By on July 26, 2016

2017 Nissan TITAN SV Single Cab

With so many parents using crew cab pickups as family haulers, it’s gotten to the point where a regular cab full-sizer starts to look weird. Well, Nissan has one on tap that looks weirder.

Nissan will offer a regular cab Titan and Titan XD this fall, part of its plan to flesh out the lineup to three body styles. An extended “King Cab” version will follow the “Single Cab”, which is somewhat jarring when viewed from the side.

The automaker pulled the wraps off the newest Titan member today. It’s the first full-size regular cab in Nissan’s history, and (along with the future extended cab) its purpose is to soak up more sales by covering more bases.

“Once we complete the roll-out of all (Titan) cab, bed, powertrain and grade level configurations, our all-new (Titan) family will cover about 85 percent of the total light pickup marketplace,” said Rich Miller, chief product specialist for Titan and Titan XD, in a release.

2017 Nissan TITAN SV Single Cab

Nissan didn’t announce pricing, but called the new models “an affordable and rugged entry-point in the commercial fleet/work truck market.”

Regular cab Titans come with an eight-foot bed, two trim lines, and a choice of engines — a 5.6-liter gasoline V8 or the 5.0-liter Cummins turbo diesel V8. A V6 will follow at a later date. Gas models get a seven-speed automatic transmission, while diesel versions receive a six-speed unit. The wheelbase is about a foot shorter than Crew Cab versions.

The regular cab models look fine from the beltline on down, where the Titan’s bulging fenders add visual muscle to its flanks. The sloping roofline ends abruptly and looks a bit awkward, like a Holden Ute.

Work and fleet buyers traditionally head to the Detroit Three to meet their needs, but Nissan hopes they’ll look its way and think hmm, maybe I’ll go Japanese this time. Before the redesigned models arrived, Nissan said it wanted to sell 100,000 Titans annually.

Titan sales reached a peak of 86,945 units in 2005, but its been a steady decline since then. A post-recession peak of 23,416 units came in 2010, but last year’s total was only 12,140. May and June sales figures were well off last year’s performance, but the changeover from the previous generation to the 2017 Titan could explain that. The Titan XD bowed as a 2016 model, but was slow to reach dealer lots in significant numbers.

Regular cab Titans go on sale in late fall.

[Image: Nissan]

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60 Comments on “Nissan Takes a Chainsaw to the Titan, Offers a Regular Cab Version...”


  • avatar
    crm114

    Looks like a proper pickup to me.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Payload numbers?

      As far as fleets go, can they produce 100’s if not 1,000’s of these at a time to keep the big fleet buyers happy?

      The problem with fleets is that if they are running any upfitter equipment changing brands often means changing or heavily modifying gear. That tends to be a big reason why many won’t change brands. I see a local reforestation company go with short term Ford HD leases every year and they use the same bumpers, cargo bodies, decks, and crummies.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Payload?

        I’d say a person buying a fleet would look at those numbers.

        The single cab Titan looks okay for a work truck.

        I wonder if the “real” half ton Titan will have the same payload as the XD. If so the payload would be okay.

        So far the articles I have read regarding how the Titan carries it’s load is superior to any other pickup. That is the vehicle is more composed and handle weight better. As one article stated you wouldn’t know there was a load in the bed.

        I’d be more worried about little people moving vans, SUVs, CUVs and even cars being overloaded than a pickup.

      • 0 avatar
        Adam Tonge

        They aren’t going to get many fleet orders. They are better off not worrying about those.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Adam Tonge – I agree and unfortunately that means titan isn’t going to sell too many pickups.

          • 0 avatar
            Big Al from Oz

            Does Nissan have to sell to fleets?

            It seems this bigger, mostest, largest, fastest, quickest and all the other ‘ests is driving perception here.

            Would a company not be in a better position to sell less at a bigger profit than sell at a much smaller margin.

            Being a fleet vehicle doesn’t not make for a better vehicle.

          • 0 avatar
            JohnTaurus_3.0_AX4N

            Nissan intends to sell in fleets and not only by dumping base model Altimas off by the truck load at the rental gate.

            Why do you suppose they produce a full size van, and a smaller, also commercial-focused van? They along with GM are the last BOF van producers that I know of. The Nissan full size looks like a stretched pickup, I think it has met with mixed results in the marketplace, but they are the first Japanese to venture into these markets in North America. The short roof cargo version resembles an old-school panel truck more than it does a Sprinter or Express.

