By on July 9, 2014

2015 ford fiesta se ecoboost front 34

Enthusiasts, rejoice! Ford has what you have been asking for – a low-priced economical vehicle with a proper manual transmission (it’s the only choice!) and turbo power. Those two important features are in a car that is not completely stripped down, either! Yes, you can stream music from your fancy phone and open the windows by pressing buttons. But does this combination make the 3-cylinder Fiesta a game changer?

2015 ford fiesta se ecoboost engine

For an extra $995 over the regular 1.6-liter 4-cylinder, the Fiesta SE gives you a 1.0-liter 3-cylinder EcoBoost (marketing term for a direct-injection and turbo/intercooler) engine. That engine produces three more horsepower and 13 more torques for a total 123hp and 125 lb-ft. Not surprisingly, the fuel economy increases to 31mpg in the city and 43mpg on the highway. While those are good numbers, they are certainly not changing any games. For comparison 2015 Honda Fit gets 31/41mpg, Toyota Yaris 30/37, Nissan Versa Note 31/40, and the Mitsubishi Mirage 37/44.

Even with the improved fuel economy, it is unlikely that the additional cost of the engine would make sense to most casual buyers. Furthermore, the lack of an available automatic transmission is likely to keep most buyers away, which leaves two kinds of potential buyers: cheapskates and enthusiasts. Cheapskates are out, they’ll just buy the Fiesta S. That leaves you, the enthusiasts who are reading this.

2015 ford fiesta se ecoboost details

This is a slow car, yet the engine begs to be red-lined in every gear. You can drive it like a total hooligan and not get into an ounce of trouble. While this may have an adverse effect on the fuel economy, it is fun and perfect for those who treat the accelerator like an on/off switch. The shifter is smooth and the clutch pedal is light – if you stall out in this car you should just quit saving the manuals.

That said, the Romanian-built cast iron motor in this Mexican-built car is very slow reving, as if someone intentionally bolted up a heavy flywheel to it. Get caught in the wrong gear, especially around slow city turns where downshifts into first gear may be required, and you’ll be inching along with your foot to the floor. On the highway it is surprisingly frisky, but still requiring a lot of shifting.

Common sense would dictate that a vehicle designed with the enthusiast in mind would come with perhaps a sport tuned suspension, but that is not the case here. While the engine is not overpowering the chassis, there is nothing sporty about this car’s handling. Further confusing the potential enthusiast buyer is the fact that this engine cannot be combined with the upscale versions of SYNC (Aux and USB audio inputs are there), aluminum wheels, or an upgraded interior trim which is available on the four-banger SE. This should have you scratching your head.

2015 ford fiesta se ecoboost interior dash

The interior, even without the mentioned features, is surprisingly nice. All materials are pleasing to the eyes and to touch, the seats are well padded and generally very comfortable. There is plenty of room in the front but those over six feet tall will, not surprisingly, complain when seated in the back seat. The rear seats folds down, 60:40 split, but the opening to the trunk is rather small so only flat parcels will fit. There are some typical Ford-esque ergonomic issues with the Euro-flavored dash, specifically the tiny diamond-shaped radio buttons. The center radio display and its controls seem pretty dated, too.

The SE sedan starts at $15,580. This test vehicle had the SE EcoBoost engine for $995, comfort package (heated seats, mirrors, clime control) for $290, special Green Envy paint job at $595, and a destination charge of $825. The total comes to $18,285 but at the time of this writing Ford was offering a $750 incentive which brought the total price to $17,535.

2015 ford fiesta se ecoboost rear 34

After spending a few days with this car, I could not figure out who this car was for. If I was a cheapskate I would buy the entry-level model. If I was someone who just wanted an appliance I would get the four cylinder. A true enthusiast would spend a little more and get the superb Fiesta ST for only three grand more. And that car, my friends, is a game changer.

Kamil Kaluski is the east coast editor for Hooniverse.com. Read his ramblings on eastern European cars, $500 racers, and other miscellaneous car stuff can be found there. 

Ford provided the vehicle for this review.

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113 Comments on “Capsule Review: 2014 Ford Fiesta SE 1.0 liter EcoBoost...”


  • avatar

    This is the kind of car the drivers Ed should be conducted in. Even a first car for new drivers . Train kids to use a manual and do regular maintenance on a car.

