By on June 22, 2013

 

Susan Docherty, a life-long career woman at GM, suddenly wants to stay at home with her husband and 13 year old son, or so GM wants us to believe. According to Selim Bingol’s troops, Docherty “announced her intention to leave General Motors to spend time with her family, effective September 30.” Docherty is 49, that’s no retirement age.

Three years ago, Ed Niedermeyer and TTAC was “looking forward to her departure from General Motors.” Now his wish is fulfilled. In the tradition of Farago’s death watches, things always take a little longer than expected at GM, but eventually, they happen. Usually, they happen too late.

Docherty’s career was in trouble when it reached new heights. After Bob Lutz retired (sort of), Ed Whitacre merged GM’s Sales, Marketing, and Service into one job, and to everybody’s (silent – saying something would have been sexist) bafflement, Susan got the job, and the kiss of death along with it. That job would have been too big for bona-fide superstars; with Docherty, it was the Peter Principle in instant action. Just three months later, she had to give half her job, and with sales the most important part, to Mark Reuss. A few month after that, Joel Ewanick took the other half , the marketing job – which soon proved too big a pair of shoes even for certified miracle maker Ewanick. He may have been able to walk on water, the parting of a sea of shit overtaxed even his abilities.

Ewanick will be remembered for an ad where frogs dropped out of the sky, and for upsetting both nerds (no ads for Facebook) and good old boys (no ads for the Super Bowl, but for soccer.) Docherty left a flotsam of ditzy memories in her wake. Her “Volt Dance” became Internet luz-material . Her Fastlane live chat performance turned into an embarrassment. She was unable to face reality in regards to GM’s incentive levels, and her Chevy tagline “Excellence For Everyone” was an instant flop.

Docherty was shipped far, far away, to China as VP of sales, marketing and after sales of GMIO, GM’s rest of the world. What ostensibly was a lateral move, was a demotion. Being the marketing chief for disparate regions and cultures, all the way from China to Africa, is a tough job when you can understand neither headline nor copy, and when the agency keeps saying, “sorry, Sir, errr, Miss, that’s impossible to translate, but it is very witty in Mongolian.” Or when you make a suggestion, and the local viceroys tell you “love it, but they’ll stone me for it back in Burkina Faso.” In the best of cases, everybody agrees on a strategy, then they go home and do whatever they please. As long as sales go up, nobody notices. If sales go down …

A little more than a year after Susan knew the difference between “heng hao” and “bu yao”, Docherty was out in Shanghai, and on her way to Zurich, where she led GM’s punishment battalion on a suicide mission: She was put in charge of Chevrolet and Cadillac Europe.

The European automotive industry, Saudi Arabia, and Switzerland are the last holdouts of male chauvinism, and Susan was in two out of three.

Cadillac may become a mild success in Europe when Elvis returns in a pink CTS, but not earlier. Chevrolet, for all intents and purposes a new brand nobody in Europe has been waiting for, is dipping its toes into a market where the auto trade resembles a pool of starving piranhas. Good luck with that bloody pedicure.

It’s probably not her fault, but on Docherty’s watch, EU Chevrolet sales dropped more than 30 percent in the first five months of this year. Hit squads, dispatched from the RenCen to identify the guilty, rounded up Docherty, were done with it, and hit the Kronenhalle for a celebratory Geschnetzeltes mit Rrrröschti. En guete!

Where to send Susan now? North Korea? Nah, they have the bomb and might use it. Let’s send her home.

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55 Comments on “Ditzy Docherty Done...”


  • avatar
    Summicron

    Women further demeaned in the eyes of professional men.

    Mission Accomplished, GM.

    • 0 avatar

      I don’t think Dogherty changes anything, considering that she clearly was a failure. Also, she cannot add anything to Florina, who, in words of Yale Business School prof, “has proven that women are every bit as good as men at senseless, egomaniacal empire-building”. By this day we saw everything already.

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        It appears that Docherty was a known ditz for many years. Just that provided video alone shows that she’s a programmable rah-rah. Elevating her to a high-profile chopping block was an act of strategy.

