By on August 3, 2014

2014 Toyota Camry SE

In the prelude to the introduction of Toyota’s revamped 2015 Camry, the current Camry has been selling at a prodigious rate. July 2014 marked the fifth consecutive month that the Camry has been America’s best-selling car; the tenth such month in the last year.

During these last five months, Toyota has averaged 42,000 Camry sales per month, up 17% compared with the average monthly sales output from the same period one year ago.

Although not the most relevant figure when analyzing passenger car volume, the fight in which the Camry is currently participating doesn’t involve the second-ranked Honda Accord, so clear is its number one status. It has quickly become a foregone conclusion that the Camry will end 2014 as America’s best-selling car: the Accord would need to outsell the Camry by nearly 8400 units per month in each of the calendar’s remaining five months to make up the deficit.

Instead, the Camry is tangling with the Chevrolet Silverado to end 2014 as America’s second-best-selling vehicle line overall. The Camry is currently 20,453 sales back of the Chevy pickup. On a monthly basis, the Camry last outsold the Silverado in May. On a yearly basis, the Camry most recently outsold the Silverado in 2009.

Rank
Auto
July
2014
July
2013
%
Change
7 mos.
2014
7 mos.
2013
%
Change
#1
Toyota Camry
39,868 34,762 14.7% 262,323 242,244 8.3%
#2
Honda Accord
35,073 31,507 11.3% 220,351 218,367 0.9%
#3
Toyota Corolla/Matrix
30,833 23,357 32.0% 205,122 181,982 12.7%
#4
Honda Civic
30,038 32,416 -7.3% 197,135 191,120 3.1%
#5
Nissan Altima
26,654 29,534 -9.8% 203,107 197,321 2.9%
#6
Ford Fusion
23,942 20,522 16.7% 189,440 181,668 4.3%
#7
Hyundai Sonata
22,577 18,903 19.4% 128,924 121,913 5.8%
#8
Hyundai Elantra
22,213 23,958 -7.3% 134,710 150,202 -10.3%
#9
Chevrolet Cruze
20,926 25,447 -17.8% 166,264 159,136 4.5%
#10
Ford Focus
17,724 16,764 5.7% 138,680 151,549 -8.5%

Most assuredly, the Chevrolet Malibu is not the top GM rival for the leading Toyota. The Malibu was America’s 16th-best-selling car in an improved July, but sales are down 5% this year after falling 5% (from 2012’s 210,951-unit peak) in 2013.

Chevrolet’s Cruze, on the other hand, has made its way to the top of the passenger car leaderboard in the relatively recent past, if June 2011, can be called recent. (The Malibu was America’s best-selling car in May 2011.) The Cruze ranked second behind the Camry in June of last year. Cruze volume jumped 3% in 2012, 4% in 2013, and sales had risen 18% through the first five months of 2014. Cruze sales then plunged 21% in June.

The Cruze joined three other members of this top ten list – Civic, Altima, Elantra – in recording year-over-year decreases last month. Of those four cars, only one, the Elantra, has recorded a year-over-year decline through the first seven months of 2014. Cruze sales are up by 7128 units so far this year, but maintaining growth has clearly proven difficult over the last two months, what with stop-sale orders and all.

Four different passenger car nameplates generated more than 30,000 July sales, up from three in July 2013 and zero in July 2012. These figures speak to the  recent growth in the overall passenger car market, which grew 5% in July.

Overall “light truck” volume was up 14%.

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60 Comments on “America’s 10 Best-Selling Cars In July 2014...”


  • avatar

    I’m cheering for the Hyundai Sonata 2015.
    Giving the American public what they need at a price they can afford.

    The interior space is astounding – the interior design is better than CamCordIssan and the 2.0 Turbo drives like a V6.

    • 0 avatar
      wmba

      “Drives like a V6″

      Maybe not. September C/D got 0 to 60 in 8.0 seconds for the new smaller turbo, which has 29 hp less than last year’s model that ran 6.1 seconds. Weight has also ballooned to 3600 lbs.

      Perception versus reality.

      They also dun the K900 which you praise, but really like the new Genesis sedan.

