By on June 25, 2014

2015-chrysler-2001

A select group of 2015 Chrysler 200s and Jeep Cherokees will enter showrooms with stop-start technology on-board later this year.

Automotive News reports Chrysler Group will install the tech in Cherokees equipped with its 3.2-liter V6 in Q3 2014, while 200s with the 2.4-liter I4 will receive it in Q4 2014. Cherokees with the 2.4 and 200s with the 3.6 V6 will not have stop-start aboard.

With stop-start, the Cherokee will net 19 mpg in the city at its most fuel-efficient configuration. The 200 fares slightly better at 23 mpg for its most efficient model.

Both the sedan and crossover share the same platform and a number of components, including Chrysler’s new nine-speed automatic transmission.

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32 Comments on “Select 2015 Chrysler 200, Jeep Cherokee Models To Receive Stop-Start...”


  • avatar
    Good ole dayz

    Can one shut off or disable stop-start?

    I have to believe that over time (i.e., post-warranty) the cumulative effect of taking off from a stop without full oil and transmission fluid pressure (and distribution) raises hell with longevity.

    Not to mention the inevitably decrease longevity of starters and batteries. And then there’s the extra complexity of all the sensors etc. required to run start-stop, which are sure to develop post-warranty intermittent issues that are expensive to diagnose and repair.

    Another example of long-term increased costs passed on to the consumer, all in the name of bowing to the Gods of CAFE.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Actually, stop-start has been slow to roll out in the US, exactly because it doesn’t really help with CAFE numbers.

    • 0 avatar
      Scott_314

      Stop-start is pretty much common sense. They’ve been beefing up the batteries in the past couple years and the other parts too. I see your concern but I got used to it after a 4-day BMW rental. Then back in my car, waiting for a full minute at a red light with the engine running, feels stupid and wasteful.

      • 0 avatar
        Kyree S. Williams

        Although BMW uses a large, pricey AGM (Absorbent Glass Mat) battery to achieve this effect. I think the 2014 Malibu with stop/start has a better solution—a regular battery for normal aux/cranking, and then a separate AGM battery in the trunk for aux duty during a stop.

        • 0 avatar
          zerofoo

          I wonder how much fuel is now spent hauling around yet another big heavy battery for the life of the vehicle.

          I’ll bet any fuel economy gains from these added complexities are wiped out late in the life of the vehicle by repair costs.

          It all seems like a game to manipulate EPA MPG and CAFE ratings.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      “Can one shut off or disable stop-start?”

      Yes. There is a button to toggle it on the instrument panel. As for your concerns about the rest of the car, accomodating changes are being made to address durability issues.

      • 0 avatar
        mcs

        It hasn’t been a problem for the Prius. I think Mazda had a really cool system that involved squirting fuel into a cylinder and firing the plug.

        http://www.caranddriver.com/news/mazdas-efficiency-strategy-to-include-stop-start-energy-regeneration-diesel-and-more-car-news

  • avatar
    VoGo

    I will say this for FCA: they continue to install new technology across the model lines, without waiting to align it with a midcycle refresh. First they did this by rolling out the pentagram 6 to nearly every vehicle, and then FCA did it with their transmissions, such that just about everything has an 8- or 9- speed tranny now.

    As opposed to GM, who pretty much would typically let the model rot on the vine for 6 years, and then replace it with a new model, likely with a new name so we would forget the old car.

  • avatar

    STOP/START would help tremendously those of us with V6 and V8 engines find ourselves sitting in traffic.

    It probably doesn’t show major improvements related to CAFE but most of those tests are probably not done trying to get from New York to New Jersey via the Holland tunnel- where you can literally wait on the same street for an hour.

  • avatar
    Kenmore

    Who builds rococo parking garages? Is that some Detroit ruin? (I mean the building)

    • 0 avatar
      jhefner

      That is what caught my eye as well. Thinking it is an old church or goverment building adaptively reused as a parking garage. Left the shell standing as a historical building, but built a parking garage inside of it.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      It would appear to be the Michigan Building in Detroit.

      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michigan_Building

      • 0 avatar
        Kenmore

        No question, that’s it. Thanks.

        If I could stand the vomitous, squiggly excess of rococo, or “Renaissance Revival”, I’d mourn how much that building has lost.

    • 0 avatar
      VoGo

      Congratulations, Kenmore,

      You are the first car guy in history to use the word ‘rococo’.

