By on January 16, 2014
YouTube Preview Image

Rivaling Jack’s tales of his harem in the “Most Unpopular Subject Matter on TTAC” Sweepstakes is my constant references to rap music. What I perceived to be a wink-and-a-nod to younger readers who enjoy hip-hop was succinctly summed up by one commenter who wrote “It wouldn’t be a Kreindler piece without a [deleted perjorative for white wannabe rappers] reference”. Although I resolved to tone down the “shout-outs”, an recent piece by Bloomberg demonstrates that there is a time and a place for a knowledge of hip-hop music.

Bloomberg, – a notorious peddlar of pro-Cadillac stories, even in the face of contradictory date – is committing yet another act of fellatio-in-print upon GM’s luxury brand, suggesting that a song by rapper Macklemore is indicative of Cadillac’s rising fortunes, along with a 22 percent bump in sales in 2013. There are, of course, a few issues at play here

1) Nobody who is a real fan of the genre regards Macklemore as anything but an interloping yuppie, adopting hip-hop modes of dress and language while preaching overly PC themes. This is neither the time nor the place for a discussion of hip-hop’s attitude towards gender relations, other sexual orientations or state and federal penal codes, but it’s safe to say that people from all walks of life, whether black, white, gay, straight male or female enjoy hip-hop music, including its darker sub-genres – and part of it is because the edgy, if not downright criminal themes, resonate within them the same way that any form of rebellious, anti-social music does. Macklemore is like the helicopter parent that wants Little League to abandon scorekeeping and make every game a tie, when everyone else is alright with the spirit of competition.

2) Cadillac has not been relevant in hip-hop, or with young people, for some time. Over time, rappers’ taste in cars has evolved, with imported luxury cars becoming the preferred vehicle of choice. Maybe the 2015 Escalade will make a resurgence, but it’s hard to see rappers backing away from the G-Wagen and Range Rover as the SUV of choice.

3) Even though a late model SRX is driven for 2 seconds in the video, the song is not singing the praises of the XTS, CTS or any modern Cadillac. The brand made its way into hip-hop culture via old body-on-frame sedans like the Fleetwood, which were both prestigious in hip-hops early days, and popular with the low rider crowd on the West Coast. Dr Dre may have been “King of the beats you ride to in your Fleetwood” but nobody is ever going to rap about the ATS. Speaking of which…

4) In a growing luxury market, Cadillac sold 182,543 units, including 38,319 ATS models. Subtract sales of the ATS from that total, and Cadillac’s 2013 performance is worse than any other year since 2009. So while adding a nameplate has been a help for Cadillac’s overall volume, the rest of the brand is down, and the ATS itself has been struggling, with residuals taking a beating due to incentive spending. Those $299/month lease deals are going to be very expensive for Cadillac once the term is up.

5) Bloomberg’s piece also sneaks in the inevitable mention of Cadillac as a global luxury brand. Can we please stop this? Mary Barra may be targeting 1 million units in a decade, but with diesel engines not arriving for another three years, Cadillac is, and will remain, an utter non-entity in Europe

The “White Walls” video isn’t so much an ad for new Cadillacs as it is an homage to the Broughams and B-Bodies of yesterday, the ones that cemented Cadillac’s reputation as a “pimp mobile”. They might still be writing songs about Fleetwoods, but in 20 years, nobody will ever be rapping about the XTS. Now, the Elmiraj on the other hand…

 

Get the latest TTAC e-Newsletter!

89 Comments on “Generation Why: Macklemore Is Wack, And So Is Bloomberg’s Piece On Cadillac...”


  • avatar
    jaydez

    You mentioned that 38,319 of the sales were for the new ATS. It makes me think though, how many of those buyers went into the showroom to look for a CTS and ended up with a ATS because 1: it was newer, and 2: they didn’t know it existed prior to stepping foot in the showroom.

    What did CTS sales look like year over year?

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      CTS sales in 2013 were 47K, against 55K for 2012. So a 15% decline.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      CTS sales were down for the year by almost 15,000 units, or about 31%.

      It should also be noted that there was a substantial price increase for MY 2014 (about $6,000) as GM tries to move it up the ladder. But oddly enough, sales during 4Q2013 weren’t that far off of 4Q2012.

      It could be cannibalization. But it seems more likely that some CTS buyers spent most of the year waiting for the new 2014 replacement model to be released last fall.