      Sorry if you don’t like the printed mags, but on average, C/D far beats any pure web-based car site for me. I drove the new V6 AWD Chrysler on Thursday for an hour with no salesman, and their review which I read a day later is spot on so far as it goes. I found the transmission unacceptable, the constant droning exhaust far too loud, and the driver’s seat has no upper torso support. It’s a sedate car. The interior is very nice, the V6 great in the first 3 gears if you hammer it. That’s it.

      • 0 avatar

        I am my own C&D. I don’t need them.

        • 0 avatar
          DeadWeight

          I’ve yet to drive the 2015 Sonata , but I think Hyundai is now at a critical juncture that will test if they can maintain high volume sales of the Sonata without heavy incentives, given that Ford is aggressively pricing both sale & lease prices of Fusions, the Honda Accord is already aggressively priced, and Toyota is stacking really steep discounts on LE model Camrys.

          There was a time when Hyundai lept ahead in sales (versus their prior era) based on the fact that they were selling cars that many consumers viewed as 80%-85% there in terms of quality & refinement as compared to Camcords, but at a 20%-25% discount to those same competing cars.

          I remember when a 2009 Sonata GLS could easily be found new for around 16k to 17k.

          Those days are over.

          This will be a telling time for Hyundai in terms of whether it has shed its “nearly there” reputation, especially since a Fusion, Accord and Camry can all be had for LESS (in some instances, $3,000 less) than what Hyundai Dealers thus far appear to be asking for the 2015 Slants.

          I’ve noticed Toyota getting extremely aggressive on low to mid trim Camry pricing.

      • 0 avatar
        JCraig

        I don’t trust anything C/D puts out. That being said, Hyundai has been tweaking their engines for 2015 and beyond to abandon the spec sheet wars and give more usable power. The 2014 turbo had more HP and was faster to 60, but it didn’t feel as fast as the lower spec 2015 turbo. It’s all about where you get the power. Most people are not going to flat out 0-60 ever, so the newer model is effectively faster than the old one in the majority of driving situations.

        Same story with the 2015 3.8 V6. The 2014 348hp Genesis Coupe looks much more impressive than the 311hp 2015 3.8 in the sedan on paper, but the reworked, lower hp 3.8 feels a lot stronger at lower and mid RPM.

    • 0 avatar
      Lou_BC

      Hmmmmmmm. So turbo engines are fine in cars but suck in trucks? It is okay for a turbo 4-banger to drive like a V6 but not for a turbo V6 to drive like a V8.

  • avatar
    petezeiss

    Back in the days of the Accord-Taurus rivalry, who’d have ever thought that pickup trucks would horn in on the contest?

    I guess the current Zeitgeist is to up-armor everything about American life.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Pickup trucks were the top sellers back when there was a serious 3 way dog fight between the Taurus, Camry and Accord and in fact which ever one actually came out on top in a given years was often the 4th best selling vehicle that year since the Explorer took 3rd place in many of those years to be the best selling passenger vehicle.

  • avatar
    turboprius

    Here’s what I think happened.

    *Camry sales jumped because of the safety improvements, and the much improved IIHS small overlap score. Plus, they’re roomy, reliable, comfy, and are being heavily discounted right now.

    *The 2014 redesign helped the Corolla a lot. This new one is impressive. Crisp styling, high-quality interior materials, and modern technology. All products that the previous gen Corolla lacked.

    *Good deals and a recently released redesign of the Sonata helped boost its sales. The Elantra is four years old now, and, compared to its competitors, is outdated. Still a good car, though.

    *I don’t know about the Focus. I haven’t seen Focus Girl in a month, so I’ve been unable to ask if I can check her Focus out and write a review about it. Yes, I’ve ridden in it, but I’ve been unable to check out the MyFord Touch, etc. Until then, I don’t understand the Focus sales, except for rental fleets. When I fully look at it, I’ll see if it’s a good car. But hey, there are surprises.

    • 0 avatar
      djsyndrome

      “Camry sales jumped because of the safety improvements, and the much improved IIHS small overlap score. Plus, they’re roomy, reliable, comfy, and are being heavily discounted right now.”

      They jumped because Toyota is throwing massive amounts of money on the hood to clear them out before the redesigned 2015 appears.

      • 0 avatar
        turboprius

        That’s what I was meaning by the discounts. Seriously, the TrueCar discount for these is like seven grand.

