By on April 25, 2013

News of GM potentially exporting cars from China to the United States in the near future has some wondering if the General will be the first OEM to sell Chinese made cars in the United States. One can have a diverse array of opinions on the political, social and economic impact of such a move, but from a product standpoint, it may not be such a bad thing.

 

Talk of GM exports comes from this Autoblog article, where GM China President Bob Socia was asked about new plants providing exports to America.

“It could very well happen. It could very well happen. You know, I’m not sharing any plans with you, but we try to keep open as to what makes sense. And Tim [Lee – GM's president of international operations] is the right guy to talk about your manufacturing footprint. If it make sense to tool up a vehicle in one location as opposed to two, from an economic perspective, Tim will say that’s what we should be doing. We’re open to be doing that. There’s no reason why we can’t be exporting to the States, and obviously the States are exporting here.”

GM’s ventures in China have yielded some good fruit. The current generation Buick Lacrosse was largely developed by SAIC for world markets and has been a success for Buick. The GM-SAIC venture itself is regarded as perhaps the best JV in China, thanks largely to GM’s expertise and willingness to share technology and resources.

TTAC has also sampled the Chinese made Honda Fit, currently sold in Canada, and there was no appreciable difference in quality between it and other Japanese-made Fits that we’ve sampled. GM’s biggest hurdle may involve the optics of imported Chinese cars, rather than any major gaps in quality.

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90 Comments on “Chinese Built GM’s May Be Exported To America...”


  • avatar
    Lie2me

    This may meet with some resistance… but if these are priced significantly less, then I’m sure they’ll sell everyone they make

    • 0 avatar
      Wscott97

      I highly doubt that they will be dropping the price of GM products. With lower production cost, that just means bigger profits. It’s funny how so many foreign cars are made here while the “American” cars are made some where else.

      • 0 avatar
        ect

        GM’s gross margin took a big drop in 2012. If they can move lower-cost product without having to drop prices, it would help them recover at least some of that and perhaps restore vehicle operations to profitability

    • 0 avatar

      Keep sending us your dollars.
      We’ll keep sending you garbage.
      We’ll come around and buy you out later.
      In the mean time- we’ll contniue financing your enemies for the future wars you’ll end up fighting.

  • avatar
    hreardon

    The almighty dollar is king and Lie2me is probably right: if there is a significant savings and price difference this will sell well.

    I’m very curious as to what the cost structure and resultant margins are for GM (or VW, for that fact) product assembled in China versus the US.

  • avatar

    it’s been the plan all along.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      And I think it is a great idea! GM should divest itself completely of Buick, have them (all the Buick models) made in China and import them to North America.

      Now, if GM would only divest itself of GMC.

      With GM free to focus solely on Chevrolet and Cadillac, and having many of them built in Mexico, GM is sure to be profitable and self-sustaining.

      • 0 avatar
        PrincipalDan

        Many so called pundits were surprised when Buick and GMC were saved and Pontiac died. But then again I was part of the mouth hanging open crowd that was surprised when Oldsmobile died and Buick lived.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          Me, too Dan, since I had owned so many Oldsmobiles over the years.

          I bought and sold many cars over the decades, but the Olds Rocket 88 350 and the 455 were always my favorites.

          • 0 avatar
            PrincipalDan

            My shocker HighDesertCat was the amount of money they had poured into Oldsmobile. It was like they gave Oldsmobile the money Buick was supposed to spend in advertising and then killed Oldsmobile.

            It would be like giving your ex wife your Ferrari F40 and then planting a car bomb under it. Makes no dang sense.

          • 0 avatar
            highdesertcat

            Dan, GM has a long and verifiable history of making numbskull decisions.

            For instance, I was a fan of their Northstar V8 engines. I thought that with a little work the venerable Northstar would work great in trucks, sedans AND SUVs and CUVs, in a variety of bores.

            Yes, I know the Northstar had issues. But they could have been rectified and corrected with only slight mods.

            Instead, GM chose to go another route after they had invested so much into the R&D and endurance-testing of that particular engine design.

          • 0 avatar
            golden2husky

            …..My shocker HighDesertCat was the amount of money they had poured into Oldsmobile. It was like they gave Oldsmobile the money Buick was supposed to spend in advertising and then killed Oldsmobile…..