    Later on they can graduate towards a nice, automatic, Hellcat.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      There’s lots of new drivers (the flatbill hat wearing kind) round here driving brand new Challengers.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      Damnit, BTSR, you had to make this about the Hellcat, didn’t you?

    • 0 avatar
      Sigivald

      Manuals, because …

      Yeah, no.

      Waste of everyone’s time and expensive for the school to maintain when they break the clutch.

      The only maintenance most people need to do on their cars is take it in for an oil change when the sticker or light says to.

      There’s *nothing wrong with that*; I’d trade modern reliability and economy for Old Days shade-tree repairability and swearing-at-it any day.

      And have. The only thing I DIY anymore is modifications (lighting and accessory wiring) and brake pads.

  • avatar
    dwford

    So what you’re saying is is that this car is the perfect base for an enthusiast to begin working on it. Obviously the wheels get replaced immediately, bolt on some suspension parts from the ST, change the flywheel, open up the intake and exhaust and you’re on your way. Yes you could just get an ST, but where’s the fun in that?

    I thought the point of this motor was improved drivability with the extra and lower end torque and the improved gas mileage.

    And even though when you build one of these on Ford’s site it lists a $750 incentive, there is actually up to $1500 incentives on it, so now you are close to $16k (skipping the ugly paint) for the cheap turbo of your dreams.

  • avatar
    tresmonos

    Compared to the 1.6L, I don’t think you can call this variant ‘slow.’ The 1.6L Sigma paired with a 5 speed is painful. When I drove this, I didn’t experience any mental anguish, but I did beat the sh1t out of the vehicle the entire time I was driving it (and yielded 31+ mpg).

    The reason this didn’t get paired with the Getrag POS was explained by Derek in previous articles: the head of Ford PD drove the combination and thought it was dreadful.

    The enthusiast point of view is an interesting one and explains why I enjoyed driving it. Great write up.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Apparently it is selling well. There is something to be said for a car that is so well matched to its mission.

    Whoever decided to not offer it with auto should receive some sort of award for valor. Otherwise we would be reading about nothing except complaints about the transmission.

  • avatar
    dougjp

    Good article, it underlines that this car makes no sense at all.

    Cheapskates won’t pay an extra grand for a (still) slow car. Enthusiasts have no use for it either, there are many (most?) cars out there that would attract them more, so why bother. “Ecobabies” won’t be interested either because they know the turbo in real life driving won’t get the fuel economy numbers that the turbo was put there for (solely the EPA numbers game). Drive it like a hooligan and not get into trouble, fine. How about reliability, how about resale…..

    This car only exists as a “reverse Halo” type vehicle. As in, look at the little thing (engine) we made! Who cares?

    • 0 avatar
      Clarence

      Well said. How long would it take for you to get sick of redlining this thing? A week? Luckily, the combination of a Romanian engine and Mexican assembly will undoubtably mean Lexus-like reliability.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      This is such a ridiculous post. Why don’t you look and see what MPG owners are getting in this configuration and eat your words. On a Dynojet it put down 121HP/125tq at the wheels, it’s a strong car.

      Cheapskates have been paying a premium for diesel and hybrids for decades now to achieve maximum MPG. Sure, this won’t appeal to the guy who wants the stripper that Steve Lang wrote about but he can buy a Versa.

      Once you do your research on this car and substantiate your inane, biased claims feel free to eat your words.

    • 0 avatar
      RobertRyan

      Agree, slow and on par with other cars in the segment as far as fuel consumption

  • avatar
    dwford

    Even Ford is already tuning this car:

    http://www.autocar.co.uk/car-review/ford/fiesta/first-drives/ford-fiesta-red-and-black-editions-first-drive-review

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    Good for Ford for introducing a manual-only powertrain on a non-sports car. Ford deserves some praise for that, but I agree with Kamil that who exactly this car is marketed to is a mystery. Really is an oddball.

    Interesting engine, though. The extra torque might be worth the $995, but this is no performance engine and the fuel economy advantage approaches insignificance.

    I’d have a hard time paying more money for the slightly better of two econo-car engines.

  • avatar
    kvndoom

    Holy sh11111t! It almost gets the same MPG as a Verano!

  • avatar
    djsyndrome

    Sorry, but for eighteen large I’m moving up a size class. That’s Focus/Mazda 3 money.

