By on July 26, 2016

2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT, Image: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars

Just slightly over twenty-nine months since taking delivery of my 2014 Accord V6 Coupe 6MT and I’m already out of warranty. That’s not strictly true; there’s still powertrain coverage until the 50,000-mile mark. Certain items, like seatbelts and airbags and catalytic converters, will be replaced on Honda’s time for the rest of this decade, if not longer. But that 3/36,000 bumper-to-bumper honeymoon period of being able to take the car to the dealer for noises and clunks and little broken parts? As my future third wife, Este, would say — those days are gone.

The odometer ticked over into the (not-really-that) danger(ous) zone during the transit drive back from the AER race at New Jersey Motorsports Park. My current wife, the infamous Danger Girl, took the car to New Jersey so she could learn the track in a street car before taking her stint in Saturday’s endurance race.

That’s right: Mrs. Baruth now has more wheel-to-wheel competition experience than the entire full-time staff at Motor Trend. (Cue the video of Reese Witherspoon saying: “Like, it’s hard?“)

This was her first time driving the Accord in anger, but it was the fifth different track the big Honda’s circled in the past couple of years. In truth, my warranty was probably compromised the minute I showed TTAC readers a picture of the car with numbers on the door. Regardless, the party’s definitely over now, so I decided there was no harm in driving the car down to South Carolina for my son’s golf camp this week and seeing what kind of fuel economy I could wring out of the now thoroughly broken in 3.5-liter V6.

Alright. Let’s cut the cutesy stuff and get right to what, come Festivus time, is known as “the airing of grievances”.

2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT, Image: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars

It was recently alleged by one of our more caustic commenters that I was personally afraid to criticize the Accord’s brakes. That’s not quite true. I’m just not willing to brand them as unfit for normal, everyday use. If you’re “warping the rotors” in your Accord on the street, then you’re almost certainly driving the car well outside the bounds of what’s legal or even sensible to do. My car has an 11.5-inch front disc. That’s slightly under one inch less diameter than you got with an E36 M3, just to put things in perspective. We’re not talking about a Fox-body 5.0 with drum rear brakes.

Still, Honda’s taken some action to address these complaints for 2016, upgrading the four-cylinder Sport and the six-cylinder auto-only Touring to a 12.3-inch front disc. Note that the EX-L V6 coupe did not get the new stoppers. If you really want bigger brakes on your coupe, however, it’s only going to cost you about $400 to swap the calipers. It’s almost certainly a waste of time and money on your part if you’re not regularly going to the track.

If you are tracking your Accord, however … well, it’s still going to be a waste of time and money on your part because nobody, and I mean nobody, makes performance pads for either set of calipers. The stock pads and rotors are strictly a three-lap affair, immediately reaching temperatures high enough to boil Motul 600 fluid. As a track car, every Accord ever made is seriously under-braked and this one is no different. The nice people at Carbotech can do performance pads for you, but it takes a few months and, as of now, I’m still waiting for them to get back to me with an exact delivery date. Another alternative: spend $3,500 on a set of Brembo GT calipers and rotors. The cheapest way to handle it: learn to bleed your brakes in-between sessions and manage your brake temperature. Doing so will also save you the cost of upgrading to the 19-inch wheels you’ll need to clear the Brembo calipers.

2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT, Image: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars

Speaking of wheels: The B&B were absolutely merciless when it came to the “Sport Edition” winter wheels that I put on the Accord last year. So for this summer I thought I’d try something a bit more upscale. I bought the O.Z. Racing Omnia, an entry-level, made-in-Italy wheel that gives up a little style (and about a pound of weight savings) to its Ultraleggera and Superleggera brethren in exchange for a significant price break. The tires are the Cooper Zeon RS-3 G1 all-seasons, which are on loan from Cooper. Expect a review on these tires, and how they survived a few sessions at NJMP’s “bowl” final turn, in the near future.

After a few years working at and around the Honda company town of Marysville, Ohio, I’ve concluded that there are two things that American Honda is absolutely unable to do:

  1. Provide a decent employee meal in the executive/office-worker building;
  2. Paint a car.

The sheer havoc wreaked on my Accord’s nose by the past 37,000 miles hasn’t done anything to change my opinion. I once owned a Mercedes-Benz with 247,000 miles and no repaint history that had fewer chips down to the primer. If you’re wondering how Honda provides this much car for the same price as a Malibu Premier, running your fingers along the leading edge of my car’s hood will help you come up with at least a partial answer to that question.

Also less than outstanding: the plasticky perforated leather of the front seats. No amount of conscientious cleaning or constant conditioning can prevent the surfaces from creasing and fading. I suppose it’s all part of the master plan to get you to buy a four-cylinder Acura TLX instead. I pride myself on my ability to keep an automotive interiors looking new, having lease-returned everything from a Range Rover 4.0S to a B5 Volkswagen Passat without so much as a shiny spot on the armrests, but the Accord’s innate cheapness has already triumphed over my best efforts.

2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT, Image: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars

So those are my complaints, in no particular order. Weighed against the Honda’s unquestionable merits, they don’t amount to much. Over the course of 700 miles between Ohio and South Carolina, the Accord returned 32.3 miles per gallon running at 80 miles per hour on the flat freeways north of Charlotte, and even managed to show 28.2 mpg averaging close to 90 mph on the hills and curves of the West Virginia Turnpike. The engine remains a standard by which every passenger-car mill short of a Coyote 5.0 can be measured. The interior is supremely comfortable, even over long trips. The ergonomics are impeccable. Most importantly — or perhaps least importantly, depending on your temperament — the big coupe is effortlessly fast enough to outpace all but the most outrageous SUVs and luxury sedans, giving the Accord V6 driver full command of his own traffic situation.

It’s a car that I would buy again without hesitation. As the B&B know, I’ve toyed with the idea of trading this one in for a brand-new one, particularly since Honda is about to discontinue the V6 and/or the manual transmission, which leads me to perhaps the most impressive aspect of the Accord V6: resale value. When I bought the car in early February of 2014, I only put tax and title down, and I financed the balance over 60 months. At the moment, I owe $15,600 or thereabouts on that loan. Kelley Blue Book thinks the Private Party value is $19,346, but I’m thinking I could do a little better than that; manual-transmission Hondas always fetch good money if you’re patient. Needless to say, I’ve never had this kind of equity in any new German or British car at this point in the purchase cycle. It’s enough to make you slowly, grudgingly understand why people won’t consider anything but a Honda.

