays the used car industry and peripheral businesses . Option B pays BMW HQ.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “…Option B pays BMW HQ.”

        Or Option C. Don’t get a BMW.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          By default, obsolescence will haunt most new vehicles. Exponentially as time passes. And the lack of OEM support, at just a few years old. Stick to the mainstream as much as possible, Camaros, Mustangs, Wranglers, F-series, etc, whenever possible. Restoration/upgrade/tuner suppliers will help here, dramatically.

          I’m a little too tempted by the old stuff, resto-mod’d right now! Especially with the obscene costs of current new rides, (up to $80K pickups?) and the pending “chicken” taxes across the board??

          • 0 avatar
            SaulTigh

            The more they sell of themj, the easier and cheaper parts will be to obtain, and also, I think, the more likely they are to work the bugs out.

            Drove a Grand Marquis for 10 years when they were thick on the ground and it was sooooo cheap to maintain, and it wasn’t even a best seller like the Camcords.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            The Grand Marquis is a good one! It might outlive everything from the ’00s.

            Not just by its crude simplicity, but the tough Panther platform put millions and millions on the road before quitting, counting Crown Vics and Town Cars, (most used by cops/commercially), not to mention the 4.6 V8, AOD-E trans and 8.8 rear end (trio/combo), have been proven/tested and bugs worked-out, by billions of miles, including those by F-150s, E-150s, Mustangs, and probably a few others I’m forgetting.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Um….I would think there would be a few spares from autoparts, aftermarket and wreckers for the Frontier.

            Don’t you? It not if the Frontier or Suzuki spin off are rare.

            Doh!

  • avatar
    cargogh

    That car carrier in the third pic looks bad-ass.

  • avatar
    gtemnykh

    I got to see a scary-bad early D40 (2005-2006ish) Frontier crewcab set up as a plow truck for sale in rural Upstate NY this christmas. Totally rotten looking rear quarters, first one I’ve seen like that.

    More worryingly, my coworker’s ’12 F150 crewcab is bubbling in the cab corners. Unreal! I was thinking it must be indicative of previous body work being done, but the only minor shunt the truck was in was on the other side of the vehicle.

  • avatar
    Nick_515

    From the linked article: “owners of Nissan Navaras — popular among ­builders and mums — have found severe rust which can cause cracks in the chassis.”

    Popular among MUMS?!?

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Nick_515
      That whole article is pretty weird that Steph Willems is quoting. We have had no problems with Navara’s built in Spain, that article contends
      Popular with Mums? English article,, but how many Europeans drive Pickups?
      Navara’s in South Africa, Latin America, Australia/ New Zealand, Asia and Europe

      • 0 avatar
        Nick_515

        That’s what I thought, RobertRyan.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        “…no problems” that you’re *aware of*, but what the heck do you know about “Australia”??

      • 0 avatar
        Hector

        There’s a company car tax loophole in the UK that makes pickups desirable because they’re classed as commercial vehicles, and some people just like them.

        http://www.autoexpress.co.uk/vans/95748/double-cab-pick-up-truck-tax-benefits-explained

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        RobertRyan,
        There are a significant number of D40s in France (by French standards). This might have something to do with Renault.

        I do believe there are D40s in the UK.

        I also believe pickups in the UK are becoming more popular over time.

        Nissan has been building Navaras in Spain for a while now to supply the European market.

        Maybe someone here at TTAC can get a breakdown of vehicle sales in the UK and EU countries. That would make for an interesting comparison.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Big Al from Oz
          There is a Tax loophole in the UK for getting small commercial vehicles, in this case Pickups a break. As far as TTAC goes if it is from outside of NA, they can be pretty clueless

        • 0 avatar
          HotPotato

          That comes as a surprise. Why in the world would somebody buy a pickup where it rains? Didn’t Land Rover invent the SUV (an enclosed pickup) for this very reason? Aren’t gargantuan front-drive Fiat Ducato vans and the like thick on the ground for this reason? No protection for cargo + very little weight on the drive wheels = idiot idea in a rainy climate (unless you’re moving livestock). People never cease to amaze me, not always in good ways.