    • 0 avatar
      Astigmatism

      I had the same thought. In what world is this a better deal than a Focus SE?

      • 0 avatar
        djsyndrome

        Good question. My first thought was in a country that’s taxed by engine size. But this same engine is also offered in the Focus overseas, right?

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The 1.0T is offered in the Focus overseas. It will also be available in the US Focus, manual only, for 2015.

          It is also available in the C-Max, B-Max, EcoSport, and Mondeo.

      • 0 avatar
        MAGICGTI

        For somebody who doesn’t want a Focus SE, there are plenty of reasons to choose a Fiesta over a Focus, price notwithstanding.

    • 0 avatar
      SomeGuy

      I think this is the big problem with small cars. The price gaps just aren’t big enough, nor are the MPG gains. For a few bucks more, you get more of everything with little to no MPG hit.

      Oh well. This would be a great first car for a teenager.

      • 0 avatar
        MAGICGTI

        More of what, space? Once again, this is a non-issue, if you want more space at this pricepoint, you can find it.

        You can get similar MPG going used (or maybe PriusC) but then you’re driving a hybrid vs. a fun, manual hatch with some athleticism.

        You’re not getting more tech than this car, especially with the mythical 202 package that’s on dealer lots but not the configurator.

    • 0 avatar
      SCE to AUX

      I just bought a leftover 2013 Optima Hybrid for $20k that is rated at 36 city / 40 hwy mpg, but actually nets 45 mpg highway if driven at the speed limit.

      It’s a lot more car than this tin can, and it’s comfortable on long trips.

      There are many options in the $15-20k range that are superior to this vehicle.

    • 0 avatar
      bomberpete

      Even Consumer Reports agrees with you.

  • avatar
    Stumpaster

    “Get caught in the wrong gear, especially around slow city turns where downshifts into first gear may be required, and you’ll be inching along with your foot to the floor.”

    Sorry, but this is not the right way to drive. I never ever ever plant the gas pedal to the floor. Tried, and it just bogs the engine down. Probably because it never worked with carb’ed engines, and I don’t think it works with FI engines. You press the pedal part way and it has a better effect because you are not asking the engine to go beyond where it can go. As to stick shift driving, if the car is that gutless, you match the revs and put it in first gear and have no problem.

    • 0 avatar

      I agree with you, that whole part about getting caught in the wrong gear, as in you want to avoid that.

      From my experience in cars such as this, between TBW, direct injection, and all other marvels of modern engine control technology, partial throttle or full throttle will yield the same results.

    • 0 avatar
      Andy

      Right. This describes any manual transmission. The solution is to choose the correct gear, which is the entire point of having a manual.

      • 0 avatar
        Drewlssix

        The complaint was about the responsiveness of the motor making gear changes difficult in some situations. I have driven cars that will come to a stop waiting for the engine to rev high enough to matter. It’s not always a flywheel issue though. With DBW OEs can tune throttle response slow enough to improve emissions and MPGs while making the care almost in drivable by certain folks.

    • 0 avatar
      moorewr

      Many torque-converter automatics make you mash the pedal because it is the only way to hint to the transmission that you’d like to go fast.

      But yeah, for certain reaching the redline means you are falling away from the power peak.

    • 0 avatar
      LeadHead

      Planting the pedal to the floor in an EFI manual-transmissioned vehicle in too high of a gear doesn’t bog them down. It feels like it does, because at a really low RPM you only need like 30% throttle to hit 0 manifold pressure (instead of a vacuum), so any more throttle after that doesn’t increase power, but increases induction noise.

      In a carb vehicle, you’d have a point, because high throttle openings at low RPM the velocity in the venturi tanks, causing the engine to go lean until RPM comes back up. Hence the need for accelerator pumps.

  • avatar
    psarhjinian

    I’d be more swayed if these weren’t so cramped inside. The Fit is absolutely cavernous by comparison (though Honda did a number on the knee room in the current model) and the Versa Note is quite spacious as well: both cars can accommodate tall people in all four seats. Even the Yaris isn’t too bad, and the Spark is surprising for it’s size.

    The Fiesta (and the Focus, which is also worse than just about ever B-segment car, fwiw) are awful for rear-seat passengers. They’re nice enough cars, but Ford did something very wrong with the interior packaging.