      • 0 avatar
        AdamVIP

        I think due to its unique size the old CTS was in a position were a lot of people felt it was right at the verge of being too big or too small for their needs. Everyone knew the ATS was coming and the CTS was getting bigger so I think people who wanted the smaller ride bought the ATS and those who wanted bigger waited till the new CTS came out.

        They are good cars and I think the public will find them this generation.

  • avatar
    redav

    I still don’t know who this Macklemore is. I think that is probably a good thing.

    I still don’t see the appeal of the Elmiraj. I suspect it, like wagons, is an indicator of the disconnect between ‘car guys’ and normal people.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      Go on Youtube and search for “Thrift Shop” and “Same Love”. He’s a white hip-hop/rap/whatever artist who’s lyrics and style run counter to the classical white viewpoint of what rap and hip-hop are.

      For instance, “Thrift Shop” talks about buying stuff and, wait for it, a thrift shop. It espouses thriftiness as opposed to the more common gauche displays of wealth.

      “Same Love” is about supporting equality and gay rights (mostly marriage) which, again, is counter to the usual homophobic stance of most rap stars.

      I disagree with Derek’s “No True Scottsman” fallacy and believe that what Macklemore is doing is excellent.

      • 0 avatar
        morbo

        Meh. As a decriptly old 36 year old, I remember hip hops golden era. KRS-One, Ice Cube, Chuck D, and Flavor Flav before reality TV and big breasted German Amazon Women defined him.

        It’s like a Philly cheesesteak. There’s no ‘right’ way to make hip hop anymore than than there’s a singular Philly cheesesteak (though sharp provolone with onions, mushrooms, and rabe brocolli is the way to go). Anyone claiming the ‘right’ way to rap is an idiot.

        Granted, Mackerelmore is terrible (to my ears), but the young-ins must find something they like about him. Good for them. I return to listening to Tupac when he was a goofy, fun loving spaz doing the humpty Dance as part of the Digital Underground entourage.

      • 0 avatar
        05lgt

        Seconded on the “No True Scotsman” BS. I may or may not be a “real” fan of the genre, but … my playlist this AM on Pandora has NWA (who I first bought when it was an off label cassette), Tech N9ne, Prozak & Nappy Roots. I respect Macklemore’s sound and message. Then again, I was never a true banger, only a known associate and occasional wheel man. Truth is when I listen to the song in question I always envision an old Fleetwood, gloss black, convertible w/ whitewalls and way too much chrome. Resto-modded with way too many speakers.

      • 0 avatar
        Don Mynack

        His “message” is hilariously on the nose and bludgeons the listener nearly to death with it. “Thrift Shop” is at least humorous – “Same Love” is so corny that even my children mock it and demand that I change the station on the radio. It’s Jr. High level message music delivered by a mumbling nitwit.

        • 0 avatar

          Exactly. A$AP Rocky delivers a similar message to “Same Love” and takes specific aim at the entrenched homophobia in hip-hop.

          • 0 avatar
            Les

            Derek.. *sigh* I just.. no. I… No. Just No.

            ‘Same Love’, is it corny? I don’t know, I don’t care. Is it a dilution of Hip-Hop? I don’t know, I don’t Care. Have others made more ‘targeted’ jabs at Hip-Hop’s particular specific brand of homophobia? I don’t know..

            And I…

            Don’t…

            CARE!

            ‘Same Love’ speaks to Everyone, it speaks about a problem that’s in Every segment of our society, and it speaks to me. Everyone needs to hear ‘I can’t change, even if I tried.. even if I, wanted too…’ Not just the Hip-Hop haters afraid their manliness will be questioned about what they’re doing ‘on the down-low’, but the fire-and-brimstone preachers telling their congregations that if gay marriage goes through they’ll be ‘less-married’ to their own spouses, it needs to be heard by the parents who take their kids out of schools with a gay teacher for fear their kids will catch ‘the gay’.

            It needs to be heard by my own grandfather, who honestly believes that homosexuals are not fighting for equal rights and equal treatment but are fighting for the right to rape children in the town square.

            It needs to be heard by my former barber, the good-ol-boy who made a comment while I was in his chair about how funny it would be to go up to the big city with a lariat rope, hog-tie some homosexuals, and castrate them: and then Laughed, laughed like he’d just made a really funny joke.. nevermind how un-funny that sounds to someone with homosexual friends who’ve told stories of their own friends who were hog-tied, who were castrated, and who BLED-OUT-AND-DIED-FROM-IT!

