By on February 9, 2017

2017 Nissan Titan King Cab and Titan XD King Cab, Image: Nissan

In 1977, Nissan released the revolutionary King Cab option for the Datsun 620 pickup, which opened up 10 extra inches of space behind the front row of seats for people or stuff.

Forty years later, Nissan has revealed the new King Cab for the Titan and Titan XD, joining the Crew Cab and Single Cab options to round out the product line.

Interestingly, the Titan and Titan XD King Cab is offered with a rear-seat delete option, giving extra cargo space behind the front row for the coveted work-truck market.

2017 Nissan Titan King Cab Doors Open, Image: Nissan

The Titan and Titan XD King Cabs both have 78-inch-long beds, slotting nicely between the 67 inches of the Crew Cab and the 98.5 inches of the Single Cab bed. Like the other Titans, the only engines offered are the 5.6-liter gasoline V8 in the standard Titan, and either the gas V8 or the diesel Cummins V8 in the Titan XD.

2017 Nissan Titan King Cab rear seat cargo tray, Image: Nissan

The rear-hinged rear doors open 170 degrees to allow for easy access to the second row — or to your securely stowed cargo if you opted for the second-row seat delete. This could be a great option for contractors who need secure stowage for expensive tools and equipment. When the seat is eliminated, the Titan has a flat load floor and tie down hooks on the rear wall of the cab.

2017 Nissan Titan King Cab and Titan XD King Cab, Image: Nissan

The Nissan Titan and Titan XD King Cab will be available this spring. Pricing will be announced closer to the on-sale date.

2017 Nissan Titan King Cab, Image: Nissan

2017 Nissan Titan XD King Cab, Image: Nissan

[Images: Nissan]

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31 Comments on “Chicago 2017: Nissan Reveals Titan King Cab Option That’s Not Just For Passengers...”


  • avatar
    mason

    Rear seat delete? How bout a simple removable rear seat. On my older truck, my rear seat is often folded up for the extra storage space but it’s great to have it for the few times the kids are with me.
    I would also think a king cab with no optional rear seat would have a very limited market when it comes time to sell.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      Methinks 90% of King Cab Titans with rear seat delete will be S (fleet) models.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      You can’t well have a rear seat without all manners of costly safety equipment that are tough to make removable these days.

      I personally LOVE this option. Don’t particularly love the lack of an 8 foot bed, but compared to the space robbing, costly, never used rear seats in F150 Scabs, this is the perfect half-and-half between open storage in the bed, and plenty of enclosed, lockable storage in the cab. Camper in the bed, a pair of 10K mountain bikes in the cab, kind of thing…

      Or, for the work truck set, which Nissan is courting heavily with accessory lines, a King Cab 6.5 with a custom toolbox insert behind the seats, could easily be preferable to a reg 8 with a 1.5 foot toolbox permanently mounted in the bed for some use cases.

      It is a bloody truck, after all. One seat row is enough for quite a few truck use cases. Perhaps not enough to bother with for the 2000/day sales volumes Ford deals with, but upstarts like Nissan have to be on the look for under served niches. Like 5/8 tons, open back King cabs etc. Now, what about a reg cab, 9-10 foot bed revival…..

  • avatar
    Vulpine

    Rear seat delete is a nice idea, but I agree with mason that having them easily removable OR having a different kind of pedestal to clear the floor when the seats are raised would be a good idea. My biggest complaint about most is that you can’t clear that floor for gear with the seats raised.

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    “In 1977, Nissan released the revolutionary King Cab option for the Datsun 620 pickup, which opened up 10 extra inches of space behind the front row of seats for people or stuff.”

    A friend of mine once owned one of these. The 1st generation King Cab was not roomy enough for people and did not have a rear or jump seat like the later models. It was roomy enough for a couple of tool boxes or fishing poles.

  • avatar
    John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

    I’m thinking about test driving a Nissan Titan XD Cummins single cab S trim.

    There, I said it.

    I recently went on a “hot shot” drive in a prev-gen Ram (Dodge) Ram 3500, it pays extremely well if you have your own truck.

    Now, it pays more if you haul more. But, the Titan XD’s ratings are within a CDL class I can get pretty easy. The way I’m to understand it, this class won’t require me to be able to drive a long nose Pete, and that’s good because although I have driven class 8 trucks, I’m physically unable to do it consistently.

    I will take smaller loads in a truck that’s easier to drive for me.

    Driving the Titan should be okay. I want a regular cab because a) these are usually “day” trips (not that I could sleep in any vehicle), and b) it will be more maneuverable.

    The Ram rides like a block wheeled wagon. I’ve driven F-350s and Silverado 3500s that had the ride quality of a Lincoln Town Car by comparison.

    I know a reg-cab pick up will not be the smoothest ride. And I want 4×4. But, I want to drive it and see if its acceptable. The review here on TTAC mentioned a smooth ride, but that was a crew cab. Like I said, I need to drive it.

    I found a Titan XD S 4×4 Cummins single cab painted in Canyon Red in Lake Charles, LA. which isn’t too far. MSRP is $40k. I’m betting I can get it far, far cheaper. I wanted an S, 4×4, diesel in something other than Fleet White. This one matches my preferred equipment, color, model, etc.

