By on May 13, 2014

Golf SportWagen Exterior

Volkswagen officially announced their new 2015 Golf Sportwagen (nee Jetta Sportwagen) for the US market. And they’re still unclear about whether it will get 4Motion AWD.

Despite rumors to the contrary, Volkswagen told TTAC that they are still “investigating AWD”. For now, FWD will be the only option, along with a 1.8T gas engine (with a 5-speed manual or 6-speed auto) or a 2.0 TDI with either 6-speed manual or DSG gearboxes. VW says that cargo space will rival many small SUVs, and now it’s up to all of you to buy them, rather than just let the internet know how great wagons are.

 

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61 Comments on “2015 Volkswagen Golf Sportwagen Will Not Have AWD – Yet...”


  • avatar
    FractureCritical

    I saw the blue 4motion stick golf wagon at the New York auto show. I believe it was a 5 speed/1.8T version (could be worng) and I saw more people crawliing over it than anything else VW had to offer. The thing was a hipster magnet like nothing else as the show.

    The product rep told me that they have gotten a lot of really positive feedback on the car from a lot of different people. … including disgruntled audi owners who can’t get wagons anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      Stumpaster

      a. hipsters don’t buy cars, they rent.
      b. what did you expect, that the PR pimp would tell you the people really hated the car? disgruntled audi owners can and do get Q3, Q5 or Q7.

      • 0 avatar
        hyperion740

        No disgruntled Audi Avant owners don’t buy the Q SUVs. They don’t settle for that. Those are entirely new customers. Customers who are the majority in terms of preferring SUVs as a result of superb marketing over the years. Wagon people are quite discerning and don’t settle for something. The Audi Avant owners went to either BMW or VW or didn’t buy another vehicle.

  • avatar
    davefromcalgary

    Dangit, I’m all out of new car buying ability at the moment.

  • avatar
    3800FAN

    I was looking at the sportwagens till I looked and saw the old focus wagons have bigger interiors. I wish ford would bring back the focus wagon.

  • avatar
    onyxtape

    Around the time they become available, I’ll be up for a car refresh.

    If AWD is available – just shut up and take my money!

  • avatar

    The small but dedicated wagonista loyalists will never rival the sheer volume of faux-yuppie student-loans-preclude-me-from-qualifying-for-a-Q5 Tiguan buyers.

    • 0 avatar
      sproc

      Sadly, you’re probably right. It kills me that in an ideal world, I would be choosing between stroking a check for an S3 Sportback or an S4 Avant, but quite likely will bring my money to a VW dealer instead if they can deliver the form factor I want.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    I’d wager those pragmatic enough to appreciate wagons are also pragmatic enough to be reluctant to buy a new car (or finance anything at least).

    Or at least that’s my case. I just need these to stick around long enough so I can get to a point where I can rationally buy a new car.

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      I’d wager wagon buyers are pragmatic enough to keep them for a long time, the U.S. average being around 11 years. You have a long wait!

      Edit: @Maymar… I misread your post. Nevermind. Commenting should be banned after midnight.

    • 0 avatar
      gtemnykh

      I’d wager those pragmatic enough to appreciate wagons are also pragmatic enough to avoid Volkswagens and their repair costs!

      *ducks for cover*

      But a close family friend of ours did buy a 2010 JSW TDI 6spd, check engine light and no start condition within 6 months of owning it. Anecdotal I know. The 1996 Civic DX with 170k miles it replaced had the running costs of a dishwasher and got 38mpg on his rural commute.

      • 0 avatar
        brettc

        I’ve had no mechanical problems with my 2012 Jetta wagon. Although it has had some problems (scratched steering wheel, broken engine electrical connector) that happened up after I took it in for one of VW’s “carefree maintenance” appointments. But the dealer fixed those problems. I’m at 25000 miles and am happy with it so far except for the problems that only occurred when I decided to take advantage of VW’s free (but certainly not frustration free) maintenance. I’m trying another dealer for my last free service.

        Other German brands also share in new/no-start fun. A guy in our subdivision recently had his brand new BMW 335 loaded onto a AAA flatbed and then had an X3 loaner for about a week. So BMW apparently puts out some lemons too.

  • avatar
    30-mile fetch

    My wagon conscience is clear, I bought one 4 years ago. AWD doesn’t interest me, and neither does the TDI. I like my VWs the only way I trust them, simple. 5-banger w/ 5-speed, FWD.

    It’s not very attractive looking in profile, is it?