            Derek, Mister Kreindler, What the [REDACTED] man? Seriously? It is ALWAYS the time, it is ALWAYS the place to talk about this, and it Always will be so long as I keep hearing stories about young people that were beaten and strung across barbed-wire and left out to die for being a Fa-[REDACTED].

            If this steps on your delicate musical tastes, Mister Kreindler, I’m afraid that’s just too bad.

          • 0 avatar
            chevron

            Yes Les, we all agree crimes are bad, especially violent crimes. Are homosexuals victims of violent crime at a highly disproportionate rate? No, not really. So calm down.

            Entertainment media is for the purposes of entertainment and nobody has an obligation to listen to something that doesn’t entertain them just because it has a message you feel is important.

          • 0 avatar
            mr.cranky

            Derek sounds like every other stuffed shirt that has criticized rap/hip-hop over the years.

            I mean, how can he claim to speak for people who listen to rap when he’s shown that he knows very little about it?

          • 0 avatar
            Les

            @Chevron

            Right, right-right-right.. Nobody has an obligation to listen to this, that, or the other… but they Do have an obligation to tell others to shut up so they can enjoy being ‘Edgy’.

            And really? “It doesn’t happen that often, so it’s not worth getting worked-up over.”

            Look, I know you’re trying to say something that sounds reasonable in your head but are you even aware of the possibility that the words you’ve chosen to express yourself might sound dismissive, condescending if not outright bigoted to others looking in from a different perspective?

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      He takes black music and dilutes it for the masses, like Elvis, with the added dimension of making fun of black conspicuous consumption, with the Thrift Shop song, except for when he is late to the party copying it, with this Cadillac song.

      The only way he could be more out of touch is if he referenced the G-wagen.

      • 0 avatar
        The Heisenberg Cartel

        Conspicuous consumption is a rap thing, not a black thing. It’s a theme in songs from white, black, Latino and Asian rappers that I’ve heard. So he’s more making fun of rap stereotypes.

      • 0 avatar

        I almost used this analogy, but even with Elvis, there was an element of salaciousness. They only showed him from the waist up, never shaking his hips. Macklemore is safe, easy-listening rap that you’re more likely to hear on a pop station and a hip-hop channel.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      His songs are complete and utter $hit. Recently he had a song about shopping at Goodwill, and now this song about sleeping in his Cadillac.

      He’s also white, and looks like he’s probably high a lot.

    • 0 avatar
      halstorm

      He likes the bugger boys.

      On the other hand, this is probably really pretty good news for Cadillac.

      I suspect that your Macklemore liking types probably leave their leased vehicles in better condition to be marketed post-lease than the demographic that is abandoning the Cadillac brand. Are they leaving the Chrysler 300 now too? If not, can someone hurry them along, thank you very much.

  • avatar
    sportyaccordy

    Even with diesels, Caddy will remain a non entity in Europe, just as all non-European luxury brands will. They don’t want it. Especially at prices on the level of actual European luxury cars. The whole “ape the Germans” thing is a stupid idea that GM jumped on about 10-15 years too late.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      The global Cadillac concept is a brand manager’s fantasy. The old GM didn’t entirely disappear in the ashes of the BK.

      They should have turned Opel into the global luxury brand, with Cadillac as the in-your-face luxury SUV maker paired with it. Opel as GM’s Audi would raise some eyebrows in Europe, but at least GM could have bragged to the world about its one virtue — it’s German.

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    You know what they need:

    Me and my baby and my Cadillac, fifth wheel on the back, yeah

  • avatar
    Detroit-Iron

    I disagree with the premise. I believe that Cadillac still has cachet with the hip-hop crowd (i.e. everyone Baruth’s age or younger), but I also believe that out of stupidity or possibly even racism they will squander it.

    • 0 avatar
      sportyaccordy

      As a member of the “hip hop crowd” I can say this is patently false. See: Lloyd Banks, “Bimmer, Benz or Bentley”. Like the European market hip hop wants nothing to do with washed up domestic brands. The novelty of the Escalade wore off about 6-7 years ago.

      • 0 avatar
        Detroit-Iron

        Who the fuck is Lloyd Banks? Your username is “sportyaccordy” I don’t think you are an arbiter of taste for anyone who doesn’t read whatever the 2014 equivelent of “sport compact” magazine is. Now git off ma lawn!

        • 0 avatar
          fvfvsix

          Okay…I hope my username is sufficient to answer your post then…Given that small arms are indeed “gangsta”, I think I’ll be okay..