        And the prof’s comment is ironically funny only in the context of traditionally assumed female inferiority.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        Florina? I think you mean Fiorina. As an outside observer, it looks to me that she was consciously recruited by a famously disfunctional Board, who nonetheless understood that the “HP Way” had to change. Her crime was to think differently, without the team or skills to execute on that strategy.

        Her successor, Douglas Hurd, got credit for successfully executing Carly Fiorina’s initiatives. He got sacked when he ran out of that strategy, and had to propose something new of his own – and which was completely bone-headed.

    • 0 avatar

      inappropriate and non relevant comment. find a crossword puzzle to apply your irrelevant suppositions. the woman failed. claiming gender bias makes you look clueless.

      • 0 avatar
        Summicron

        Hmm… you’re seldom this upset.

        • 0 avatar

          I have 7 daughters and stand for their rights and potential against any prejudice. calling for it where inapplicable is like defending the Liar in Chief because of his race. in both circumstances, it’s incompetence and corruption not gender or skin color. defending someone by hiding behind false claims make me sick.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            That’s such a good answer that I’ll wear the fool hat on this one. Regarding you.

            Still, Docherty’s incompetence must’ve shone for years like the Armada beacons. Why put her in such a highly visible and difficult role if not to set her up for failure?

          • 0 avatar

            forgive them for they know not what they do sounds good in religion. in business, it causes bankruptcy.

          • 0 avatar
            Summicron

            That’s about as elliptical as it gets.

      • 0 avatar
        RobertRyan

        Better Off for everyone at GM, those programs she was involved with at GM were terrible in their execution.

        • 0 avatar

          Yeah “execution”. Theyve gotta prove themselves in Europe to get cred anywhere. Chevy, Cadillac, Opel? Buick? just arent doing it. Saab had a chance, but thats been “executed” in fine GM fashion.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    I always thought the greater shame at GM was the dark days when they brought people in from other companies to work on “brand management”. You know because selling Buicks is just like selling Tide detergent.

  • avatar
    highdesertcat

    Regardless of Ms Docherty’s reasons for leaving, or being forced to leave, GM is going through some major changes to attempt becoming a viable, self-sustaining American auto manufacturer, while at the same time longing to rid itself of the stigma that accompanies bankruptcy, taxpayer-funded bailout and nationalization.

    I’m not sure that Ms Docherty could have done much for either Chevrolet or Buick because more drastic changes are needed to propel those divisions forward to gain the potential buyers’ attention. Ford clearly has the upper hand in innovations, curb appeal and buyer attention. And Fiatsler is getting its fair share of sales by drawing in new buyers for their best-sellers.

    Look at all the hype that accompanies the intro of the 2014 GM pickup trucks. From all the press rhetoric we are led to believe that GM’s pickups are “ALL NEW!, IMPROVED!!, BETTER THAN EVER!!!”

    But whatever changes were made, or advertising media employed, when you get up close and personal like I did yesterday with a 2014 Silverado in El Paso, TX, there really isn’t enough to change the ranking calculus among American pickup trucks. Ford sales will remain number 1 with GM lagging behind, a distant second.

    No matter who leads what within GM, the status quo has not changed since GM was bailed out and nationalized in 2009. What is needed are changes and innovations like those from Ford (Ecoboost I4, V6 and interactive electronics), Nissan Altima equipment, RAM Pentastar/8-speed automatic combo and interiors, Grand Cherokee styling, drive-trains and interiors, and the marvelous Tundra all-aluminum, 32-valve, DOHC, 5.7-liter V8 for the half-ton GM pickup trucks.

    Until that happens, GM will be the major rental car and fleet provider on the planet. IOW, the same old, same old, in spite of the nice write up GM got recently in the WSJ.

    The more things change, the more they stay the same. What GM needs is a mover and a shaker like an Alan Mulally or a Sergio Marchionne. That is unlikely to happen, so heads will roll as the innocent are punished for the sins of the many.