            I believe the idea was that by dramatically improving the quality and desireability of Oldsmobile products, the brand would be re-invigorated. The first volley was the Aurora, Intrigue, Alero. Not bad first efforts at all, and compared to the GM products of the day they were great steps forward. But GM in typical fashion did not see a fast enough turn around, and following that great American business model of putting today ahead of tomorrow, that was the end of that.

        • 0 avatar
          ixim

          Bucks were better than Oldsmobiles. Better than Pontiacs. Higher transaction numbers, too. Simple as that.

      • 0 avatar
        Big Al from Oz

        @Highdesertcat
        Keep GMH to build affordable performance cars with decent V8s.

        If GM had any management skills they would sell Holdens as HSVs globally to take on the prestige (not luxury) performance Eurocares like M Series, AMG etc.

        They could take on Acura, Lexus, Infiniti etc as well.

        Market them as HSVs not Holdens, Holden is a bad sounding name, HSV has a ring to it. Just a thought.

        • 0 avatar
          highdesertcat

          BAFO, it is a great idea. I truly believe that if GM puts its focus on Chevrolet and Cadillac, regardless of where it is sourced, GM could have potent competitors. And GM can always revert to badge engineering again.

          I’ve never been a fan of Chrysler, but what they have done with their 5.7 and 6.4 is truly invigorating.

          I got to drive my son’s 2012 SRT8 Grand Cherokee right after he bought it. Man, what a delight! Responsive as all hell!

          And then my kid took me for a spin in it and demonstrated a four-wheel drift on the dirt track north of here.

          Any more excitement for an old dude like me and I would have pee’d in my pants!

          Performance is definitely where it is at. Even if you don’t use it, you’ve got it in case you need it, whenever you want it.

  • avatar
    Lie2me

    One report I read said the cost to produce a identical car in China is 50% of what it is in the US. Of course this raises a multitude of issues concerning quality, which even physiologically isn’t a priority with the Chinese. They actually have a “good enough” manufacturing ideal. We’ve all experienced the results of that policy through Chinese products and I have to wonder if even a “good enough” goal is ever met.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Step away from the flag, Larry. A production facility’s output is going to be as good as its design intents from the corporate entity that operates it. Would you consider Apple products to be simply “good enough”? Like ‘em or hate ‘em they’re produced to the highest standard in the world, and they’re made in China.

      As TTAC states, the Chinese-made Fit is otherwise identical to the Japanese-made car. I would expect Buicks rolling out of China to be every bit as good, or bad, as GM can make them. The big question here, which the article makes clear, isn’t how good the cars are, but rather how the American car buyers will react to China being the point of manufacture. On that point, your comment demonstrates the uphill battle that GM will face, should they go that route.

      PS: American-made cars aren’t exactly the gold standard for build-quality. (See recent GM recalls about forgetting to install brake pads and steering wheels falling off.)

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        From what I understand a Yugo would be a desirable alternative to most Chinese automobile offerings. I agree with your point that closely managed Chinese manufacturing can produce goods of high quality. The hurdles of a selling a Chinese made American car here would be mostly emotional unless there were cost savings to the consumer that he would find difficult to refuse

        • 0 avatar
          Luke42

          Which Chinese cars are referring to?

          The BYD, Great Wall, and Geely cars that I’ve read reviews for seem like 1990s cars were in the first world. Useful, lightweight, minimal frills. That seems pretty intuitive.

          BTW, I seem to recall that the last generation Ford Focus is selling well in China.

      • 0 avatar

        Brake pads left off was a supplier issue (and in fact they were not left off, they fell out during shipment over the potholed roads of Michigan) and the steering wheel issue was on the Buick Encore (built in Korea).

        Try again…

        • 0 avatar
          corntrollio

          Of course, as far as we know, no one’s steering wheel actually fell off on a Buick Encore. The issue happened on another vehicle on the same platform. They checked 144 Encores with retro-fitted heated steering wheels that were made in December over a 20-day period to check the fastener. 59 of the cars had already been delivered, and the others were still on dealer lots (http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20130402/AUTO0103/304020381)

          Recalls are a good thing — it means they caught the problem. Like it or not, occasionally, you get small scale problems like this, and it’s part of the manufacturing process.

        • 0 avatar
          CJinSD

          The steering wheels did fall off of Chevrolet Cruzes in the hands of US customers.