2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT, Image: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars

Far from perfect, the ninth-generation Accord nevertheless represents a significant improvement over its bloated, anodyne predecessor. It also represents a return, however brief, to the fundamental values that made Honda the darling of the smart set 35 years ago. The warranty sucks, the paint is thin, the leather is embarrassingly bad. So what. It’s a great car, and I continue to recommend it to all of you.

[Images: © 2016 Jack Baruth/The Truth About Cars]

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126 Comments on “2014 Honda Accord V6 Coupe 6MT Long-Term Test: 37,000 Miles and Counting...”


  • avatar
    FreedMike

    “If you’re wondering how Honda provides this much car for the same price as a Malibu Premier, running your fingers along the leading edge of my car’s hood will help you come up with at least a partial answer to that question.”

    This.

    I have two neighbors who have Accords of a similar vintage, and the paint on both is a mess. On one of them, the clearcoat is peeling off.

    I do love the way the door slam sounds on Accords, though.

    And those wheels look sweet.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Stone chips in road salt regions of Ohio lead to rust. I invested $100+ for a big sheet of 3M clear bra on the Verano 2.0T 6MT and it was still on when it tried it in last month.

      The Honda incredibility of it’s resale is poor or you are looking through rose colored glasses. My Verano Premium MSRP is within the Accord Coupe V6 by about one thousand dillars, used they are similarly near one thousand dollars. Consider that there is around $3000 in discounts on the Verano at purchase time or even better Buick’s 20% event, the Honda doesn’t hold it’s value and cost too much.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        You’re smoking your breakfast if you think a used Verano of any kind will pull twenty grand used. They barely pull 20 grand new.

        • 0 avatar
          Maymar

          You forget the added value of Trifecta Tune (although the cost of the security detail you’ll need for protection from the same guys that covered up the 100mpg carburetor will negate that).

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Tip your rose color glasses for a minute.

          Kbb has your Accord at a high $18K private sale. Verano is within a thousand. Same goes for trade in.

          You know if you are buying new the tax savings on the used selling price and new car price is taxed only on the difference?

          If your ego too big, I’ve seen “Honda” tattoos in Lancaster, Ohio, on Civic driving-type-must be the water, ask Bark M. to explain the numbers.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Lollll, Verano pricing.

      • 0 avatar
        JuniperBug

        A quick look at used cars in Montreal, Canada – a market which is more expensive than anywhere I know of in the US – yields the most expensive Verano I saw as a 2014 model with just over 4,000 miles (no typo), sold by a dealer for just under CAD 18,000 – about USD 14,000.

        It must be a weird feeling to be known by the entire commentariat of a website for making outlandish claims.

      • 0 avatar

        There are not a lot of either in manual out there but this is what the most recent wholesale auction data shows:

        2014 Accord Coupe EX-L 6MT
        07/14/16 $18,750 39,085 Avg RED

        2014 Accord Coupe EX-L Auto
        07/15/16 $21,100 34,103 Above WHITE
        07/22/16 $20,250 13,039 Above RED
        06/29/16 $19,400 34,887 Avg WHITE
        07/15/16 $19,000 17,757 Avg RED

        2014 Buick Verano Premium 6MT
        05/05/16 $16,000 8,237 Avg BLACK
        06/08/16 $17,900 4,450 Above RED

        2014 Buick Verano Premium Auto
        07/20/16 $16,500 11,071 Avg BLACK
        06/15/16 $16,100 20,890 Avg BLACK
        05/10/16 $15,900 21,469 Avg WHITE

        So an above average Verano with 4k miles wholesales for about $850 less than an average Accord coupe with 39k miles. Looking at the autos that have similar mileage and condition, the gap grows to $3000 or more

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Maybe some glasses aren’t rose-tinted, but rather dusted in white powder.

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          I like how T28CL and TTAC staff quote auction and dealer prices like the whole commentary area has access to them.

          I use kbb as evey can see same/similar numbers. Remeber the Verano can be had for less than the Accord with GM’s incentives. No license required.

          • 0 avatar
            sportyaccordy

            We can use KBB too. KBB indicates a $3K retail price differential between an Accord EX-L coupe and a Verano Premium from 2014. Top spec 2014 Verano will fetch no more than $19K by KBB’s optimistic pricing. And those are both 4 banger prices… the V6-6 is even more expensive.

            http://www.kbb.com/compare-cars/overview/2014-honda-accord-392675-vs-2014-buick-verano-391443/

            You don’t have to do this.

          • 0 avatar
            JuniperBug

            I would think that they post that data precisely because others don’t have access to them. Thanks to them, now we do.

            Sorry that the data don’t support your dreams.

          • 0 avatar
            chrishs2000

            I think the better question is: Who the hell actually wants a Verano?

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Verano Premium for $31,000 could be had for 24,800, or 20% off. So $6,000 in savings on Verano minus your highest reference of $3,000 better the Accord was is $3,000 profit to the Verano….plus inyerst for 3,years.

            An Accord sedan with auto might prove me wrong.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            So my question to Jack B., what is so impressive about Accord Coupe residuals?

  • avatar
    PeriSoft

    Jack – we’re running Chump right now but we’ve been looking at AER for next season. What’s your experience with them? Is it worth running a slower car like a Miata in AER given that the faster hardware could be a lot faster in that series than in Chump, where the closing velocities experienced by a 1.6 Miata are already somewhat alarming?

  • avatar
    Morea

    Is this one of those Honda V6 engines with the excessive oil consumption? Many of those seem to require rebuilds before they reach 100,000 miles. Good luck!

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      So far it hasn’t used any oil. The future’s uncertain and the end is always near.

    • 0 avatar
      mtmmo

      Doesn’t sound as bad as my sister’s experience with 2010 and 2013 Audi A4’s. Despite both being purchased new they burned through a quart of oil every 500/600 miles. Audi settled out of court on both cars after my sister’s husband, who is an attorney, sued them. From what I recall in both cases the piston rings weren’t manufactured properly. My sister loved both A4’s but has since gone Lexus.
      I wonder how many oil consumption cases Honda has had and how they handled them. From what my brother-in-law said Audi of America is completely tone deaf until you have leverage on them.

  • avatar
    Fordson

    ” My car has an 11.5-inch front disc. That’s slightly under one inch less diameter than you got with an E36 M3, just to put things in perspective.”

    My 2003 SVT Focus, which weighs around 600 pounds less and has over 100 fewer hp than this Accord, has 11.8-inch front discs, just to put things in perspective.

    Those are very nice-looking wheels…but they do make the rotors look even smaller than they are.