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      They were for a time nationalised but no longer since the large majority of stock is privately held. And by the end of 2014 should be entirely privately held.
      As for innovation – the Ecoboost and MFT systems seem to be causing Ford issues. Cadillac is innovating with 8 speeds coming soon, before most manufacturers. If innovation is so important please explain how Toyota still sells 4 speed Corollas even when the brand new car comers out later this year. By your metric they are failing, when obviously they are not.
      The twin turbo V6 (420hp) for the CTS vSport sounds interesting and the new Corvette too.
      As for the truck, evolutionary styling changes are not necessarily bad (tell that to VW and the Golf) and people have said in reviews that when comparing the two the differences are more obvious. The reviews seem pretty good and time will tell how they perform. I expect Ford to stay #1 but the market is big enough for a profitable #2. I recall predictions from you and others on how Toyota would continue to gain market share (how is that working out this year) and GM would be around 15% market share last year (again how is that prediction working out).

      BS says there are vociferous commentators disagreeing with him, there are plenty who are just as vociferous on the other side.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        mike978, I’m of the belief that every person is entitled to their own analysis and to their own opinions based on how they dissect a situation.

        So, if people disagree with what I have to say, I’m cool with that. I post my views yet I can still accept the view points of others, because that’s what life (and business) is all about. Different people see things differently.

        Back to topic, any new, revolutionary systems are going to have their growing pains and issues.

        Toyota has no competition in the market place and won’t do any innovation until they are challenged in the sales environment. Hence their entire line of vehicles is long in the tooth.

        Toyota is always late to a party, but when they get there, they’ve arrived and will continue to sell because they have the established street cred.

        Since we’re dealing with a dynamic, ever changing industry, the only way to keep current is to make forecasts on a continuing basis like most analysts do when they evaluate the industry on a weekly/monthly basis. I don’t do that anymore. I read for enjoyment, not because I have to.

        Things change. A lot of factors evolve and people adjust to ever-evolving developments. Don’t forget the subprime lenders actively stimulating car sales at this time. That changes things too.

        I’m willing to bet that things will change again, AFTER the 1st of July and we’ll see APRs rise on everything, affecting all lending. If you want to buy that new car and have to finance, now is the time to do it.

        • 0 avatar
          rolladan

          I’m not sure but wasn’t Toyota the first to use a 7 or 8 speed trams in the ls460?

        • 0 avatar
          mike978

          I agree we are all entitled to our own opinions. I just note that you didn`t refute any of the factual statements I made in contradiction to yours.

          I have to laugh at your assertion that Toyota has no competition in the market place. They are 3rd in the US (14% market share), distant in the EU (4% market share), 3rd in China and their saving grace is a very strong domestic position. Looking at global production, they are #1 with about a 12% market share. VW and GM are essentially tied in #2 with 10% market share. I hardly call that no competition.

          I also note the contraction in your statements, you first lambast, incorrectly, GM for not innovating. Then you say well Toyota hasn`t innovated but that is because they are just so successful and don`t need to. So what is important innovation or not?

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            mike978, sorry about the delayed response, but I have a real life beyond my brief stints behind the keyboard.

            I don’t refute anyone’s factual statements because they may have arrived at their conclusion by a different route and may see something from an entirely different perspective than I do. I have to live my life along the lines of what I believe and that’s why I quit buying GM after decades. I don’t care what other people buy.

            Regardless of what we each think of Toyota, I have never known Toyota to put money and innovation behind any of their products if they still sell well and make money for the company. My very first Toyota was a 2008 Japan-built Highlander Limited. Great vehicle!

            If you believe that GM is as innovative as Ford or Fiatsler, I’m OK with that. I think GM is lagging behind both Ford and Fiatsler in innovation. When I had to make a choice as to what SUV/CUV to buy next, I chose the innovative 2012 Jeep Grand Cherokee Overland Summit as my wife’s daily driver over anything GM.

            The ultimate criteria is what sells and who is making the money. I’m not sure that Ms Docherty could have done any better under the circumstances. I’m not defending her but unless something at the top of GM changes I’m not sure that anyone can succeed where Ms Docherty failed.

            Only time will tell.

  • avatar
    mikey

    @HDC…As of the end of May 299,477 F 150′s sold. 270,392 Siverado/Sierra. If thats distant second, how the Tundra making out? I’ll save you some time 41,806.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Mikey, didn’t Ford just make a big production of delivering its 33-millionth? There was a nice article elsewhere about why the F150 has the better chops than either GM or RAM.