          • 0 avatar
            corntrollio

            Make that steering *wheel* singular, and there was no injury in that incident. As far as I know, it only happened on one car, and Chevy was fairly sure it was an isolated incident. They recalled about 2100 cars in the US and about 400 in Canada as a precautionary measure, but even other cars on the production run didn’t seem to have problematic fasteners.

            Keep repeating it, as you have been, maybe you’ll make it true.

          • 0 avatar
            NormSV650

            One Cruze, not like a Honda/Toyota type recall. Even if the nut to shaft was missing the splines, clock spring and wire would required quite a heave-ho to completely remove.

            Some of us don’t work on our cars and have to rely on other’s expertise, unquestionably.

        • 0 avatar
          DenverMike

          Other than missing parts or procedures not followed, isn’t every issue a “supplier issue”? Not unlike the Mustang’s Getrag MT82?

      • 0 avatar
        golden2husky

        Lie2me: As much as I find the idea of GM manufacturing in China to sell to the USA, Thinkin is 100 percent correct in that the Chinese will deliver as much quality as you are willing to pay for. Apple is a great example. What they won’t deliver is treating their workers properly and protecting their environment. To me, for a country that is supposed to care about these things, that is a deal killer. A company with the profits of Apple could very well afford to manufacture here. The profit margin on Apple products must be staggering. Not to mention that Apple goes through great lengths to avoid a normal share of taxes. I don’t blame them for that part, as if the loophole is there you would be a fool not to use it. But I’d be proud to see Made in USA on my Macbook and iPad…

  • avatar
    threeer

    And if so, that will be one less “American” brand I’ll consider buying. Given the fact that they came to the American people to be bailed out, even considering this is sheer folly and spits in the eye of every taxpayer (and potential worker) here in the States. Thanks for your money, America…now we’re going to produce vehicles in China and sell them BACK to you. WTH…

  • avatar
    danio3834

    The first number of the VIN does make a difference to me. Call me an old fashioned “1″ or “2″ man if you want.

    Not that I haven’t owned the odd well used J, W, 6 or 3, when it comes down to making a new car decision, there are plenty of great 1 and 2 options assembled by my friends and neighbors to choose from.

  • avatar
    ...m...

    GMs, Derek. Plural words don’t require apostrophes.

    • 0 avatar
      potatobreath

      That depends on the style manual that you are using. In America, plural of abbreviations and dates still use apostrophes (GM’s). According to Lynne Truss, that convention was abandoned only recently in the UK.

      Steven Lang’s use of it’s and its bothers me more. :)

      • 0 avatar
        ...m...

        …really?..so all the folks writing 60′s, 70′s, 80′s, et al are actually correct?..

        …it still makes me wince, but i’ve learned something new today…

      • 0 avatar
        corntrollio

        Depends on the style guide, as you said — some people say the opposite.

        http://www.lawprose.org/blog/?p=1333

        Garner suggests using an apostrophe to indicate a plural only when you have an abbreviation with periods or you’re talking about a plural lowercase letter, and sometimes an upper case letter. For dates and for abbreviations without periods, he suggests not:
        SUVs and 1990s vs. mind your p’s and q’s and M.D.’s

  • avatar
    NN

    This won’t happen to any mainstream car as long as the government owns part of GM; it would be too much of an Obama political lighting rod.

    With automation, the labor cost of assembling a car is only a fraction of the overall costs. Plus, you have more costs in managing a lengthy supply chain, needing to build more inventory, freight costs, etc. I’d guess the true real savings would only be in the hundreds of dollars per unit…which is certainly still significant, but won’t translate to much in the way of better prices for consumers, just better margins for GM, at huge political expense. Their margins in the US are fine now…they could use help in Europe, which would make more sense (all Chevy’s sold there already made in Korea).

    More likely to see more parts sourcing from China first…ex: 1st gen Equinox had Chinese built motors. They’ve since not imported Chinese motors, however, they could still do so into a US Assembled car with little political troubles.

    • 0 avatar
      jpolicke

      The government had nothing to say about GM sinking a few hundred million into an idiotic venture with PSA; as long as the importation of Chinese product isn’t accompanied by layoff announcements I doubt DC will notice.
      As for Chinese content infiltrating U.S. product you’ll know something is afoot if you start hearing about lobbying to have the engine and transmission sourcing removed from the domestic content stickers. Until then, you can still check for “Engine: China” and run away.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Totally agree. Much as we like to think otherwise, the GM brass can’t be that crazy and out of touch to think that they can get away with final-assembly in China in the present American culture. I’m sure the cars would be fine, but they’ve got to manage their brand image pretty closely these days.