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      Yep, just like the US in the UK things like SUVs and double cab pickup trucks have became popular as family cars.

      Double cab pickup trucks even attract a lower rate of tax in the UK for the self employed (contractors etc.) or ‘company cars’ as they are technically a commercial vehicle.

      Things like Nissan Navaras, Toyota Hiluxs, Mitsubishi L200s, Ford Rangers, VW Amaroks, Isuzu DMax Denver Rodeos and even Chinese imports such as Great Wall Steeds are hugely popular.

      Quite often you’ll see such vehicles on building sites being used as workhorses, but variants with big alloy wheels are more likely to be used for school runs.

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Steph Willems
    The Frontier is not a Navara. Fascinating rust issues are NOT an issue with Navara’s here.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      No one’s talking about the “current” Navara. So there is a problem with Australia Navaras, and yes a “silent” recall, Down Undah!

      youtube.com/watch?v=zbmx9MGl7Lo

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Little Troll,
        Bad stress welds from the factory, nothing to do with corrosion. They had beds coming off under load.Everyone knew that issue, not a secret.
        Corrosion not a problem.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Ah those pesky “Stess Welds”!

          WTF are you yapping about now??? At least BAFO has the common decency to scamper off, after unloading a big pile of kangaroo sh!t.

          So tells MORE about these *Stress Welds* and why truck makers would put such a thing at the most venerable spot on a pickup frame, most prone to overload failures, IF “Stress Welds” actually existed outside your basement.

          You’re such an idiot.

          • 0 avatar
            JimZ

            I was gonna say, what is a “stress weld?”

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            He’s so full of sh!t, ya gotta laugh. No way he’s serious.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Yes, corrosion had nothing to do with the Australian Navara chassis cracking.

            I did read a while ago airbags along with heavy tow bar loads caused most cracking.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            JimZ,
            I do believe he should of stated chassis welds set areas of stress, as any weld does.

          • 0 avatar
            DenverMike

            You’re digging a deeper hole for him. Nothing magical happens to Navaras when they hit Oz. Except there’s less snow, less salt, however this specific batch of Spain Navaras are rusting beyond repair, no matter where they land.

            So no “Stress Welds”?? Complete fairy tale???

            But show some Navaras with “cracked frames” . Interesting too. Not that that’s a good thing either, but OK let’s see them.’

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            DenverMike,
            The cracking also occurred in Thai built Navaras.

        • 0 avatar
          Big Al from Oz

          Also the use of airbags on the Australian Navaras caused cracking.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      RobertRyan,
      Australia did get its D40 Navaras and Pathfinders from Thailand and Spain during this period.

      Only V6 diesel D40 Navaras and Pathfinders are Spanish. The V6 petrol and 4 cylinder petrol and diesels came from Thailand.

      During this period all D22 Navaras came from Japan.

      • 0 avatar
        DenverMike

        @BAFO – I’m not convinced your partner Robbie is really trolling from Australia. The more he yaps, and gets everything wrong about Oz, the less I think he’s ever been there. Or maybe he’s just never left his mom’s basement??

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @Big Al from Oz
        We had them both, correct. No rust issues with either. D22 came from Japan and they sold them with the D40

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    That rot is pretty extensive and has been going on for a while. I was under the impression that strict British MOT inspections would have flagged this condition long before it got to the ready-to-split state.

    • 0 avatar
      Hector

      The MOT test isn’t that strict and plenty of MOT testers are lazy, it’s a basic 30 minute safety check.
      I guess a lot of these cracks developed under the paint, or hidden by mud or road debris.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @jpolicke
      Correct that is why I think original article is pretty strange. They are very harsh on any form of corrosion.