    • 0 avatar
      WheelMcCoy

      As a happy owner of a 2012 TSX Wagon, my conscience is also clear. Agreed, the profile on the VW Golf Sportwagen looks a bit clunky and certainly not as sleek looking as the TSX Wagon, But the VW comes with a 5 speed manual!

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      That 5-banger is on its way out. They’ve already got the 1.8-liter turbo as the volume engine in the Passat and Jetta.

      • 0 avatar

        The 2.5 may be on its way out, but it was a criminally under-appreciated engine. VW has a history of trouble with their engines, especially the gas ones (kids, don’t buy anything with the 2.0T before 2009). The 2.5 was there one solid and reliable option. Good torque, interesting noise, etc.

        • 0 avatar
          matador

          I’d add the Audi 2.7T to the list of avoidable engines. I’ve heard good things about the engine itself, but I’ve heard that the turbochargers aren’t that reliable.

          I’m happy I found an Audi A6 Avant with the 2.8. The 2.8 is a tad pedestrian in speed, but mine certainly is reliable.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            Was there an Avant with the 4.2? Since the sedan and Allroad Quattro got it.

            Becuz that’s a dandy engine.

          • 0 avatar
            gtemnykh

            My mechanic brother whole-heartedly endorses the good old 2.8 V6 in Audis, much moreso than the 1.8T. The v6 is pretty fun in an older A4 with a stick shift and Quattro!

          • 0 avatar
            Kyree S. Williams

            I have the 2.8-liter VR6 in my MK3 Jetta, but that’s a different engine than the Audi 2.8-liter.

        • 0 avatar
          NeinNeinNein

          2.0T Audi A4 engine (same basically as what VW offers) has been trouble free for 104K miles. A couple coil pack issues–otherwise its been great. Civic vs a VW. Hmmmmmmm not a difficult choice there. Civic = a tin box–usually w/ peeling clearcoat

      • 0 avatar
        30-mile fetch

        I know it is being phased out, its efficiency was the Achilles heel. Hopefully the 1.8t will be as reliable as the 2.5. The only reason I went for the VW is the promising reliability ratings for VWs equipped with the 5.

        I agree it was under-appreciated. Not a street racer engine, but excellent for everyday driving. Very responsive with the manual. I was surprised that my 5 cylinder was more responsive moving through traffic at low rpms than the 2.0 turbo GLI I tested while waiting for scheduled maintenance.

        • 0 avatar
          brettc

          I had a 2.5 loaner twice in a Jetta and Passat. Good power but I couldn’t believe how thirsty it was even in the Jetta. I was glad to get my TDI back.

          I now also own a 1.8TSI Jetta so I’m hoping the engineers and the people in Silao have put together a long lasting engine. Time will tell. So far we’re averaging about 27 MPG in mostly city driving with it.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            brettc,
            The 23/30 EPA mpg is realistic for the 2.5. Like most gassers, that’s much thirstier than the TDI, but I didn’t have to pay the $4500 premium for the privilege of saving fuel. And there’s something about the complexity of that TDI that scares me in the long run.

            Were you able to run through most of a tank on your loaner to calculate the mileage, or was it more of a “use a 1/4 tank and fill it up prior to return”?

        • 0 avatar
          Short Bus

          aaaactually….. if you could get over the initial cost and install of the kit, the 2.5 has a higher, and easier to access power ceiling than the 2.0T. Yeah the initial power upgrade path on the 2.0T is easier to access with simple upgrades, but when you’re at the point of bolting on a bigger turbo and upgrading the fuel system the 2.5 is actually better than some give it credit for.

          • 0 avatar
            30-mile fetch

            Oooh, link please. When my powertrain warranty expires that sounds mighty tempting.

        • 0 avatar
          sgeffe

          Turbo. VW. Reliable. Pick any one.

  • avatar
    redliner

    As an auto enthusiast and a b&b commentariat I would just like to wash my hands of all this brown-manual-wagon fetishism.

  • avatar
    alsorl

    AWD or just FWD this new sportwagen will sell very well in the U.S. It’s been needing a refresh for sometime now.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      On what do you base your data, the always-stellar sales of the original version? The desire for many people of a small FWD wagon?

      Or did you just make it up entirely? Do you in fact live in the US?

  • avatar
    DrSandman

    It’s simple: my backseat must accommodate my 6’2″ “children”… My rear wheels must be driven. My car must be able to double the “recommended speed” of on-ramps. My mileage must be 30mpg hw or better.