    I could (should?) go for at least a 3/4 ton Ford or GM, but I think the Titan will ride better and I bet I can get it fairly cheap since they’re not exactly flying off the lot.

    There is a reg cab diesel at another dealer closer. I may go drive it to see if its still worth considering.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      The only thing that makes a RCLB “more maneuverable” is that you can see out the back window directly behind your seat. Otherwise, it’s the same dimensions as a King or Crew Cab, as there will be no RCSB Titan. If that’s what you meant, then I apologize, withdraw my objection, and retreat behind my typical excuse of pedantry.

      The XD occupies a strange niche in the truck landscape, but for certain buyers, it might meet their needs perfectly.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Yes, that is what I mean, although you’re right in that I could’ve worded it better.

        I realize it isn’t a short bed, and that’s fine for ride quality. I know it will require lots of work to get it backed in and turned around, etc. and I don’t need any “DLO FAIL” getting in the way lol.

        I’m going to drive one tomorrow. My cousin wants to look at an Accord coupe on my recommendation, so we decided to make a day of it, lol.

        What Honda should I drive?

        “The XD occupies a strange niche in the truck landscape, but for certain buyers, it might meet their needs perfectly.”

        Yep, and i think it will fit mine, for this job.

        • 0 avatar
          Vulpine

          “What Honda should I drive?”

          You have to ask? Ridgeline.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            That’s not a bad idea, actually. I know I would love an Accord, I don’t want a CUV, but a “crossover pickup” is interesting.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            How better to judge a vehicles capacity to meet your needs than by actually hands-on studying the rig and driving it?

            Maybe it’s not for you–you’ve already mentioned some needs that might strain the Honda’s abilities–but unless you plan to tow or drag heavy things on a frequent basis do you really need that heavy capacity? Dragging that Fairlane out of the mud might be easier with a farm tractor (you did say it was on a farm) at which point the Honda should be able to handle the trailer easily enough. Same for that Camry you mentioned. And if the Honda offers a better ride and more utility in other ways, is it really worth disregarding simply because it doesn’t have the biggest engine on the road?

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            A hot shot driver DOES carry heavy loads on the daily. As Samuel L. Jackson would say: “that’s thay mo’fuggin job”.

            I’m thinking the XD might be just capable enough without having to go with an F-250 or 350. Hooking up a goose neck to the XD will be stressful enough, I’m not going to risk a FWD unibody pickup with much more than a small utility trailer. Maybe some dirt bike or ATVs.

            I would buy an F-150 before the Honda, but I don’t think I want to hook up to a trailer that big with it, either. I am choosing the smallest and least capable pickup that can do what I require. In fact, its capabilities may not be enough.

            I will be limiting myself on loads, but I talked to the guy and he said there is plenty of under 20k lbs loads, they are passed up by a lot of guys because they don’t pay as well.

            With a cheaper truck, that suits me just fine.

            Let’s wait for Big Robert Al Ryan with his head down unda to tell me how a Mazda BT50 will tow a mobile home so that’s all I need.

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            A) I think you misunderstood my meaning; I meant you should test drive it just to know more about the truck; I clearly acknowledged that it might not meet your needs in other ways. However;…

            B) Unless whomever you work for pays for mileage over and above your salary/wages, why should you use YOUR truck to haul company loads? I had a boss try that on me one time and I refused to use my personal vehicle without additional compensation to pay for wear and tear (work-related repairs due to using the vehicle beyond its design purpose.) Any company jobs I performed that required a truck, I took the shop’s Isuzu P’up (diesel). My Old’s Toronado was not going to be used as a truck, no matter how much he wanted me to. (Turned out the IRS ended up padlocking his doors because he was claiming payouts he was not making.)

            C) I accept that there are some few who actually use their Road Whales as real working trucks; again, I acknowledged that you may be one of them. That doesn’t mean a Ridgeline can’t serve as well or better for the lighter needs of a services company for plumbing, pest control, electrical, etc. and DIY handyman type who would rarely, if ever, haul the kinds of loads you describe. Even a landscaper (the residential lawn-mowing/flower-garden type) could get by with one at least until they reach the level of working business properties. And while I like the Ridgeline for what it is, it’s still too much of a Road Whale for my comfort, especially when my little Ranger can still go places it can’t simply due to its notably smaller size and tighter turning radius.

          • 0 avatar
            John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

            * I’m aware the XD can’t tow near 20k pounds. I didn’t mean to put that as some sort of limit for the truck’s capacity. I meant it as a CDL class limit. Although I do plan on going to talk to the licensing department to see what will work for me.

            I just realized that it looks like I was saying I would hook up to any load under ~20k lbs with my little Nissan, lol, no not without an F-350 6.7L at least. But, even if I could, I’m not dropping what they want for one of those.

            The guy who owns the company has a few 1 ton trucks I could use for heavier loads. The Dodge Ram 3500 my cousin and I took to Texas earlier this week was one of them.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Why 4×4? From the reading I’ve done, the hotshotters are mostly 2wd since they’re dedicated highway trucks.

