By on July 23, 2014

2015_Toyota_Yaris_001

 

Toyota is touting a new “European flavor” for the 2015 Yaris. I’m not sure what that means, but it does evoke bad memories of the chevre I left in my suitcase after coming home from the Paris Auto Show. All jokes aside (and that was bahhhhh-d), our Yaris will likely be built in France, but Toyota is looking for a way to both incorporate that into their messaging, and avoid telling everyone that their new subcompact is built by a bunch of socialist surrender monkeys. It’s not easy to explain the poor economics of building a subcompact car in Japan, but telling American consumers that its made in France is likely even more difficult. Not much has changed mechanically, and the 4-speed automatic still remains. C’est la.

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62 Comments on “2015 Toyota Yaris Has “European Flavor”, We’re Afraid To Ask…...”


  • avatar
    kitzler

    Thank God it is built in Valenciennes, close enough to the Belgian border so hopefully most of the skilled labor will be Belgian. Hope that makes you feel better Derek.

  • avatar

    That extra “something” you put in your food whilst no one is looking.

    …for flavor.

  • avatar
    Tom Szechy

    The Yaris is built in France for the European market since ~2000, and actually it has a surprisingly good reputation in terms of reliability and build quality. Just FYI of course.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    Not much has changed mechanically, and the 4-speed automatic still remains…

    Is Toyota even trying? I get it will be reliable as the sunrise but I remember US automakers being roasted in the press for still using 4-speed autos 15 years ago. The Yaris as it stands today is pretty much outclassed by every other B-segment offering in North America and has awful sales numbers. It needs a lot more than a new skin, and customers have made that crystal clear with their wallets.

    • 0 avatar
      FormerFF

      I’d have expected them to go to a CVT. On the other hand, if Europe is the target market, nobody cares about what automatic transmission Toyota would install.

    • 0 avatar
      thirty-three

      A 4-speed is a step forward for a company that offered 3-speed automatics for so long (i.e. within the last 15 years).

    • 0 avatar
      boogieman99

      It’s no different than Toyota still offering the 4 spd auto as the base automatic tranny in the 2015 Corolla… yet people still buy the Corolla in droves.

      This is just another bland, dynamically compromised car from a “legendary” brand

      • 0 avatar
        psarhjinian

        My mother bought the four-speed Corolla specifically because it had a four-speed: she wanted something that she wouldn’t be afraid to tow with.

        I don’t think Toyota has ever really been a “push the envelope” kind of car company. Recall that they hung onto rear-drive and carburetors a bit longer than even the domestics. Even the Prius was very cautiously developed and the first generation was a very, very modest car.

        The difference is that, unlike GM, they didn’t make a car that was cost you money. I’d be pressed to say if the 1998 Corolla or 1998 Cavalier was better or worse off the lot, but the Corolla wouldn’t break.

  • avatar
    Tomifobia

    It may have European flavor, but I’m going to guess that it’s the same basic dish Toyota has been serving Americans for the past several years: Reheated leftovers.

    • 0 avatar
      challenger2012

      You can sell reheated leftovers if they are priced right and are reliable. If only the Big 3 had built cars of the same quality 30 years ago, then they could do the same as Toyota is doing now. 30 years is enough time to breed a generation of lemmings who will follow in the path of their parents. And the path leads to Toyota, Honda, Nissan etc. GM, Ford, Fiat/Chrysler will have to build quality cars for some time to overcome the bias of lemmings years who mindlessly purchased cars based upon the past performance of the Japanese automakers. Fortunately, Ford seems to be there. GM and FC are a few years behind.

      • 0 avatar
        whynot

        Pricing it right and reliability has done little to help Toyota in the subcompact market, however, where I believe the Yaris sales can best be described as abysmal compared to most of its competitors.

        • 0 avatar
          Quentin

          I don’t think they care. They probably lose a stack of cash on each one and the Yaris basically serves as something to get people in the door based on a low MSRP. Then the dealer upsells the local built Corolla that drives better and is more efficient. And actually makes Toyota some money. Who wants to be the sales leader for a segment that very likely loses money most of the time?

  • avatar
    bumpy ii

    Next USDM Yaris is supposed to be a reskinned Mazda 2, hecho en Mexico?