  • avatar
    PRNDLOL

    With all the incremental advances that come with each iteration of the Accord I’d still rather own a last-of-the-mohicans 1993 Accord EX-R. With all the refinements over the years came girth and gristle, in place of what made a Honda so desirable in the first place.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I really liked the circa 06 Accord, with the triangle LED tail lamps. Looked sharp in V6 trims.

      http://playswithcars.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/accordv6manual.jpg

      Nice wheels and nice door handles as well.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Safety, space, corrosion protection, an engine that isnt gutless, and extra refinement came with that “girth” too.

      Want a smaller Honda? Get the latest Civic.

  • avatar
    SCE to AUX

    Those wheels *are* better than the same 5-spoke wheels Honda has put on every car they’ve made in the last 15 years.

    Despite my once-and-out bad experience with Honda, I concur on the sweet engine.

    Oh, and I missed the part where Danger Girl became Mrs. Baruth. If that’s news, then congratulations!

  • avatar
    LeMansteve

    My memories of Honda paint jobs begin and end with Milano Red. Actually, it should be called Milano Pink. 93 del Sol and 04 TSX. It looked red for a few years, until the sun slowly turned it to pink. On our TSX, hood chips and a finely-sandblasted appearance were common.

    Unforgivable.

    • 0 avatar
      Madroc

      LOL. I had a 2006 TSX in Milano Pink. When I bought it CPO with 50k miles or so, it was still red, but the front end already had enough salt-and-pepper specks of visible primer that I gave up trying to touch them all up. It was good and pink by 100K miles. Fantastic car otherwise, but that paint definitely took the allure out of having a red car.

  • avatar
    seth1065

    Regarding the TLX does that price jump get you better , brakes, paint and leather ? The Accord touring w a 6 Cyl or the TLX is on my list for a TDI replacement.

    • 0 avatar
      CaptainJon

      “I suppose it’s all part of the master plan to get you to buy a four-cylinder Acura TLX instead.” These are exactly the two cars my wife’s last car buying choices came down to. We ended up with the TLX, 4 cyl with DCT. No regrets. It’s a wonderful car that gets pretty excellent mileage. With the tech package, you do end up with nicer leather. I’m unable to comment on the difference in paint quality. Brakes have never been an issue for either of us, and I enjoy throwing the car around in the hills east of us, but would never track it. (Stock tires on the TLX are awful.) It’s by no means a sports car, but Hondas will always be fun to wring out, and the DCT and paddles are a decent means to do that.

      In the end, the wife wanted a four door. That’s really what ended up swaying the decision purchase.

  • avatar
    TrailerTrash

    “the plasticky perforated leather of the front seats. No amount of conscientious cleaning or constant conditioning can prevent the surfaces from creasing and fading. ”

    I have the very same issue with my 09 mazda6 s.
    The seats are rock. plastic hard. No amount of even the finest cleaners and conditioners stop the fade or wear and tearing. I had to replace the entire driver side from just a complete wear and separation at the seams.

    Ditto for the paint. I didn’t know anybody sprayed on a thinner paint or more fake clearcoat. Even a hint of pine tar or the head on collision with a butterfly removes both.

    I think this is an issue with all cars today. They are forced to fill the cars with the highest tech and in the case of Mazda, even a real pure fun driving machine. To do this…some things have to give. In the Mazdas, material quality is one.

    At least both the Honda and 09 Mazda6 have wonderful and powerful V6s in them.

    Paint, leather quality and again in Mazas…the quality and sound of the doors. All my Mazdas sound like they are empty doors.

    • 0 avatar
      PeriSoft

      My ’15 Sonata has 36k on the clock, and while the leather was always non-great quality (what do you want for ~21k?) the paint seems to be holding up pretty well. I was disappointed when during a recent deep-clean I noticed two tiny clearcoat chips on the front clip; I didn’t realize other people had it worse!

    • 0 avatar
      tonycd

      It’s worth mentioning what cheap automotive leather is. It’s the inner layers of the skin, which means it wouldn’t even have a surface that looks like our idea of “leather upholstery” unless they finished it in some elaborate way. Which they do, basically topping it with a thin coating of plastic to make it impervious to American families’ spills and chronic leather non-maintenance. On the downside, that also means traditional leather products do nothing to help it, sitting futilely atop the plastic.

      This plastic protective layer is pretty standard on most Japanese and American leather-seat models, though not most European ones.

      I remember seeing a picture of the leather upholstery on a 2G TL literally melting under the Texas sun. If you didn’t know the above information, you’d think that’s a pretty unusual cow.

      • 0 avatar
        TrailerTrash

        this is depressing news to a guy that rubbed in conditioner for 4 years….

        Almost worse news than when my guru told me my life was meaningless.

        Are all my truths also illusions??????.

  • avatar
    87 Morgan

    Glad that you still are enjoying your coupe. I traded with a guy on CL my 100k odo 07′ coupe MT for a 40k odo 11′ sedan MT. The dude was in a pickle, needed some cash and a car.
    I kept the four door for 1 tank of gas. Worst front seats I have ever sat in, loud driving conditions, and slow. I was amazed the difference in driving dynamics between the coupe and four door. Never again. The best news was I put the sedan on CL Saturday am at 8 and it was gone by 11 with a little profit. I was bummed, I didn’t even get to email with the guy working on the oil rig who wanted my account information so he could wire me some cash.

  • avatar
    Driver8

    Nothing between stock and $Brembo$? Are any of the multi-piston Acura parts interchangeable? Wilwood perhaps?

    • 0 avatar
      cammark

      I do believe 3rd gen (’07-’08) TL type-S front brakes would go on without much trouble. They are factory equipment Brembos with 12.2″ rotors and 4-piston calipers. Question is are they better enough?

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        It’s really more a question of offsets. The calipers on most of these hondas have the same bolt spacing on the knuckle, but almost all of them use a wild variety of offset on the rotor, limiting interchangeability. Not to mention the caliper location fore/aft of the wheel has to be identical from the donor to recipient car due to asymmetric piston layouts and bleeder location when you move to a fixed caliper

        I know from my RSX days that there were folks who cobbled together an OE big brake kit from various sources. The Type-R brembos require axles, rotors, calipers, hub and a JDM front sway. On a budget you can mix the calipers with S2000 rotors, spacers behind the rotor, and extended wheel studs. Swapping in the TL brembos was a no-go because of caliper placement.

        There is way too much potential trial and error in a OE swap on Hondas, they’re not lego cars like Subarus are.

        For $1500, most cars have a stoptech application though. Jack should look into that.