        • 0 avatar
          Fred

          People like a bargain. That’s why Hyundai is on the list, lots of features for a bargain price.

        • 0 avatar
          hbarnwheeler

          How does one get these discounts? At TrueCar, I get an estimate of $21,702 for a base LE. At Toyota.com, I get $23,695 after delivery etc. charges ($22,870 base price).

          Am I doing something wrong?

          • 0 avatar
            APaGttH

            Yes you are – don’t build on the site as you’re building MSRP.

            Toyota’s total incentives on the Camry are Detroit grade – around Fusion territory. That was unthinkable five years ago on any Toyota product. Really the only car company not dancing the incentive dance still is Honda – everyone else is to some degree in a race to the bottom (of the mainstream brands).

            However, Toyota, in the data I last saw which was about 16 months ago so it very well may have changed (since pedantic folks like CJ thrive on following my posts), Toyota had the largest dealer incentives of any other mainstream brand.

            That is – Toyota dealers were having to discount vehicles close to 10% off of sticker, on top of any other incentives to move product at volume. Dealers have complained about this but of course Toyota doesn’t want to take this on – because their incentive spend will go up, which looks bad (and other car makers play games so I’m not saying it is right or wrong, just stating the situation).

            The 10% isn’t “Camry” specific, to be clear, again for pedantic folks, but the Toyota products as a whole. So it is likely vehicles like $80K Land Cruisers get bigger discounts than a $16K Yaris.

            What you need to do is look at sites like TrueCar which shows you what people are actually paying. It still is questionable – think of it as a Zillow grade snap shot so your pricing may vary.

            The reality is the Camry will finish out between 15% to 20% fleet – and in total numbers of unit solds (actual cars in number not percentage) will likely be the number one four door anything sold to rental lots – to the tune of 60K to 70K units (last year was around 63K units and 17% IIRC). This isn’t long term a good thing – as discounting like this and large fleet volumes hurt long term resale value, which hurts total cost of ownership.

            As others have noted Toyota has a large group of customers that are spawning salmon. They return to the showroom faithful to buy their new models. They don’t cross shop at all. Time has also shown that a 2014 Camry doesn’t even compare to a 1994 Camry in build quality, materials or content. That isn’t to say the Camry today is a bad car (get over it), but it is saying, and it’s undeniable that from a material, build, and quality sense they have gone down hill. Yes, they are safer and have more refined engines – but they aren’t “better.”

            If Toyota keeps this up history is full of examples in Europe and North America on what will happen eventually. They’ll start to cross shop, and falling behind those cross shoppers realize there is something better. We also know that takes 20 to 30 years to happen – so Toyota has 10 to 20 years to either get back on track, or keep up the very slow slide.

            The Corolla is the one product that Toyota offers that leaves me going, “why on earth given all the choices in the C-segment would anyone buy a Corolla. WHY?!?!?”

            Hope that helps – use TruCar – it will reveal a closer reality to what pricing is – because those dealer discounts are otherwise not reflected.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            “Time has also shown that a 2014 Camry doesn’t even compare to a 1994 Camry in build quality”

            My take is that the production costs for that old posh and polish have been transferred to increased safety, more gadgets and greater horsepower in even base models.

          • 0 avatar
            hbarnwheeler

            This is meant as a reply to APaGttH (for some reason I can’t reply directly).

            Thanks for trying to set me straight. I realize that the manufacturer’s site will give me MSRP. My confusion stems fact that turboprius suggested that one could get very steep discounts (~$7000)on the Camry with TrueCar. However, when I used TrueCar, it gave me an estimated price of just $2000 under the price I got at the manufacturer’s site (less if the TrueCar estimate doesn’t include destination).

            Maybe the deeper discounts can be had only on high-level trims or something.

            In general, people are always talking about huge “cash on the hood” and I’d like to know how/where people get information about this. I’ll be in the market for a car next year (if all goes well) and this could be really helpful.

    • 0 avatar
      Scoutdude

      Note only the 2014.5 Camry had the safety improvements and they aren’t really touting that as the reason that there is such a thing as a 2014.5 version. Yes the constant ads do mention how the cheap lease/big discount is on the 2014.5 version. The reality is that it is selling as well as it is due to the fact that it is the cheapest vehicle in it’s class when the discounts are considered and many people just buy another Camry w/o considering any other vehicle.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “The reality is that it is selling as well as it is due to the fact that it is the cheapest vehicle in it’s class …”

        That’s somewhat disingenuous, the Camry’s low ATP is primarily a reflection of its model mix. There’s no such thing as a $30,000 Touring Titanium Camry because an expensive Camry is an Avalon, or better still an ES.