      • 0 avatar
        jpolicke

        All I know about MOT inspections I learned from watching Wheeler Dealers. It seems like cars get failed for defects that wouldn’t even rate a mention in NY.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @jpolicke
          They are savage, what would get you off the road in the UK and Australia, woul be acceptable in the US. Some of vehicles I saw he’d together by rust in the US were eye opening to say the least

    • 0 avatar
      WallMeerkat

      UK MOT kicks in after 3 years (4 in Northern Ireland), possible that this would have occurred within that timeframe.

      It used to be commonplace in the 80s/90s to hear of cars failing for terminal rust, these days it’s more likely to be worn suspension components, worn tyres or an out of alignment headlight bulb.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        @WallMeerkat
        Used to be the same in Australia. Any surface rust gets you ” over the pits”, and possibly getting the vehicle being put out of it’s misery.
        Surface rust is common I found in the US,makes you wonder what is underneath.

  • avatar
    Joss

    Mum = mom diff spelling. Not mum’s the word.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    Notice they’re all double cabs, too much weight in the front half, I bet this doesn’t happen in single cab models.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Corollaman
      Load on tray acted as a fulcrum and cracked the chassis. They have rectified that in the later production models and current one.
      I have seen early F150’s here doing the same thing, so it is more than a Nissan thing.

  • avatar
    Corollaman

    Perhaps an after market undercoating would be a good investment. when I lived up north, I did that to all my new cars.

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    I’d love to know the story behind the story. These are too new to rot like that and I don’t think road salt is an issue.

    I believe some early wrangler TJs suffer from something like this but not as Catastrophic.

    • 0 avatar

      I’m guessing bad steel. None of these trucks appear to have body rot.

    • 0 avatar
      indi500fan

      I agree, and also on the Toyotas.
      Some of those seem like they have failed in fewer years than you would expect even for completely unpainted / uncoated steel parts

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @whynotaztec
      Correct about being too new. Here it was found that the welds on the chassis were faulty, nothing to with corrosion
      “Nissan is recalling 40,400 (out of as many as 90,000 4×4 models it sold in the time period) of its Navara D40 series, manufactured in Spain between July 2005 and January 2010, for an inspection.

      A redesigned Nissan replacement towbar (with additional mounting points) and welded repairs to any chassis cracks – some as wide as 2.5mm according to owners – will be completed for those with faulty genuine Nissan towbars.

      But Navara owners who opted for an aftermarket set-up with cracks in the chassis rails could face repair bills of $1000 or more.

      The company said the problem relates to faulty towbar designs specific to the Spanish-built D40 ST-X and RX model Navara and while 40,400 vehicles were being recalled for inspection under this campaign, around 9800 were fitted with the affected Nissan genuine towbars.”

  • avatar
    mikey

    Got go with Arthur here. Where we live the salt piles up in drifts. Vehicles… ALL Vehicles will sooner or later rot away .Gas lines, brake lines, and frames, and sub frames ,will rust, and prematurely end the life of the vehicle.

    I have tried everything from concoctions of transmission fluid, and used motor oil, to laying on my back with a 2 in inch brush and can of wheel bearing grease. The waxy stuff that dries out , will do more harm than good. The newer wax product that leaves a film, is not bad, and as gtem mentioned not as messy.

    As far as i’m concerned” Krown” is by far the best rust inhibitor i have ever used. It is indeed a little messy, and i like a clean car. I have it applied in mid fall, and let it drip for a week. A couple of careful washings, with lots of soap will clean up most of the mess. I drive my Mustang year round, and plan too keep it on the road for a long time.

  • avatar
    Big Al From 'Murica

    When purchasing my first vehicle we asked if it had a warranty. The gentleman replied “it has a 2 part warranty. If it breaks in half you get to keep both parts.” Who knew it actually was a thing.

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Who says they don’t build’em like they used to? “Massive structural failure caused by corrosion” has always been the natural state for 8-year-old Japanese pickups. That’s why you only ever see them in California and Australia.

    Big-3 pickups have a better strategy; the body flakes away before the frame cracks. It’s a lot safer, provided you are up-to-date on your tetanus booster.