      Bigger and more parts coming from China? A sound bet. I mean heck, don’t the new Mustang’s transmissions now come from China?

      • 0 avatar
        Lie2me

        Not without issue, MT82 Mustang Transmission has had problems. Which if indicative of Chinese quality will prove to be a difficult road to get a complete vehicle exported and sold here

        • 0 avatar
          28-Cars-Later

          I agree a tough sell to some people (esp as a “higher end” Buick) but I could see 12K subpar quality econoboxes selling very well …Spark an ideas RenCen)?

        • 0 avatar
          Pinzgauer

          Yeah but how much of those problems can be attributed to Chinese manufacturing directly. The majority of issues I believe are engineering problems with the materials and even the shift linkage design in Mustangs.

      • 0 avatar
        bikegoesbaa

        I suspect that you’d predict the same thing if we were talking about manufacturing in Mexico, if there wasn’t already precedent for it.

        I don’t recall hearing many complaints about that. You buy Mexican-manufactured cars in traditionally conservative categories such as family sedans, luxury cars, and even pickup trucks. Nobody seems to be bothered much by that.

        I expect that most drivers couldn’t tell you where their car was assembled, because they don’t care.

        People are already very accepting of buying expensive luxury goods that are made in China, such as iPhones. Unless there are multiple high-profile quality or safety problems, any reticence on the part of buyers regarding Chinese cars would be limited both in scope and duration.

    • 0 avatar
      fps_dean

      You think the Obama administration would try to stop GM if they shut down their US operations and moved to China? Personally, I don’t think they would.

      They tried buying out car manufacturers in Korea before, and that didn’t fare well in the US for them.

      That said, I’ve always owned GM cars and never had a problem, but my next car very well may be a Chrysler or possibly Ford if they ever release another RWD Lincoln, or a Lincoln that’s not a rebranded Fusion or Taurus.

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        Yeah, they would stop GM. GM simply cannot fail. The US government will not let it. Precedence was set in 2009 and then doubled down on in 2009.

        The US government has GM’s back. The US Treasury is GM’s kitty. Were GM to ever need another handout or bailout, the US government would give them the money, no matter who’s in power or who runs Congress. And then the US would simply print more money. It happened before. It CAN happen again.

        Hey, if Obama and his green-weenie administration can lavish money and waste same on sure-fail ventures like Solyndra, A123, Fisker et al, they are not going to deny GM whose UAW union represents 6% of America’s labor force.

  • avatar
    jpolicke

    When GM builds cars in China, how actively do the remain engaged? Is it a case of, “Here’s the plans and tooling, call us if you need something” or is there actual GM supervision? I’m asking because Chinese producers have a history of substituting inferior materials for what is specified. So a Chinese Buick body might stick to a magnet but one has no way of knowing what grade of steel is in there without sending a piece for metallurgical analysis, and the gains in strength while cutting weight are due to the use of expensive high-strength steel. Just like there are many alloys of aluminum, etc, none of which can be determined by the naked eye, and are opportunities to cut cost.

    • 0 avatar
      rodface

      Positive material identification (PMI) can confirm alloy grade (works for steels, not sure about aluminum). It’s performed with a handheld tool that is touched against the part being tested. The oil majors that purchase my company’s products for use on their production rigs often request that PMI be performed to confirm the use of the higher-grade steels they specify (SAF2207 duplex stainless, for instance).

      • 0 avatar
        highdesertcat

        I don’t have any PMI equipment but I can tell you that engines built in China do not hold up as well.

        In my area, many people us AC generators when the power goes out. So many people buy the cheap $199 4KW generators built in China.

        They don’t last nearly as long as the more expensive variety from Generac, Honda, Yamaha, Kohler, Briggs&Stratton, etc.

        I doubt that engineering behind these Chinese products specifies a cheaper kind of metal, since everyone who ever owned one of these short-lived units has since moved on to the more durable variety, like those from Honda.

  • avatar
    tenzin

    At what point does the American people say enough is enough. First, they bail out these overpaid and incompetent execs at GM with the people’s money and then they start shipping jobs out to foreign countries. GM is already selling Korean built GM’s in North America. I say these leaders should be tried for treason, from George Bush to Obama!