        Trim for trim it’s tough to find a meaningful price difference between midsize models and in a competitive commodity segment you wouldn’t expect there to be. $4500 off sticker is cheaper than Camry’s reputation suggests but it’s not any cheaper than an Altima,

    • 0 avatar

      I can’t count how many times I got a Camry as a rental even 15 years ago, I never saw an Accord in rental fleets, on top of that, come to NYC and you will see many types of cars as yellow cabs but in general, most of them are Camry’s.

  • avatar
    LeeK

    Ok Derek, I think it’s official, the Fusion has not turned out to be a game-changer. The second generation Ford has been out long enough to be readily available and advertised and, good a car as it is, it has not managed to break the Camry/Accord/Altima lock on the top 5. Sorry about that.

    • 0 avatar
      Conslaw

      The problem with the Fusion is that, especially as you go up in trim levels, it gets very pricey. I agree with bigtruckseriesreview that the Hyuandai Sonata doesn’t get its due credit. I’m basing that on the 2014, Hyundai changed up its trim lineup for 2015, and I haven’t figured it out yet. The Honda Accord is a great overall vehicle with some bizarre choices in its equipment packages and almost nothing in the way of ala-cart options. For example, you can’t get heated seats until you go to the EX-L at 27,000; whereas in the Sonata you can get heated seats at about $23,000, less with incentives.

      Today’s midsized cars are more competitive than ever, and are probably the best deals on the new car lot. Today’s midsized cars have equimpent level comparable to and are as fast as the premium cars of 10 years ago. They get better fuel economy than the compact cars of 10 years ago. For the most part, they hold half of their resale value to 100,000 miles.

      • 0 avatar
        Mandalorian

        The Fusion is definitely a more premium model in the segment. It has European roots and amazing styling compared to some of it’s cheaper hum-drum (not bad though) competitors.

        • 0 avatar
          golden2husky

          The Fusion is a very good alternative to the top sellers, but it does not have the historical reliability that propels people into Camrys over and over. Most Camry owners I know simply do not look at anything else. Fair enough; Toyota earned the right to that kind of thinking. Now add the massive discounts, heavy advertising, and lease deals that Toyota is pushing and you have a freight train at full speed. Missing from those numbers though is the fact that at one time, Toyota did not need to cut prices and add sweeteners…so I’d say that Toyota’s dominance will require a lot of effort to keep over the next ten years. For those willing to look, there are a number of cars that are real competitors, and for those who enjoy driving, better choices.

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Excellent. About as balanced a view as one could have. I know some serial Camry owners and, no, they don’t seriously consider any other vehicle as a replacement.

            Toyota has created a security blanket of a vehicle that gives the average motorist one less thing to worry about in day-to-day living.

            Of course, I feel the same way about our Hondas :-)

        • 0 avatar
          thornmark

          Fusion still does huge fleet sales and, to my knowledge, has never won a comparison test.

          Plus, the Fusions are hobbled by the Ecoboost engines which are thirsty and slow compared with the competition. Which makes the Fusion inferior.

          • 0 avatar

            thornmark:

            You nailed it, it’s the fuel economy and acceleration, I wanted to get one and that is the main reason I did not.

    • 0 avatar
      Ion

      I don’t believe Ford can produce enough Fusions to do that anyway. However if Toyota does eventually drop the V6 Camry for a turbo 4 I’d consider at the very least the rules of the game to have been changed.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Fords small cars are not selling in Australia either

      • 0 avatar
        DeadWeight

        Objectively speaking, for all the progress Ford & GM have made in terms of their sedan and non-truck passenger cars, neither would likely be very profitable, and by some measures, they’d be unprofitable, without their pickup truck divisions.

        I admittedly don’t have accurate data at my fingertips, but when I did last, I believe it showed that Ford was barely turning a net profit on its passenger cars, and GM was losing money on most of its sales of passenger cars.