    • 0 avatar
      DeeDub

      It’s the squashroof syndrome that crushes (heheh) rear headroom.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      I agree. The Fiesta is even a fairly long sedan for the B-segment class. Don’t know where all the passenger legroom went.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      +1

      Interior packaging seems to be something Ford is particularly bad at lately. Can’t blame it solely on the Euros, either; the Taurus is equally coffinlike. The Fiesta is the kind of car I want to like, but I also demand spatial awareness in my rides.

    • 0 avatar
      cdotson

      I might have one of these (hatchbacks) in my driveway now if it weren’t for the fact my wife looked at the back seat and said “too small, forget it.” We didn’t even open the door. It’s exactly the type of car I’m interested in, exactly the budget I’m looking for, but I have to ferry around three kids including one rear facing and one in a booster. No WAY I could fit them in the back seat. I care not about the headroom, but the legroom is a killer.

      After a week in a rental 2013 Forte sedan (36k miles!) the kids complained loud enough that I’m pretty sure even a Focus has an insufficient back seat, and that was with the little guy in a forward-facing seat.

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        Consider the Fit or the (old) Versa. Both are spacious enough for three kids, assuming one of them is out of a carseat.

        The Versa Note is almost as good as the old Versa hatch, but hurts for cargo space versus it’s predecessor (and the Fit). It still smokes the Fiesta. And the Focus. And the Fusion. And possibly the Taurus.

    • 0 avatar
      DC Bruce

      Agreed, and I’m not as tall as you. The rear seat in the Focus is ridiculous, given the size of the car. And the Fiesta felt claustrophobic to me in the front, even though I fit. The Focus is a two-person plus two kids car AFAIC.

  • avatar
    Z71_Silvy

    One thousand dollars for three more horsepower. Unbelievable.

    This car is a game changer in the way most Fords are……it changes the game of mediocrity.

  • avatar
    Andy

    Leather wrapped steering wheel. Bluetooth. The only other thing I can’t live without are alloy wheels.

    Also, I can’t see anyone in the shallow end of the market paying $600 for a paint color. But I’m glad it exists.

    • 0 avatar
      dwford

      Paying extra for paint on a car like this is pretty silly.

    • 0 avatar

      There’s a dude that writes for this here website that once blew a ton more money just to have a green car.

    • 0 avatar
      05lgt

      If it ends up popular with young “tuners” it could help Fords future in ways that Civics used to even when they weren’t SI’s. Rims and shocks are easy to change, but the paint? Offer the colors.

      • 0 avatar
        CJinSD

        Were the tuners good for Honda? Cars were stolen from real customers. Insurance rates climbed for real customers. Civics were associated with low-lifes that stole, modified and street-raced cars. No bueno. Turning off the perpetual adolescents was a great victory for Honda.

        • 0 avatar
          djsyndrome

          “Cars were stolen from real customers.”

          Who would then march right back into a Honda dealership to purchase a replacement.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            Or when it was recovered take it back to Honda and spend a bunch of money replacing the messed up steering column, missing seats and sometimes wheels too.

            There is a reason that Honda never took keeping people out of their cars or making it hard to defeat the ignition switch very seriously.

            Yeah the fact they were and usually show up at or near the top of the most stolen list means that the insurance rates are higher. However the average person doesn’t call up his insurance agent and ask if it would be cheaper to insure a Camry, Corolla or something else, they just pick a car and then when they get the big insurance bill go “well it is a new car” and shrug it off.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Only Honda did address the problem of thieves propensity for taking their cars, which is why the ones on the most stolen list are all from 1994-1996. You seem to have them confused with GM, that still sets up Escalade customers to be easy marks.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      “Green Envy paint job at $595″

      I assumed he received that much as a refund, for having to suffer the embarassment of driving around in such a tastelessly painted car.

      • 0 avatar
        Ion

        And I would rather not drive a car painted in a shade (black,white,grey,brown, etc). To each his own.

        • 0 avatar
          tankinbeans

          I recently traded my Focus (and Blazer) because I wanted to get out of two cars. The extra was fodder for my friends to borrow and abuse and I got tired of it.

          Anywho, back to my point: the salesperson asked me if I had a color preference. My response was, “any color that’s not white, black, silver or any shade thereof.” I ended up getting a nice shade of blue.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    “After spending a few days with this car, I could not figure out who this car was for.”