    • 0 avatar
      28-Cars-Later

      I’ll drink to that.

    • 0 avatar
      highdesertcat

      tenzin, you’ll just have to suck it up. I didn’t like it when Shrub did it. I thought it was ill-advised. And I liked it even less when Obama doubled down on the handouts.

      But that’s the new America. That’s what the voters voted for. They like them handouts and freebies.

      You don’t even have to work in America any more. The government will sent you money. Such a deal!

      Money for nuttin’ and foodstamps for free.

    • 0 avatar
      VA Terrapin

      So now free trade with Asian countries = treason? Does the word “treason” ever enter into your mind whenever GM sells Australian or European built cars in North America?

      • 0 avatar
        dan1malk

        Don’t mind him.

        There are a lot of over-tighten foil hats in the comments of this one.

        It’s a global economy. If GM doesn’t do it, VW will. If VW doesn’t do it, then some Chinese company will do it themselves. The buying public will buy the best car for them regardless of where it’s made.

        I think it’s a lot more simple than everyone is making out to be.

  • avatar
    wormyguy

    Not to put too fine a point on it, but it seems like that Romney “lie” wasn’t so much of one in retrospect (well, *possibly* the wrong automaker).

    I voted for Gary Johnson fwiw.

  • avatar
    thornmark

    Gee, wasn’t it just two days ago that the meme was localization.

    But once again the exception largely seems to be US manufacturers cursed by UAW labor.

  • avatar
    Commando

    WAIT!
    We would now have a main street, All American, Mom & Apple Pie, marque made and imported to the USA from China???

  • avatar
    carguy

    While other car makers are relocating to the US the big three are moving elsewhere to escape the UAW.

  • avatar
    sunridge place

    Good lord people. This was a press conference at the Shanghai Auto Show. He was asked a question by a reporter and answered it.

    He basically said…’yes, it could happen. We have no current plans to do so…but it could happen. I’m not really the guy who makes those decisions so talk to Tim Lee about it’

    Shocking news story!

    Should he have insulted the country–the largest auto market in the world where he leads GMs efforts by saying something like:

    ‘Americans would never accept an inferior product built in Red China. We would be a fool to even consider it’

    Ask Toyota how well perceived insults towards the Chinese people is working out.

    • 0 avatar

      Thank you. Apparently everyone missed the part where he said “Could”. If GM or any other automaker does end up importing from China to the US, it is not going to be for lower labor costs. China has huge tariffs on imports which forces all automakers to build locally. It will soon become unjustifiable from an economic standpoint to have have two assembly plants, one in NA and one in China for low volume models. If they cant import from China for PR reasons, I am certain automakers in the near future will start producing complete kits in China for final assembly in the US.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      Exactly. Some people freak out that the Encore/Spark is built in S Korea. Encore is a new segment in the US with unknown potential–but its a larger segment in parts of Asia and Europe.

      Old GM would have placed Encore production in North America with capacity for 150,00 units annually and started cranking them out–only to have to give them away with rebates when they realize the actual market is about 75,000 units.

      If the ultra compact crossover market bears fruit and they see long term potential closer to the 150,000 units, I’m sure they’ll move production to North America–because that makes sense. If the segment remains niche, they can continue to fulfill it from the current footprint without blowing a few hundred million bucks retooling here.

  • avatar
    NormSV650

    Sounds like a Toyota recall scenario in the making where they end up recalling every model produced outside the home country.

  • avatar
    PrincipalDan

    Give me a Chinese Park Avenue with an up-level interior (real wood, thick leather) but wait that would be more of a flagship than the joke called the XTS.

    http://industrie.turbomagazine.be/photos/mes_images/GM/buick_park_ave.jpg

    http://images.businessweek.com/ss/08/03/0317_chinalux/image/6_buick_parkave_interior.jpg

    Come on GM, have some guts and make Buick really “The New Class of World Class.”

  • avatar
    CJinSD

    Call me crazy, but I’m pretty sure we could have had Chinese cars without ending the rule of law and wasting money on the auto industry bailout.

  • avatar
    TheEndlessEnigma

    GM starts importing ChiCom built cars into the states and I will never again consider a GM product for purchase, new or used. I just purchased a new car, the selection came down to either a Mustang, Camero or a Challenger. The Mustang won out with the Challenger coming in a close second and Camero third. GM begin China production for US import, and there badges won’t even be on the list.