        So, if this is even roughly still accurate, both Ford & GM still live & die based on the acheiving both high volume sales of their pickup trucks, and turning a proportionally large average profit of the sale of each of these pickup trucks.

        This is just one reason why GM & Ford’s fortunes are far more tied to the price of gasoline and the health of pickup truck intensive sectors of the economy.

  • avatar
    hiptech

    Guess I still can’t get it through my head that buying a car from a company so anxious to slap ‘em together as fast as possible is not necessarily advantageous to the customer.

    How many missteps will there be in an effort to “move the metal?”

    I’m speaking from personal experience…

    • 0 avatar
      petezeiss

      “a company so anxious to slap ‘em together as fast as possible”

      Which company isn’t? It’s a manufacturing business, not medieval cathedral building.

      • 0 avatar
        hiptech

        Exactly…

        Just ask GM (et al.) now forced to spend millions (profit give backs) for massive recalls because of escalating manufacturing pressure to meet production deadlines. And let’s not overlook suppliers who are under constant pressure to give up profits each year and increase output…

        Great recipe for high quality, high volume mass production.

        Here’s the business mantra for most manufacturing: “there’s never enough time to do it right but always enough time to do it over…”

        • 0 avatar
          Toad

          GM’s problems are caused by bad engineering, not rushed production. If you start with faulty design, production speed/volume is irreverent.

          GM (and most other manufacturers) have been fairly successful in designing production processes the make assembly almost idiot proof; this allows for increased volumes without necessarily reducing quality.

          But if you start with faulty designs you have essentially guaranteed the ability to reproduce those faults consistently and accurately.

  • avatar
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  • avatar
    burgersandbeer

    The Camry does nothing for me, but not because of typical “enthusiast” complaints of vanilla appliance, no manual, etc etc. I think it’s one of the ugliest cars in the segment inside and out. I guess if I were shopping midsize cars, I would learn to squint for the discounts Toyota dealers are offering.

  • avatar
    Mandalorian

    It’s a pretty good time to be in the market. For well south of $23k, one can get a brand new Camry or Sonata with Leather Seats, Navigation, Dual Zone climate control, bluetooth, and lots of other goodies.

  • avatar
    Hummer

    I knew the new silverado was a pretty p*** poor vehicle, but I had no idea is was doing so poorly it was within shooting distance of the Camry.
    I don’t quite understand how the fusion is able to maintain its sales levels, after being around the new one I have to wonder who thought it was a step up from its predecessor, and not just in looks.

  • avatar
    thegamper

    Maybe it’s just me, but lately most cars I sit in just give me sticker shock. HOW MUCH? …..FOR THIS!!! I’m probably just getting old. Granted, you can get the price down with a little negotiating, but not so much that it now seems a reasonable price. There are some good bargains out there, but a lot more cars resting on the laurels of their brand reputation and charging the sheep who buy them far more than they should pay.

    • 0 avatar
      DeadWeight

      The pricing structure for used vehicles is very distorted, for a variety of factors (not the least of which is the relative weakness of the economy & the huge amount of subprime used car buyers as a % of overall sales), which has now distorted new car REAL average transaction prices.

      I have never witnessed a time where, with the exception of high priced luxury vehicles, it made less sense to buy a used vehicle versus a new one.

  • avatar
    jimmyy

    Looks like Detroit automakers are a one segment firm … the large pickup. On the east and west coast, few would purchase a car or CUV from a Detroit automaker. Question is, what happens to the domestic auto industry when foreign automakers crack the large pickup segment.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Or when the Pickup segment keeps on shrinking as percentage of sales, that is a worry for them for they are far from competitive selling anything else

    • 0 avatar
      DenverMike

      “…what happens to the domestic auto industry when foreign automakers crack the large pickup segment…”

      It’s more likely domestic (D3) OEMs will crack the code on building competitive smaller cars, CUVs, etc, than foreign OEMs breaking the D3 death grip on the large pickup segment.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Agreed. We’re seeing them closer every year.

        The Sonic is the number two B segment car behind the Versa – and the Versa sells on price. The Sonic by all reports, especially in the higher trims is a solid fun to drive car that is well priced. Then you have the Fiesta. The Yaris is quite frankly a steaming pile compared to just about any other car in the segment.