          Anyway, I’ll register my agreement with Mr. Accordy. Anything under $100K is the automotive equivalent of dogsh!t in today’s rap music.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      Right, and they still show Ja Rule and Nelly on MTV during Carson Daly’s hosting of TRL.

  • avatar
    danio3834

    At least Cadillac is ahead of Lincoln in credibility. While I really like their current cars, they need to lead instead of follow. Not easy, but that’s what they have to do. Be what they can be and make the best luxury cars in the world.

    • 0 avatar
      Pch101

      Cadillac isn’t likely to recoup its investment. Outside of North America and possibly China, it won’t be taken seriously.

      Lincoln has been operating on a shoestring, which shows, but it won’t bleed so much.

      Cadillac is making the better vehicle, but Lincoln is the more financially prudent choice of the two.

      • 0 avatar
        danio3834

        “Cadillac isn’t likely to recoup its investment. Outside of North America and possibly China, it won’t be taken seriously.”

        That was my point, they need to build credibility to be taken seriously. That’s built over time and making the right products. I agree it’s easy to be skeptical that they would not be successful in doing this in any big way, looking at the way things are and have been.

        If they can’t make a case to make and sell Cadillacs among the best, they might as well just fold the brand and let Buick take over affordable luxury.

      • 0 avatar
        imag

        They could do worse than to be successful in China.

      • 0 avatar
        PenguinBoy

        While I agree with you that an American (or Japanese, for that matter) luxury car is unlikely to be taken seriously in Europe, I don’t think Cadillac should stop trying to make competitive luxury cars.

        They can potentially be successful in North America and China – which are two of the biggest markets for luxury cars and hopefully are enough to carry the brand.

        Plus GM is one of the top three automakers in the world, and that is unlikely to change anytime soon – so I can see some value in them offering a top of the range product to show of their capabilities and build credibility for the company as a whole. Toyota has the Lexus LS, Volkswagon has the Audi A8, why shouldn’t GM offer a world class Cadillac?

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          If a brand was going to be reinvented into a global sports sedan maker, it would have been better to have started with a German brand, as German heritage actually helps to sell expensive cars to non-Germans.

          GM actually has one of those, but opted to complain about the labor costs instead of using the location as a selling point for a new breed of autobahn screamers. If VW could reinvent Audi, surely someone else could have done the same with Opel.

          • 0 avatar
            PenguinBoy

            It took a long time to get Audi up to the point where it was taken seriously as a competitor to Mercedes et. al. I think it would take even longer to raise Opel up to that level – my sense is Opel / Vauxhaul is considered a notch below Volkswagon in Europe, maybe on par with (or slightly below) Ford, so hardly a premium brand.

            At least the Cadillac name still has ~some~ equity in its home market, and has a shot in China.

            I don’t think a German badge is essential for a credible luxury brand – Lexus seems to do just fine with a Japanese badge, I don’t see why Cadillac can’t eventually get up to that level as well. Since GM is identified as an American company, it makes sense for it to have an American flagship.

            Another thing that works in Cadillac’s favour: now that some of the Germans are moving downmarket to chase volume (e.g., Benz CLA), they run the risk of tarnishing their brands – much like Cadillac themselves did 40 years ago. Since GM has several brands, they at least have the option of positioning Cadillac higher, while chasing volume with Chev, and to an extent Buick.

    • 0 avatar
      bball40dtw

      Everyone seems to like the newer Cadillacs, but that doesn’t get them out of their BMWs, Audi, Lexus, Merc, or whatever.

  • avatar
    Eggshen2013

    “Macklemore is like the helicopter wants Little League to abandon scorekeeping and make every game a tie, when everyone else is alright with the spirit of competition.”

    Hip Hop English?

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Oldsmobile has more hip-hop credibility than Cadillac.

    Suckers to tha side
    I know you hate my 98
    You gonna get yours

  • avatar
    MPAVictoria

    “Nobody who is a real fan of the genre regards Macklemore as anything but an interloping yuppie, adopting hip-hop modes of dress and language while preaching overly PC themes.”

    I like Macklemore and his themes. Sexism and homophobia are a huge problem in hip hop and it is nice to see something a little different. Also, just for future reference, people who complain about “political correctness” always come of to me as just being angry that they can’t call people fags in polite company anymore.