    Just saying.

    • 0 avatar
      sunridge place

      I’m not normally a grammar cop–but this post (with the incorrect spelling of Camaro and errors in the last sentence) is probably a perfect representation why they probably will not actually ever import to the US from China..too risky for part of their base who considers the Camaro or Silverado in their next purchase.

      If it ever happens, it would be a vehicle like the Spark. But, they have Korea now or perhaps Mexico in the future for low cost production.

    • 0 avatar
      BrianL

      Good thing those manual transmissions in those Mustangs are built in China.

  • avatar
    Da Coyote

    Matters not to me. No GM ever again.

    I’ve endured too much of their cr*p, and know that the Chinese can easily go below GM’s well known lack of quality without even trying.

  • avatar
    NeinNeinNein

    The goal of the neoliberals will be offshore as much production as makes economic sense for them. Jobs for US workers? Nah…… They’ll take the infrastructure, our university graduates to design them, or patent protection and tax breaks all while offshoring jobs. They’ll scream if we try and place import tariffs onto these Chinese cars. Look you’re making them unaffordable! Its the Walmartization of the world. We’re trading our middle class and manufacturing for cheap garbage at Wal Mart, Kmart and 7-11. Oh joy.

  • avatar
    Truckducken

    Get with the program, people. In case you hadn’t noticed, and in case the demise of Pontiac instead of Buick didn’t make it crystal clear for you, the truth is that GM is already de facto a Chinese car company. Which isn’t a bad decision for stockholders, by the way, wherever they may live. And aside from a few vocal cranks, if GM delivers desirable and durable cars, there won’t be a second thought given to their point of manufacture. The escalation of costs in China means that name-brand China imports are less and less likely to happen anyhow, so chillax.
    /rant

  • avatar
    Lampredi

    “In case you hadn’t noticed, and in case the demise of Pontiac instead of Buick didn’t make it crystal clear for you, the truth is that GM is already de facto a Chinese car company.”

    Yes, and it’s evident that Government Motors will eventually become the *Chinese Government* Motors.

  • avatar
    rmwill

    Cessna builds the Skycatcher LSA in China, and it passes FAA muster just like any other LSA. I would consider a Chinese made car if it was produced by a producer that engineers and builds to global safety and quality standards. GM, Ford, Toyota, Nissan, VW, Fiat… Sure. Chinese firms? No way.

  • avatar
    MLS

    Didn’t the last generation Chevy Equinox have a Chinese-built 3.4L V6? Nobody noticed or cared. Chinese final assembly is the next logical step.

    • 0 avatar
      PrincipalDan

      Actually I thought the Buick Rendezvous and the Aztex did too. My grandmother’s Aztex has been going strong.

      • 0 avatar
        sunridge place

        It was just the Equinox and the Pontiac Torrent that had the Chinese built engine.

        The reason why they used it had more to do with the partnership with Suzuki in the development of the last generation Equinox/Torrent and the Suzuki badged XL7 than GM just deciding to build the engine in China.

  • avatar

    The Chinese made my underpants and, given the tremendous pressure I place upon them, I must say that they have proven to be remarkably sturdy.

    • 0 avatar
      Big Al from Oz

      In Australia we have a term called a “wedgy”.

      This when people get drunk and grab the back of you underpants and try to rip them off.

      Chinese underwear have proven to be as strong as the Australian one’s (when they were manufactured here)

      Oh, this activity only arises now and then, not often:-)

  • avatar
    Big Al from Oz

    Some might not like the idea of GMs built in China. But it should work out okay.

    GM will not break Buick from the company, it has a reputable name in China.

    China is the future and where the money will be.

  • avatar
    mkirk

    Nope…too much political red meat for the right if the bailout poster company starts selling cars made in China even if it somehow adds American jobs.

  • avatar
    BrianL

    It may start with GM doing it, but it certainly won’t end there. The Honda Fit is already made in China and going to Canada. I am actually surprised it hasn’t been been sent to the US already, or if it has and no one has really reported it.

    But, with the dollar falling every day, it will make less and less sense to do this. But, when the Yuan starts appreciating, which it will one day, China is going to have some serious issues changing its economy around when it produces a huge amount of goods, but doesn’t consume near as many.

  • avatar
    TomHend

    China is the enemy.


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