        The Cruze and Focus are better cars functionally and driving than the Corolla, and darn close to the Civic in the C-segment. Chrysler has yet to unlock the code. As I posted above, of any of the Toyota offerings, it is the Corolla that leaves me scratching my head going, “why would anyone buy one of these given the competition in the segment.” I get it, the buyers don’t cross shop.

        We’ve seen Toyota and Nissan try to crack the fullsize truck code with little success. The Tundra by current reviews has only one thing going for it – price – and Toyota has fallen woefully behind on engine technology in the MPG department in trucks.

        So I have to agree – the D2-1/2 seem to be a lot closer to cracking the car code (and in the B, C, and E segments largely have) then the other way around.

        Just as the average loyal Ford buyer (or Chevy buyer or RAM buyer) are basically spawning salmon who return to the showroom for another truck – the same goes in the sedan market for Japanese cars.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        The domestic “3 minus 1″ have been able to build competitive small cars and SUV’s in Europe not the USA. They just happened to figure out that the European stuff happens to be competitive in the USA against the Japanese.
        Technically they build it here but the designs and engineering came from elsewhere.

      • 0 avatar
        Lou_BC

        ” death grip on the large pickup segment”………. interesting metaphor.

        Toyota and Nissan have to contend with tradition. It is hard to break buying habits that run generations deep.

        That would be like Toyota, Nissan etc. trying to sell a muscle car.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Been trying to do that since the 1970’s and as Toyota’s sales prove not that successful

      • 0 avatar
        Toad

        For consumers it is fantastic that the “foreign” automakers are trying to crack the code on full size trucks, while at the same time the domestics are building more competitive smaller cars.

        More competition, more innovation, better products. This really is a golden age of automobiles.

        • 0 avatar
          RobertRyan

          @Toad,
          They are not trying to “crack the code”,they do not offer 3/4 or 1ton alternatives. GM and Ford’s small car engineering is done elsewhere.
          They in Toyotas case is offering a 1/2 ton Pickup that is very profitable for the Company. Toyota is currently second in sales in the US, so lack of a 3/4 and 1 ton has not hurt it

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I’m curious why you’d say that. I’m looking at Good Car Bad Car’s sales segments for June, for the small SUV/CUV segment, and in first place, it’s Honda, with Ford a few percent behind. Next up is Chevrolet, just ahead of Toyota, then the Jeep Wrangler, then Nissan, then the Jeep Cherokee.

      In the midsize SUV/CUV group, Ford is #1. For some reason the Wrangler shows up on this chart as well, but excluding the Wrangler, the Jeep Grand Cherokee is #2. If you look at sales by company and not by brand. GM is #1 and Ford is #2.

      If you look at large SUV sales, GM absolutely dominates this group, Ford sells a reasonable number of vehicles, and Toyota and Nissan are bit players.

      The other area Detroit dominates are sporty cars. The three ponycars absolutely dominate this segment, and the Corvette rules the roost when it comes to sports cars.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    If you make a great and reliable product people will buy. Our market clearly shows that Americans are, in my opinion, the most unbiased group of consumers in the world. As long as Toyota can continue a balance between price and quality, it’s going to be hard to knock then from the number one in sales spot. It’s not always about the best warranty and hoards of options for cheap.

    • 0 avatar

      Recently, I got a brand new Corolla from Alamo, I think it was an LE, backup camera, BT Audio, touch screen for radio, cruise and so on.
      I also manged almost 40MPG on the highway.
      BUT! I asked myself if I can live with this car? NO! and why is that? because it drives like crap, the CVT also take much of the fun driving it.
      When I look at the average Corolla driver, I understand, they just don’t give a s___t about driving.

  • avatar
    mechaman

    I just can’t believe that the Altima is outselling ANYTHING. I see one, I recall the old ‘RAID!!’ insecticide commercials. Oh, it’s reliable, so you get to live with the ugly a long time? And this years Camry, I think, will be admired for a long time for its’ looks .. this is the first year that I’ve liked to see one. The monstrosity to come? Not so much at all …

  • avatar
    alsorl

    I know the Camry is middle age winner to so.many. But did some of those buyers cross shop at all ? I’ve driven many new sedans and the Toyota was close to last on the list. I now know two people that had major issues with their 2013 Camry’s and one has already traded it in for a Mazda.


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