By on January 15, 2013

Hot on the heels of the broken embargo comes real live shots of Caddy’s Volt. The ELR gets a nice boost in power – 207 horsepower and 295 lb-ft versus 149 horses and 273 lb-ft for the Volt. A .5 kwh larger battery means slightly less range in EV mode, but an 82-mile boost in overall range and a longer charging time (4.5 hours with a 240V outlet, 12 hours with a standard outlet). There’s also a paddle-shift activated regenerative braking feature – we’ll have to drive that one to see if it actually works well.

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55 Comments on “NAIAS 2013: Cadillac ELR Live Shots...”


  • avatar
    Macca

    I like the look of this, quite a bit. The overall proportions are very similar to the Civic coupe.

    • 0 avatar
      racer-esq.

      Cadillac did tease of this car, where it only showed a shadow outline, and without the headlight and taillight details it looked completely like a Civic coupe. Honda already makes a Civic hybrid sedan, so it could replicate this quite easily.

  • avatar
    1998redwagon

    i know that the lattice grill and streaking headlights are cadillac’s front end ‘signature’ but i cannot help but think last generation ford fusion when i see those lights integrated into the upper part of the fender.

    anyone else see the same thing? not that it is bad, just that now it seems old.

    car is appealing in a hot wheels styling sense. not sure how well it would work for me at 6’3″. never been in a volt for comparison either.

    • 0 avatar
      tuffjuff

      Probably not the greatest, given this thing is based on the Volt, which is itself basically a Cruze with a battery. My 2012 Focus hatch is a stretch for me at 6’5″, and the Focus driver’s seat goes back much further than the Cruze’, last I checked.

  • avatar
    Robstar

    Any pricing hints? $70k?

    Is there a 4 door version available?

  • avatar
    philadlj

    Seeing it in real non-manicured photos, I think I like it more than the Converj concept (and definitely prettier than the CTS coupe, which I like quite a lot) The wide rear end was a trouble-spot for the Converj, but it seems to have been resolved quite nicely – that rear view with the hips is lovely. And the “closed-off” egg crate grille is suitably futurisitc.

  • avatar
    28-Cars-Later

    Cadillac is truly dead.

    • 0 avatar
      celebrity208

      If you mean that Cadillac as we knew it from the 90′s, where everything was 4/5ths of what it should have been, then I agree with you. A new Cadillac has emerged and I like it. (Of course I know that is not what you meant. I just happen to disagree with you.)

      • 0 avatar
        Freddy M

        “A new Cadillac has emerged and I like it.”

        I’m kinda with you on that. I’m no GM hater, but I really wouldn’t get anything from Chevy, Olds or GMC, even though I like them as cars.

        But ever since they brought out the CTS, I’ve taken a liking to Caddy’s mid and smaller sized offerings.

    • 0 avatar
      bd2

      How so?

      The ATS has been getting rave reviews and the 3G CTS will be even better than the ATS.

      Then there will be at least one, if not 2 flagship models on the new Omega platform.

      As for the ELR, it looks good, seems to have a nice interior and the Voltec system appeals to a certain segment of the market.

      • 0 avatar
        28-Cars-Later

        Well with regards to ATS (or just Alpha as I call it) I actually think fits its audience well but the entire brand should not emulate one model, its sad. Cadillac always had two or three different platforms to choose from on car lines, now only really one (Sigma II) in different flavors, ok two if you count XTS as being a Cadillac (which I do not). Competing in a market is one thing, completely selling out is quite another.

        rant
        I also can’t stand this “style” of the Cadillac coupes, granted I’m on record against the Art and Stupid styling mistakes but these coupes take to a whole other level of fail. Others may disagree, but the Catera Coupe and this thing are flat out design abortions in terms of looks. I want to buy a coupe, I want an excuse for a new car, I can’t buy/lease these things they are just hideous. How can I spend 50 large on a jelly bean? Heck RenCen, if I wanted a Civic coupe body style I’ll just buy the Honda.
        /rant

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      To suggest Cadillac, a 110-year-old company that has sold ~150,000K luxury cars each of the last three years in the US alone, is in any danger of going under due to the generally very well-received styling of its newest low-volume coupe that utilizes already-developed technology…well, that’s frankly a bit of a stretch.