        • 0 avatar
          Jack Baruth

          Based on the experience I just had with Stoptech rotors on my race car… haha fuck no. :)

          • 0 avatar
            duffman13

            Did they crack? I’ve been using Centric blanks forever without much issue except for pad deposits, and that has more to do with my insistence on a dual-duty pad than anything else. I’ve always found Stoptech BBKs to be fairly well regarded within track communities, unless you’re going a different more one-off direction like AP Racing, Performance Friction, or Racing Brake.

      • 0 avatar

        The pre-2013 Accords could get the TL-S Brembos if they swap to a TL-S knuckle but the 2013+ Accords have a completely different knuckle design.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Regarding paint- I got in at the 11th hour for a full repaint of my 09 Civic. Clearcoat along the whole top of the car was done, hood/roof/trunk. Got it done along with some body work from an accident.

    Regarding brakes- unless things have changed, Honda has used the same caliper bracket bolt pattern from the 90s. I know because there are kits that let you use NSX calipers on everything down to a Fit. Cheapest bang for the buck move for you will probably be to move up to TSX brakes, but for a little more you can get the 4 piston calipers from an 05-12 RL. Fastbrakes sells kits:

    http://www.fastbrakes.com/product_p/accord-rl-12.6.htm

    I’m almost certain brake balance won’t be an issue thanks to Honda’s EBD. Your rotors are the same size as those in a little Civic Si, which is 500lb lighter and which folks feel the need to upgrade….. so yea I would definitely look into some upgrades

    • 0 avatar
      carrya1911

      Wow. I always thought there were ample opportunities for upgrades for Honda brakes, but I didn’t know it was that straightforward. If I understand correctly, buying that kit and Accura RL calipers is all one really needs to significantly upgrade the brakes on this generation Accord?

      • 0 avatar
        sportyaccordy

        Yes, in a stroke of genius Honda has kept the caliper bracket bolt pattern and bracket to rotor spacing the same I think across the whole lineup. So it’s just a matter of plug and play. I will probably give my Civic TSX brakes this winter if the budget allows it.

        The only issue in the past was switching from hub over rotor to rotor over hub, but the idiotic HOR configuration has been dead for decades. Honda makes it easy!

  • avatar
    carrya1911

    When I bought my 2013 Sport sedan I looked really hard at a beautiful red coupe with the V6 and the leather.

    I’ve been sorely tempted to trade my Sport in on a V6 coupe with the manual…but the price is within Mustang GT territory.

    The paint worried me from the getgo, so I put an AVS hood deflector on mine and so far, so good. Admittedly I’m easy on the car (I’ve never tracked it, for instance) but no chips or major paint damage on the front end yet. Knock on wood.

    I’m mystified by brake rotor complaints myself. I’ve been known to drive with some enthusiasm around the twisties in the mountains, but so far my brakes are still pretty much like new with 30K on the clock.

    I’m also impressed by the mileage you’re getting. On the highway doing 80 I generally average 36-37 MPG without the AC running. I figured the V6 would be farther off from my numbers.

    If I remember correctly, there are a couple of really good aftermarket leather replacement covers for this generation Accord for not a whole lot of money. Might be worth looking into.

    • 0 avatar
      duffman13

      A simple pad upgrade to Stoptech Sport or Hawk HP+ will cure most people of complaints about the brake system. I’ve been running the Sports on my S2000 for HPDEs and am only now feeling the need to upgrade to something more aggressive after a few years of consistent track time. On the street though? I’ve never been able to fade them.

      • 0 avatar
        JuniperBug

        Granted, it’s a lightweight car with little power, but I’ve been unable to fade my Miata’s stock calipers on Stoptech Sports during 20 minute lapping sessions. A faster driver and/or track probably could, but I can’t.

    • 0 avatar
      JMII

      “some enthusiasm” vs the track are two totally different things. As mentioned on the track most stock systems are basically toast after only a few sessions. Honestly almost all brake systems, even those on “performance” models are not really track worthy. However since most people will never see track time the factory upgrades are plenty adequate for enthusiastic mountain drives. From Honda’s point of view I’m pretty sure the Accord Coupe (even in “sport” trim with 6MT) has about a 0.5% chance of seeing track time.

      • 0 avatar
        duffman13

        JMII,

        I remember that the Z (not sure if 350 or 370) was one of the biggest offenders on this, even with the Brembos. The factory pads, and even the Nismo pads just weren’t up to the task per an old C&D article.

        What are you running, if you don’t mind me asking?

        I’m moving to the Hawk Street-Race (a new modified DTC-30 compound they just came out with) for my next track day since I’m roasting the Stoptech Sports now that I’m used to my Rivals.

        • 0 avatar
          JimZ

          I remember reading that issue. they were pretty torqued that even the NISMO brakes evaporated so quickly, and that the folks they reported it to at Nissan didn’t even seem surprised.

      • 0 avatar
        carrya1911

        Of course…but have the majority of complaints about warping really come from people tracking their cars?

        I wouldn’t expect *any* street car south of, say, an entry level Corvette or GT-350 to come with brakes suitable for tracking the car.

        For street duty the brakes seem to be plenty adequate for even enthusiastic mountain twisty driving if the driver approaches the task with a reasonable level of intelligence. If one is following someone too close or picking up massive speed going down hill and trying to stomp all of it off before the next curve I can see riding the brakes until they fatigue. Short of that, though, the brakes should be just fine for a spirited drive.

        As an example, I drove through the mountains of West Virginia to get to Pittsburgh PA just last year using a bunch of back roads. (Specifically to avoid Maryland and their idiotic gun laws) The Accord was untroubled by any of the large number of twisty, down-hilly bits I ventured across during the trip.

        I’m sure driving style accounts for the vast majority of the difference in my experience and complaints from those who have never tracked their cars. In my experience, on most public roads if it’s clear of traffic you can carry most of the momentum you can generate with the motor through most of the turns you will encounter.

        …and if it’s not clear you shouldn’t be driving that fast anyway. =)

        On the track is a completely different situation and I wouldn’t expect a family sedan in this price range to have a brake system capable of withstanding the punishment of lapping a race track as fast as possible. It would certainly be nice, but I don’t expect it.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      I simply added a VentureShield clear bra to the hood, fenders, rockers, leading-edge of the windshield header, and back bumper. $1200 applied before I took delivery. Cheap insurance.

      (Ironically, I did get a stone strike within a couple millimeters of the top of the film on the hood. Next car, the vendor will do the entire hood for $50 extra.)

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    Good to hear. Our 2012 Accord has been a gem, we’re halfway through a 1700 mile trip around the Pacific Northwest. At 30k I did have to replace the front rotors and chose to replace all 4 pads, mostly due to my driving style on Idaho mountain highways. The leather is cheap but at 60k miles, it’s held up fine with 2 kids and occasionally the dog (she goes on the floor).