    China and Brazil. Both of them have displacement taxes that increase at the 1.0-liter mark. This engine is 999cc, and that is not a coincidence.

    • 0 avatar
      CJinSD

      People that accept miserable compromises created by the idiocy of bureaucrats in other countries are funny.

      • 0 avatar
        Pch101

        “People that accept miserable compromises created by the idiocy of bureaucrats in other countries are funny.”

        So Alan Mulally is a comic genius?

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          Alan was amortizing money he spent meeting standards in said countries. Buyers of China compliance cars are the jokes.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            As a Honda fanboy, you need to be careful.

            It’s no coincidence that many Japanese imports have had motors that were just under 2.0 liters, either; that’s the point at which displacement taxes increase in Japan.

            The Honda S2000 had a motor that was 1997cc. The Toyota 86/ Scion FR-S comes in at 1998cc. Compliance, compliance, compliance.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            Going forward, everyone will be pushing compliance cars as the US declines relative to other markets. Your examples are pretty meaningless though, considering that the S2000 went to 2.2 liters in its first revision and most Honda products that were once around 2 liters are now closer to 2.4 liters, which relates to no tax class anywhere. Don’t waste your time making things up to argue with me. I’m not someone ignorant enough to be impressed by your empty rhetoric.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            I understand that facts and logical thinking aren’t your best friends, but what I told you was simply factually correct, namely that Japanese regulations influenced what was exported to the US. Japan had an abundance of engines under 2.0 liters because of the taxes that they had to pay on them at home.

            Facts don’t stop being facts simply because you find them to be inconvenient. But given your political fixations, it’s not surprising that you can’t distinguish between reality and fantasy.

          • 0 avatar
            CJinSD

            I can’t stop you from wasting your time any more than you can stop yourself from compounding each of your fabrications. The S2000 was 2 liters because the concept called for a high reving 4 cylinder engine and that was as much displacement as they could achieve. When they later increased displacement to add low RPM torque, they had to lower the engine’s redline and sacrifice peak power. US Civics have had 1.2 to 2.4 liter engines. US Accords have had 1.6 to 3.5 liter engines. None of them have been obvious tax bracket engines tailored for other markets in the sense that a 2 liter turbo BMW or 1.5 liter Ford EB is.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The way that your mind works is, er, interesting. Even basic stuff doesn’t get through that fog of yours.

            Ford makes all kinds of engines that are larger than 1.0 liter. But that doesn’t mean that the 1.0-liter engine’s displacement was simply random.

            If you can accept that reality, then you should also be able to figure out that the plethora of 2.0-liter engines that came out of Japan were likewise not some odd coincidence. But for whatever reason, reality and you just don’t get along.

          • 0 avatar
            RobertRyan

            @CJ in SD,
            Correct, They increased the capacity to get more torque, nothing to do with regulations

  • avatar
    johnhowington

    ladies and gentlemen, i bring you the new ford tempo! if only it came in that lovely red interior.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      No 4×4 available! :(

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        I had a buddy that had an AWD Topaz in high school. He put SuperDuty and 4×4 stickers on it.

        • 0 avatar
          CoreyDL

          Ha, I like that.

          Could you use those on dry pavement, unlike that initial Tempo?

          • 0 avatar
            bball40dtw

            The Topaz was more Tempo than the Milan was Fusion, so I’m guessing no.

            He drove all kinds of crazy old Ford products while we were in high school and when he was my college roomate. Ford Fairmont wagon, first gen Taurus wagon, Escort hatchback, and my favorite, a turbo Probe.

          • 0 avatar
            Scoutdude

            They only had one version of the Tempaz that could drive the rear wheels. At first they labeled them AWD which wasn’t accurate since you had to push a button to engage the rear alxe and there was no center diff, though it did include a limited slip rear diff. For the swan song year they gave them 4×4 badges but that was the only change.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    Not like this will change anyone’s opinion. But some people that are not ragging the crap out of the car are getting an average over 40mpg. Meaning some people are probably getting close to 50mpg on the highway. Not that I think this is a great auto. But for some people that have to commute, this might not be a bad option. This same car that was tested can be bought for under $15,000 with rebates and discounts.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Exactly, this article and most of TTAC completely misses the point. The cost delta is about $4k between this and a base ST, which is significant. The transaction prices on a cheap Ford, as we have seen int he past, are hardly close to MSRP.