    • 0 avatar
      notapreppie

      Agreed. Derek’s employing the “No True Scottsman” fallacy here and it really undermines the preamble and ramp up to his criticism of Bloomberg (which could stand on its own without the alleged support from the fallacious argument).

    • 0 avatar
      korvetkeith

      Macklemore’s a fag.

      The hip hop crowd going away from Cadillac aligns with their desire to be exactly like BMW. I just wonder if there is a sufficient market for BMW, Audi, Mercedes and Cadillac to all compete for the same customers. Cadillac formerly having a different demographic due to the escalade’s popularity certainly was beneficial for their bottom line.

      I suspect the Range Rover and Porsche Cayenne’s appeal to suffer the same fate as the escalade’s soon as they are now the soccer mom and hip hoppers rides of choice. I find it funny how much those two demographic’s tastes overlap.

      • 0 avatar
        The Heisenberg Cartel

        “Macklemore’s a fag.”

        Cool story bro. Got anymore of em?

      • 0 avatar
        Jellodyne

        I heard he liked girls from before pre-k.

        All that poser gangster woman hating ‘Rumpelstiltskin ass shit’ is immature posturing. Macklemore’s lyrics are fresh by comparison, and it’s not so much ‘PC’ as mature. Not ‘explicit’ — I mean the opposite of immature.

        There’s a ton of folks who might like hip hop if so much of it weren’t so fucking stupid and hateful. I really like Macklemore’s album, even if it is a bit pop at times. Also listen to some Atmosphere or P.O.S. That’s my jam right there, tight hip hop, no need to check your brain.

  • avatar
    The Heisenberg Cartel

    What’s wrong with Macklemore’s themes? He raps what he knows just as ‘real rappers’ do. And considering he’s been rapping for 14 years you can’t exactly call him an interloper yuppie. Or are you one of those people who believes that rap is a ‘black people thing’ and white people should stick to ‘white people things’? Good god Kriendler. Go shoot at some kids on your lawn. Not to mention, the ‘politically correct’ themes he raps about (marriage equality) is not only right, it’s closer to the spirit of the old rap that roused massive rabble than the cliche-filled rap that tends to be popular today.

    As for Cadillac, I can’t find anything to disagree with. They need to stop trying to rip BMW off and embrace their heritage a little more. While they can’t go to the era of purely big floaty cars and still hope for success, at least give us a few more V8 options and cars with more room than its competition. The XTS is arguably the truest Cadillac sedan, bizarrely enough. And I’m not going to beat the ‘real names’ dead horse but it’s true. Tap into your damn heritage Cadillac.

    • 0 avatar

      A$AP Rocky also manages to discuss marriage equality and fashion in a more appealing manner.

      • 0 avatar
        MPAVictoria

        Okay so you don’t like the music but who made you the gatekeeper for all that is pure and good in Hip Hop?

      • 0 avatar
        The Heisenberg Cartel

        So did Jay Z, Eminem, Kanye and 50, and Kendrick Lamar. Macklemore, to the best of my knowledge is the only one to base a whole song on it. So what’s the problem with that other than the fact that you just don’t like the song or Macklemore’s music in general?

        • 0 avatar

          I think he can’t hold a candle to any of the artists you mentioned above, and I think the premise of the Bloomberg article (that “White Walls” is indicative of Cadillac’s relevance in pop culture) is laughable.

          • 0 avatar
            George Herbert

            I agree Bloomberg’s out of their place thinking they can say anything meaningful about popular culture, much less rap or hip-hop.

            I also think you’re out of your place attempting to define Rap in an exclusionary manner, much less do so here.

            Maclemore is rapping; he’s also doing pop and a couple other things, but those genres cross over all the time. Even on the streets of Oakland, LA, and Detroit (or so I hear regarding Detroit). There’s a bit of pissed off critical backlash right now because Eminem was so prominent for a bit, a lot of TROO BELIEVERZ are against any other white boy rappers now. But I’ve seen black guys rapping to and riffing on Maclemore on the street in Oakland. They don’t give a fuck what critics think.

            Thry ALSO in different areas are doing the hardcore rap that never seems to make it on the radio anywhere, and everything in between.

          • 0 avatar
            Dingleberrypiez_Returns

            I love the rap references. Don’t ever change.

          • 0 avatar
            Dingleberrypiez_Returns

            Macklemore’s political lyrics are extremely heavy handed. I mean seriously, he’s one small step away from saying “discrimination from gays is wrong.” He’s equally heavy handed with his references to classic rap- seriously, the Cadillac song drops just about every rap cliche into one song (big rims, candy paint, old english, etc. etc.) He even claims flat out in his lyrics that he’s “old school.” If he was a true member of the traditional hip hop community he wouldn’t have to try so hard.