    Haven’t had issues with paint, but I agree it’s not the highest quality. Once a year I do a 3-step process using Meguairs (compound, polish, wax) and that seems to help. My 90 Integra (white) had a much better paint.

    Overall my wife enjoys driving it and eschews the need for hauling our 2 kids in an SUV. The 08-12 gets derided for being ugly, it’s not bad and it sure offers a lot of room in what drives like a rather tidy package. I do wish they would have had the Sport back in 2012.

    I just like that it’s paid off, requires little maintenance, is safe and practical for our needs.

  • avatar
    indi500fan

    Good honest evaluation Jack.
    I’m sure the Honda fanboys would tell you the thin paint is part of their engineering strategy to optimize overall weight.

    As for the brakes, given the mission statement for this product, I’d say they are plenty good enough.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      “thin paint is part of their engineering strategy to optimize overall weight.”

      As is the rotors and floor mat that holed under gas pedal in less than 20K miles, he failed to mention.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        We can go toe-to-toe on the quality of a Korean “Buick” versus the Honda Accord all day, dude.

        • 0 avatar
          davefromcalgary

          Jack, if you want to have a RATIONAL conversation about Buick, see two comments down.

          NOTE: I wish I had bought an Accord Sport. :-/ Live and learn.

          • 0 avatar
            Jack Baruth

            The funny thing is that I really dig the six-speed Veranos and I think that building them was exactly the kind of thing that GM needs to do to regain credibility with enthusiasts. Shame they couldn’t stick to their guns on it.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Or you know, build a reliable one.

            Straight up, if the car had been reliable, my mostly positive “mini review” below would be the same. 6 speed Veranos are pretty cool cars, MINE is just a turd.

            If it had been reliable, I would have bought it out after the lease, and sourced an LSD for it, then installed a hitch and bike rack.

  • avatar
    JimZ

    I saw a new (as in still had the Monroney on it) ’16 Civic, and I was rather surprised at how poor the body fits were.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Just for fun, since I was looking at this car and the Verano (and ignoring my particular raft of issues). It currently has 42000 miles (67500 kms).

    The 2.0T is strong, but laggy. Not as commanding as the 3.5 V6. It oddly gets 36 mpg through the Rockies but drops down to 30 cruising at 120 kph across the prairies. Aero? And I’m in the mid 20s around town. 6 speed stick action is acceptable feeling. Honda was much better from my test drive. Brakes are very strong for every day usage, front rotors are >12″ (the exact spec escapes me atm). I’ve never tracked the car, and feel it would be a disaster. The Verano is a very heavy and rolly polly vehicle in turns. It grips and turns in the twisty mountain roads but the feelings it generates going around turns do NOT produce confidence, it feels like “its gripping but its going to roll over!”.

    Its beast feature is comfort. Great thrones for long hauls, quiet, Intellilink actually works great, strong AC, (though the auto climate control is run by a crackhead of a logic circuit). In comfort, both cars seem well matched. The surface materials are holding up much better so far than I would have guessed at first. The driver seat is creaky though under my clutch leg, because the base of the seat is a plastic wrap around that rubs on the leather. Poor design. Also, I will say the headlights are only adequate and the center opening wipers always seem to chatter and wipe poorly.

    The Verano actually has a pretty useful trunk and back seat, especially when we put the back seat down and load up for camping. The biggest issue I have is the rear door openings are not very great. The back seat is comfy but tall and/or broad folks don’t enjoy clambering in.

    The paint on the Buick is beautiful, in metallic blue. Still very deep and nice to look at. I have the 3M, so the front end paint is still in great shape. The 18 inch rims look awesome, but they are very prone to damage in the way of scuffs and gouges. I’ve never curbed them, but gravel roads wreak havoc. My 16″ winters are much more durable and better riding, but make the car look pretty vanilla. I’ve never tracked it so no comment.

    • 0 avatar
      NormSV650

      Dave, you need a ecu tune to really experience direct injection and turbo-4 torque in the Ecotec. We have no plans to Canada, maybe Niagara Falls, so if you’re stateside I’d be more than happy to give you a ecu tune via HPTuners.

      The Verano 2.0T has been gone a few months now but you can be assured the newly acquired 2013 ATS 2.0T AWD is not stock.

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        This car absolutely depends on the extended warranty it has, otherwise it would probably brick in short order, considering how many electrical issues it has/had. Its been running lately, but it needs to go in because the parking sensors randomly don’t function, its given me “service keyless start” warnings, and various other intermittent WTF messages on the driver info center. It hesitates, seems down on power, and carbons up the exhaust tips very quickly. Its on its second ECU, second transmission, third flywheel, I’m pretty convinced the release bearing is F’d (which I’m pretty sure is the grinding noise I complained about since day 1). Also, its developed an odd clunk when maneuvering at parking speed. And some of the wheel well shields have started to disintegrate, though I rarely travel on gravel.

        And your answer is an ECU tune that will void the warranty? Your advice is to put more power through an already questionable and compromised drive train?

        • 0 avatar
          NormSV650

          Most of it’s 32,000 life it was Trifecta tuned. With anywhere from 340 lb-ft on 92-93 octane to a scalding 400+ lb-ft on E85, the clutch assembly and trans never missed a best. That included a few 150+ mph runs and brakes to match.

          Keep me in mind when your warranty is up. :)

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Brother, I am getting rid of this heap of hot trash WELL before the warranty is up if I can, or the lease is up at the end of the warranty if I can’t, and then it is GM Canada’s problem.

            You need to stop glossing over the fact that MY Verano is the biggest yellow-est lemon that ever put 4 wheels on Calgary’s roads. I don’t care how great yours was. Its just not relevant to my situation. Stock, my car is falling apart. Warranty voiding extra power is just a stupid suggestion.

            Also it sure is interesting to me that you seem to get rid of these cars that you boost the life out of rather quickly. Keep one for 12 years and 180,000 kms on that boost level and then lets talk.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            Marriage to a non-shifter and opportunity to add AWD. Besides the driving dynamics are night day difference. I only miss the surreal quietness born the Verano.

    • 0 avatar
      ajla

      The Charger hasn’t broken for the past two months!!! My remote start even works now!!

      Well, I guess the keyless start still fails to work like three times a week, but still, improvement!

      • 0 avatar
        davefromcalgary

        Oh lord, you are the reason that I am pretty sure that I am absolutely bat crap crazy for thinking about RAM trucks.

        Lets form a lemon support group. Meet at the nearest bar?