      I’m not selling Ford, and I prefer to drive a Tundra 5.7 because I can, since I’ve had both a Silverado and an F150 before buying my 2011 Tundra.

      The reason Tundra still sold those 41,806 is because some people clearly wanted something more refined than what Ford, GM or RAM had to offer. I’m with the crowd who tried the rest but now wants the best.

      I remember the days of old quite well when we had a choice of three from Detroit; the bad, the worse and the worst.

      • 0 avatar
        mike978

        Mikey, basically HDC didn`t admit that he used hyperbole when he said distant #2 and he cannot admit his mistake.

        As for Ed wanting Docherty to go, at least she wasn`t in product development where in 3 years she could have caused major problems. In marketing she could do little harm.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          mike978,

          “at least she wasn`t in product development where in 3 years she could have caused major problems.”

          What has GM brought to market since 2009 that was earth shaking? And how do GM sales substantiate your premise?

          I’m not defending Docherty but I don’t believe that there is any one else there who could have done better.

          Maybe you have someone in mind?

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            Lets see – they have brought the ATS, new CTS, Corvette, Sonic and Cruze which have all be well received. Since sales are a key metric for you the Sonic outsells the Yaris and Fit combined and has consistently done this. The Cruze has sold pretty well, given the poor heritage of the Cavalier and Cobalt and hasn`t needed massive incentives (like lets say the Camry).

            Can you name me many vehicles that are on your assessment earth shattering since 2009 – not a very long list so hardly a place where GM is lagging the competition.

            I don`t have anyone in mind for marketing, not my area of expertise. I don`t think much automotive marketing has been, to use your term, been earth shattering. So that validates my point that she hasn`t really done much harm (certainly no real good).

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            mike978, again, regrets for the delayed response.

            If you think that the vehicles you listed are going to do the trick for GM, I have no qualms with that. I don’t agree with your assessment, but I respect your view. To me, runaway sales are what drives the bottom line.

            And as far as Camry incentives, or for that matter the enormous incentives on Ford trucks these days, to me that just means that they want to maintain the sales lead and take away as many sales from their competition as they can.

            Every sale made by any manufacturer is lost to the others. Sales are THE key metric for me, and the annual sales stats because sales, or the generation of sales, is what makes money for everyone all around. Everything else is wishing and hoping. Touchy feelies don’t pay the bills.

            The vehicles that IMO had earth shattering effects since 2009 were the Ford Ecoboost line of vehicles, the MyTouch system, the Chrysler 300 and Jeep Grand Cherokee, the RAM Pentastar with the 8-speed automatic, the expanded Prius line of vehicles, the Leaf, the Tesla vehicles, several Audi vehicles, the VW TurboDiesel line, the Mazda6, and the Hyundai/Kia line of vehicles.

            I know that’s not many truly outstanding innovations but each of those sales resulted in one fewer for their respective competitors and collectively they grabbed the buying public’s attention, and more importantly, their money.

            My take on the Docherty situation is that she has been severely restricted in what she could do by a GM management that became very conservative in its approach to risk-taking after the company died.

          • 0 avatar
            mike978

            You state that runaway sales are what is important and to an extent they are. So I am amused that you include in your list of earth shattering vehicles the Leaf which sells a fraction of the equally innovative Volt. The Yaris hybrid (sorry Prius C as it is called in the US) is a good car but sales have not met expectation and I recall puff pieces on here about how well it would sell(3-4K a month is not great). I think quite a few people would question the inclusion of MFT and Ecoboost engines to the list, remember all the issues with the Escape intro?
            I also note no Honda product, I would consider the new Accord a great product and the new hybrid version as superb and much better than the second generation Camry and Fusion version.

  • avatar
    sunridge place

    Ford is also 32% fleet YTD versus GM at 26% fleet YTD. HDC likes to say ‘if you don’t like what I say just ignore me’

    You can certainly own your own opinions…but you don’t get to own your own facts.