            Although he’s not a great song writer, he has good producers and there’s plenty of room for a white rapper from Seattle. Def a market for it, just not the traditional rap audience. Thought of as pop music, I think he’s just fine.

            Bringing it back to cars- yeah, it’s laughable that anyone would think for one second that Macklemore has influenced Cadillac sales.

    • 0 avatar
      ellomdian

      Getting tired of these “Gen Why” articles being written from a rapidly aging Gen-X viewpoint – and the No True Scottsman fallacy doesn’t help.

      The actual article, which as far as I can tell is unlinked in any reasonable way in the context of your critique, discusses the importance of generating (or revamping) the Image of Cadillac, particularly in the Pop Culture environment. Cadillac is more than just a brand – it represents a social construct that GM basically dismantled for close to 20 years in the 80′s and 90′s, and they seem to have realized two very important things since then: If old people are your only customers, you won’t have a market in 15 years, and if young people talk about your car, aging mid-lifers in denial will flock to you. This shouldn’t be news to anyone – especially not to a brand that has tried to compete with Lincoln and Mercedes.

      Seriously guys, you sound like my Dad, and he has 20 years on you. If you are going to pick apart the original article on it’s own basis, do so. If you are going to use it as a thinly veiled excuse to rag on music you don’t like… weren’t we promised less of this shit with the editorial revamp?

      • 0 avatar

        Most of the article is about Cadillac, not Macklemore, but for whatever reason, musical taste became the focus of the discussion, rather than the dubious notion that Cadillac is suddenly relevant due to the shoutout from Macklemore.

        • 0 avatar
          Pch101

          I like a lot of different music, but this guy makes me want to channel Walt Kowalski from Gran Torino.

        • 0 avatar
          MPAVictoria

          Derek in his article “Man Macklemore sucks. And why does he spend so much time talking about the gays and the poors?”

          Derek in the comments “Why do you people insist in bringing up Macklemore?”

          • 0 avatar

            I wrote a paragraph on Macklemore for context, and said nothing about those groups. You’ve seized on it with unfathomable fervor.

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            The point of the article was to argue that Bloomberg’s analysis sucks. The rapper reference was made merely in that context.

          • 0 avatar
            MPAVictoria

            Derek you used his name in the title, discussed him in a disparaging way in the article and posted his video. Why are you surprised that he is coming up in the comments?

          • 0 avatar

            Because the article is about Cadillac

          • 0 avatar
            Pch101

            It might help to read the original Bloomberg article.

            http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-01-15/macklemore-brings-cred-to-cadillac-as-sales-boom.html

            The claim being made here is that the analysis in this Bloomberg piece is out of touch, both with the brand and with whatever relevance that pop culture may have for the brand.

            In other words, this rap song isn’t going to sell cars, while Bloomberg is overselling how well Cadillac is allegedly doing.

      • 0 avatar
        Dingleberrypiez_Returns

        Macklemore is relying on the traditional established hip hop image of Cadillac in an attempt to beef up his cred. If anything, he’s reinforcing the old stereotypical image of Cadillac. I didn’t read the article so I’m not sure under what context they reference Macklemore- but if what ellomdian says is true, that the article is about improving their image, and the article argues that Macklemore is helping with that- then they’re totally off base.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    “I got that off-black Cadillac, midnight drive
    Got that gas pedal, leaned back, taking my time
    I’m rollin’ out, roof off, letting in sky
    I shine, the city never looked so bright.”

    I’m more of a country music man but my wife started laughing uncontrollably at that line. I was in the car and asked: “Why?”

    She said: “That sounds like you.”

    But I’m 36 and she’s 30 so we’re not exactly Gen-Y.

    Personally I prefer Southern Pacific: “Reno Bound”

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E7ktEYvzRqQ

    “Flying by Winnemuca doing about 95, automatic cruise control, it’s good to be alive.

    Got the radio up,
    Top rolled down,
    Got the cleanest Eldorado around.”

    • 0 avatar
      Drzhivago138

      I still think the best Cadillac song is Johnny Cash’s “One Piece at a Time.”