    • 0 avatar
      Demetri

      I think the Mazda2 based car is going to be a Scion, actually; an xD replacement that will be a little more upmarket than the Yaris. I imagine Toyota is probably testing the waters in their relationship with Mazda before fully handing over development of their global sub-compact platform.

    • 0 avatar
      rockets

      Mazda? BMW? Subaru? Who isn’t Toyota working with? Hope Mazda is going with 6spd trannies in the new 2/Toyota…have not heard of a CVT from them.

  • avatar
    koshchei

    Toyota’s designers seem to have missed the subtle nuance inherent in a successful aggressive front clip and gone full-on rage face.

    http://alltheragefaces.com/face/rage-super-rage

  • avatar
    Scott_314

    Calling the French ‘surrender monkeys’ is funny and all, but if you look into some of the World War 1 memorials and casualties you can’t help but say ‘holy shi!t’.

    The total US killed in the Civil War was around 650,000, or of 2% of the population.

    French World War 1 deaths were around 1.7 million, or 4.3% of the population. A single battle such as Verdun, the French killed were 150,000. The other side also took 150,000. What would 300,000 bodies (and body parts) look like strewn around an area?

    In other words when WW2 came around and the French said ‘you know what, it may not be worth doing this again’ it’s not so surprising.

    Cheers

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      Are you cheeking your meds?

      • 0 avatar
        petezeiss

        You’re normally adolescent but are you seriously questioning French casualties suffered in WW1?

        • 0 avatar
          Scott_314

          No, I was just saying that the ‘surrender monkeys’ thing is fine, but a lot of people don’t know what was behind them sitting out WW2. In any case, way off topic so never mind.

          Edit – wait you were replying to alsorl…

          • 0 avatar
            petezeiss

            Mon Dieu, dude. I absolutely wasn’t criticizing you. I hugely appreciated seeing someone else show awareness of what French people suffered rather than hopping on the jingoist “surrender monkey” bandwagon.

        • 0 avatar
          alsorl

          You forgot to add that the French are still selling weapons to Russia as you read this sentence. So yes some Americans may have issues purchasing autos build by the surrender monkeys and some may not.

    • 0 avatar
      DevilsRotary86

      Agreed. France actually has a hell of a martial tradition going back hundreds of years, most notably Charles Martel at the Battle of Tours, and through to the modern day where the French military has borne the brunt of the dirty work in Cote d’Ivoire. WW2 was an embarrassment but even after defeat the Free French kept fighting. So I agree; Cheers!

    • 0 avatar
      dartman

      Well what did you expect from a Canucklehead, Snow-Monkey, Rubber-head, Hoser from Toronto? Hell the only thing to ever come out of Canada was hookers and hockey players. Don’t they speak some foreign language in Hog-Town like french, with weird words like “aboot” “eh” and spend “Loonie” “Toonies” monopoly money on “two-fours” and “Homo” milk! Oh yeah; they also lost the War of 1812! USA! USA! USA!

      Apologies for the above to Canadians everywhere. Derek, a slur is a slur. Would you make the same comment about Mercedes hiding the building of their Panzer-wagens in the deep south with a workforce of poorly paid, uneducated in-bred yokels?

  • avatar
    mjz

    Good god that front end is ugly. Looks like an angry Japanese cartoon character. Why are Toyota/Lexus front grills so ugly lately? I know they were accused of being bland before, but now they are just plain awful looking.

    • 0 avatar
      alsorl

      This little ricer Will sell well in the U.S. even with the its 1990’s technology.

      • 0 avatar
        APaGttH

        If the mechanical under pinnings and driving dynamics are the same, I don’t see how.

        Sales are utterly in the toilet – worth noting in a segment Toyota once basically owned.

        • 0 avatar
          MRF 95 T-Bird

          Agreed as well. Remember how popular the Tercel was. And it came in a variety of flavors from base steel wheeled, vinyl interior, 4 spd manual coupes to fully loaded AWD wagon with incline meter. A Subi beater, no less. Once they dropped it for the penalty box, awful center speedo dash Yaris Toyota gave up the segment to the better Rio, Accent, Fiesta etc.