      Unless you meant Cadillac is truly dead to YOU. In which case…fair enough. To each his own! Cadillacs are not – and have never been – for everyone.

  • avatar
    tmkreutzer

    Another handsome coupe by Cadillac, I could really see driving something like this. Let’s get the trickle-down started so the plebians like myself can have something similar.

  • avatar
    kmoquin

    That’s one ugly snout.

  • avatar
    gslippy

    If you’re willing to plug in a car AND spend $60k+, you may as well get the Tesla Model S.

    Cadillac buyers don’t want to spend more money to get less car, just to prove they only have to buy gas once every three months.

    • 0 avatar
      james2k

      Who said this is $60k+? No pricing information has been made public yet. For the sake of discussion, let’s say the 40kWh Tesla S and the ELR cost the same amount. All things being equal, I can’t see too many people buying either. The Cadillac is an impractical size and the Tesla’s range is too short. Tesla claims the 40kWh model has a 160 mile range at 55mph. At least in California, they make a compelling argument that the 85 kWh model supported by the Supercharger network allows you to make pretty much any drive you want. That’s just not the case with the base model that doesn’t support the superchargers.

    • 0 avatar
      Crabspirits

      I would never consider the Tesla just out of fear of being stranded after a depleted battery, or never being able to take it out of the state before that happens. Such cars are useless to me. This works.

      I hear rich people don’t like to be inconvenienced either.

    • 0 avatar
      KixStart

      Cadillac buyers will spend money for something unique and interesting. Amazing torque from zero? Silent operation? Has whiz-bang technology on board?

      It will attract *some* buyers. Since Volt buyer income averages $175K, this doesn’t look like a particularly bad bet. Of course, it should have come out before the Volt but we do count on GM to give us our dailiy WTF? moment and GM hates to disappoint.

  • avatar
    Herm

    The wheels are too big

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    How can a larger a battery mean less EV range? What ICE did they use? What’s the MPG rating in range- extending mode?

  • avatar
    Crabspirits

    Love the Volt, but was never 100% invested in it’s shape. This is a nice sleek coupe.

    Need an accurate word on pricing so I can either say “Wow!” or facepalm.

  • avatar
    Dr. Kenneth Noisewater

    Volt 1.5 it looks like, kinda disappointed that the charging remains 3.3kW. Sure is pretty though!

  • avatar
    prndlol

    Aw, what a cute motorized golf caddy.

  • avatar
    Dynasty

    Looking forward to the review.

  • avatar
    Pch101

    The car doesn’t match the badge. I doubt that there is much demand for a Civic-sized Cadillac hardtop coupe.

    They should have made it as a convertible. That wouldn’t be a high-volume seller, either, but at least it would make for a better halo.

  • avatar

    It looks like an evolution of the CTS-Coupe. Problem: with a price tag around $60,000 – all I can think of is the TESLA MODEL S.

    • 0 avatar
      philadlj

      Cross-shopping the two is a possibility, and the Type S is slightly prettier, but the ELR is more versatile with its ability to run on gasoline.

      • 0 avatar
        Thinkin...

        One could say the Model S is more versatile with it’s ability to carry seven people and/or gobs of stuff. Two-door coupes and “versatility” do not belong in the same sentence.

  • avatar
    CoreyDL

    I’m not sure I like the design feature of side/door window being lower than hood line and headlamps. It looks like two different cars mashed up.

  • avatar
    phargophil

    It’s a shame that once again we have a styling exercise that negates any utility of the rear window. I’d really like to have a good view to the rear designed into a new car again.

    • 0 avatar
      Dynasty

      I agree. Its going to be another generation of vehicles before we get back to good visibility. Or at least until the high beltline, steeply raked windshields and back window trend moves on.

  • avatar
    carguy

    Upside:
    - It looks good inside and out
    - The EV + ICE luxury coupe market doesn’t have much competition yet.