      Now the headlights, they were another sight
      There was one on the left and two on the right
      But when we pulled out the switch, all three of ‘em come on

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Joe Nichols “Brokenheatsville” he gives a description of the car and to me its still the one of the ways one should be able to describe a true Cadillac:

        “It was long on chrome, sittin’ in the lot.
        An’ fire engine red, that thing was hot.
        He revved it up, she waved goodbye.
        Well, love’s gone to hell and so have I.”

        I think the devil drives a Coupe de Ville.

  • avatar

    Advice to Derek don’t put down an artist in the man stream just because he’s In the main stream pop culture. You can say you don’t like him but your rant on macklemore come off as nerd in the basement I hate this guy because he is on top of the pop charts rather than an actual critical review. I remember being young listening to weird folk rock and heavy metal bands (yes I have weird taste) and putting down pop music, but when I got older I realized putting down something just because it dosen’t match your definition for cool is just silly. This is not to say you can’ t call out the lip sync made in a office bands out there for being crap but be resonable about it. The top point maybe the worst example of brown wagon style fanboism ever published on this site.

  • avatar
    talkstoanimals

    So, leaving aside Macklemore’s references to Caddy, what to make of Lorde’s sarcastic invocation of “we’re driving Cadillacs in our dreams” in the song Royals? Does it mean that young people are once again associating Cadillac ownership with the culture of bling and/or wealth and power?

    I humbly submit that references to cars in song mean very little. Otherwise, the argument could be made that the Playmates release of Beep Beep should have sent sales of Nash Ramblers through the roof.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      And Lorde is from New Zealand. It could still be an invocation of American style conspicuous consumption.

      So perhaps in pop culture Cadillac has become an easy slang way to invoke conspicuous consumption that the classic Cadillacs invoked.

      • 0 avatar
        CoreyDL

        Also because it rhymed with her other lyrics and she needed to mention a car.

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        “But every song’s like:
        Gold teeth
        Grey Goose
        Tripping in the bathroom
        Bloodstains
        Ball gowns
        Trashing the hotel room

        We don’t care, we’re driving Cadillacs in our dreams”

        Nope, it doesn’t rhyme with anything. Cadillac is there because it’s part of the culture Lordes is singing about.

        Cadillac needs to bring back some bling (Elmiraj) if it’s going to remain legendary for future generations

  • avatar
    carguy

    Derek, I am not sure what is driving your anti-Cadillac rants lately but you will need to go beyond throw away lines like “half baked” (from your predictions piece) or pondering its relevance to the hip-hop community if you want to be taken more seriously.

    It seems to me that Cadillac has the best product lineup in decades that are finally competitive with German and Japanese products.

    So what if Cadillac has moved on from the rapper and “Cigar Aficionado-subscriber” demographics and have cars with a broader appeal? To me it means that for the first time in my life they have products I would actually buy.

  • avatar
    bball40dtw

    Derek, if you can keep all of Drake’s music in Canada, I will do my best to keep Macklemore’s in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      CoreyDL

      I liked his “Going Home” song, til I saw the HORRIBLE AWFUL TRITE Miami Vice meets Scarface video he did for it.

      It was set in 1982, and he pulls up in a Range Rover with 1995+ style wheels on it. All credibility gone.

    • 0 avatar
      fvfvsix

      A-freaking MEN!!!

      Drake’s “they don’t make no award for this” a$$ needs to EABODADIAF with his repetitiveness..

  • avatar
    fordcomm

    I enjoy Macklemore’s ode to Cadillacs and rolling in style, but to my mind, nobody ever did it better than Curtis Mayfield back in the 70′s classic, ‘Diamonds in the Back’: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZVANQheoRUw

    • 0 avatar
      jconli1

      Yes. A truly excellent car-related song that goes completely against the conspicuous consumption nature of most of today’s r’n’b and rap. However, despite what YouTube says, the song is “Be Thankful For What You Got” by William DeVaughan, not Curtis.

      As to this whole Macklemore nonsense… if anything, he represents the scene he came out of – which is the whole point… be who you are and rep your hood. So the yuppie interloper thing doesn’t really resonate.

      I grew up in DC and Baltimore, and rap (and hardcore and punk and whatever else) reflected life in DC and Baltimore. I live in Seattle now, and the rap scene out here isn’t about being threatening and hard and tough, because for the most part, life out here isn’t those things, even in the worst parts of town (at least not compared to places like Atlanta or NYC or Long Beach). So it’s more thoughtful, a little more silly, and ultimately a lot more left-leaning, just like the city. But it’s authentic.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I am a 30 year old driver of a current Cadillac. I’m no big Macklemore fan, but to me his songs are catchy and light in a Manic Eminem sort of way (“Without Me” or “Just Lose It” Eminem, not scary “Stan” or “Underground” Eminem). I’ve never put much thought into deeper meaning behind Macklemore’s work other than he is mildly amusing. He even looks funny.