    Whomever (Volvo, Audi, BMW, Subaru, Porsche, Caddy, and still accepting applications…) offers me the wagony-car will get my $50,000 dollars in $100 bills.

    • 0 avatar
      TOTitan

      My 335d exceeds all those requirements without even trying except for the 6’2″ children part. BMW does offer that engine in 5′s and 7′s now but probably not for 50K.

      • 0 avatar

        One of the best cars I’ve ever driven. M3 vs M Sport 335d is a better comparison than you’d think.

        I hope you aren’t one of the folks with a plugged intake at 50k. There seems to be an EGR problem, theories say “icky US diesel” or “folks who don’t drive hard”….

        I’m retroactively grateful I didn’t end up with a CPO 335, no matter how big blocky it drives

        • 0 avatar
          TOTitan

          My 335d is the best car Ive ever owned and having driven for 45 years now thats quite a few. With 425 ft lbs of torque all in by 1750 rpm the availability of instant, massive power with no fuss is simply amazing. Mine is a CPO car that I picked up with 33,000 miles for $28K that includes warranty coverage until 100,000 miles. Compared to anything else available for that kind of money, I cot a lot of car for not much money. With 55K on it now I have not had carbon buildup issues yet, but if I do, BMW has said they will take care of it.

      • 0 avatar
        DrSandman

        Yeah, I’m thinking a 328d or 328i Wagen (or whatever they call it) is going to win by default. The wife hates bimmers because she associates them with bunghole drivers and cheating husbands, but not necessarily in that order. I swore I would never cheat, so….

        • 0 avatar
          Kyree S. Williams

          The E-Class wagon meets all of that criteria, but good luck *ever* getting a new one for $50K. I’d suggest the new V60, but it looks a tad cramped (and it’s FWD-based). I say go with the Bimmer.

          • 0 avatar
            CoreyDL

            The E-Class estate is quite a bit more stately than the 3-Series has ever been.

            I’d sacrifice and get a very slightly used one to fit his (too demanding) specifications.

  • avatar
    TOTitan

    I have a 2012 Sportwagon TDI with DSG. So far after 30K miles its been perfect…no issues, squeeks, rattles etc. Its amazingly useful for carrying stuff and its got great german fun to drive characteristics even though it was assembled in Mexico.

    • 0 avatar
      Kyree S. Williams

      I never understood why people think that the Mexican-built Volkswagens aren’t built the same as the other models. It might be because the Puebla factory builds lower-tier models. But trust me, my MK3 Jetta VR6 is *just* as unreliable as all of the other VWs of that era. In fact, it’s at the shop currently because the A/C compressor exploded—through no fault of mine—and took out the radiator, radiator-support and condenser with it. It’s too much of a hassle to part it out. So I’m going to fix it and sell it…and then get a new or newer Volkswagen, because I’m just that insane…

      • 0 avatar
        FractureCritical

        2010 Jetta sportwagen – built in Mexico:

        ABS failure – assembly fault in sensor connector

        airbag failure – assembly fault in connector under seat

        sunroof rebuilt – assembly error when installing glass panel on rails

        driver side mirror failure – assembly error bolts not tightened

        LOOSE SUBFRAME BOLTS

        broken interior trim clips

        falling out exterior light housings

        shall I go on?

        it took TEN MONTHS for this car to fall apart from the time it came off the damn truck from that miserable hell hole of Puebla.

        I sure they’ve gotten their act together since.

        • 0 avatar
          bball40dtw

          The loose subframe bolts were an issue on many MKV Jettas/Golfs. They stretched out and needed to be replaced, ideally with the beefier Passat bolts.

          I will say that owning 4 different MKV VW products with 3 different engines, 3 different transmissions, and 2 different body styles over about 200K miles, the German built products held up better. My Jetta Wolfsburg’s suspension was feeling sad at 40K miles.

      • 0 avatar
        DC Bruce

        Amazing stuff. I’ve owned cars for more than 40 years. I’ve had a/c compressors fail but never “explode.” VAG always finds new ways to fail, and they’ve been doing it a long time. My 1980 Audio 5000 (bought new) had the heater core fail, drenching the front floorpan in coolant. Never had that happen before . . . or since. Also, that car had the boots on the steering rack fail, requiring complete replacement. Never had that happen before or since. Also the slave cylinder on the hydraulic clutch failed. Never had that happen before or since. All this before the car even had 50K miles . . . and I won’t even mention the diesel engine.