      EPA numbers are just that, and history says they aren’t always accurate. Some cars never come close to EPA numbers, some cars (looking at your, TDI) routinely achieve above EPA.

      When Fuelly has more data you’ll see the owners of the 1.0T are 40 MPG+ in combined driving, some drivers coming close to 50 MPG on the highway in the right conditions. This engine is for real.

      A forum member dyno’d his 1.0T Fiesta and basically, the stated power from Ford is at the wheels. The 1.6T turbo will bolt up to the 1.0T and is the key to getting close to 200hp with supporting modifications.

      While the Ford configurator won’t let you build it, a there are some Ecoboost 202A cars with cold weather, moonroof, and SYNC navigation. Can’t tell you how to order one though.

      Neat car, the 1.0T Focus is coming here with a 6MT and hope it makes it to the Fiesta.

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    “Paying extra for paint on a car like this is pretty silly.’

    Lots cheaper than the tarted up base model mini coopers. Mini Coopers are silly but likable.

  • avatar
    Andy

    Went to build one and noticed that the $995 upcharge for the 1.0 actually DELETES aluminum wheels and swaps in the plastic covers… maybe it’s because of a different tire size – skinnier, lower rolling resistance? (In which case the 1.0 engine doesn’t get all the credit for the increased FE.) At any rate, it’s clearly meant for FE, not sportiness. Too bad it can’t be a little more of both at the same price.

    In their defense, you can get heated seats, mirrors, and auto climate control for only $290. That’s a better spend than the optional paint colors.

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    “the Romanian-built cast iron motor in this Mexican-built car is very slow reving, as if someone intentionally bolted up a heavy flywheel to it.”

    Without looking, I’d bet that it does have a rather hefty flywheel to quell the inherent 3-cylinder vibrations. Overall, it seems like this engine has a diesel-esque power delivery. Drive it like a TDI and be happy.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      Yes exactly. People are averaging over 40mpg meaning people are getting close to or over 50mpg highway when not driven like its a wannabe ST. And there is no extra cost for diesel and the same model that this guy ragged out is under $15k after rebates. I don’t like this small of a car. But it is still something to think about if your looking for a commuter. If I’m not mistaken this 3cyl is also one of Wards top ten engines.

      • 0 avatar
        Dan

        “Yes exactly. People are averaging over 40mpg meaning people are getting close to or over 50mpg highway when not driven like its a wannabe ST.”

        No, meaning it’s being driven by and reported on by a handful of hypermilers with no normal people to bring the average down. Who else would look twice at this car?

        With a coefficient of drag that Ford sells as “as low as .33″, which means the hatchback is a couple of points worse, 50 mpg highway is not happening at realistic highway speeds no matter what’s under the hood.

  • avatar
    CapVandal

    Seems like the sporty Fiat 500, Mini Cooper, and Fiesta ST get compared. In their sporting trims. Not that different HP wise in base trim.

    Fiesta is never going to be cool. Mini Cooper is way to 00’s to be cool. A thought about who this car is for.

    Sustainability is very very big on campuses these days. Who knows — I don’t drive cars like this, but there is a bit of logic here.

    • 0 avatar
      S2k Chris

      “Sustainability is very very big on campuses these days. Who knows — I don’t drive cars like this, but there is a bit of logic here.”

      You know what else is big on campus? Pu$$y. And no one driving a 3cyl Fiesta will be getting any.

      • 0 avatar
        bball40dtw

        Pssh. Ain’t nobody care about what kind of car you drive in college. If it works, and is nearby, it is about the same as any other car. N-bodies can be sexy if you don’t have payments.

      • 0 avatar
        bomberpete

        Yes the boys will – especially if the ladies are “green” and no one else in the dorm has wheels.

  • avatar
    S2k Chris

    I’m an enthusiast, and I’ve never asked for a nuclear-booger-green Ford hatchback with half as much horsepower as I want. $17k buys a whole crapload of C5, pre-5.0 Mustang GT, E36 M3 and $10k for cooling system parts, S2000, etc etc etc. You know, stuff that’s ACTUALLY fun to drive.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Chris, I have a fun car (E36 M3) and this isn’t supposed to be the fun car, this is the commuter or the car for me in outside sales when I need to cover a large territory while maximizing my $.42/mile reimbursement, not breaking down, and not looking like a douche in a BMW or a homeless person in a beat ’95 Accord.