          • 0 avatar
            threeer

            Think I’ll keep the 1997 Tercel that’s in the family. Well over 200k, near-zero issues mechanically. Heck, the dashboard and door inserts aren’t cracked and even have…wait for it…cloth and relatively soft-touch plastics. The A/C is freezing cold and the engine/clutch are still original. I’m seriously contemplating asking my son to return the car to me when I return from overseas in another year or so. With high 30 (we’ve actually seen low 40s on occassion) MPG and nothing much to break, the old girl is a near-perfect in-town commuter. Not sure that the Yaris is really a true successor to the Tercel…

    • 0 avatar
      anti121hero

      Agreed

  • avatar
    cronus

    French vanilla?

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    Lutefisk in the headliner? Limburger in the dashboard?

  • avatar
    heavy handle

    Still the best car they make. Other than the Crown taxi, which we don’t get. A the diesel Land Cruiser which we also don’t get.

  • avatar
    ChiefPontiaxe

    Does the hood slide back like a foreskin?

  • avatar
    Johannes Dutch

    It’s a good B-segment car, nothing wrong with its quality. It does have a typical “elderly people image” (as in the age of most owners) though, just like the Honda Jazz. (That’s Fit in the US I believe.)

    Younger people mostly go for the smaller and cheaper Toyota Aygo, the new generation (recently introduced) is a real looker, certainly for a Toyota.

    Furthermore there are the Auris (C-segment) and Avensis (D-segment). Toyota also has a design studio in France.

  • avatar
    James2

    Even by Toyota standards it sets a new high in ugliness.

  • avatar
    SELECTIVE_KNOWLEDGE_MAN

    This “article” would have been better if it had been left blank. It is pretty rare that I can say such a negative thing!

    Now. If you want actual information about the car, then I recommend heading over to the European magazines which have actually driven the damn car! The largest improvements seem to be in interior quality, noise reduction and road manners, aka. everything people have asked for since the introduction of the 3rd. gen model.

    I would in particular like to point out the first drive by Autobild, a car mag which is historically very critical of all non-German cars. They test drove the hybrid and confirmed that these points of complaint have indeed been addressed. Reliability reports also show that this French made car isn’t lacking in reliability, although there have been 2 embarrassing recalls.

  • avatar
    wmba

    Derek, this is a poor post from beginning to end.

    The French-made Yaris has been coming to North America for over a year, AS REPORTED IN THESE VERY PAGES. Get your mind in gear, and learn to punctuate as well: ” that its made “.

    As for the cheese-eating comment, I suppose that it’s just a throwaway remark in Toronto, and for the benefit of the knuckle-draggers who frequent this forum, ho f**ing ho.

    Rubbish.

  • avatar
    Acd

    A Renault LeCar had European flavor too; let’s hope the Yaris drives better.

  • avatar
    spw

    Toyota Europe took over ownership of Yaris development, so it means that it is designed and engineered by Toyota Europe. All of their compact vehicles will be designed and engineered in Europe in the future.

    As others said, it is also imported from Europe in this case.

  • avatar

    I do think that Toyota is capable of nice styling within its new school of design. The current Corolla, for example, is very nicely-executed. The Avalon *definitely* is. But this Yaris design just doesn’t work. I’m in no way making fun of this condition, but the way the lower grille meets the upper grille reminds me of someone with cleft lip. Two thumbs down.

  • avatar
    HerrKaLeun

    This articke had no information beyond mentioning the 4-AT. And will it even get exported to the US? They made the Yaris in France for over a decade already.

    And no one in Europe cares how many gears an AT has. They could sell a 2-AT or a 9-AT, wouldn’t matter. The entire continent maybe bought 10 AT cars in the last decade – by guys in a wheelchair. Except for 7 BMW or other cars that don’t have MT at all.

  • avatar
    210delray

    It’s that awful lower grille again! Please kill with fire!

    When can we have small grilles or no grilles back — like ’92 Civics and Crown Vics?

    My first-gen Sable had that wretched light bar, but at least the “grille” consisted of simple vertical slots under the front bumper.

    • 0 avatar
      Ryoku75

      Ditto, if we’ re going to pull off maximum aero we need to ditch this notion that all cars need two grilles.

      Though there area few grilless-types like the Leaf.

  • avatar
    Ryoku75

    Anyone seen one of those second gen Scion Xbs withe armor-all between both grilles? Seems to be where Toyotas going for their latest “design language”.

    I think I prefer their styling when it was boring, Toyota trying to hip-ify its cars is like an old CEO trying to fit in at the skateboard ring.


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