            Toyota is obviously focused more on the “status” end of the North American truck market, although you occasionally see a base model Tundra with steel wheels. Its usually driven by a man obviously of retirement age, not an employee driving a company truck as is the case with the same versions of American pickups. Nissan is trying to play in that field, too. Kudos to them for thinking outside the box.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          I’m not disparaging the Titan because it won’t have huge fleet sales. It’ll just limit its sales numbers.

          • 0 avatar
            npaladin2000

            That might not be a bad thing. Fleet buyers generally expect discounts for buying in bulk. Individual sales may end up more profitable.

          • 0 avatar
            Adam Tonge

            Right. This truck can be successful moving retail units. Nissan really needs to get the regular half ton in dealerships though. In the last 32 months, they’ve sold less than 33,000 Titans. That’s not enough to keep this product going.

          • 0 avatar

            It doesn’t seem like they have any capacity shortfall to producing enough trucks for the retail market. As long as they can fill those orders and sell the fleet trucks for more than the marginal cost of making them, it’s to their benefit to make them.

            Now that Nissan has two commercial vans, they are probably more interested in fleet sales than they were before. Plus the Frontier has some appeal to fleets that used to buy stripped Rangers.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            No the fleet buyers do not get the deal that everyone thinks they do. They don’t qualify for the year end clearance bonuses, $xxxx cash back or 0% financing, competitive conquest cash, first time buyer, college grad, first responder, loyalty bonus ect. Where they make the real money at retail vs fleet is the fact that the retail trucks are loaded up with high margin options and trim levels.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      Yep. Too bad they’ll drop it after a few years due to a sub-5% take rate. A regular-cab Cummins 4×4 will become a holy grail of sorts next decade.

      • 0 avatar
        RHD

        At a “monster truck/mud run” event at the local fairgrounds a few years ago, nothing even came close to the capabilities of old jacked-up Toyota 4X4 two-door pickups. They never got stuck, and about half of the other brand trucks did.
        It would be cool (at least from an industry watcher/vehicle fan’s point of view) to see a capable mini to medium-sized 4X4 pickup with Jeep-like capabilities. Does anyone think there is a large enough market to justify producing this variant?

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    A real pickup! My dad will appreciate this. Too bad someone punched it in the middle, and it got all puffy at either side.

  • avatar
    Steve Biro

    I agree with Cory. I can do without the “muscular” bulges. Throw out the stupid grill and chromed gills on the sides, too. I wouldn’t even mind a slightly shorter bed, although I don’t expect one. Still, it’s great to see another real work truck on the market. I wonder if a bench seat, rubber floor covering and column-mounted shifter are offered.

  • avatar
    npaladin2000

    Might sell pretty good if they sell it in a proper work-pickup trim like Dodge…er…RAM does with the Tradesman trim. GM and Ford seem to be edging away from that sort of market, do they even HAVE a base model regular cab pickup these days?

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      Both sell a lot of regular cab work trucks. I’m not going to say it’s the best seller for anyone, but Ford offers the XL trim and GM offers a Silverado WT.

      • 0 avatar
        bumpy ii

        Most of them are fleet sales, and a handful in the back of the retail lot for the occasional curmudgeon and/or cheapskate buyer.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Right, but they sell a bunch. Ford sells a $hit load of refrigerator white F150s and SuperDutys in XL trim.

        • 0 avatar
          Drew8MR

          I’m in coastal Orange County and base trucks are scarce here, but if I drove out to say, Barstow I’d undoubtedly have a huge selection to choose from. I don’t haul alot of rock or soil so I think I’m going full size van which are everywhere stripped to the bone. I can always get a trailer if need be and I’ll put the gas cans on a roof rack.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I wonder if the half ton Titan will help numbers, or better still by how much?

    Nissan currently with just the XD has limited options considerably to the customer.

    Judging by the way the Titan is selling it wouldn’t surprise me if this pickup is Nissan’s last foray into the half ton market.

    Nissan might have been better off releasing the US variant of the Frontier.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      They have to help. Ford sells more F-Series in a few days than Nissan has XDs at dealerships.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        Adam,
        If one looks at the total representational average of HDs sold by the Big 3 I’d say it would be around 20% or so of total pickup sales for them.

        The XD is targeting a smaller niche than even HDs, ie, potential 250/2500 customers. Even again the Titan is targeting the light end of this ……. then again the Titan targeted the rich dude wanting to tow his big ass fishing boat to chase pelagics and tow a horse float for the kids. A toy, a huge SUV daily driver for the well heeled.

        I see the current XD in its dual cab, high end appointed car come SUV hitting around 5% of the market.

        I can see Nissan selling at least 15 000 to 20 000 Titans a month when all models are released.

        I really find it difficult to comprehend why the global Navara in it’s US guise hasn’t been released. The vehicle exists. It’s a pity they just can’t be imported and the problem is solved.