    Downside
    - The EV + ICE luxury coupe market is probably not very big
    - Given the cost of the Volt, this will most likely be in the $45K-$55K range.

  • avatar
    APaGttH

    bigtruckseriesreview @ Youtube has it nailed. If this is priced at the same point as a Tesla S (although base models have yet to be delivered) then this doesn’t compete (lack of a really functional back seat comes to mind) this won’t be price competitive.

    GM has a big challenge in that they need to price this above the Volt but below a model S and they don’t have a wide range to work in.

    Still very intrigued – a $399 lease would be damn interesting.

  • avatar
    Nicholas Weaver

    I’m clearly the target buyer for this car (and am quite interested if the price is ~$50K before the Federal tax credit, something I think they can do as a $10K premium over the Volt.). I have a strong income, solar panels on my roof, I like my cars (Hey, S2000 daily driver…), and an 80 mile round trip commute.

    The Model S comparisons are pointless. A base Model S is $50K AFTER the tax credits, so $58K before. But the base model is silly: nobody will buy it, its just so they can say its a $50K car not a $80K car.

    You need at least the 60KW pack to get the fast-charger, and you need the fast charger to get the functionality you get in the Caddi-Volt: The ability to drive distance.

    Which means the “comparable” Model S is going to be over $70K before the tax credit… Because, unless it truly is a toy car, there is a huge capability in being able to drive far, which the Tesla can only sort of do even with the 80 kWH battery pack (over $80K, thankyouverymuch…).

    And I don’t know about you, but 1/2 hour stops every 3 hours (at 60 MPH), with each stop somewhat damaging the battery, doesn’t seem like a good solution to me.

    Rather, the only competition in the next 2 years is going to be the BMW i3 with range extender. But there are several unanswered questions on the i3, including cost, the loss of space with the range extender, and whether it will look as boring as it appears to be shaping up to be.

    So I strongly suspect that, this time next year, I’ll have my order in for a ELR…

  • avatar
    Brian E

    I’m squarely in the target market as well, and I’m definitely not GM’s #1 fan (to say the least). However, this looks absolutely fantastic to me. The Model S looks like a nice car, but as a large sedan it’s not really the kind of car I’m looking for. The ELR has a shot at getting me to buy an EV instead of a conventional small luxury coupe or sedan.

  • avatar
    sckid213

    I think this car looks incredible, and the interior is truly world-class luxurious. I am in the target demo for this vehicle (single, urban area) and would absolutely consider it. I think they will sell a TON here in LA. Compared to the ELR, the Lexus CT looks like a boy racer’s ricey toy.

    Nice to see Caddy making bold styling statements like this…like a modern-day late ’60s ELdoRado.

  • avatar
    Carlson Fan

    The more I read about the new ELR the more I’m disappointed in it. I expected better EV range & extended range fuel economy than the Volt. The drive system appears to be pretty much the same thing as what is offered in the current Volt. Considering it’s 300 pounds heavier it will probably have less EV range and worse range extended fuel economy. Sorry I can’t get excited about this car and I have to wonder WTF they’ve been doing at GM for the last 3 years where the Voltec propulsion system is concerned.

  • avatar
    el scotto

    I imagine the Tesla dealer network will eventually only be on the scale of Jaguar dealerships. Gorgeous cars but a far drive to get one. Caddy may outsell Tesla due to its sheer amount of dealerships. Just saying; hybrids can co-exists with pick ups

  • avatar
    Lorenzo

    Is this one of those models with that room divider that goes clear through the back seat? I shudder to think what a divided back seat will do to America’s birth rate, or nookie rate at least.

    • 0 avatar
      Thinkin...

      Yup – supposedly it uses the same big T-shaped battery from the Volt. Which means a seat-height bump in the middle of the rear seat. In a two door car. Thus, any rear-seat occupant must enter and exit from the same side… And nookie is right out. But then again, considering the folks that will but these, might not be so bad…

  • avatar
    vanwestcoaster

    Is it a digital glitch in the photo quality, or is that one bad chrome strip match-up below the windows of the passenger door and the rear quarter panel?


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