    I find “White Walls” a very tongue-in-cheek celebration of Cadillacs. It’s something I would have put together. The kid bouncing on hydraulics in the hood, the trailer park, the blunts and the forties. It’s a bit of a satire about all the stereotypes about Cadillacs. It’s meant to be funny. That’s how I take it, at least.

    I agree with the poster(s) above who said the more “Generation Why” pieces I read, the more I feel like Derek is actually a Gen-X’er stuck in a Gen Y body. A very old soul Gen Y’er indeed.

  • avatar
    Maymar

    The current Escalade (and belongs to a class that’s waning anyhow) came out in 2007, the then-current CTS came out in 2008, and even the SRX has been out since 2010 – their core lineup was a little long in the tooth for this past year and we’re reading any more into their relevance than that?

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    Ok, someone needs to explain this “Macklemore” to me, I’m assuming this song is a tongue-in-cheek parody of Hip-hop/Rap bling thug videos of the past, but some comments seem to suggest this guy is sort of a serious alternative. Which is it?

    • 0 avatar
      Les

      I dunno, but I always took ‘Thrift Shop’ to be a comment/satire of ‘Brand-Consciousness’, poking fun at the people who spend way too much money to look like everybody else instead of making their own style.. which can be done for peanuts if you put some effort into it. It’s a mystery to me how it came to mean it was parodying gold chains and enormous rims, which is what I associate with ‘Bling’.. not branded sneakers and T-shirts.

  • avatar
    dtremit

    “Even though a late model SRX is driven for 2 seconds in the video…”

    Just long enough to see the Hertz barcode.

  • avatar
    stanczyk

    ‘Another thing that works in Cadillac’s favour: now that some of the Germans are moving downmarket to chase volume (e.g., Benz CLA), they run the risk of tarnishing their brands – much like Cadillac themselves did 40 years ago. Since GM has several brands, they at least have the option of positioning Cadillac higher, while chasing volume with Chev, and to an extent Buick.’ – I agree …

    Yes, brands like Mercede$ and Por$che should pay (and hopefully will pay:) price for their hipsterish,’nouveau-riche’,’shmancy-fancy’ new-produckt-attitude(Cayenne or CLA)..

    Cadillac should stay .. ‘american’ , and not to go ‘Global-Product’!(enough of ‘executive kinda guy’ and their ‘corporate-global-product bulls..it’ :) ..

    New Caddy star-cars(ATS, CTS) are good quality vehicles, but they ‘drive away’ too much from ecscentric Cadillac heritage (most important: they should keep that oryginal, sharp, edgy Art&Science design ( XLR and previous CTS were OK, but this new CTS and ATS are too ‘mellow’ ).. )

    Yes , and they need flagship (modern Eldorado : full-size coupe like Merc CL) .. and it don’t need to be Sixteen-concept.. :) ..
    [quite handsome Elmiraj-concept would be acceptable , .. even if it isn\'t \'knock-out design\'..:)]

  • avatar
    badcoffee

    I’m a 25 year old white male who dislikes most hip-hop, listens to country, and drives a caddy.

    Theres always an anecdote

  • avatar
    amca

    I’m hoping the new big Caddy – about which they seem to have managed o maintain good pre-introduction silence – comes out with some sort of highly up to date plug in or full electric power train. That might, maybe, possibly, boot Cadillac ahead of its competition.

    But if it just comes with the 3.6 in turbo and regular flavors . . . ho hum.

    My hope here is based on the fact that the car has been so darned long in gestation, and the fact they’ve succeeded so well in maintaining control of information about it.

    Cross your fingers, Cadillac devotees.


Back to TopLeave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Subscribe without commenting

Recent Comments

New Car Research

Get a Free Dealer Quote

Staff

  • Contributing Writers

  • Jack Baruth, United States
  • Brendan McAleer, Canada
  • Marcelo De Vasconcellos, Brazil
  • Vojta Dobes, Czech Republic
  • Matthias Gasnier, Australia
  • W. Christian 'Mental' Ward, Abu Dhabi
  • Mark Stevenson, Canada
  • Cameron Aubernon, United States
  • J Emerson, United States