        • 0 avatar
          Adam Tonge

          Nissan is not selling 15K Titans a month. In their best year, they never averaged 7000/month.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Big Al from Oz – Ford is around 60/40 LD/HD. GM is more like 70/30 and Ram is somewhere in between.

          What’s a “pelagic”?

          • 0 avatar
            BuzzDog

            Lou_BC: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pelagic_fish

          • 0 avatar
            Lou_BC

            BuzzDog – I looked it up before posting but I wanted to see if he’d explain why it was relevant to the conversation. I live 500 miles from the ocean but anyone I’ve ever met who has a boat for ocean fishing isn’t towing it behind a 1/2 ton truck. Is he implying east and west coast fishermen are the only ones buying this truck? If one wants to comment at least keep it relevant to the marketplace it is sold.

          • 0 avatar
            RHD

            Of or relating to the open sea.
            “the kittiwakes return from their pelagic winter wanderings”

            •(chiefly of fish) inhabiting the upper layers of the open sea.

            Pelagic, used as a noun, as in “chasing pelagics”, is an error.

            It also could be creatively used to describe some classic streamlined car body designs, and possibly that very unattractive teacher you had back in junior high school.

        • 0 avatar
          stuki

          The only XD on sale s far has been the Crew Cab with a 6.5 bed. Even the F150 doesn’t sell too many halftons than long. Much past 19 feet, and you’re sized out of lots of parking options even in ‘Murica. Especially considering the places with the most people open to buying “Japanese”, tend to be the most parking challenged ones. Then, to to it off, the CC XD is tar getting the subset of F150 CC6.5 buyers looking for the noticeably rougher riding HD payload package. Which Ford, as evidenced by their optioning schemes, are doing their darnedest to keep out of non commercial users hands.

          So, by that standards, I’m not sure the XD is doing that poorly. It might, but I have seen a few around. Once the line is fleshed out with Reg and King Cab, they can start to focus on executing the “Ford HD Payload done right (or at least conservatively, for those who plan to keep their truck for a decade or more)” strategy in a more complete fashion. A similar positioning vs Ford’s Transit seem to be how their pitching the NV, and not entirely without success. Heavier, more traditional, and with solutions more proven in practice over time, than Ford’s lighter, newer and higher tech entrants.

          They need a 35+ gallon tank option on the XD, though. Or, at minimum, to pay the upfront costs to have Titan or someone develop an aftermarket solution for the diesels.

  • avatar
    14Tundra

    I think we can all agree that it’s a little ugly, but work trucks don’t sell on looks.

    For fleet buyers, purchase price and total cost of ownership is all they’re worried about.

    • 0 avatar
      Adam Tonge

      “For fleet buyers, purchase price and total cost of ownership is all they’re worried about.”

      Which is why Nissan will have a hard time getting fleet buyers. Will they be able to deal at the levels Ford, GM, and FCA do? Can they beat TCO when the V6 engine hasn’t even been announced yet?

      • 0 avatar
        Maymar

        Don’t forget, TCO includes resale value as well, which most modern fleets are pretty heavily concerned with. For now, the Titan might benefit from not being so saturated, and resell for a little more, so long as Nissan’s just looking for a small bump in sales to help amortize their new platform.

        • 0 avatar
          Lou_BC

          Maymar – depends on the fleet and often they view residual value as zero. In my part of the world, fleet trucks used in the forest or mining industries are viewed at zero residual value.

          • 0 avatar
            Maymar

            Lou, for what it’s worth, I work for a rental company – we did apparently did fairly well with last-generation Titans bought a year or two ago, but we also didn’t get very many. With the monthly depreciation cost we get on our best performers, we’d have to hang onto a newer pickup for something like 15 years for zero residual to make financial sense. You’d also be right that even with rental customer abuse, our vehicles are probably in much better shape than the trucks you’re talking about after 18 months.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Fleet “lease payments” aren’t minus the residual. The payment’s equal everything, meaning at the end of the lease, you own it. There’s usually too much wear and tear and no lender wants them back.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Wow… way to take the simplest-to-get-right 3-box form in vehicular history and get it wrong.

    Front-heavy, bling-happy, squozed-in-the-middle toothpaste tube styling motif… this is Pure Nissan.

    • 0 avatar
      stuki

      Unless it’s strapped down for the camera (in which case it was done conservatively), at least it doesn’t look to ride quite as obnoxiously ass high, as the big3s’ reg8s.

  • avatar
    dukeisduke

    That’s even weirder and uglier than the King Cab version, especially in the front 3/4 view.