    I wonder how the aluminum F150 will die prematurely.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      “That’s why you only ever see them in California and Australia.”

      *Reference needed

      My wife’s uncle in NE Ohio must have traded in a real “unicorn” last year then, a ’01 Tacoma ext.cab 4wd with 170k miles that he got $7k for. Frame was looking pretty nasty but was still structurally sound, body was spotless (rear bumper had been replaced after a fender bender so it was likewise immaculate). Saw it on the used lot marked up to $10k a few weeks later. My neighbor around the corner here in Indy has a similar gen Tacoma Prerunner, rear bumper looks pretty bad, no idea on the frame but they drive it regularly.

      • 0 avatar
        JimZ

        IIRC the 2005-2010 Tacoma had the rust prone frames, not the 2001.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          Jim the 95-04 US-made Tacos were part of the initial massive recall and buyback, with some lucky owners getting 150% of KBB “excellent” value back, regardless of truck condition. Dana Corp. is likewise the supplier of the 05-14 frames, and this new recall suggests they did not learn their lesson.

      • 0 avatar
        heavy handle

        gtemnykh,

        There are unicorns and Typhoid Marys, but what makes them special is the fact that they survived when so few others have.

        One other phenomenon, which I’m sure is universal, is people who keep driving a pickup well past the point where it can still be described as a pickup. One guy in an adjacent neighborhood has a 97-03 F150 with no sills and barely any bed. He keeps a plastic pan under it to catch oil when it’s parked, and I swear I’ve seen him pour it back into the engine.

        • 0 avatar
          gtemnykh

          “There are unicorns and Typhoid Marys, but what makes them special is the fact that they survived when so few others have.”

          My point is that what you’re saying is nonsense. I see 1st gen/2nd gen Tacomas all over the northeast/midwest. Did some get taken off the road from frame rust? Yes. Some also received new frames, and yet more are simply still plugging along just fine on original crusty-looking but structurally sound frames.

          The older Hilux-based pre-Tacoma pickups are of that other rusting scenario that you describe. Un-galvanized body rots away, but the older, stronger fully boxed frames are superior to the lighter duty C-channel Dana Corp frames, and the trucks can keep driving in a really scary looking state.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @heavy handle
      It was nothing to do with Corrosion, red below bad welding and a massive recall
      Nissan is recalling 40,400 (out of as many as 90,000 4×4 models it sold in the time period) of its Navara D40 series, manufactured in Spain between July 2005 and January 2010, for an inspecti
      A redesigned Nissan replacement towbar (with additional mounting points) and welded repairs to any chassis cracks – some as wide as 2.5mm according to owners – will be completed for those with faulty genuine Nissan towbars.

      But Navara owners who opted for an aftermarket set-up with cracks in the chassis rails could face repair bills of $1000 or more.

      The company said the problem relates to faulty towbar designs specific to the Spanish-built D40 ST-X and RX model Navara and while 40,400 vehicles were being recalled for inspection under this campaign, around 9800 were fitted with the affected Nissan g

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    Years ago I would have my vehicles Z-barted but you don’t see them much anymore. Eventually you could get rust but it did help keep most rust away with frequent car washes.

    As for manufacturers making a vehicle that will last most want you to come back and buy another one sooner than later but if the vehicle is really bad then the consumer will not buy another one. Crown Victoria and Grand Marquis are relatively inexpensive to get parts for and with proper care can last indefinitely. I would add Suburbans, Tahoes,S-10s, Rangers, and Tacomas. I have an 18 year old S-10 which has a little rust but mechanically it is in great shape and runs like it will last forever. The parts are inexpensive and plentiful. I expect to get 10 years out of my vehicles which I buy new–anything over 10 years is a plus. I expect the same out of appliances but many newer appliances are lucky to last 5 years and usually many of them require repairs that make it more feasible to buy a new appliance.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff S
      It is not rust in the case of the Navara, but welds on the frame, that. Got them recalled here.
      “Nissan is recalling 40,400 (out of as many as 90,000 4×4 models it sold in the time period) of its Navara D40 series, manufactured in Spain between July 2005 and January 2010, for an inspectiIon”
      Read more of the quoted article above.