        • 0 avatar
          ajla

          FWIW, my problems have pretty much been electrical and body-integrity related.

          If you get a RAM without all the bells and whistles you’ll probably survive.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            Hmmm.. do you consider the 3.0 diesel V6 and air ride bells and whistles?

            Yeah, I want a high end one. Im screwed.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            https://memegenerator.net/instance/69678320

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            “do you consider the 3.0 diesel V6 and air ride bells and whistles”

            Yes. LOL

            Dave, just buy a nice Tundra DoubleCab 5.7 with the basic TRD package (non-Pro) and enjoy troublefree motoring for once!

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Did you see the story where the man actually drove his 07 Tundra 5.7 to the END of the digital odometer at 1,000,000? Toyota bought it back to study and dissect, and gave him a new Tundra.

            He didn’t like the cup holder.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            No can do. Can’t bear to look at one every day.

            I just dont like the Tundra. I like the 7/8 of a half ton first gen (except the eye scalding stepside version) but I just dont like it. Personal opinion, not slagging on Toyota or Toyota fans at all.

            The Tacoma is the Toyota I would want, but I wouldn’t want to tow a 5k lbs trailer through the Rockies with one. We don’t have the trailer yet but e know what we want, we have an idea on the timing, and I don’t want to be buying multiple vehicles.

            Edited just to foster the discussion. As enthusiasts, it acceptable in my mind to ignore a competitor that has a proven track record for quality to either obtain a special vehicle (look how many people love GTIs despite VW track record) or a car that just makes you want to look back at it when you walk away in the parking lot. I think RAM trucks look great. I am super meh on the Tundra. But I have no doubt that all else being equal, in moderate half ton usage, the Tundra would last longer. But thats a downside because you can’t then justify getting rid of the ugly goat!

            And this is the downside of being an enthusiast. I know what makes me happy and sadly I know that its a gamble. Same deal as Verano VS Accord.

          • 0 avatar
            ajla

            I don’t really like trucks, but if I was getting one for some reason I’d lean towards GM.

            Probably a 6.0L 2500 because that is the last of GM’s pushrod iron-block anvil V8s. Second would be a low or mid-level 5.3L 1500. I’d be into a 6.2L but wouldn’t want the required fancy trim.

          • 0 avatar
            davefromcalgary

            http://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.html?requestSource=b&adId=1181277444

            This is drool worthy to me. That price though, yeesh, even after some depreciation, still crazy.

  • avatar
    TEXN3

    I couldn’t edit my post but I wanted to add three observations from this current trip, and many others; the road noise on certain surfaces is really wearing but the oem Michelins have reached near end of their life (I’ll replace next spring when the snow tires come off), the seats are not fatiguing or painful after several hours, and the visibility is way better than any other midsize I’ve recently rented.

    • 0 avatar
      baggins

      Texn3

      I have a 2011 accord and I have the exact same experience as you. Seats are fine, visibility and head room are great. Leather holding up ok too.

      But road noise is horrific. Before I replaced my stock Dunlops at 35K miles (still had some tread life), it was intolerable. The last 1-2 years of those tires life, I took to using earplugs.

      I installed some Bridgestone Turanza Serenity Plus touring tires and this helped A LOT. But its still far too noisy. My SE model has no sound insulation on the hood or trunk. Just bare metal. Guessing sound insulation is pretty thin elsewhere too. I dont mind the engine sound, HOnda 4 cyl is smooth as a 4 can be. But the road noise….

  • avatar
    Land Ark

    I have loved Accord coupes since the 80s. I find myself wanting a 6 cylinder example fairly constantly.

    I sat in a new one recently and was immediately repulsed by the quality and texture of the door pulls. It is GM-at-its-worst levels of cheap plastic. On par with those plastic easter eggs YouTubers have been so fascinated with opening the last couple years. As probably the second most common touch point on the car, I couldn’t believe how awful it felt to the touch.

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    The brakes on my 2016 vw sportwagen are great….never an issue with them. It weighs 3050 lbs and has 11.3″ rotors. The honda weighs 3400 and has 11.5″ rotors. The rotors on my sisters accord regularly warp. She doesnt drive fast and in fact she is one of those annoying left lane bandits. I drive hard whenever I can. Why hers warp and mine dont…who knows.

    • 0 avatar
      brettc

      I drive my 2012 Sportwagen hard as well. In 51000 miles, no problems with the brakes. The rear pads are getting thin but that’s it. VW does equip their cars with decent brakes.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      The warping of the rotors is likely a function of the quality of the metal, not the size of the disc. I had a ’92 Taurus SHO (bought new). After a couple of trips through the mountains of W. Virginia, the rotors were pretty warped. There was a “SHO Shop” in metro DC that sold German aftermarket rotors for the car. They were the same size as stock; but they didn’t warp. Better quality metal. Also — and this, I believe, is still BMW’s philosophy — “turning” warped rotors to straighten them out just makes increases their propensity to warp. Turning removes metal from the rotor, which reduces the size of the heat sink, meaning they got hotter more often. Better to bite the bullet and replace them — which is what BMW specifies for rotors that are out of spec.

  • avatar
    suspekt

    Jack,
    My current car “fleet” consists of the following 2 motors/cars. These 2 cars have brought me more joy then I can put in words.

    #1. J37A4
    Acura TL SH-AWD
    Running full K Tuner software tune (http://ktuner.com/0914tl/) in conjunction with an RV6 PCD and Comptech induction system.

    Just an absolute sweetheart motor especially now that it breathes unrestricted. So much mid range torque on the J37 with a top end surge that never gets old.

    And that torque vectoring differential is the real deal. The ability to rotate (and slide) the rear end around is such a pleasure

    #2. LS1
    Bought a 2000 Corvette C5 FRC. Only 18,000 miles!!!!! Just an absolute treat.

    You wrote about it in an R&T issue.

    The car is just a pleasure to wring out.

    2 great motors. 2 great drivers cars.
    1 very very happy guy.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      Great to hear!

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Agreed! I just wish our cars weighed about 300lbs less…it’s a lot of mass to carry around, even though the SH-AWD is able to hide so much of it and can flat out pull off some magic tricks when you know how to drive it. The performance in snow is absolutely incredible, controlled drifting of a gigantic sedan must terrify bystanders. 132k on my 2011 6MT and I still have yet to repair or replace anything besides fluids, tires, brakes and the 105k mile tuneup items. Never seen a single dashboard light. She drinks quite a bit of oil, but not nearly as much as an F20C. My most reliable Honda/Acura product yet.

      Is yours also a 6MT? It’s a very rare vehicle that almost no one knows about…..selling it will be an interesting experience.