      For $15k you get a car that will routinely touch 40 MPG, is decent to drive, looks good for the class, and is brand new. What’s not to like?

      • 0 avatar
        S2k Chris

        It’s an underpowered crapwagon? For $17k, I’ll be the guy in the CPO Camcord Fusionbu 6tima, thanks. Enough power to get out of their own way, decent highway manners, and reasonably similar fuel economy.

        • 0 avatar
          MAGICGTI

          Get that suburban Chicago idea of bigger is better out of your head. There is no shortage of large 4-door snoozemobiles at this pricepoint.

          With the power it puts down at the wheels, it’s not underpowered in the slightest. How much power should a $16k subcompact fuelsipper have? By that definition your S2k and my E36 M3 are underpowered, and I can’t agree with that.

          For this money I’ll get a loaded one with discounts for $17k, have a funky little Euro-flavored hatch wearing a badge I can be proud of with alloys, Sync, moonroof, and heated seats and zoom past the drones in the Camcordimas like cones in an autocross while getting mid 40 MPG.

          • 0 avatar
            S2k Chris

            It’s not about underpowered fuelsippers, it’s about “this is the enthusiast’s choice” and I say that’s hogwash. If you want to tell me something with under 150hp is an enthusiast’s car, and it isn’t made by Lotus or Ariel or the like, I’m going to laugh at you.

            And if I want a distance car, to some extente bigger IS better in terms of space to stretch out, wheelbase to absorb potholes, etc. If you need to drive 1000 miles, do you want an S550 or a Smart? Only an idiot takes the Smart.

          • 0 avatar
            Drewlssix

            Alloys? Not on the car in this article.

          • 0 avatar

            So the CRX wasn’t an enthusiast’s car?

            Be careful with that logic…somebody might say a car with only 150 lb-ft of torque isn’t an enthusiast’s car, either.

    • 0 avatar
      bumpy ii

      The smart has better seats, and you only have to stop at one sketchy gas station instead of three.

  • avatar
    jim brewer

    Simply,it is selling about as well as the st. As many have pointed out, its real world mileage is comparable to a Prius, fun to drive and inexpensive. I can’t find a hatchback model.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I feel when shopping at this price point, you’d be better off to spend your money on a better trim or optional items than some ugly HORRIBLE paint.

    Or, you could get a much MUCH nicer gently used car, which will be just as reliable and not contain Romanian components.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Did I miss something about Romania? What’s so much better about a larger, used car that won’t come close to the MPG or be as fun to drive with a stick?

      Once again, Ford isn’t discontinuing their lineup and replacing it with this car. This trim is just an addition, not a replacement. I bet that most people at this pricepoint will go with a basic Focus, which is a great car and great choice, just won’t touch the mileage and will be more difficult to park. We have friends in urban DC who share one car, a Lime Squeeze Fiesta hatch, and it’s perfect for them. They couldn’t buy a larger car if they wanted to (they don’t) due to size constraints.

      • 0 avatar
        tankinbeans

        The number on the Focus is lower, but the absolute fuel use isn’t very different when viewed as consumption per distance.

        Focus 26/36/30 (EPA)
        3.85/2.78/3.33 (figures in gallons per 100 miles)

        1.0 Fiesta 31/40/?
        3.23/2.50/?

        Difference
        .62/.28/?

        Price difference at $3.50 per gallon.
        $2.17/$0.98

        I’m not really seeing an advantage other than the “look at me, I’m different and have a tiny engine.”

  • avatar
    krhodes1

    I really like that color, I’d pay for it. Seems like a fun commuter for cheap money. Hatch only for me, of course.

    The cars by the pound brigade don’t get it, as usual.

  • avatar
    Beerboy12

    Every aspect of this car, from the heavy flywheel, the small capacity 3 cylinder turbo motor and the non sporty suspension point towards a car designed for gas mileage economy and real world gas mileage savings. The EPA ratings are probably only half the story. This car achieves this with out being a diesel and with out resorting to overly complex hybrid nonsense. The torque profile also lends it’s self to easy round town driving and relaxed highway cruising.
    The overall package of this car would make perfect sense to a commuter, long or short distance and there are a loads of those people out there, many of whom are not enthusiasts or cheapskates.