  • avatar
    an innocent man

    The frames in Spain fail mainly from the rains?

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Dammit, I was hoping to see them split lengthwise.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    This might be a low point for the B&B commentariat.

    Not even popcorn made this fun to read.

  • avatar
    VoGo

    Body by Fissure?

  • avatar
    Jeff S

    @Robert Ryan–Please explain the quotes below that are directly from this article.

    “So many Navaras — sold in North America as the Nissan Frontier — are snapping in two due to extreme frame rust that owners are pressuring governments to do something about. Check out these photos if you think it’s an isolated problem.

    In all instances, the rusty chassis snaps at the point of maximum frame stress — just ahead of the rear axle, where the body and bed meet. Once corrosion reaches a point, the vehicles fold like Superman on laundry day.”

    I don’t see anything in this article that directly attributes the frame snaps to weak welds. The Dana frames on Toyota trucks was due mainly to not dipping the frames in the anti-corrosion treatment. I would think that there would be some quality control that would check these frames before they were sent to the final manufacturer.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      @ Jeff, Robert, BAFO – Those defective welds or “Stress Welds” (lol) finally recalled in 2013, are a different issue, like totally. Old news.

      But yes, the same D40 chassis. Amazing, right? As if there can ONLY be *one* major problem per truck chassis? And as if Robert and BAFO know it all!

      Welds at the back of the chassis, at the towbar location, were weak, they cracked and need repairs. Those frames were fixable, although just as dangerous, but handled 4 years ago.

      And it obviously had absolutely nothing to do with *current* rusting away D40 frames, bending, breaking or otherwise, rusting clear through! And of course taco’ing Navaras in half!!

      Yes the current D40 chassis RUST problem extends beyond the EU to Australia, even if some happen to be ignorant to the fact.

      Not a pretty scene!

      youtube.com/watch?v=Y1hijOHhB3Q

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Little Troll,
        You are trying to stir up a non existent issue. Frame issue had been resolved, not a problem. Massive rust on US vehicles generally a very big issue. No recall like we have in Europe/ Australia, most are mobile death traps

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        “Not a pretty scene” I know little troll
        http://truckyeah.jalopnik.com/how-a-2015-ford-f-150-aluminum-repair-cost-17-000-and-1719664610

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        DenverMike,
        If you for once stood back and actually researched your comments, in lieu of alternative facts you would realise the current EU chassis failures have little to do with the Aussie Navara chassis failures.

        Here’s some info for you. You can then present a credible argument based on fact. Your approach is very Trump like with your constant use of alternative facts, or you are just trolling and presenting yourself as a d!ck.

        1. Aussie Navara chassis failures are directly related to the US engineering of the frame. The frame might be okay for the US market, but it doesn”t suit the loads expected in the Aussie market.

        2. In defence of Nissan the D40 was designed when the average global pickup was rated to tow 2 to 2.5 tonnes and carry 1 000kg+.

        With the advent of the new generation global midsize able to tow 3 tonnes plus left the Navara uncompetitive. The Amarok came out with 3 tonne towing, so, the Ranger/BT50 came out with 3 350kg towing. The global Colorado and Izuzu came out with 3.5 tonnes towing. Ford and Mazda followed suit uprating to 3.5 tonnes respectively.

        This left Toyota unchanged with 2.5 to 3.0 towing and Nissan lifted its tow limit to 3 tonnes. The D40 Frontier chassis designed to carry a half ton and low tow rating compared to the new trucks.

        I did read years ago rhat the use of airbags on the Aussie D40 Navara was not recommended due to chassis failure.

        I would think the Spanish/EU chassis failure due to rust is a manufacturing oversight.

        • 0 avatar
          Scoutdude

          But you used to claim that the POS Nisanns sold down under and in the rest of the world were far superior to the US units with stronger frames and other running gear.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Scoutdude,
            You appear to be confused with someone else.