  • avatar

    niceties and pleasantries aside, it WAS her fault, distinctly and directly! she bombed, didn’t understand, and played the “I’m smarter than you” card way too long. she is part of the Gerosa Mafia Syndrome that has it’s tentacles partially into Reuss as well. their LaNaive carryover mentality sprang from John Smith’s loyalty to Pistol Pete (birds of a feather), and still has traces of this ill begotten, cancer simulating, stupidity living in the Ren Cen like black mold.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      Buickman, I don’t know her, never met her, but I’m not sure it was all her fault.

      She had to present her strategy to someone higher up in the chain and may have been shot down. Clearly she failed but that could have been because she was forced to work within limiting constraints driven by “this ill begotten, cancer simulating, stupidity living in the Ren Cen like black mold.”

      While this is not the venue for that discussion, there have been plenty of people who failed because they had one or both hands tied behind their back. Given the long and established history of GM, I’m not sure anyone else would have succeeded under the same circumstances.

      Firings happen every day, everywhere, in every business. The slogan always has been, “If you can’t get the job done, we’ll find someone who can.”

      Clearly GM hasn’t found the right people for the job at some levels. So the hunt goes on and we’ll see how her replacement will perform.

      • 0 avatar

        I met her. that bad really.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          I believe you, but the top brass must have seen some potential in her in order to move her up the chain.

          • 0 avatar

            charming goes a long way. so does fraternalism…and bs.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Since you were part of that at one time you must know that particular strategy for advancement is what makes the corporate world go’round.

          • 0 avatar
            Extra Credit

            I find it interesting (disturbing, amusing, confusing, frustrating, telling, frightening,…?) that, in general, the only people defending Ms Docherty are the people that have never met her.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            I’m not defending her. Read my other comments.

          • 0 avatar
            Extra Credit

            @HDC my comment was meant in more general terms. It was not an attempt to label specific commenters. As a casual observation from the various TTAC reports of Ms. Docherty’s abilities and escapades, I cannot recall anyone with firsthand working inowledge jumping to her defence. Given her level and tenure, there must be a few of these people out there.

  • avatar
    Michael500

    True dat! Would Roger Penske have kept her and her incompetence on? Nope. Makes me think Whitaker is a dope too for not firing her ASAP. I wish GM would cut Penske a $20M check and get Lutz off the beach to fix GM- but their egos won’t allow it. Short of this, GM is headed for BK again. Cadillac is lower in sales than ALL German luxury brands IN THE USA- who thinks this is sustainable?

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      I agree she should have gone before but it is hardly indicative of them heading to BK again.
      As fro Cadillac I note their sales are increasing and they outsell Acura, Infiniti and other brands who are US dependent too. So it is sustainable and their sales should increase when they have a proper, full product range which belatedly they are finally doing with a proper sized CTS and the ATS.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        mike978, it’s a dynamic, ever changing industry but everyone has to forecast their own analysis based on the facts as they have them at that time.

        So, it is a snapshot in time and when people evaluate the facts as they have them at that time, some may see GM drifting to another BK. I also used to think so, not too long ago. But no more.

        I remember how some of the industry forecasters and analysts were ridiculed in 2008 when they predicted that GM would die. Ultimately, they were proven right! GM and Chrysler both died.

        I was among those who initially would not believe that GM was as bad off as it was or that there was even a remote chance of GM collapsing.

        Fortunately I was persuaded, albeit reluctantly, to divest myself of all my automotive stock in late 2007 and early 2008. I thank my lucky stars every day for the insight of others.

        Let me add that with the active changes that the GM execs are currently making for corporate course corrections, that the likelihood of GM going BK again is diminishing (as long as the economy continues to grow and the subprime lenders will fund the sale of vehicles).

        Things are actually looking up for car sales and the US economy. The gas&sip where I live is bustling with growth and expansion activity, more than we’ve ever seen in the past. Lots of (temporary) jobs needing to be filled.

    • 0 avatar

      Roger’s not interested in the job. I asked him.

      http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2013/06/roger-penske-no-thanks-im-having-too-much-fun-to-give-that-up-to-run-general-motors/

      • 0 avatar
        Michael500

        Dang, great minds think alike! He’s probably right about his age. He did a pretty awesome job turning around Detroit Diesel and was a magician with Longo Toyota in Los Angeles.