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    I know people love to trash talk Titans but my experience has been good. In early 04 I ordered a 4×2 Titan SE with the off road, utility bed, and towing packages. I installed the 18″ front brakes when they became available in 08 and Firestone air bags on the rear suspension. I have owned every brand of pickup available including a cornbinder. Twelve years and 150,000 miles later the Titan has been the best handling, best towing, and most reliable of the bunch. Ive replaced the tires twice, the battery twice, and the brakes once. The AC still blows cold and interior rattles and squeeks are at a minimum. The exhaust manifolds were replaced under warranty as the early ones had a defect. Would I buy another one? Sure but this one has been paid for years now and there is nothing wrong with it.

    • 0 avatar
      davefromcalgary

      Where do you live? The upgrades you made make a ton of sense, and really probably eliminated the noted Titan factory defects.

      Curious since you have a 4×2 what your driving conditions are, and if you have an LSD and what kind of tires you like for it.

      • 0 avatar
        TOTitan

        I live in Thousand Oaks CA, about six miles inland from Malibu. Driving conditions are mostly pavement but since Im in construction management I have to occasionally drive over curbs, logs, etc when Im starting a new jobsite. Limited slip is Nissans brake activated limited slip which has worked well….Ive never been stuck. Tires are 305/50/20 Falken STZ/05 on Momo wheels. I had to replace the OEM wheel studs with longer studs to be able to use the thicker Momo wheels.

    • 0 avatar
      jjster6

      So I’m guessing from what you describe, the last pickup you owned that wasn’t a Nissan was designed sometime during the Reagan administration?

      • 0 avatar
        TOTitan

        No I had a 2005 F150 company truck for two years also. The Titan outperformed it in every measurable way but it was free so I parked the Titan and put 70,000 miles on it in two years.

    • 0 avatar
      wstarvingteacher

      @TOT: That just about reflects every experience I’ve had with Nissan. Seriously undervalued brand. I have driven just about everything but no other brand seems to hit just the right spots. Looking at possibly adding a NV 200 one day soon but still a little reserved on the CVT trannie in a van. My cube has been moving people for 96k and it’s still holding together. Big difference moving people and working. It’s been out long enough to have a history now Time to read up on it.

  • avatar
    theonlydt

    So okay, the front’s a little chromey, the middle’s a little squeezey, but it’s a honest-to-goodness work truck. I love it.

    • 0 avatar
      Kenmore

      An undeniable point, but since the current Titan starts at 35K will the back-seat delete drop the price enough to appeal to those only interested in a WT?

      • 0 avatar
        theonlydt

        I’d love to see this come in at $20-$25k. It won’t just be cheaper from the wheelbase cut and reduced complexity of the single cab; it’ll undoubtedly be stripped of equipment too. It won’t though, cheapest F150 on the road is $27k CAN. (and when did they replace the 3.7 with the 3.5? I liked the 3.7 when I had it in the Transit on the weekend).

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          I’m hoping for a stripper 23K WT version, too, with a humble black plastic snout vice the watch-me-pit-&-flake chrome.

          But still… that anime-sized headlight mess…

          Still can’t imagine they’d tool up for these without dreams of fleet conquest, however deluded.

          • 0 avatar
            TonyJZX

            http://www.motortrend.com/news/2017-nissan-titan-single-cab-revealed-regular-xd-configuration/

            your prayers are answered… sort of

            white, steel rims, black trim, ugly

            but I doubt it will hit $23k. The quad cam 5.6 v8 would be quite an expensive motor?

            That red in the Ford-esqe XLT trim looks nice. The black stripper model? Hmmm…

  • avatar
    Hummer

    Windshield has too much slope. Kill it with fire.

  • avatar
    Drzhivago138

    Neat! IMO, the only thing aesthetically wrong with it is that it uses the same doors as the King/crew cabs. Unless you take the Ford route and make the door cutouts straight vertical on all cabs, you “have” to make the regular cab doors unique (see: Dodge 2002+, GM 2007+, Toyota 2007+).

    Any chance we’ll see a King Cab/8′ bed Titan returning? A non-XD crew cab/6.5′ bed seems likely, since the Big 3 all have one.

  • avatar
    wolfman3k5

    It’s ugly as sin!

  • avatar
    geo

    It reminds me of an unhappy cat being bathed.

  • avatar
    RHD

    The fender flare reaching deep into the door is just silly. The over-chromed front end can only be attributed to trying to out-tough the American pickups by making the front even more silvery and shiny.
    If the price is within the economic reality of construction workers, it should sell pretty well, if Nissan can just convince them to walk into a Nissan dealership.

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