      • 0 avatar
        John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

        Excellent question. I didn’t want to go into it because my post was already long enough lol.

        I want to use the truck to go out west and get old cars during the “slow” time.

        I would love a 4×4 for not only the mountain passes, but to pull a decent looking, uber cheap 1966 Fairlane out of the muddy field its been in since 1997.

        I figure if my experience with the Titan is positive, I would keep it as a spare vehicle, and having the option of a 4wd tow master would be awesome for off-road driving with my cousins and going to pick up craigslist finds.

        I could’ve bought a 1996 Camry XLE coupe last week if I’d had a way to go get it. No, 4wd wouldn’t be required for that particular job, but it I know it will come in handy in others.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Per my recollection, I was very impressed with the lightly loaded ride of the Titan XD crew cab vis-a-vis the Silverado 2500. And the Chevy has a nicer highway ride than the previous gen Superduty, as well as the Ram 3500. The 2500 Ram with the coils or air, is much nicer than the 3500, but above, say 65mph, the IFS of the Chevy is still more relaxing. And the XD seemed better still, if you don’t need the additional capacity. In all honesty, the Big3 HDs only really massively trounce the XD for towing, capacity wise, once you get a dually.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    I’m glad they decided to continue with clamshell doors and not the rear-opening Quad/Double Cab doors of Ram, GM, and Toyota.

    Presumably this’ll be just S, SV, Pro-4X, and SL, not Platinum, if other manufacturers’ offerings are any indication. But how high up can you go and still get the rear seat deleted? (Probably just S and SV.)

    What are the chances that Nissan will once again offer the Titan (XD or regular) King Cab with an 8′ bed, like they did on 2008/09 models? I’m thinking something like 3,720:1.

    Along the same lines, is there any talk of a non-XD Titan crew cab/6.5′ bed?

    • 0 avatar
      John-95_Taurus_3.0_AX4N

      That has to do with crash protection. From my understanding, GM, Toyota and Ram can’t pass side impact crash tests with rear hinged “suicide” doors. Ford and evidently Nissan can.

      • 0 avatar
        Vulpine

        I have one question that can shoot down GM, et al’s argument:

        Why do the back doors have to be hinged on that center support? Why can’t the latching mechanism be mounted there instead? Not only would it be more accessible for driver and passengers but it would also make access by emergency personnel easier by offering a single cut point to access both front and rear seating.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          One of the great things about suicide/clamshell doors is the opening is free of a center post or “B pillar”, as they’re built into the doors themselves. The latches are on the top and bottom of the doors. Similar to a vertical “tailgate”, with the normal ‘striker’ for the front doors. Except the doors are very heavy, which has to be why GM and Ram decided against them.

          They’re worth the extra weight for my uses, not to mention you can stop and p!ss on the side of a busy hwy and no one notices, male or female! Sometimes we’re on the road up to 20 hours nonstop, and facilities are often few and far between. Lots of caffeine/Monster/etc, to say the least!

          • 0 avatar
            Vulpine

            No, it’s not that they’re free of the pillar itself, though that is a side-effect of the concept; rather, it’s the ease of access without a door itself being in the way. If that B-pillar is aligned with the front seat back, it is out of the way for people entering and leaving the vehicle while potentially offering a grab point that makes entry and exit easier, not more difficult. The B-pillar can then continue to offer the extra support needed for top and side crash safety while giving the operator free access that doesn’t require walking out around a door to transfer tools and materials from front to back seat, etc.

            Think out of the box. Just because it has always been done one way doesn’t mean it HAS to be done that way.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Considering the XD comes as a crew 6.5, you’d think a King 8 would be straight forward. The Scab8, while a small seller in the big scheme of F150 sales numbers, is popular amongst the kind of buyers you would think the XD is targeting.

  • avatar
    WallMeerkat

    Presumably like the rest-of-world Navara it’ll snap in half anyway?

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    “In 1977, Nissan released the revolutionary King Cab option for the Datsun 620 pickup, which opened up 10 extra inches of space behind the front row of seats for people or stuff.”

    It was only revolutionary for small pickups. Dodge released their D-Series Club Cab model for MY1973.

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      And the 10″ (if that’s really how long it was) was only for stuff, no passengers. The first Datsun King Cab with actual passenger space was the 720 pickup in 1980, and that was around 18″ long, same as just about every compact/midsize extended cab before or since.

      Dodge’s ’73 Club Cab was 18″, long enough for two jump seats, but not enough for a full bench. Early models still had the fuel tank in the cab–something I’m pretty sure the ’74+ Fords never did.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2012/07/junkyard-find-1974-dodge-d-200-club-cab-custom/

      Ford’s SuperCab was 22″ longer than the regular cab, long enough to put a full bench and advertise 6-passenger seating in a smaller-than-crew cab truck. Plus by the time they started making them, all pickup (non-chassis cab) models had moved the fuel tank under the bed.

  • avatar
    iNeon

    “And the 10″ (if that’s really how long it was)”

    tehee


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