  • avatar
    yamahog

    I’m the ‘fleet manager’ for two Honda Ridgelines and I can tell you that their engines (3.5 V6s, detuned, with serious bottom ends) didn’t full break in until about 70k-85k miles. The 2006 used to struggle to break 19 mpg, but now that we’re running Toyota Genuine 0w20 and good gas, it never gets below 20 mpg even though it now has 140k miles on it. And we haven’t even opened the valve cover. Just oil changes and a timing belt. And a power steering pump.

  • avatar
    WestoverAndOver

    Este? Alana FTW. Cool car, bro!

  • avatar
    whynotaztec

    These Honda paint issues have been going on since at least the 1998 models – clear coat peel on top surfaces, pretty heavy checking in some cases, especially on the darker colors. I have personally seen it as late as a 2006 model, that is inexcusable.

    Having said that my 12 Accord SE is at 75k with zero issues. Did the brakes finally at 60k when the oem tires gave up. Of course there is road noise, but on the plus side – interior room, mileage, and no infotainment or electronic nannies – reminds me of my 71 lesabre.

  • avatar

    While I generally like Honda’s cars, it would appear I have bought my last new one. I decided to purchase a brand new Civic EX a couple of years ago. Six weeks into having it the computer that controls the transmission messed up while I was vacationing in the mountains of Tennessee. The local dealer fixed it and that was the end of it-until a couple hundred miles before the warranty ran out. All of the sudden it happens again, not once, not twice but four times within a month! The last time it left me stranded in Ohio (I live in Michigan) at this point I was fed up and called Honda to complain and look for some kind of compensation or some such, they would do nothing to help me. I contacted my selling dealer and told them I wanted them to buy the car from me, they appraised it, offered me a very low amount (apparently Honda resale values crashed this summer), but I just wanted it gone! The dealer told me to come back in a couple of days and they would cut me a check. I showed up, title in hand, and they flat refused to buy it, said it was defective, and they didn’t know what was wrong with it, even though they are the ones that had been working on it!

    It’s a shame, the rest of the car is quite nice, but I’m trading it in on a new VW sometime this week…

    • 0 avatar
      chrishs2000

      Is this bizarro world, or was your story really about a VW and you’re trading it in for a Honda?

      In all seriousness, that sounds 100% like a dealership issue. I’ve had much more expensive parts than the transmission computer replaced well out of warranty for free. Which dealer was it? I would email all documentation from the dealer to Honda and tell them the whole story.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        His Honda dealer has given him a taste of the BDSM lifestyle, and now he’s really ready to invest.

      • 0 avatar

        Fischer Honda, Ypsilanti, MI. I contacted Honda several times, had all documentation ready, flat out told me there was nothing they could do for me. The dealer knew the car had problems, as they worked on it, and I told the used car manager.

        I’m still try to figure out how an extremely well kept three year old Honda is apparently worth less than half its original price.

        You read correct, I am purchasing a VW. I’ve had American and Japanese cars, I might as well try something European, seeing how none of the others have really went the distance, despite my meticulous care of them…

        • 0 avatar
          chrishs2000

          Ah yes I’ve heard some very negative stories about their service department. Take it to Suburban Honda in Novi, go straight to the service manager there and explain your situation and ask if they can help you…the sales staff there is questionable but the service department is very good and in my experience they will fight for you with AHM. As just one example, I had a rear main seal and clutch replaced for just parts cost on my ’03 Accord V6 6MT when it was almost 2 years out of warranty.

          If that doesn’t work….take it somewhere else. The issue is with this particular dealer not putting any time or effort into your issue, or fighting for you with Honda to get reimbursed for it.

          If you actually have documentation that you’ve had the same unresolved issue since before the warranty expired, Honda will cover it if a dealership goes to bat for you.

          But your situation totally sucks. Hope it works out for you.

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    I really wish this powertrain was available in a sedan. It would be a worthwhile alternative to a BMW for those of us who like sixes but need more space than a coupe offers.

  • avatar
    runs_on_h8raide

    Jack, having owned numerous Hondas with leather interiors…I find a premium leather conditioner applied once a month to the problem areas help alleviate the creasing and delay any cracking that might occur. A good horse-hair brush to clean the leather surfaces and generous application of said premium leather conditioner and you can keep Honda leather looking good for quite some time.

    The problem is, people become lax or neglect it totally with this type of maintaining…and so, their leather invariably will crack and crease and wrinkle more than Hillary Clinton under testimony.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Is the Acura leather of considerably higher quality? Looking at MDX models which are 10 years old or so and have had kids in them and 120k miles, the leather still looks pretty good.

      • 0 avatar
        tonycd

        I don’t know about the MDX, but the higher-end Acura sedans tend to have much better leather than the lower ones. The RL, f’rinstance, is Lexus-grade, while the TL and TSX were more Accord-like (fitting, given that the latter two are produced on Accord assembly lines, and the TSX is sold in Europe as the Accord).

        Sight unseen, my guess is that the MDX’s leather is probably pretty good, and the RDX’s is probably more like the Accords.

      • 0 avatar
        chrishs2000

        Yes, typically. And the TSX does have better leather than the Accord, just not much better. It was not produced in the same plants as the USDM Accord. The 4th gen TL with “milano leather” is really good, I believe the MDX also had the same option. None of it is anywhere near German or Lexus real leather though, except for the RL/RLX, which has fantastic quality in every place that most consumers don’t care about.

  • avatar
    Frylock350

    Is the leather real Jack? If so try a product like Lexol; it will improve the feel.

    • 0 avatar
      Jack Baruth

      I’ve been using it since the day I bought the car.

      Hate to think of how it would be without it.

      • 0 avatar
        chrishs2000

        Jack, try Leatherique products…you’ll never go back to lexol. Just remember to rub the rejuvenator oil in by hand when the seats/interior have been baking in the sun. Unlike Lexol, you won’t need to constantly re-apply…I’ve found that the seats on my TL and my wife’s TSX maintain their conditioned feel for many months.

        https://www.amazon.com/Leatherique-Restoration-Products-16oz-Kit/dp/B0002SPCBW

        http://www.detailedimage.com/Leatherique-M8/Prestine-Clean-P64/16-oz-S1/

        http://www.detailedimage.com/Leatherique-M8/Rejuvenator-Oil-P65/16-oz-S1/

  • avatar
    TAP

    On the cheap leather seats, I believe Italian shops were first to basically liquify the hide, then reconstitute in sheets.

    As to the ’93 accords, chassis stiffness was sorely lacking.
    Loved my ’92 EX tho.