  • avatar
    Russycle

    “with out resorting to overly complex hybrid nonsense. ” Right, it just uses a turbo and direct injection, no complexity there. I do mostly agree with you, kudos to Ford for getting Prius-like mileage at a much lower price point. But the “overly complex” Prius has a reputation for solid reliability. I hope the eco-Fiesta turns out to be as solid, but I wouldn’t bet the farm on it.

  • avatar
    Eyeflyistheeye

    I almost bought a Fiesta EcoBoost two months ago when Ford was offering their cavalcade of incentives and it became a wash for me to trade my Chevy Sonic Turbo in, figuring that I’d be rolling my interest into principal and reducing my monthly payments.

    When I took the Fiesta EcoBoost on a test drive, the same feeling came to mind as when I drove the Honda Fit – that this is definitely not a motor designed for American driving conditions. Never mind that I was spoiled coming from the relatively lazy GM 1.4 turbo, which was shrewdly designed to be acceptable to Uncle Fred and Aunt Louise in their Cruze and work without too much groan or protest.

    Ironically, as the review noted, it’s better on the highway then it is in the city or stop-and-go traffic, where it’s easy to get caught flat-footed and out of the turbo range, in which point the turbocharged wonder turns back into a 1.0 litre, three-cylinder pumpkin.

    After I drove the Focus SE with stick, and had a rental Focus (with the Powershift) that managed to get 45 mpg on the highway with cruise set at 60 (to be fair, it was broken in, 34k miles), the choice was clear and I bought a stick Focus SE for $1k more.

    Although, I shudder at the thought of the 1.0 in the upcoming 2015 US-market Focus. The motor is acceptable in a Fiesta and can work with the right driver, but C&D got even lower mileage with the 1.0 EB than the 2.0 GDI in American driving conditions and I’m not seeing how Ford can get a more relaxed driving profile with the Focus (more frenetic shifts?) and better real-world mileage.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    31/43 EcoBoost so reality is around 28/38

    Meh.

    • 0 avatar
      MAGICGTI

      Who’s reality? Check Fuelly.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        Just did.

        Only 10 cars reporting with the 1.0L 3-banger in the 2014 model year. So statistics 101 says not a valid sample – yet.

        With that said, reported MPG is equally government MPG sticker at 36 MPG combined.

        You need about 30 to 50 vehicles reporting to have a valid sample – individual samples are all over the place from high 40s to low 20s

  • avatar
    tjh8402

    for the reviewer, what sort of fuel economy did you observe with this engine and what were your driving conditions like? I agree with those who say the option packages make no sense on this car.

  • avatar
    Kyree S. Williams

    First off, I’ve mentioned numerous times that I think the Fiesta and Focus sedans are very ill-proportioned, so I’d have to get the hatch, if one is available. And while this would be a nice package at $14,500, at nearly $18K (which can get you a decently-equipped Focus), it’s not really happening for me. $3K more for the ST? Money well spent…

  • avatar
    ksmo

    This car intrigues me, but Ford drives me nuts with interior packaging. The Focus and Fiesta seem to have the worst interior to exterior space ratio in their respective classes. Ford needs to snake one of Honda’s interior design engineers from the Fit program. You get in a small Ford, you think, woah, this is even smaller inside than I thought–not gonna work. You get in a Fit, you think, is this thing a Tardis or what? How is the car this big inside and so small outside?

    Ford: People who want to buy your small econocars actually have kids in car seats, etc. Don’t make it so easy for us to scratch you off the shopping list when your cars are otherwise attractive. We don’t all want to move to SUVs.

  • avatar
    tankinbeans

    Will there be a similar review of the Focus with the 1.0EB when it is released? I’d be curious how that turns out if the Fiesta is ‘slow’ even while weighing less than the Focus.

    Also, if those buttons are small to you there must be some major fingerage going on because I was always able to stab the buttons without any hassle in my Focus with a very similar stack.

  • avatar
    LeadHead

    It feels like it has a super heavy flywheel, because it most likely does. With a 3 cylinder, you have a huge gap between a firing event, which would be very apparent.


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