      • 0 avatar
        koshchei

        Oh, I don’t know. How would you describe the 1970′s Lincoln/Cadillac aesthetic, if not baroque/rococo? There’s a fairly high likelihood that in the last 30-40 years, somebody probably has.

        We can certainly give him credit as the first post-modern functionally-minimalistic appliance with a predisposition towards automotive fanaticism and western culture to mention the high baroque period.

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          “How would you describe the 1970′s Lincoln/Cadillac aesthetic, if not baroque/rococo?”

          One word. Pimptastic.

        • 0 avatar
          Kenmore

          Re: rococo

          Music great, everything else sucked.
          Except maybe the shoes.
          I’d wear those shoes.

          • 0 avatar
            iNeon

            Kenmore– The Rococo palette is a magical thing– impossibly romantic. I’m starting to question your tastes, and I’ve owned both bricks 240. In white.

            Did you take your art history from the old (boring white men) school, or the (black/lesbian feminist) new?

          • 0 avatar
            koshchei

            Not such a fan of Bach — too simplistic harmonically and rhythmically. Give me Liszt, Chopin, through to contemporary stuff like Arvo Pårt.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        Kenmore = Nick Danger :-)

  • avatar
    05lgt

    I like that Blue.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    Without combining this with electric heat & AC, I could see myself using this about 30 days a year. Sitting stuck in summer traffic is not the time I want the compressor to stop running.

  • avatar
    DrGastro997

    I’ve noticed the start-stop being widely used in Japan for almost 20 years. There are street signs encouraging taxis, cars, buses, and motorcycles to shut it down when sitting idle. I don’t like it at all, so far. If it’s a seamless transition then fine. The only car I drove that felt seamless was the Prius. The BMW 3-series wasn’t seamless at all. It was rough stopping and restarting.

    I wonder what stress it puts on an engine.

  • avatar
    brandloyalty

    There are thousands of Ford Escape Hybrids in service as taxis in major US cities. They’re run for 300,000 miles or so, and are retired due to regulations, not because they’re clapped out. I’ve heard of no reports of problems due to stop/start, and surely taxis in big cities would be doing this hundreds of times a day. That’s as far as the ICE goes. Hybrids do use one of their electric motors and the big hybrid battery as a starting system, so I trust these non-hybrids with stop/start will have durable starters. And a good charging system for cold weather.

  • avatar
    HotPotato

    The biggest benefit may be refinement. The 2.5 liter 4-cyl in my rental Fusion, only one year old, had a noticeable amount of engine vibration at a stop. I shudder to think (teehee) what it would be like when the engine mounts start to wear out. And I suspect it’s the same story for all these midsize family sedans powered by mammoth 2.4, 2.5 liter Fours.

    Of course, this assumes that the start-stop feature works smoothly. Hybrids like the Prius and C-Max do it seamlessly; some ICE-only cars not so much.

    • 0 avatar
      danio3834

      What’s neat about the system when used with the MultiAir engine, is the valves can be commanded to reduce the effective compression ratio during cranking to make for smoother starts.

  • avatar
    shaker

    Hopefully soon, all cars will be some level of hybrid – at the lowest level using regen to restart the engine using a “pancake” motor and small supercapacitor/battery combo. That would save many millions of gallons per year, and the costs would be quickly recovered. The pancake motor wouldn’t require the typical starter gearing and subsequent wear issues.

    • 0 avatar
      iNeon

      NOOOOOOOOOOO! I don’t like a pancake engine :/

      Didn’t like it in the 1600tl, don’t like it in the PT Cruiser. Too much time to service them. I tire of removing half the car’s induction and a goodly portion of the fuel system to replace spark plugs.

      • 0 avatar
        shaker

        Wrong “pancake” – I’m talking about an electric motor between the engine and transmission, capable of starting the car using direct drive, thus avoiding using the starter gears.

        Maybe more of a “bagel” motor :-)

        Out of necessity, it would be a high-voltage unit (200 volts or so) to keep the wire size down, and a lithium battery pack + supercapacitor bank to provide starting power and some limited regen to make stop-and-go less wasteful.

        Id be willing to bet that such a combo pack could be not much larger than present lead-acid batteries in the near future.

        • 0 avatar
          iNeon

          D’oh! I knew that! Having stopped correcting everyone that thinks ‘motor’ and ‘engine’ are the same– I’ve allowed my mind to relent that they are!


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