  • avatar

    http://www.autoline.tv/show/1317

    http://www.thetruthaboutcars.com/2009/10/general-motors-zombie-watch-18-hire-buickman/

  • avatar
    jthorner

    A long overdue departure. Her career is mostly a long list of failed projects. We often comment about inept government employees, but I think that the real problem is large organizations of almost any kind. Be they for-profit, government or non-profit/private … large organizations time and time again reward and retain counterproductive individuals.

    Why is that?

    • 0 avatar
      mike978

      As Buickman says in an earlier comment – charm, bs and fraternalism. It happens in all big organisations. People hire those like them, promote those like them etc.

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    I think for GM to fire Docherty is the correct action.

    What you must also take into consideration is what was her job? Who else had influence within the GM institution? It all well and good to fire people, but sometimes it can become a little grey.

    Who else should GM be firing? Who was in her ear?

    GM as a whole needs a broom put through it, including the UAW. It really needs to restructure.

    Fiatsler is doing this in within the NA market. A few firings will make the Detroit culture change and catch up with the rest of the world.

    But, it should also be the guys on the factory floor who aren’t performing as well, get rid of them.

    Then GM has a great future. GM needs people with dreams and ideas to freshen up its products.

  • avatar
    bunkie

    Yeah, the red velour is over the top, but I, for one, miss cloth seats. It’s not a coincidence that the need for seat heaters coincided with the total victory of leather in the luxury and near-luxury marketplace.

    EDIT – Damn, the back button bit me and got this posted here instead of in the junked Imperial thread…

  • avatar
    FirebombDetroit

    Good to see the vacuous twunt finally gone.

  • avatar
    April 5

    “The European automotive industry, Saudi Arabia, and Switzerland are the last holdouts of male chauvinism, and Susan was in two out of three. ”

    You forgot to add this article.

    • 0 avatar
      Summicron

      You’re brave to be here.
      Please stick around.

      • 0 avatar
        April 5

        I found this site a few months ago but all the reactionary nonsense (Anti Federal Government/President Obama/Labor Unions/General Motors/Electric Cars/Woman/Lesbians) is making me nauseous.

        At this point Junkyard Finds is about the only thing keeping me around.

  • avatar
    Domestic Hearse

    She served a needed corporate function. The bullet taker. The bullet taker must be a blindly loyal Kool Aid drinker and dispenser and have little intellectual curiosity or critical thinking abilities. You put the bullet taker into a career killing suicide position — a mostly un-winable situation where a fall guy is needed to take the bullets that said predicted failure will produce.

    Susan, never quite comprehending the political or practical situations into which she was being sent, gave a cross-eyed salute and marched to war, spouting her rehearsed lines and executing a perfect botch. This allowed GM, which had watched bad situations turn even worse, step back and watch her take the fall, while preserving sharper players to play the rescue role.

    Eventually, the bullet taker can no longer be sent into lost wars to play the fall guy, er, gal. Too shot up to be believable. And so we find Susan, sent home from the war, a useful if unwitting combatant.

  • avatar
    DC Bruce

    Domestic Hearse may be close to the truth, but the fact is, when you listen to Docherty, watch her or read a transcript, what is off-putting to most who hear or read it is the relentless spin on everything. I rather doubt that she invented this on her own. Rather, I am pretty confident that she talks this way to conform to the expectations of everyone at GM. Notice that she praises the questioner who refers to bad GM dealers for “being candid.”

    If you’re in a culture where “being candid” is something that is singled out for recognition, then — I submit — you’re in a dysfunctional culture that, among other things lies to itself. A culture that lies to itself — whether it’s a business or a country (e.g., the old USSR) — is doomed to fail.

    So, Ms. Docherty is simply a reflection of the old GM culture that created her . . . a culture that, to this day, doesn’t know how the company ended up in bankruptcy . . . but has lots of people/institutions/circumstances to blame for it.

    I think it’s unfortunate if her career ends at 49; she seems like a decent enough person, but someone who absorbed the GM culture all too well and now is its victim.


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