  • avatar
    Eiriksmal

    Herr Baruth, can you give a synopsis on why you prefer the Earth Dreams (is it an Earth Dreams?) Honda over the Nissan VQ? I guess the comparison is harder to make today as there’s no longer a 6MT offered on a VQ of any size. :(

    • 0 avatar
      tjh8402

      doesn’t the 370z still offer a VQ/6MT?

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      That’s incorrect, as the 370Z is currently available with a 6MT.

    • 0 avatar
      Eiriksmal

      Right, sheesh. It used to be on G35s, G37s, 350Zs, 370Zs, Maximas, and Altima coupes and sedans. Now it’s only on the low-volume 370Z.

      There’s never been one strapped to the VQ replacement, the VR. Maybe they’ll eventually hook one up to that, but I’m not holding my breath. I guess the last Nissan V6 6MT I’ll own will be a ~2010 G37.

      • 0 avatar
        Jack Baruth

        The EarthDreams V6 spins eagerly and sounds like a real race engine, even through the Honda passenger-car muffler.

        I can’t say either about the VQ. I dearly want to love the VQ but every time I drive a Z I go away feeling disapponted.

        • 0 avatar
          Carzzi

          The J35’s great even in the newest Pilot. I find myself making excuses (“it’s raining today!”) to drive it to work these days instead of my 2015 Coyote Mustang. Went home at lunch just to swap one for the other. Two of the sweetest modern engines of our time.

  • avatar
    Trucky McTruckface

    I’ve owned my ’14 Sport 6MT a little longer than Jack’s had his and I racked up over 40k miles on it before it got banished to second-tier status in my fleet earlier this year. Of the eight vehicles I’ve owned, I have to say that it is easily the least charming of the lot; I’ve grown to like it even less than my last Honda, a frumpy 7th gen Civic sedan with an automatic and the non-VTEC engine.

    Jack hit on a couple of reasons why I don’t care for this car. Namely, the poor brakes, chintzy interior and truly bad paint quality. I’d also like to say that I just don’t think this car’s driving dynamics are anything special; I actually like how my car drives less than the last two long term rentals I had: an Altima (despite it’s rubber band CVT) and the much-maligned last-gen Malibu. Add to that Honda’s traditionally pathetic infotainment systems maddening approach to feature availability, and you have a pretty unappealing, disappointing and frustrating product.

    The best thing this car had going for it was the styling. It was a departure from the usually hamfisted and often downright hideous designs Honda has become known for over the last 15 years. Unfortunately, Honda seems to have discovered where it misplaced its ugly stick and, based on the spy shots, the next Accord is going to be a ringer for the much-derided Crosstour.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Unfortunately, the bones of the Sport are from the LX base-model Sedan. So no SmartKey, no blinkers on the mirrors, no LaneWatch, and to your point, the crappy base stereo. Just dual-exhaust, big wheels, spoiler, red lighting on the inside.

  • avatar
    SirRaoulDuke

    I’m glad someone else treats the WV Turnpike properly. What a wonderful highway. That MPG figure for that run is great, I have never gotten close to that at those speeds. Granted, my last few trips on it have been with a V8, driven in anger at times.

  • avatar
    drzombie

    In Canada we don’t have that same restriction on the V6 Touring being automatic only. Seems like a random variation between the two countries.

  • avatar
    Chicken Daddy

    Jack,

    I own a 2013 Accord Coupe EX-L V6 6MT with navi. I agree with almost all of your comments. My commuting does not highlight any of the brake system’s weaknesses. I can only assume that your coupe does not have the navigation option. A good call since mine stinks. It is slow, and very inconvenient to use. Fortunately, I did not buy it for the navigation system.

    I am surprised that no one has mentioned the quality of the carpeting (you did speak about the floor mats if I recall correctly). It is by far the worst of any car I have ever owned. However, if money has to be saved, I am glad Honda did not do it in areas that affect how it drives.

    The car rides, shifts and handles well. It truly does not behave like a run of the mill mid size family car. I too would get another one.

  • avatar
    Felix Hoenikker

    I have a 14 L Accord four cyl/CVT bought new. It now has a little over 16K miles. The only work I had done is two oil changes at the dealer.
    I choose the base model because the mid level trim levels had things I didn’t want such as a moon roof and/or navigation or leather seats. All trims come with automatic climate control and an 8 inch screen.
    Also, I could get 65 series tires on 16″ wheels. I dislike low profile tires (anything below 60 series) immensely for daily driving.
    The cloth seats are very comfortable especially after the car has sat in the sun. The cloth does seem thin, but so far it still looks new with no wear spots. However, the floor mats are already showing wear on the drivers side. I’m going to replace them with something more robust. The carpeting also seems on the thin side.
    The AM/FM CD with four speakers is nothing to write home about, but gets the job done. If I make any upgrades, it would be replacing the speakers with better ones.
    Now comes the part that will send some members of the B$B into a Luddite tizzy. The best thing about the four cylinder Accord is the CVT tranny. I never had an automatic on a four cylinder car that I liked before buying the Accord..The Honda CVT is smooth and has absolutely no rubber banding. I had rented other cars with CVTs in the past and was not impressed with their drive-ability aside from their fuel economy. I also cross shopped the Accord against the Altima which wasn’t bad, but not in the same league with the Accord power train. Same with the Mazda 6 six speed auto which had a habit of not being in the correct gear (as judged by me) a good portion of the time. Same for the Ford Fusion with either the turbo or NA 2.5L engines. The NA Fusion was the worst at shifting in stop and go traffic. The Honda CVT really shines here as it always seems to be in the right gear ratio.
    My only concern is the long term durability of the CVT that I won’t know for quite some time as I only put about 5K miles a year on the car now that I’m not commuting anymore.
    I also like the feel of the electric steering on the Accord. So go ahead and flame away.
    Finally, the brakes seem very grabby in an over boosted sense. If I don’t drive the car for a few days, I have to re-acclimate myself to the touchy brakes over the first five times I touch the brake pedal. Nothing else is our fleet has this much brake boost.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      The EX trim has a few more doodads and a sunroof.

      The LX-grade cloth isn’t quite as thick-feeling, but Honda cloth usually wears like iron, so you should have no problems.

      See my reply above regarding the “carpet.”

      And the CVT is as good as any conventional automatic, without the upshifts. 2013 units were a little shaky, but Honda stepped up to the plate and stood behind them.

  • avatar
    igve2shtz

    EBC makes brake pads for the Accord V6 with 11.5″ calipers in Green (street), Red (fast street) and Yellow (race) versions… and also upgraded rotors in 11.5″ diameters.

    Happy trails!


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