        Audi: the car that fulfills your need for adventure!

  • avatar
    TonyJZX

    i wouldnt want this as its VAG technology, no thanks

    but i think many companies have it almost right but cant get the pieces together

    here’s what I think…

    Cruze Wagon
    1.6 turbo gasoline which runs on regular but can get 40mpg hwy
    6 spd manual or 6 spd automatic
    slight lift for a CUV like look but still a station wagon vibe
    put an electric motor driving the back wheels and a modest battery pack

    you want 4wd? push a button and it runs in concert with the front wheels

    you want EV mode with no gasoline used? charge it up from the wall socket

    you want to travel 1,000 miles? use the gasoline motor

    why isnt this happening?

  • avatar
    MRF 95 T-Bird

    Up until a few years ago VW offered 4 Motion on a few cars, namely the Passat and Phaeton. (The quite rare Passat W8 4 Motion 6 speed was a unique vehicle) Then they drop the option probably thinking that the typical VW buyer wanting the option in a car is ready to move up a notch to an Audi. Shades of Alfred Sloan at GM.

  • avatar
    changsta

    As much as everyone would like to think this will be a hit, I’m still skeptical. The current Sportwagen has more cargo capacity than the Tiguan at a lower price, but I still see far more Tiguans on the road. I’m a wagon lover myself (2004 Ford Focus ZTW, 2006 Mazda5 GT, 2008 Volvo V50 T5) but I think my next vehicle will be a crossover. The driving position and ride height is something that is simply better in a taller vehicle. I test drove the new Volvo V60 against the Volvo XC60 and although the XC definitely wasn’t as agile, it had 95% of the handling ability in daily driving type situations with a far more spacious feeling cabin and a more commanding view of the road. Sorry wagon lovers, but if the demand was there, every manufacturer would be in the game.

  • avatar
    IHateCars

    “…and now it’s up to all of you to buy them, rather than just let the internet know how great wagons are.”

    Lol…well said! And that is the real problem right there.

    • 0 avatar
      natrat

      no the real problem is the bait and switch, showing the real deal and delivering half of it

    • 0 avatar
      Ubermensch

      Sorry, can’t do it this time. I am a wagon lover (2006 Subaru Legacy Wagon) and I have already most likely committed to getting a Fiesta ST as a second commuter car. I am just one man and can only do my part by buying 2 of the enthusiast demanded vehicles. Plus, I already did the VW wagon thing before the Subaru and it was a disaster.

  • avatar
    NN

    Sounds like a great car, and very similar to the Seat Altea I reviewed for TTAC last year: http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/11/ur-turn-seat-altea-xl-a-reader-rental-review/

    After reading the frequent comments here re: VAG reliability, I wouldn’t buy a VW, but an attractive lease deal (for the manual diesel, if they’d dare) would have me considering something like this.

  • avatar
    Perc

    Interesting that the 1.8T gets a 6 speed auto.

    Here in Euroland, it’s called 1.8 TSI and gets a 7 speed dry-clutch DSG just like the 1.2 and 1.4 versions. I can understand why, though… the dry-clutch DSG is far behind a torque converter auto in stop/start situations. The six-speed wet-clutch DSG mated to the 2.0TDI and 2.0TSI is a lot smoother.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    She sho got a smoov ass now. But the interior looks cheap.

    • 0 avatar
      sgeffe

      Yep–crapcan interior from the new Jettas.

      And why did the automakers in general get rid of the tint “brow” strip at the top of windshields? (Damned accountants!)

  • avatar
    Short Bus

    I always liked these, but they’ve been in need of a decent bump in efficiency ratings. The old 2.5 was a good engine, but too thirsty these days.

  • avatar
    nutbags

    Having had a 2009 Sportwagon 2.5 with a 5-speed which my family loved and never had a problem with. The 2.5 provided enough oomph but mileage was not as good as expected. I look forward to replacing my 2012 GLI 6-speed with the new model. A 1.8T with 5-speed sounds good but why no 6-speed manual? Curious about pricing on leases and what trim levels there will be.

    • 0 avatar
      30-mile fetch

      A number of reviews of the 1.8t stated the broad torque curve made a sixth gear unnecessary.

      It’s the 5-cylinder that needed a 6-speed. It runs 3000rpm at 70mph in fifth, and while that ensures you don’t need to downshift to overtake someone or climb steep grades, I’m sure it is costing a few miles per gallon.


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