            Ring Trump it seems you have much in common with him.

          • 0 avatar
            OldManPants

            “Scoutdude… Ring Trump it seems you have much in common with him.”

            Careful, BAFO.

            As a kid I saw the results when one neighbor’s chihuahua was stupidly aggressive enough to badger another neighbor’s shepherd.

            Ex-chihuahua.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Omp,
            Scoutdude needs to realise I have never or even considered talking up a D40. Even GTE would know my dislike for this vehicle, as I have always put forward.

            Scoutdude is using Trump like alternative facts. Based on what?

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @Jeff S
      Nissan had bad cracking issues on a batch of frames, that is why the massive recall. As someone commented they were brand new pickups. We did not have any rust issues, but there was welding issues with the frames, they could have rusted around faulty joins. Why they appear to be rusting in Europe is a mystery to me as the new Navara has no issues in Europe.
      As you will not get the new Navara, it has no relevance

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Jeff S
    ” So many Navaras — sold in NORTH AMERICA as the Nissan Frontier — are snapping in two due to extreme frame rust that owners are pressuring governments to do something about. Check out these photos if you think it’s an isolated problem.”

    So how many Nissan Frontiers have had their frames snapping in the US?

  • avatar
    RobertRyan

    @Jeff S
    It would appear how those rusted vehicles went to Europe. Manufacturer not that liable. They take more care now.
    “your vehicle was one of the many of the load and transported on deck, it WILL HAVE been subject to salty water or atmosphere.
    If the waves were splashing and crashing on the side of the ship, your vehicle will have been doused in salt water quite a lot of times.
    After it’s “salting” it will have been stored for a while possibly in sun and the water which has entered through seals etc will then just sit an rust the vehicle.
    At pre delivery, nothing would be noticed because they basically don’t look for anything, just repair the dings and scratches and clean them.”

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Not that Spain is in some way a poor automaker – VW group entrusts it’s subsidiary SEAT to build Audi Q5s and VW Polos, GM build Merivas in the country.

    Nissan has form for Navara defects without a recall – the D22 diesel engine was known for blowing conrods through the block, even with a full dealer service history.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      @WallMeerkat
      Nissan seems to have behaved itself over the last couple of years. Transplants as a whole, do not have many problems as they have been ironed out elsewhere.
      I wonder how Renault and Mercedes are going to use the Navara platform for their Pickups?

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      WallMerkat,
      In the NE of Spain (Viga) the French auto manufacturers have plants.

      DenverMike claims to have been to Spain over 36 times, he would know ;)

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I was thinking.

    The D40 was engineered and designed at Nissan’s San Diego Design centre.

    I don’t think the differences between the NA and global pick up would of been that significant.

    I have never been a fan of the D40 due to its wanting off road performance.

    I have read conflicting statements regarding the newest D23 Navara. Some comments stated the chassis was based on the D22 (D20) and I have read others its based on the D40.

    Maybe the D23 designation is a clue.

    The D40 design was also the basis for the old Armada and Titan chassis.

    It would be interesting to research and find out.

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      Don’t overthink it. US Frontiers dodged the bullet, but you can bet a different supplier, different batch of frames. Just recall/fix.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        DenverMike,
        WTF?

        Which market? Which factory? Which country?

        Hmmmm…..another Trump’esque statement. I suppose you believe in massive voter fraud in the US election.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          @BAFO – I agree, Australia’s much higher payload-ratings (for the same trucks) would definitely exacerbate the failure rate of Spanish built, D40 Navaras (our US built Frontiers).

          But it obviously underscores the fact OZ overrates the payload of Navaras/Frontiers, while the USDOT rated the same D40 chassis with a realistic and scientific based payload rating.

          Australia’s USDOT “equivalent” (there is none!) simply leaves payload ratings completely up to OEM marketing executive’s sense of humour!

          But even still, there’s bound to be less instances of failures of these rusty frames in arid, dry regions, which make up most of Australia. Without a doubt.


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